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Catholic Caucus: Sunday Mass Readings, 04-14-13, Third Sunday of Easter
USCCB.org/RNAB ^ | 04-14-13 | Revised New American Bible

Posted on 04/13/2013 9:04:45 PM PDT by Salvation

April 14, 2013

Third Sunday of Easter

 

Reading 1 Acts 5:27-32, 40b-41

When the captain and the court officers had brought the apostles in
and made them stand before the Sanhedrin,
the high priest questioned them,
“We gave you strict orders, did we not,
to stop teaching in that name?
Yet you have filled Jerusalem with your teaching
and want to bring this man’s blood upon us.”
But Peter and the apostles said in reply,
“We must obey God rather than men.
The God of our ancestors raised Jesus,
though you had him killed by hanging him on a tree.
God exalted him at his right hand as leader and savior
to grant Israel repentance and forgiveness of sins.
We are witnesses of these things,
as is the Holy Spirit whom God has given to those who obey him.”

The Sanhedrin ordered the apostles
to stop speaking in the name of Jesus, and dismissed them.
So they left the presence of the Sanhedrin,
rejoicing that they had been found worthy
to suffer dishonor for the sake of the name.

Responsorial Psalm Ps 30:2, 4, 5-6, 11-12, 13

R. (2a) I will praise you, Lord, for you have rescued me.
or:
R. Alleluia.
I will extol you, O LORD, for you drew me clear
and did not let my enemies rejoice over me.
O LORD, you brought me up from the netherworld;
you preserved me from among those going down into the pit.
R. I will praise you, Lord, for you have rescued me.
or:
R. Alleluia.
Sing praise to the LORD, you his faithful ones,
and give thanks to his holy name.
For his anger lasts but a moment;
a lifetime, his good will.
At nightfall, weeping enters in,
but with the dawn, rejoicing.
R. I will praise you, Lord, for you have rescued me.
or:
R. Alleluia.
Hear, O LORD, and have pity on me;
O LORD, be my helper.
You changed my mourning into dancing;
O LORD, my God, forever will I give you thanks.
R. I will praise you, Lord, for you have rescued me.
or:
R. Alleluia.

Reading 2 Rev 5:11-14

I, John, looked and heard the voices of many angels
who surrounded the throne
and the living creatures and the elders.
They were countless in number, and they cried out in a loud voice:
“Worthy is the Lamb that was slain
to receive power and riches, wisdom and strength,
honor and glory and blessing.”
Then I heard every creature in heaven and on earth
and under the earth and in the sea,
everything in the universe, cry out:
“To the one who sits on the throne and to the Lamb
be blessing and honor, glory and might,
forever and ever.”
The four living creatures answered, “Amen,”
and the elders fell down and worshiped.

Gospel Jn 21:1-19

At that time, Jesus revealed himself again to his disciples at the Sea of Tiberias.
He revealed himself in this way.
Together were Simon Peter, Thomas called Didymus,
Nathanael from Cana in Galilee,
Zebedee’s sons, and two others of his disciples.
Simon Peter said to them, “I am going fishing.”
They said to him, “We also will come with you.”
So they went out and got into the boat,
but that night they caught nothing.
When it was already dawn, Jesus was standing on the shore;
but the disciples did not realize that it was Jesus.
Jesus said to them, “Children, have you caught anything to eat?”
They answered him, “No.”
So he said to them, “Cast the net over the right side of the boat
and you will find something.”
So they cast it, and were not able to pull it in
because of the number of fish.
So the disciple whom Jesus loved said to Peter, “It is the Lord.”
When Simon Peter heard that it was the Lord,
he tucked in his garment, for he was lightly clad,
and jumped into the sea.
The other disciples came in the boat,
for they were not far from shore, only about a hundred yards,
dragging the net with the fish.
When they climbed out on shore,
they saw a charcoal fire with fish on it and bread.
Jesus said to them, “Bring some of the fish you just caught.”
So Simon Peter went over and dragged the net ashore
full of one hundred fifty-three large fish.
Even though there were so many, the net was not torn.
Jesus said to them, “Come, have breakfast.”
And none of the disciples dared to ask him, “Who are you?”
because they realized it was the Lord.
Jesus came over and took the bread and gave it to them,
and in like manner the fish.
This was now the third time Jesus was revealed to his disciples
after being raised from the dead.

When they had finished breakfast, Jesus said to Simon Peter,
“Simon, son of John, do you love me more than these?”
Simon Peter answered him, “Yes, Lord, you know that I love you.”
Jesus said to him, “Feed my lambs.”
He then said to Simon Peter a second time,
“Simon, son of John, do you love me?”
Simon Peter answered him, “Yes, Lord, you know that I love you.”
Jesus said to him, “Tend my sheep.”
Jesus said to him the third time,
“Simon, son of John, do you love me?”
Peter was distressed that Jesus had said to him a third time,
“Do you love me?” and he said to him,
“Lord, you know everything; you know that I love you.”
Jesus said to him, “Feed my sheep.
Amen, amen, I say to you, when you were younger,
you used to dress yourself and go where you wanted;
but when you grow old, you will stretch out your hands,
and someone else will dress you
and lead you where you do not want to go.”
He said this signifying by what kind of death he would glorify God.
And when he had said this, he said to him, “Follow me.”

Or Jn 21:1-14

At that time, Jesus revealed himself to his disciples at the Sea of Tiberias.
He revealed himself in this way.
Together were Simon Peter, Thomas called Didymus,
Nathanael from Cana in Galilee,
Zebedee’s sons, and two others of his disciples.
Simon Peter said to them, “ am going fishing.”
They said to him, “e also will come with you.”
So they went out and got into the boat,
but that night they caught nothing.
When it was already dawn, Jesus was standing on the shore;
but the disciples did not realize that it was Jesus.
Jesus said to them, “Children, have you caught anything to eat?”
They answered him, “No.”
So he said to them, “Cast the net over the right side of the boat
and you will find something.”
So they cast it, and were not able to pull it in
because of the number of fish.
So the disciple whom Jesus loved said to Peter, “It is the Lord.”
When Simon Peter heard that it was the Lord,
he tucked in his garment, for he was lightly clad,
and jumped into the sea.
The other disciples came in the boat,
for they were not far from shore, only about a hundred yards,
dragging the net with the fish.
When they climbed out on shore,
they saw a charcoal fire with fish on it and bread.
Jesus said to them, “Bring some of the fish you just caught.”
So Simon Peter went over and dragged the net ashore
full of one hundred fifty-three large fish.
Even though there were so many, the net was not torn.
Jesus said to them, “Come, have breakfast.”
And none of the disciples dared to ask him, “Who are you?”
because they realized it was the Lord.
Jesus came over and took the bread and gave it to them,
and in like manner the fish.
This was now the third time Jesus was revealed to his disciples
after being raised from the dead.


TOPICS: Catholic; General Discusssion; Prayer; Worship
KEYWORDS: catholic; easter; prayer
For your reading, reflection, faith-sharing, comments, questions, discussion.

1 posted on 04/13/2013 9:04:45 PM PDT by Salvation
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To: nickcarraway; NYer; ELS; Pyro7480; livius; ArrogantBustard; Catholicguy; RobbyS; marshmallow; ...
Alleluia Ping!
 
If you aren’t on this ping list NOW and would like to be, 
please Freepmail me.

2 posted on 04/13/2013 9:07:08 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

From: Acts 5:27-33

The Apostles Before the Sanhedrin


[27] And when they (the captain and the officers) brought them (the Apostles),
they set them before the council. And the high priest questioned them, [28]
saying, “We strictly charged you not to teach in this Name, yet here you have
filled Jerusalem with your teaching and you intend to bring this Man’s blood up-
on us.” [29] But Peter and the Apostles answered, “We must obey God rather
than men. [30] The God of our fathers raised Jesus whom you killed by hanging
Him on a tree. [31] God exalted Him at His right hand as Leader and Savior, to
give repentance to Israel and forgiveness of sins. [32] And we are witnesses to
these things, and so is the Holy Spirit whom God has given to those who obey
Him.”

The Apostles Are Flogged


[40b] (The Sanhedrin) charged them not to speak in the name of Jesus, and let
them go. [41] Then they left the presence of the council, rejoicing that they were
counted worthy to suffer dishonor for the Name.

*********************************************************************************************
Commentary:

29. The Apostles’ failure to obey the Sanhedrin is obviously not due to pride or
to their not knowing their place (as citizens they are subject to the Sanhedrin’s
authority); the Sanhedrin is imposing a ruling which would have them go against
God’s law and their own conscience. The Apostles humbly and boldly remind
their judges that obedience to God comes first. They know that many members
of the Sanhedrin are religious men, good Jews who can understand their mes-
sage; they try not so much to justify themselves as to get the Sanhedrin to re-
act: they are more concerned about their judges’ spiritual health than about their
own safety. St. John Chrysostom comments: “God allowed the Apostles to be
brought to trial so that their adversaries might be instructed, if they so desired.
[...] The Apostles are not irritated by the judges; they plead with them compas-
sionately, with tears in their eyes, and their only aim is to free them from error
and from divine wrath” (”Hom. on Acts”, 13). They are convinced that “those who
fear God are in no danger, only those who do not fear Him” (”ibid.”) and that it is
worse to commit injustice than to suffer it. We can see from the Apostles’ beha-
vior how deep their convictions run; grace and faith in Jesus Christ have given
them high regard for the honor of God. They have begun at last to love and serve
God without counting the cost. This is true of Christian maturity. “In that cry “ser-
viam”! [I will serve!] you express your determination to ‘serve’ the Church of God
most faithfully, even at the cost of fortune, of reputation and of life” (St. J. Escri-
va, “The Way”, 519).

The Church often prays to God to give its children this resilience: they need it
because there is always the danger of growing indifferent and of abandoning the
faith to some extent. “Lord, fill us with that spirit of courage which gave your mar-
tyr Sebastian,” his feast’s liturgy says, “strength to offer his life in faithful witness.
Help us to learn from him to cherish your law and to obey you rather than men”
(”Roman Missal”).

A Christian should conform his behavior to God’s law: that law should be his very
life. He should obey and love God’s commandments as taught by the Church, if
he wishes to live a truly human life. The law of God is not something burdensome:
it is a way of freedom, as Sacred Scripture is at pains to point out: “The Lord is
my portion, I promise to keep Thy words. I entreat Thy favor with all my heart; be
gracious to me according to Thy promise. When I think of Thy ways, I turn my
feet to Thy testimonies; I hasten and do not delay to keep Thy commandments.
Though the cord of the wicked ensnare me, I do not forget Thy law. At midnight
I rise to praise Thee, because of Thy righteous ordinances. I am a companion of
all who fear Thee, of those who keep Thy precepts. The earth, O Lord, is full of
Thy steadfast love; teach me Thy statutes” (Psalm 119:57-64).

Conscience, which teaches man in the depths of his heart, gradually shows him
what the law of God involves: “Man has in his heart a law inscribed by God. His
dignity lies in observing this law, and by it he will be judged (cf. Romans 2:15-16).
His conscience is man’s most secret core, and his sanctuary. There he is alone
with God, whose voice echoes in his depths. By conscience, in a wonderful way,
that law is made known. [...] The more a correct conscience prevails, the more
do persons and groups turn aside from blind choice and try to be guided by the
objective standards of moral conduct” (Vatican II, “Gaudium Et Spes”, 16).

Good and evil are facts of life. A person can identify them. There are such things
as good actions—and there are evil actions, which should always be avoided. The
goodness or badness of human actions is not essentially dependent on the cir-
cumstances, although sometimes these can affect it to some extent.

Like the eye, conscience is designed to enable a person to see, but it needs
light from outside (God’s law and the Church’s guidance) to discover religious
and moral truths and properly appreciate them. Without that help man simply
tires himself out in his search; he seeks only himself and forgets about good
and evil, and his conscience becomes darkened by sin and moral opportunism.

“With respect to conscience,” [Pope] Paul VI teaches, “an objection can arise:
Is conscience not enough on its own as the norm of our conduct? Do the Deca-
logues, the codes, imposed on us from outside, not undermine conscience [...]?
This is a delicate and very current problem. Here all we will say is that subjec-
tive conscience is the first and immediate norm of our conduct, but is needs
light, it needs to see which standard it should follow, especially when the action
in question does not evidence its own moral exigencies. Conscience needs to
be instructed and trained about what is the best choice to make, by the authori-
ty of a law” (”General Audience”, 28 March 1973).

A right conscience, which always goes hand in hand with moral prudence, will
help a Christian to obey the law like a good citizen and also to take a stand,
personally or in association with others, against any unjust laws which may be
proposed or enacted. The State is not almighty in the sphere of law. It may not
order or permit anything it likes; therefore not everything legal is morally lawful
or just. Respect due to civil authority—which is part of the Gospel message and
has always been taught by the Church—should not prevent Christians and people
of good will from opposing legislators and rulers when they legislate and govern
in a way that is contrary to the law of God and therefore to the common good.
Obviously, this legitimate kind of resistance to authority should always involve
the use of lawful methods.

It is not enough for good Christians to profess PRIVATELY the teaching of the
Gospel and the Church regarding human life, the family, education, freedom, etc.
They should realize that these are subjects of crucial importance for the welfare
of their country, and they should strive, using all the usual means at their disco-
sale, to see that the laws of the State are supportive of the common good. Pass-
ivity towards ideologies and stances that run counter to Christian values is quite
deplorable.

30. “Hanging Him on a tree”: this is reminiscent of Deuteronomy 21:23: if a
criminal is put to death “and you hang him on a tree, his body shall not remain
all night upon a tree, but you shall bury him the same day, for a hanged man
is accursed by God.” This is a reference to crucifixion, a form of capital punish-
ment which originated in Persia; it was common throughout the East and was
later adopted by the Romans.

32. God sends the Holy Spirit to those who obey Him, and, in turn, the Apostles
obey the indications of the Spirit with complete docility.

If we are to obey the Holy Spirit and do what He asks us, we need to cultivate
Him and listen to what He says. “Get to know the Holy Spirit, the Great Stran-
ger, on whom depends your sanctification.

“Don’t forget that you are God’s temple. The Advocate is in the center of your
soul; listen to Him and be docile to His inspirations” (St. J. Escriva, “The Way”,
57).

40-41. Most members of the Sanhedrin are unimpressed by Gamaliel’s argu-
ments; they simply decide to go as far as they safely can: they do not dare to
condemn the Apostles to death; but, in their stubborn opposition to the Gospel
message, they decree that they be put under the lash in the hope that this will
keep them quiet. However, it has just the opposite effect.

“It is true that Jeremiah was scourged for the word of God, and that Elijah and
other prophets were also threatened, but in this case the Apostles, as they did
earlier by their miracles, showed forth the power of God. He does not say that
they did not suffer, but that they rejoiced over having to suffer. This we can see
from the boldness afterwards: immediately after being beaten they went back to
preaching” (Chrysostom, “Hom. on Acts”, 14).

The Apostles must have remembered our Lord’s words, “Blessed are you when
men revile you and persecute you and utter all kinds of evil against you falsely
on My account. Rejoice and be glad, for so men persecuted the prophets who
were before you” (Matthew 5:11-12).

*********************************************************************************************
Source: “The Navarre Bible: Text and Commentaries”. Biblical text from the
Revised Standard Version and New Vulgate. Commentaries by members of
the Faculty of Theology, University of Navarre, Spain.

Published by Four Courts Press, Kill Lane, Blackrock, Co. Dublin, Ireland, and
by Scepter Publishers in the United States.


3 posted on 04/13/2013 9:13:34 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

From: Revelation 5:11-14

The Sealed Scroll and the Lamb


[11] Then I looked, and I heard around the throne and the living creatures and the
elders the voice of many angels, numbering myriads of myriads and thousands
of thousands, [12] saying with a loud voice, “Worthy is the Lamb who was slain,
to receive power and wealth and wisdom and might and honor and glory and bles-
sing!” [13] And I heard every creature in heaven and on earth and under the earth
and in the sea, and all therein, saying, “To him who sits upon the throne and to
the Lamb be blessing and honor and glory and might for ever and ever!” [14] And
the four living creatures said, “Amen!” and the elders fell down and worshipped.

*********************************************************************************************
Commentary:

11-14. The host of angels around the throne act as a kind of guard of honor pro-
claiming the sublime perfection of Christ the Lamb (v. 12); they list seven attri-
butes which all point to the fact that he has everything that belongs to the God-
head.

After the song of the spiritual, invisible, creation, there follows the hymn of the
material, visible, world. This hymn (v. 14) differs from the previous one in that it
is also addressed to him who sits upon the throne. It thereby puts on the same
level God and the Lamb, whose Godhead is being proclaimed. This marks the
climax of the universal, cosmic praise that is rendered the Lamb. The emphatic
“Amen!” of the four living creatures, and the worship offered by the elders brings
this introductory vision to a close.

As in other passages of the book, mention is made of the role of the angels in
heaven, particularly the worship and praise they offer God before his throne (cf.
Rev 7:11), their role in putting God’s plans into operation (cf. 11:15; 16:17; 22:6,
etc.) and their intercession with God on behalf of mankind (cf. 8:4).

The Church has always encouraged special devotion to the angels (cf. “Lumen
Gentium”, 50). Sacred Scripture and the teaching of the Church clearly tells us
about the existence of angels and about their mission to guide and protect us;
cf. Exodus 23:20: “Behold, I send an angel before you, to guard you on the way
and to bring you to the place which I have prepared. Give heed to him and har-
ken to his voice.” Echoing these words the Catechism of St Pius states that
“by God’s providence angels have been entrusted with the office of guarding the
human race and of accompanying every human being [...]. (God) not only de-
putes angels on particular and private occasions, but also appoints them to take
care of us from our very births. He furthermore appoints them to watch over the
salvation of every member of the human race” (IV, 9). Devotion to one’s guardian
angel, a part of ordinary Christian practice, is something we learn as children
and should keep up during our adult lives: “Have confidence in your guardian
Angel. Treat him as a lifelong friend—that is what he is—and he will render you a
thousand services in the ordinary affairs of each day” (St. J. Escriva, “The Way”,
562).

*********************************************************************************************
Source: “The Navarre Bible: Text and Commentaries”. Biblical text from the
Revised Standard Version and New Vulgate. Commentaries by members of
the Faculty of Theology, University of Navarre, Spain.

Published by Four Courts Press, Kill Lane, Blackrock, Co. Dublin, Ireland, and
by Scepter Publishers in the United States.


4 posted on 04/13/2013 9:14:31 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

From: John 21:1-19

The Miraculous Draught of Fish


[1] After this Jesus revealed Himself again to the disciples by the Sea of Tibe-
rias; and He revealed Himself in this way. [2] Simon Peter, Thomas called the
Twin, Nathaniel of Cana in Galilee, the sons of Zebedee, and two others of His
disciples were together. [3] Simon Peter said to them, “I am going fishing.” They
said to him, “We will go with you.” They went out and got into the boat; but that
night they caught nothing.

[4] Just as day was breaking, Jesus stood on the beach; yet the disciples did
not know that it was Jesus. [5] Jesus said to them, “Children, have you any
fish?” They answered Him, “No.” [6] He said to them, “Cast the net on the right
side of the boat, and you will find some.” So they cast it, and now they were not
able to haul it in, for the quantity of fish. [7] That disciple whom Jesus loved said
to Peter, “It is the Lord!” When Simon Peter heard that it was the Lord, he put
on his clothes, for he was stripped for work, and sprang into the sea. [8] But the
other disciples came in the boat, dragging the net full of fish, for they were not far
from the land, but about a hundred yards off.

[9] When they got out on land, they saw a charcoal fire there, with fish lying on it,
and bread. [10] Jesus said to them, “Bring some fish that you have just caught.”
[11] So Simon Peter went aboard and hauled the net ashore, full of large fish, a
hundred and fifty-three of them; and although there were so many, the net was
not torn. [12] Jesus said to them, “Come and have breakfast.” Now none of the
disciples dared ask Him, “Who are you?” They knew it was the Lord. [13] Jesus
came and took the bread and gave it to them, and so with the fish. [14] This was
now the third time that Jesus was revealed to the disciples after He was raised
from the dead.

Peter’s Primacy


[15] When they had finished breakfast, Jesus said to Simon Peter, “Simon, son
of John, do you love Me more than these?” He said to Him, “Yes, Lord; you know
that I love You.” He said to him, “Feed My lambs.” [16] A second time He said
to him, “Simon, son of John, do you love Me?” He said to Him, “Yes, Lord, you
know I love You.” He said to him, “Tend My sheep.” [17] He said to him the third
time, “Simon, son of John, do you love Me?” Peter was grieved because He said
to him the third time, “Do you love Me?” And he said to Him, “Lord, You know
everything; You know that I love You.” Jesus said to him, “Feed My sheep. [18]
Truly, truly I say to you, when you were young, you girded yourself and walked
where you would; but when you are old, you will stretch out your hands, and
another will gird you and carry you where you do not wish to go.” [19] (This He
said to show by what death he was to glorify God.) And after this He said to him,
“Follow Me.”

*********************************************************************************************
Commentary:

1-3. There are some very significant things in this account: we find the disciples
“by the Sea of Tiberias”, which means they have done what the risen Christ had
told them to do (cf. Matthew 28:7); they are together, which shows that there is
a close fraternity among them; Peter takes the initiative, which in a way shows
his authority; and they have gone back to their old jobs as fishermen, probably
waiting for our Lord to give them new instructions.

This episode is reminiscent of the first miraculous draught of fish (cf. Luke 5:1-
11), where our Lord promised Peter He would make him a fisher of men; now
He is going to confirm his mission as visible head of the Church.

4-8. The risen Jesus goes in search of His disciples, to encourage them and tell
them more about the great mission He has entrusted to them. This account de-
scribes a very moving scene, our Lord together with His own: “He passes by,
close to His Apostles, close to those souls who have given themselves to Him,
and they do not realize He is there. How often Christ is not only near us, but in
us; yet we still live in such a human way!... They, the disciples, recall what they
have heard so often from their Master’s lips: fisher of men, apostles. And they
realize that all things are possible, because it is He who is directing their fishing.

“Whereupon ‘the disciple whom Jesus loved said to Peter, It is the Lord!’ Love,
love is farsighted. Love is the first to appreciate kindness. The adolescent Apos-
tle, who felt a deep and firm affection for Jesus, because he loved Christ with all
the purity and tenderness of a heart that had never been corrupted, exclaimed:
‘It is the Lord!’”

“’When Simon Peter heard that it was the Lord, he put on his clothes and sprang
into the sea.’ Peter personifies faith. Full of marvelous daring, he leaps into the
sea. With a love like John’s and a faith like Peter’s, what is there that can stop
us?” (St. J. Escriva, “Friends of God”, 265-266).

9-14. We can sense here the deep impression this appearance of the risen Jesus
must have made on the Apostles, and how sweet a memory St. John kept of it.
After His resurrection Jesus showed the same tenderness as characterized His
public ministry. He makes use of natural things — the fire, the fish, et cetera — to
show that He really is there, and He maintains the familiar tone typical of when
He lived with the disciples.

The Fathers and Doctors of the Church have often dwelt on the mystical meaning
of this episode: the boat is the Church, whose unity is symbolized by the net
which is not torn; the sea is the world, Peter in the boat stands for supreme au-
thority of the Church, and the number of fish signifies the number of the elect (cf.
St. Thomas Aquinas, “Commentary on St. John, in loc.”).

15-17. Jesus Christ had promised Peter that he would be the primate of the
Church (cf. Matthew 16:16-19 and note on the same). Despite his three denials
during our Lord’s passion, Christ now confers on him the primacy He promised.

“Jesus questions Peter, three times, as if to give him a triple chance to atone
for his triple denial. Peter has learned his lesson from the bitter experience of his
wretchedness. Aware of his weakness, he is deeply convinced that rash claims
are pointless. Instead he puts everything in Christ’s hands. ‘Lord, You know well
that I love You” (St. J. Escriva, “Friends of God”, 267). The primacy was given to
Peter directly and immediately. So the Church has always understood — and so
Vatican I defined: “We therefore teach and declare that, according to the testi-
mony of the Gospel, the primacy of jurisdiction over the universal Church of God
was immediately and directly promised and given to Blessed Peter the Apostle
by Christ our Lord. [...] And it was upon Simon Peter alone that Jesus after His
resurrection bestowed the jurisdiction of chief pastor and ruler over all His fold in
the words: “Feed My lambs; feed My sheep” (”Pastor Aeternus”, Chapter 1).

The primacy is a grace conferred on Peter and his successors, the popes; it is
one of the basic elements in the Church, designed to guard and protect its unity:
“In order that the episcopate also might be one and undivided, and that [...] the
multitude of the faithful might be kept secure in the oneness of faith and commu-
nion, He set Blessed Peter over the rest of the Apostles, and fixed in him the
abiding principle of this twofold unity, and its visible foundation” (”Pastor Aeter-
nus, Dz-Sch 3051”; cf. Vatican II, “Lumen Gentium”, 18). Therefore, the primacy
of Peter is perpetuated in each of his successors: this is something which Christ
disposed; it is not based on human legislation or custom.

By virtue of the primacy, Peter, and each of his successors, is the shepherd of
the whole Church and vicar of Christ on earth, because he exercises vicariously
Christ’s own authority. Love for the Pope, whom St. Catherine of Siena used to
call “the sweet Christ on earth”, should express itself in prayer, sacrifice and
obedience.

18-19. According to Tradition, St. Peter followed his Master to the point of dying
by crucifixion, head downwards, “Peter and Paul suffered martyrdom in Rome
during Nero’s persecution of Christians, which took place between the years 64
and 68. St. Clement, the successor of the same Peter in the See of the Church
of Rome, recalls this when, writing to the Corinthians, he puts before them ‘the
generous example of these two athletes’: ‘due to jealousy and envy, those who
were the principal and holiest columns suffered persecution and fought the fight
unto death’” ([Pope] Paul VI, “Petrum Et Paulum”).

“Follow Me!”: these words would have reminded the Apostle of the first call he re-
ceived (cf. Matthew 4:19) and of the fact that Christ requires of His disciples com-
plete self-surrender: “If any man would come after Me, let him deny himself and
take up the Cross daily and follow Me” (Luke 9:23). St. Peter himself, in one of
his letters, also testifies to the Cross being something all Christians must carry:
“For to this you have been called, because Christ also suffered for you, leaving
you an example, that you should follow in His steps” (1 Peter 2:21).

*********************************************************************************************
Source: “The Navarre Bible: Text and Commentaries”. Biblical text from the
Revised Standard Version and New Vulgate. Commentaries by members of
the Faculty of Theology, University of Navarre, Spain.

Published by Four Courts Press, Kill Lane, Blackrock, Co. Dublin, Ireland, and
by Scepter Publishers in the United States.


5 posted on 04/13/2013 9:16:39 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Scripture readings taken from the Jerusalem Bible, published and copyright © 1966, 1967 and 1968 by Darton, Longman & Todd

Readings at Mass


First reading Acts 5:27-32,40-41 ©
The high priest demanded an explanation of the Apostles. ‘We gave you a formal warning’ he said ‘not to preach in this name, and what have you done? You have filled Jerusalem with your teaching, and seem determined to fix the guilt of this man’s death on us.’ In reply Peter and the apostles said, ‘Obedience to God comes before obedience to men; it was the God of our ancestors who raised up Jesus, but it was you who had him executed by hanging on a tree. By his own right hand God has now raised him up to be leader and saviour, to give repentance and forgiveness of sins through him to Israel. We are witnesses to all this, we and the Holy Spirit whom God has given to those who obey him.’ and they had the apostles called in, gave orders for them to be flogged, warned them not to speak in the name of Jesus and released them. And so they left the presence of the Sanhedrin glad to have had the honour of suffering humiliation for the sake of the name.

Psalm Psalm 29:2,4-6,11-13 ©
I will praise you, Lord, you have rescued me.
or
Alleluia!
I will praise you, Lord, you have rescued me
  and have not let my enemies rejoice over me.
O Lord, you have raised my soul from the dead,
  restored me to life from those who sink into the grave.
I will praise you, Lord, you have rescued me.
or
Alleluia!
Sing psalms to the Lord, you who love him,
  give thanks to his holy name.
His anger lasts a moment; his favour all through life.
  At night there are tears, but joy comes with dawn.
I will praise you, Lord, you have rescued me.
or
Alleluia!
The Lord listened and had pity.
  The Lord came to my help.
For me you have changed my mourning into dancing:
  O Lord my God, I will thank you for ever.
I will praise you, Lord, you have rescued me.
or
Alleluia!

Second reading Apocalypse 5:11-14 ©
In my vision, I, John, heard the sound of an immense number of angels gathered round the throne and the animals and the elders; there were ten thousand times ten thousand of them and thousands upon thousands, shouting, ‘The Lamb that was sacrificed is worthy to be given power, riches, wisdom, strength, honour, glory and blessing.’ Then I heard all the living things in creation – everything that lives in the air, and on the ground, and under the ground, and in the sea, crying, ‘To the One who is sitting on the throne and to the Lamb, be all praise, honour, glory and power, for ever and ever.’ And the four animals said, ‘Amen’; and the elders prostrated themselves to worship.

Gospel Acclamation cf.Lk24:32
Alleluia, alleluia!
Lord Jesus, explain the Scriptures to us.
Make our hearts burn within us as you talk to us.
Alleluia!
Or
Alleluia, alleluia!
Christ has risen: he who created all things,
and has granted his mercy to men.
Alleluia!
EITHER:
Gospel John 21:1-19 ©
Jesus showed himself again to the disciples. It was by the Sea of Tiberias, and it happened like this: Simon Peter, Thomas called the Twin, Nathanael from Cana in Galilee, the sons of Zebedee and two more of his disciples were together. Simon Peter said, ‘I’m going fishing.’ They replied, ‘We’ll come with you.’ They went out and got into the boat but caught nothing that night.
  It was light by now and there stood Jesus on the shore, though the disciples did not realise that it was Jesus. Jesus called out, ‘Have you caught anything, friends?’ And when they answered, ‘No’, he said, ‘Throw the net out to starboard and you’ll find something.’ So they dropped the net, and there were so many fish that they could not haul it in. The disciple Jesus loved said to Peter, ‘It is the Lord.’ At these words ‘It is the Lord’, Simon Peter, who had practically nothing on, wrapped his cloak round him and jumped into the water. The other disciples came on in the boat, towing the net and the fish; they were only about a hundred yards from land.
  As soon as they came ashore they saw that there was some bread there, and a charcoal fire with fish cooking on it. Jesus said, ‘Bring some of the fish you have just caught.’ Simon Peter went aboard and dragged the net to the shore, full of big fish, one hundred and fifty-three of them; and in spite of there being so many the net was not broken. Jesus said to them, ‘Come and have breakfast.’ None of the disciples was bold enough to ask, ‘Who are you?’; they knew quite well it was the Lord. Jesus then stepped forward, took the bread and gave it to them, and the same with the fish. This was the third time that Jesus showed himself to the disciples after rising from the dead.
  After the meal Jesus said to Simon Peter, ‘Simon son of John, do you love me more than these others do?’ He answered, ‘Yes Lord, you know I love you.’ Jesus said to him, ‘Feed my lambs.’ A second time he said to him, ‘Simon son of John, do you love me?’ He replied, ‘Yes, Lord, you know I love you.’ Jesus said to him, ‘Look after my sheep.’ Then he said to him a third time, ‘Simon son of John, do you love me?’ Peter was upset that he asked him the third time, ‘Do you love me?’ and said, ‘Lord, you know everything; you know I love you.’ Jesus said to him, ‘Feed my sheep.
‘I tell you most solemnly,
when you were young
you put on your own belt
and walked where you liked;
but when you grow old
you will stretch out your hands,
and somebody else will put a belt round you
and take you where you would rather not go.’
In these words he indicated the kind of death by which Peter would give glory to God. After this he said, ‘Follow me.’
OR:
Gospel John 21:1-14 ©
Jesus showed himself again to the disciples. It was by the Sea of Tiberias, and it happened like this: Simon Peter, Thomas called the Twin, Nathanael from Cana in Galilee, the sons of Zebedee and two more of his disciples were together. Simon Peter said, ‘I’m going fishing.’ They replied, ‘We’ll come with you.’ They went out and got into the boat but caught nothing that night.
  It was light by now and there stood Jesus on the shore, though the disciples did not realise that it was Jesus. Jesus called out, ‘Have you caught anything, friends?’ And when they answered, ‘No’, he said, ‘Throw the net out to starboard and you’ll find something.’ So they dropped the net, and there were so many fish that they could not haul it in. The disciple Jesus loved said to Peter, ‘It is the Lord.’ At these words ‘It is the Lord’, Simon Peter, who had practically nothing on, wrapped his cloak round him and jumped into the water. The other disciples came on in the boat, towing the net and the fish; they were only about a hundred yards from land.
  As soon as they came ashore they saw that there was some bread there, and a charcoal fire with fish cooking on it. Jesus said, ‘Bring some of the fish you have just caught.’ Simon Peter went aboard and dragged the net to the shore, full of big fish, one hundred and fifty-three of them; and in spite of there being so many the net was not broken. Jesus said to them, ‘Come and have breakfast.’ None of the disciples was bold enough to ask, ‘Who are you?’; they knew quite well it was the Lord. Jesus then stepped forward, took the bread and gave it to them, and the same with the fish. This was the third time that Jesus showed himself to the disciples after rising from the dead.

6 posted on 04/13/2013 9:20:45 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Pray with Pope Benedict

Pope Francis’ General Audience focused on women. Feminists aren’t going to be happy
Cardinal Jorge Mario Bergoglio's "Letter On the Year of Faith" (Crossing Threshold of Faith)

Pope Francis – the real deal – has Audience with Cardinals
Benedict XVI's Final General Audience
On Ash Wednesday
On God As Creator of Heaven and Earth
On Abraham's Faith
On Christ As Mediator Between God and Man
On the Incarnation
On God the Almighty Father
Year of Faith: Indulgences and Places of Pilgrimage [Ecumenical]
On the Identity of Jesus

On the Faith of Mary, the Virgin Mother of Christ
Father Cantalamessa's 1st Advent Sermon (Catholic Caucus)
On The Unfolding of God's Self-Revelation
On the Beauty of God's Plan of Salvation
On Bearing Witness to the Christian Faith
On the Splendor of God's Truth
On the Knowledge of God
Archbishop Chaput says Year of Faith holds solution to relativism
Following the Truth: The Year Of Faith – 10 Things You Should Know [Catholic Caucus]
Papal Encyclical on Faith Announced

On the Desire for God
On the Ecclesial Nature of Faith
On the Nature of Faith
Catechism's benefits explained for Year of Faith (Catholic Caucus)
A Life of Faith: Papal Theologian Speaks on the Grace of Faith
ASIA/LAOS - "Year of Faith" amid the persecutions of Christians forced to become "animists"
From no faith to a mountain-top of meaning: Father John Nepil (Catholic Caucus)
Living the Year of Faith: How Pope Benedict Wants You to Begin [Catholic Caucus]
Share Your Faith in This Year of Faith: Two keys to help you do it.
On A New Series of Audiences for The Year of Faith

Pope will deliver year-long teaching series on restoring faith
Pope Benedict XVI Grants Plenary Indulgence to Faithful [Catholic Caucus]
Pope, at Marian shrine, entrusts Year of Faith, synod to Mary (Catholic Caucus)
Catholic Church Calls for Public Prayers in Offices on Fridays
Highlights in the Plan for Year of Faith: Traditional Events Will Take on Special Perspective
Catholic Church calls for public prayers in offices on Fridays
Vatican Unveils Logo for Year of Faith [Catholic Caucus]
Miami Prelate Recalls Pope's Visit to Cuba, Looks to Year of Faith [Catholic Caucus]
The World-Changing Year of Faith [Catholic Caucus]
Vatican to Issue Recommendations for Celebrating Year of Faith

7 posted on 04/13/2013 9:23:25 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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He is Risen! Truly Risen!

A blessed Eastertide to all!

 

8 posted on 04/13/2013 9:25:13 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
If Christ Has Not Been Raised (you don't want to miss this one!)
The Few Witnesses to the Resurrection
Iraq: Christians celebrate Easter behind high blast walls and tight security cordons
8 things you need to know about Easter
Pope: Urbi et Orbi Message, Easter, 2013 [Full text]
Pope Francis Leads First Easter Celebrations
Resurrection of the Body (Ecumenical)
April 11 Audience: On Easter's Spiritual Joy
When did the Resurrection become truly the Faith, and the official teaching of the Church?
What are they thinking? (The Easter and Christmas only Church-goers, that is!)

The Resurrection Appearances Chronologically Arranged
Are There Discrepancies in the Resurrection Accounts? If so, Can They be Resolved?
URBI ET ORBI MESSAGE OF HIS HOLINESS POPE BENEDICT XVI - EASTER 2012
Saint Gregory the Great’s Sermon on the Mystery of the Resurrection
Pope Benedict XVI warns of moral 'darkness' as he celebrates Easter Mass
Easter Changes Everything
New Catholics a sign of Easter blessing for church (in Oregon)
On Easter Joy -- General Audience, Pope Benedict XVI
The Christ of the Folded Napkin
Reflection on Hope and New Life After the Easter Feasts (Thomas Rosica, CSB)

Easter Time [Eastertide or Easter Season]
Risen Christ opens for a us a completely new future says the Pope at Easter Mass
Man Who "Died" 5 Times Is Becoming Catholic (Thousands to Enter Church at Easter)
On the Resurrection-Pope Benedict XVI
Octave of Easter, Pope Benedict XVI
The Double Alleluia
Easter Sunday
Eastertide Overview
Our 'Great Sunday' (Season of Easter) [Editorial Column]
Happy Easter: The Tomb is Empty! The Warrior of Love has conquered!

Homily Of His Holiness Benedict XVI (Holy Saturday Easter Vigil, Saint Peter's Basilica)
Pope to Baptize Prominent Muslim
Holy Saturday (Easter Vigil)
The Exultet
The Dark before Dawn
Easter and the Holy Eucharist(Catholic/Orthodox Caucus)
Holy Saturday and the Easter Vigil
Easter Day and Easter Season
THE EASTER LITURGY [Easter Vigil] (Anglican and Catholic Rites)

Holy Saturday and the Easter Vigil
Poles visit symbolic Christ's Graves on Holy Saturday
Easter Vigil tonight
HOMILIES PREACHED BY FATHER ALTIER FOR EASTER VIGIL FROM 2002-2005
2 Paschal Candles; Lights On at Vigil And More on Washing of the Feet
RCIA and Holy Saturday
The Time Of Easter or Eastertide -- Easter Seasosn
Easter Day and Easter Season
Easter Reflections -- 50 Days of the Easter Season
The Blessed Season of Easter - Fifty Days of Reflections

9 posted on 04/13/2013 9:26:25 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Perpetual Novena for the Nation (Ecumenical)
10 posted on 04/13/2013 9:28:03 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Prayers for The Religion Forum (Ecumenical)
11 posted on 04/13/2013 9:28:49 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Jesus, High Priest
 

We thank you, God our Father, for those who have responded to your call to priestly ministry.

Accept this prayer we offer on their behalf: Fill your priests with the sure knowledge of your love.

Open their hearts to the power and consolation of the Holy Spirit.

Lead them to new depths of union with your Son.

Increase in them profound faith in the Sacraments they celebrate as they nourish, strengthen and heal us.

Lord Jesus Christ, grant that these, your priests, may inspire us to strive for holiness by the power of their example, as men of prayer who ponder your word and follow your will.

O Mary, Mother of Christ and our mother, guard with your maternal care these chosen ones, so dear to the Heart of your Son.

Intercede for our priests, that offering the Sacrifice of your Son, they may be conformed more each day to the image of your Son, our Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ. Amen.

Saint John Vianney, universal patron of priests, pray for us and our priests

This icon shows Jesus Christ, our eternal high priest.

The gold pelican over His heart represents self-sacrifice.

The border contains an altar and grapevines, representing the Mass, and icons of Melchizedek and St. Jean-Baptiste Vianney.

Melchizedek: king of righteousness (left icon) was priest and king of Jerusalem.  He blessed Abraham and has been considered an ideal priest-king.

St. Jean-Baptiste Vianney is the patron saint of parish priests.


12 posted on 04/13/2013 9:30:16 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Pray a Rosary each day for our nation.

Pray the Rosary

1.  Sign of the Cross:  In the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit.  Amen.

2.  The Apostles Creed:  I BELIEVE in God, the Father almighty, Creator of heaven and earth, and in Jesus Christ, His only Son, our Lord, who was conceived by the Holy Spirit, born of the Virgin Mary, suffered under Pontius Pilate, was crucified, died, and was buried. He descended into hell; on the third day he rose again from the dead; he ascended into heaven, and is seated at the right hand of God, the Father Almighty; from there He shall come to judge the living and the dead.

I believe in the Holy Spirit, the holy catholic Church, the communion of saints, the forgiveness of sins, the resurrection of the body, and the life everlasting. Amen.

3.  The Lord's Prayer:  OUR Father, who art in heaven, hallowed be Thy name. Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done on earth as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread and forgive us our trespasses as we forgive those who trespass against us. And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil. Amen.

4. (3) Hail Mary:  HAIL Mary, full of grace, the Lord is with thee. Blessed art thou amongst women and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus. Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners, now, and in the hour of our death. Amen. (Three times)

5. Glory Be:  GLORY be to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit. As it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be, world without end. Amen.

Fatima Prayer: Oh, my Jesus, forgive us our sins, save us from the fires of hell, lead all souls to heaven, especially those in most need of your mercy.

Announce each mystery, then say 1 Our Father, 10 Hail Marys, 1 Glory Be and 1 Fatima prayer.  Repeat the process with each mystery.

End with the Hail Holy Queen:

Hail, Holy Queen, Mother of Mercy, our life, our sweetness and our hope! To thee do we cry, poor banished children of Eve! To thee do we send up our sighs, mourning and weeping in this vale of tears! Turn then, most gracious advocate, thine eyes of mercy towards us; and after this, our exile, show unto us the blessed fruit of thy womb, Jesus!

O clement, O loving, O sweet Virgin Mary! Pray for us, O holy Mother of God, that we may be made worthy of the promises of Christ.

Final step -- The Sign of the Cross

 

The Mysteries of the Rosary

By tradition, Catholics meditate on these Mysteries during prayers of the Rosary.
The biblical references follow each of the Mysteries below.


The Glorious Mysteries
(Wednesdays and Sundays)
1.The Resurrection (Matthew 28:1-8, Mark 16:1-18, Luke 24:1-12, John 20:1-29) [Spiritual fruit - Faith]
2. The Ascension (Mark 16:19-20, Luke 24:50-53, Acts 1:6-11) [Spiritual fruit - Christian Hope]
3. The Descent of the Holy Spirit (Acts 2:1-13) [Spiritual fruit - Gifts of the Holy Spirit]
4. The Assumption [Spiritual fruit - To Jesus through Mary]
5. The Coronation [Spiritual fruit - Grace of Final Perseverance]


13 posted on 04/13/2013 9:31:22 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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~ PRAYER ~

St. Michael, the Archangel, defend us in battle
 Be our protection against the wickedness
and snares of the devil;
May God rebuke him, we  humbly pray,
 and do thou, O Prince of the heavenly host,
 by the power of God,
 Cast into hell Satan and all the evil spirits
who prowl through the world seeking the ruin of souls.
 Amen
+

14 posted on 04/13/2013 9:32:14 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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A Prayer for our Free Nation Under God
God Save Our Country web site (prayer warriors)
Prayer Chain Request for the United States of America
Pray for Nancy Pelosi
Prayer and fasting will help defeat health care reform (Freeper Prayer Thread)
Prayer Campaign Started to Convert Pro-Abortion Catholic Politicians to Pro-Life
[Catholic Caucus] One Million Rosaries
Non-stop Rosary vigil to defeat ObamaCare

From an Obama bumper sticker on a car:

"Pray for Obama.  Psalm 109:8"

   

PLEASE JOIN US -

Evening Prayer
Someone has said that if people really understood the full extent of the power we have available through prayer, we might be speechless.
Did you know that during WWII there was an advisor to Churchill who organized a group of people who dropped what they were doing every day at a prescribed hour for one minute to collectively pray for the safety of England, its people and peace?  


There is now a group of people organizing the same thing here in America. If you would like to participate: Every evening at 9:00 PM Eastern Time (8:00 PM Central) (7:00 PM Mountain) (6:00 PM Pacific), stop whatever you are doing and spend one minute praying for the safety of the United States, our troops, our citizens, and for a return to a Godly nation. If you know anyone else who would like to participate, please pass this along. Our prayers are the most powerful asset we have.    Please forward this to your praying friends.


15 posted on 04/13/2013 9:33:51 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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April Devotion: The Blessed Sacrament

Since the 16th century Catholic piety has assigned entire months to special devotions. The Church traditionally encouraged the month of April for increased devotion to Jesus in the Holy Eucharist. "The Church in the course of the centuries has introduced various forms of this Eucharistic worship which are ever increasing in beauty and helpfulness; as, for example, visits of devotion to the tabernacles, even every day; Benediction of the Blessed Sacrament; solemn processions, especially at the time of Eucharistic Congresses, which pass through cities and villages; and adoration of the Blessed Sacrament publicly exposed . . . These exercises of piety have brought a wonderful increase in faith and supernatural life to the Church militant upon earth and they are re-echoed to a certain extent by the Church triumphant in heaven, which sings continually a hymn of praise to God and to the Lamb 'Who was slain.'" --Pope Pius XII

ACT OF ADORATION
I adore Thee, 0 Jesus, true God and true Man, here present in the Holy Eucharist, humbly kneeling before Thee and united in spirit with all the faithful on earth and all the blessed in heaven. In deepest gratitude for so great a blessing, I love Thee, my Jesus, with my whole heart, for Thou art all perfect and all worthy of love.

Give me grace nevermore in any way to offend Thee, and grant that I, being refreshed by Thy Eucharistic presence here on earth, may be found worthy to come to the enjoyment with Mary of Thine eternal and everblessed presence in heaven. Amen.

FAITH IN THE EUCHARIST
O my God, I firmly believe that Thou art really and corporally present in the Blessed Sacrament of the altar. I adore Thee here present from the very depths of my heart, and I worship Thy sacred presence with all possible humility. O my soul, what joy to have Jesus Christ always with us, and to be able to speak to Him, heart to heart, with all confidence. Grant, O Lord, that I, having adored Thy divine Majesty here on earth in this wonderful Sacrament, may be able to adore it eternally in Heaven. Amen.

FOR THE PEACE OF CHRIST
O most sacred, most loving heart of Jesus, Thou art concealed in the Holy Eucharist, and Thou beatest for us still. Now as then Thou sayest, "With desire I have desired." I worship Thee, then, with all my best love and awe, with my fervent affection, with my most subdued, most resolved will. O make my heart beat with Thy heart. Purify it of all that is earthly, all that is proud and sensual, all that is hard and cruel, of all perversity, of all disorder, of all deadness. So fill it with Thee, that neither the events of the day nor the circumstances of the time may have power to ruffle it; but that in Thy love and Thy fear it may have peace. --Cardinal Newman

ACT OF LOVE
I believe Thou art present in the Blessed Sacrament, O Jesus. I love Thee and desire Thee. Come into my heart. I embrace Thee, O never leave me. I beseech Thee, O Lord Jesus, may the burning and most sweet power of Thy love absorb my mind, that I may die through love of Thy love, who wast graciously pleased to die through love of my love. --St. Francis of Assisi

ACT OF REPARATION
Saint Margaret Mary Alacoque, well known in connection with devotion to the Sacred Herat of Jesus, led the way in making reparation to Jesus in the Blessed Sacrament for the coldness and ingratitude of men. This prayer of hers can become our own as we attempt to make amends for our own and others' neglect of the great Sacrament of His love, the Eucharist.
O kind and merciful savior, from my heart I earnestly desire to return Thee love for love. My greatest sorrow is that Thou art not loved by men, and, in particular, that my own heart is so cold, so selfish, so ungrateful. Keenly aware of my own weakness and poverty, I trust that Thy own grace will enable me to offer Thee an act of pure love. And I wish to offer Thee this act of love in reparation for the coldness and neglect that are shown to Thee in the sacrament of Thy love by Thy creatures. O Jesus, my supreme good, I love Thee, not for the sake of the reward which Thou hast promised to those who love Thee, but purely for Thyself. I love Thee above all things that can be loved, above all pleasures, and above myself and all that is not Thee, promising in the presence of heaven and earth that I will live and die purely and simply in Thy holy love, and that if to love Thee thus I must endure persecution and suffering I am completely satisfied, and I will ever say with Saint Paul: Nothing "will be able to separate us from the love of God." 0 Jesus, supreme master of all hearts, I love Thee, I adore Thee, I praise Thee, I thank Thee, because I am now all Thine own. Rule over me, and transform my soul into the likeness of Thyself, so that it may bless and glorify Thee forever in the abode of the saints.
--Saint Margaret Mary Alacoque

OFFERING
My Lord, I offer Thee myself in turn as a sacrifice of thanksgiving. Thou hast died for me, and I in turn make myself over to Thee. I am not my own. Thou hast bought me; I will by my own act and deed complete the purchase. My wish is to be separated from everything of this world; to cleanse myself simply from sin; to put away from me even what is innocent, if used for its own sake, and not for Thine. I put away reputation and honor, and influence, and power, for my praise and strength shall be in Thee. Enable me to carry out what I profess. Amen. --Cardinal Newman

Prayer Source: Prayer Book, The by Reverend John P. O'Connell, M.A., S.T.D. and Jex Martin, M.A., The Catholic Press, Inc., Chicago, Illinois, 1954

Litany of the Most Blessed Sacrament

Lord, have mercy,  Lord, have mercy.
Christ, have mercy, Christ, have mercy.
Lord, have mercy,  Lord, have mercy.
Christ, hear us,  Christ, hear us.
Christ, graciously hear us, Christ, graciously hear us.
God the Father of Heaven, have mercy on us.
God the Son, Redeemer of the world, have mercy on us.
God, the Holy Spirit, have mercy on us.
Holy Trinity, One God, have mercy on us.

O Living Bread, Who from Heaven descended, have mercy on us.
Hidden God and Savior, have mercy on us.
Grain of the elect, have mercy on us.
Vine sprouting forth virgins, have mercy on us.
Wholesome Bread and delicacy of kings, have mercy on us.
Perpetual sacrifice, have mercy on us.
Clean oblation, have mercy on us.
Lamb without spot, have mercy on us.
Most pure feast, have mercy on us.
Food of Angels, have mercy on us.
Hidden manna, have mercy on us.
Memorial of God's wonders, have mercy on us.
Supersubstantial Bread, have mercy on us.
Word made flesh, dwelling in us, have mercy on us.
Holy Victim, have mercy on us.

O Cup of blessing, have mercy on us.
O Mystery of faith, have mercy on us.
O Most high and venerable Sacrament, have mercy on us.
O Most holy of all sacrifices, have mercy on us.
O True propitiatory Sacrifice for the living and the dead, have mercy on us.
O Heavenly antidote, by which we are preserved from sin, have mercy on us.
O stupendous miracle above all others, have mercy on us.
O most holy Commemoration of the Passison of Christ, have mercy on us.
O Gift transcending all abundance, have mercy on us.
O extraordinary memorial of Divine love, have mercy on us.
O affluence of Divine largess, have mercy on us.
O most holy and august mystery, have mercy on us.

Medicine of immortality, have mercy on us.
Awesome and life-giving Sacrament, have mercy on us.
Unbloody Sacrifice, have mercy on us.
Food and guest, have mercy on us.
Sweetest banquet at which the Angels serve, have mercy on us.
Bond of love, have mercy on us.
Offering and oblation, have mercy on us.
Spiritual sweetness tasted in its own foutain, have mercy on us.
Refreshment of holy souls, have mercy on us.
Viaticum of those dying in the Lord, have mercy on us.
Pledge of future glory, have mercy on us.

Be merciful, spare us, O Lord.
Be merciful, graciously hear us, O Lord.

From the unworthy reception of Thy Body and Blood, deliver us, O Lord.
From passions of the flesh, deliver us, O Lord.
From the concupiscence of the eyes, deliver us, O Lord.
From pride, deliver us, O Lord.
From every occasion of sin, deliver us, O Lord.
Through that desire, with which Thou desiredst to eat the Passover with Thy disciples, deliver us, O Lord.
Through that profound humility with which Thou didst wash Thy disciples' feet, deliver us, O Lord.
Through that most ardent love, with which Thou instituted this Divine Sacrament,
deliver us, O Lord.
Through the most precious Blood, which Thou hast left for us upon the altar, deliver us, O Lord.
Through those Five Wounds of Thy most holy Body, which was given up for us, deliver us, O Lord.

Sinners we are, we beseech Thee, hear us.
That Thou wouldst graciously preserve and augment the faith, reverence, and devotion in us towards this admirable Sacrament, we beseech Thee, hear us.
That Thou wouldst graciously lead us through the true confession of we beseech Thee, hear us.
our sins to a frequent reception of the Eucharist, we beseech Thee, hear us.
That Thou wouldst graciously free us from every heresy, falsehood, and blindness of the heart, we beseech Thee, hear us.
That Thou wouldst graciously impart to us the Heavenly and precious fruits of this most Holy Sacrament, we beseech Thee, hear us.
That Thou wouldst graciously protect and strengthen us in our hour of death with this Heavenly Viaticum, we beseech Thee, hear us.

O Son of God, we beseech Thee, hear us.
 Lamb of God, Who taketh away the sins of the world, spare us, O Lord.
Lamb of God, Who taketh away the sins of the world, graciously hear us, O Lord.
Lamb of God, Who taketh away the sins of the world, have mercy on us, O Lord.
Christ, hear us, Christ, hear us.
Christ, graciously hear us, Christ, graciously hear us.
Lord, have mercy, Lord, have mercy.
Christ, have mercy, Christ, have mercy.
Lord, have mercy, Lord, have mercy.
Our Father . . .
Hail Mary . . .
 

V. Thou didst furnish them with Bread from Heaven, Alleluia.
R. Having in it every delight.

Let us pray.

O God, Who under a marvelous Sacrament has left us a memorial of Thy Passion; grant us; we beseech Thee; so to venerate the sacred mysteries of Thy Body and Blood, that we may ever perceive within us the fruit of Thy Redemption. Thou, Who livest and reignest forever and ever. Amen.
 

From the Manuale Sacerdotum, P. Josephus Schneider, S. J., 1867

Essays for Lent: The Eucharist
Excerpt from: The Didache (The Teaching of the Twelve Apostles) [Catholic/Orthodox Caucus]
Divorced Catholics and the Eucharist
Following The Truth: So, You Just Received Jesus…Now What? (Catholic or Open)
Auxiliary Bishop Says Communion In the Hand is a Novelty [Ecumenical]
How Something We Consider Solidly Traditional was Once Thought Progressive (Catholic)
Transubstantiation: Change We Can Believe In
Diocese limits Communion under both kinds, laments excessive extraordinary ministers
Phoenix Diocese to adopt new norms for Holy Communion [Catholic Caucus]
What Does GIRM 160 for the USA Really Say?
Lift the City - a Catholic Eucharistic flash mob (Catholic Caucus)
Justin Martyr: 1st apology: Sacraments, Eucharist {Catholic/Orthodox caucus}
The Institution of the Eucharist in Scripture [Catholic Caucus]
How the Mass is a sacrifice, and why so many deny this doctrine (Catholic/Orthodox Caucus)
[Ecumenical] Lent through Eastertide - Divine Mercy Diary Exerpts: Holy Communion and the Eucharist
New book connects the Eucharist with its Jewish roots
THE SACRAMENT OF THE EUCHARIST (sections 3 only) {Ecumenical Thread}
THE SACRAMENT OF THE EUCHARIST (sections 1&2 only) {Ecumenical Thread}

The Perfect Sacrifice: When Heaven Comes to Earth [Catholic Caucus]
The Real Presence [Church Fathers on the Holy Eucharist, cont'd ]
Is the Mass a Sacrifice? (Once and for all, Heb 9-10) {Catholic/Orthodox Caucus}
Radio Replies Second Volume - Holy Communion
The Real presence of Christ in the Eucharist {Catholic/Orthodox Caucus}
Radio Replies Second Volume - The Sacrifice of the Mass
Radio Replies Second Volume - Holy Eucharist
Thanksgiving, the Prophets and the Eucharist
Lex Orandi, Lex Credendi, Lex Vivendi. As we Worship, So we Believe, So we Live
[CATHOLIC/ORTHODOX CAUCUS] 5th Luminous Mystery: Institution of the Eucharist (Patristic Rosary)
Wounded in the house of them that loved Me
[CATHOLIC / ORTHODOX CAUCUS] Eucharist is Jesus' greatest gift to us, teaches Pope Benedict XVI
[CATHOLIC CAUCUS] What makes Jesus present in the Eucharist: broadening one's view.
Pope's Q--A at End of Priestly Year Pt 4 "We Celebrate,..Meditate..on Eucharist" [Catholic Caucus]
Sacrifice, Transubstantiation, and Real Presence (Pope Benedict XVI) [Catholic Caucus]
Catholic Caucus: Eucharist is the Heart of God
[CATHOLIC CAUCUS]'Body, Blood, Soul and Divinity': The Miracle and Gift of the Most Holy Eucharist
A Secular Eucharist
Paul and the Eucharist
Centered in the Eucharist

Who Can Receive Communion? (Catholic Caucus)
Respect For Christ In The Eucharist – One Priest’s Perspective
Catholic Biblical Apologetics: Opportunities of Grace: The Eucharist: The Lord's Supper
THE PRIEST IN THE COMMUNION RITES - Liturgy Prepares for Reception of the Eucharist
Novena with Saint Peter Julian Eymard for Prayer in the Presence of the Blessed Sacrament [Prayer]
THE PRIEST IN THE COMMUNION RITES - Liturgy Prepares for Reception of the Eucharist
Boston Cardinal: Church Needs 'Clear' Injunction Denying Pro-Abortion Pols Communion
Benedict XVI calls priests to protect communion between God and man
Eucharist: Holy Sacrifice
Fr. Men: The Eucharist [Cath-Orth caucus]
Catholics in Costa Rica outraged by disrespect toward Eucharist [Catholic Caucus]
The Institution of the Eucharist in Scripture
St Anthony and the Real Presence
The Essentials of the Catholic Faith, Part Two: Channels of Grace: The Eucharist
EWTN - October 29 - 8PM - Fr. Antoine and the Eucharist
The Role of the Bishop of Rome in the Communion of the Church in the First Millennium
Radio Replies First Volume - Holy Eucharist
The Institution of the Eucharist in Scripture
Catholic Caucus: The Spiritual Combat Ch 54. MANNER IN WHICH WE OUGHT TO RECEIVE...BLESSED SACRAMENT
Catholic Caucus: The Spiritual Combat: Ch 53. CONCERNING THE MOST HOLY SACRAMENT OF THE EUCHARIST

A Few Texts From Saint Cyril of Jerusalem on the Eucharist
Catholic Devotional: On Visiting Jesus Christ In the Blessed Sacrament
The Early Christians Believed in the Real Presence of Christ in the Eucharist
Focus on the Real Presence
A Chinese Girl-True Story That Inspired Bishop Fulton Sheen- Eucharist Adoration (Catholic Caucus)
Doubting Thomases(Eucharist); the Pitfalls of Folly(Catholic Caucus)
Rainbow sash-wearers prohibited from receiving [the Eucharist at Cathedral of St. Paul]
The significance of Holy Thursday (institution of the Eucharist and priesthood)
Our Lady of the Most Blessed Sacrament [Catholic Caucus]
The Catechism of St. Thomas Aquinas THE HOLY EUCHARIST
Holy Communion (with a Quiz!)
Beginning Catholic: The Eucharist: In the Presence of the Lord Himself [Ecumenical]
Beginning Catholic: Receiving the Lord in Holy Communion [Ecumenical]
Faithful Invited to Follow Pope, Adore Eucharist [Catholic Caucus]
Christmas and the Eucharist(Catholic/Orthodox Caucus)
Eucharist kneeling request sparks controversy [Catholic Caucus]
Eucharist vs. the Word (which is more important in the Catholic Church)
Christ the Miracle Worker in the Eucharist(Catholic Caucus)
Imitating Christ in the Eucharist(Catholic Caucus)
The Eucharist - the Lord's Sacrifice, Banquet and Presence (OPEN)

Pope Calls Eucharist History's Greatest Revolution [OPEN]
A Brief Catechism for Adults - Lesson 22: The Sacrament of the Holy Eucharist (Holy Communion)
A series of reflections from St. Peter Julian Eymard Blessed Sacrament(Catholic Caucus)
Eucharist, Holy Meal
Imitating Christ in the Eucharist
Christmas and the Eucharist
Prayer Before the Blessed Sacrament
This is My Body, This is My Blood
THE HOLY EUCHARIST IS THE WHOLE CHRIST
Gift Of Life, Gift Eternal: The Most Holy Eucharist and the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass
Area worshipers march to celebrate Holy Eucharist
Grace of the Eucharist is secret to holy priests, says Pope
The Disposition of Priests [Valid Mass, Valid Holy Eucharist?]
The Body of Christ?
Holy Sacrifice, Living Sacrament
Knights of the Eucharist
The Banquet of Corpus Christi - "Why did Jesus give us His Body and Blood?"
The Eucharist: Eternity and Time Together
Restored Order of the Sacraments of Initiation? Confirmation and First Eucharist together? (Vanity)
Reflections of Cardinal Ratzinger on the Eucharist

THE HOLY EUCHARIST: NOURISHMENT TO FINISH OUR COURSE
The Eucharist in Scripture - Part 1 - Old Testament
LITANY OF REPARATION TO OUR LORD IN THE BLESSED SACRAMENT
Benediction of the Blessed Sacrament
POPE GRANTS PLENARY INDULGENCE FOR YEAR OF THE EUCHARIST
New Plenary Indulgence to Mark Year of the Eucharist
Kneeling and Faith in the Eucharist
The Immaculate Conception and the Eucharist, a course in Christian culture in Tashkent
The Year of the Eucharist by Bishop Donald Wuerl
"While We're At It": What can we do to show that the Eucharist is a communal activity?
CATHOLICS AND ... WITNESSED UNUSUAL IMAGES IN BLESSED SACRAMENT
The Discipline of the Eucharist Holy See Releases Redemptionis Sacramentum...
Vatican: Matters to be observed or to be avoided regarding the Most Holy Eucharist (April 23, 2004)
Devotion to the Holy Eucharist Advances Devotion to Jesus' Person
New rules on the Holy Eucharist on Holy Thursday
The Reverence due to the Holy Eucharist
The Holy Face of Jesus Christ as appeared on the Holy Eucharist
The Fourth Cup: The Sacrament of the Eucharist [Holy Thursday] [Passover]
Holy Father stresses Need of Devotion to Holy Eucharist outside of Mass: Pope Paul VI

16 posted on 04/13/2013 9:35:04 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

April 2013

Pope's Intentions

Liturgy, Source of Life. That the public, prayerful celebration of faith may give life to the faithful.

Mission Churches. That mission churches may be signs and instruments of hope and resurrection.


17 posted on 04/13/2013 9:45:42 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Daily Gospel Commentary

Third Sunday of Easter - Year C
Commentary of the day
Saint Gregory the Great (c.540-604), Pope, Doctor of the Church
Homilies on the Gospel, no.24 (©Cistercian publications Inc., 1990)

"When it was already dawn, Jesus was standing on the shore"

What does the sea indicate but the present age, which is disturbed by the uproar of circumstances and the commotion of this perishable life? What does the solidity of the shore signify but the uninterrupted continuance of eternal peace? Therefore since the disciples were still held in the waves of this mortal life, they were laboring on the sea. But since our Redeemer had already passed beyond his perishable body, after his resurrection he stood on the shore as if he were speaking to his disciples by his actions of the mystery of his resurrection: “I am not appearing to you on the sea, because I am not with you in the waves of confusion” (Mt 14,25)

It is for this reason that he said in another place to these same disciples after his resurrection: “These are the words I spoke to you when I was still with you” (Lk 24,44). It was not that he wasn't with them when he appeared to them as a bodily presence; but... he in his immortal body was apart from their mortal bodies. He was saying that he was no longer with them even as he stood in their midst. In the passage we read today he also disclosed, by the place in which he was standing when he showed himself on shore while they were still at sea, what he professed when he was with them.


18 posted on 04/13/2013 9:48:45 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Arlington Catholic Herald

GOSPEL COMMENTARY JN 21:1-19
Do you love me?
Fr. Jack Peterson

There is an enormous amount of brokenness and sin in our world today. We see it in societies where poverty, hatred, war and genocide still abound. It is evident in homes where genuine care, loving sacrifice and dedicated family time often are absent. We also see it in individual lives where selfishness, despair, resentment and anger reign.

Jesus died on Good Friday and rose on Easter Sunday to destroy these evils that prevail in much of our world. He is the Divine Physician who wants to heal our wounds, forgive our sins and renew our hearts. Jesus has a mission to repair our broken world, one heart at a time.

This week’s Gospel lays out for us Jesus’ effort to heal the heart of Peter, the rock upon whom He intended to build His church. Peter’s own weakness and brokenness led him to deny that he knew Our Lord three times during Jesus’ darkest hour. The one who, hours before, had boldly promised that he would die for Jesus, has a meltdown before the ones who question him, “You are not one of his disciples, are you?”

Peter’s three-fold denial of Our Lord seriously damaged his faith, confidence and sense of self. Jesus, keenly aware of this reality, approaches Peter to heal him and renew him. “Simon, Son of John, do you love me?” The risen Jesus begins the healing by simply approaching Peter and initiating an encounter. Then, Our Lord intentionally questions Peter three times concerning his love for the divine Savior. Our Lord gave Peter the chance to repair the breach and to pledge his heart anew with a three-fold public confirmation. What a skilled Physician.

In addition to healing Peter’s heart, Our Lord recommissions him as head of the apostles and visible leader of His church. As the father in the parable of the prodigal son restores his son’s dignity as a member of the family by the gift of the sandals, ring and fine robe, Jesus restores Peter as chief shepherd of the flock by commanding him to feed and tend His sheep. Peter desperately needed this moment in order to have full confidence in the role that Jesus had given him after the first miraculous catch of fish. This encounter fashioned by our risen Lord was an incredible gift to Peter and the church.

The Divine Physician also exercises His role as the Divine Teacher by highlighting that leadership in the kingdom must flow first from love for Christ. St. Paul will emphasize this reality in his famous passage from First Corinthians where he states that if I have the gift of prophecy, the faith to move mountains, and the generosity to give everything I have away but have not love, then I am nothing at all. All leadership among Christians must begin with a profound love for the person of Jesus Christ. Otherwise the leadership will be corrupted and go astray.

Jesus knew well Peter’s heart. His love for Peter, His gift of healing and His extraordinary trust in him proved true. Peter became a generous, wise and courageous shepherd of the flock. By God’s grace, Peter served Our Lord faithfully and remained close to the one he loved until the very end. Simon Peter gave his life in the end in Rome as a witness to the risen Lord and as leader of the church commissioned to make disciples of all nations and to teach them all that the Lord had commanded.

All of us have had our meltdowns and denied Jesus with our words and actions. We have damaged our faith and lost confidence. The Divine Physician knows our hearts as well. He wants to extend His mercy, bring us healing and send us out to be His witnesses in the world. Let’s commit to being like Peter this Easter season and accept the new life of Christ.

Fr. Peterson is assistant chaplain at Marymount University in Arlington and director of the Youth Apostles Institute in McLean.


19 posted on 04/13/2013 10:11:48 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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The Work of God

Peter, feed my sheep. Catholic Gospels - Homilies - Matthew, Luke, Mark, John - Inspirations of the Holy Spirit

Year C

 -  3nd Sunday of Easter

Peter, feed my sheep.

Peter, feed my sheep. Catholic Gospels - Matthew, Luke, Mark, John - Inspirations of the Holy Spirit John 21:1-19

1 After these things Jesus showed himself again to the disciples by the Sea of Tiberias; and he showed himself in this way.
2 Gathered there together were Simon Peter, Thomas called the Twin, Nathanael of Cana in Galilee, the sons of Zebedee, and two others of his disciples.
3 Simon Peter said to them, "I am going fishing." They said to him, "We will go with you." They went out and got into the boat, but that night they caught nothing.
4 Just after daybreak, Jesus stood on the beach; but the disciples did not know that it was Jesus.
5 Jesus said to them, "Children, you have no fish, have you?" They answered him, "No."
6 He said to them, "Cast the net to the right side of the boat, and you will find some." So they cast it, and now they were not able to haul it in because there were so many fish.
7 That disciple whom Jesus loved said to Peter, "It is the Lord!" When Simon Peter heard that it was the Lord, he put on some clothes, for he was naked, and jumped into the sea.
8 But the other disciples came in the boat, dragging the net full of fish, for they were not far from the land, only about a hundred yards off.
9 When they had gone ashore, they saw a charcoal fire there, with fish on it, and bread.
10 Jesus said to them, "Bring some of the fish that you have just caught."
11 So Simon Peter went aboard and hauled the net ashore, full of large fish, a hundred fifty-three of them; and though there were so many, the net was not torn.
12 Jesus said to them, "Come and have breakfast." Now none of the disciples dared to ask him, "Who are you?" because they knew it was the Lord.
13 Jesus came and took the bread and gave it to them, and did the same with the fish.
14 This was now the third time that Jesus appeared to the disciples after he was raised from the dead.
15 When they had finished breakfast, Jesus said to Simon Peter, "Simon son of John, do you love me more than these?" He said to him, "Yes, Lord; you know that I love you." Jesus said to him, "Feed my lambs."
16 A second time he said to him, "Simon son of John, do you love me?" He said to him, "Yes, Lord; you know that I love you." Jesus said to him, "Tend my sheep."
17 He said to him the third time, "Simon son of John, do you love me?" Peter felt hurt because he said to him the third time, "Do you love me?" And he said to him, "Lord, you know everything; you know that I love you." Jesus said to him, "Feed my sheep.
18 Very truly, I tell you, when you were younger, you used to fasten your own belt and to go wherever you wished. But when you grow old, you will stretch out your hands, and someone else will fasten a belt around you and take you where you do not wish to go."
19 (He said this to indicate the kind of death by which he would glorify God.) After this he said to him, "Follow me." (NRSV)

Inspiration of the Holy Spirit - From the Sacred Heart of Jesus

3nd Sunday of Easter - Peter, feed my sheep. I appeared several times after my resurrection, before my Ascension into Heaven. I was clothed with my supernatural body, which in its glory was only visible to those to whom I allowed to see it. It was necessary for me to give consolation to the faithful souls who partook of my suffering and to strengthen and give courage to my newly founded Church.

Peter had denied me three times and was still full of guilt. I had chosen Peter to be the head of the Apostles even though I knew of his human weaknesses; after all I had taught him that without me you are nothing. So the time had come to delegate my power and my authority since I was not going to be personally at the command of my flock.

I am the Good Shepherd; I do not leave my sheep unattended. Since they need food, protection, healing and shelter, I entrusted all that care to Peter, my Vicar, the head of my Church.

I asked him three times if He loved me, and of course the answer was “yes Lord, I love you”, this in itself caused healing to his wounds and restored his confidence and dignity as the new Shepherd in charge of my sheep.

I asked him to take care of my sheep and to feed them. On the last supper I had provided the new heavenly manna to feed the world, “my own flesh and my own blood”. I, the creator, had created my self in the consecrated species of bread and wine, which would be consecrated by Peter and all my apostles; and also by those appointed by them as priests. My Church was now secured until the end of times, I was its life then and I continue to be its life now, because my words are spirit and life.

Author: Joseph of Jesus and Mary


20 posted on 04/13/2013 10:22:45 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Archdiocese of Washington

Back to the Future – A Meditation on the Gospel for the Third Sunday of Easter

By:

The gospel today, is really quite remarkable. For, despite the fact that the apostles seeing Jesus risen from the dead several times now, we see in them a kind of retreat into the past. They’re going backwards, and Jesus must summon them, if you pardon the expression, “Back to the Future.”

Plainly stated, they were going back to fishing, but the Lord had called them away from fishing, and pointed them to the future, a future that included going to all the nations and summoning them to saving faith.

Thus, this is a critical gospel that shows us that Jesus summoning them back to their crucial call, a call that has its focus not in the past but in the future. Indeed, fellow believer, if this gospel had not gone right, your faith and mine might well have been in jeopardy. To make it plain, you and I are the future the Jesus sought to preserve in this crucial gospel. Our own coming to the faith depends on whether Jesus is able to summon Peter and the other apostles back to the future.

Lets look at this gospel in four stages.

I. Regrettable Reversal–the text says, At that time, Jesus revealed himself again to his disciples at the Sea of Tiberias. He revealed himself in this way. Together were Simon Peter, Thomas called Didymus, Nathanael from Cana in Galilee, Zebedee’s sons, and two others of his disciples. Simon Peter said to them, “I am going fishing.” They said to him, “We also will come with you.” So they went out and got into the boat, but that night they caught nothing.

Now let us be clear, Peter had no business going back to fishing. The Lord had called him away from fishing. For example, Back in Matthew’s Gospel, we read, And he said to them, follow me and I will make you fishers of men. Immediately, they left their nets and followed him. (Mat 4:19)

But here, we see Peter going back to commercial fishing. And lets be clear, this is not some sort of recreational fishing, their commercial nets are out! It is astonishing to think that after having seen Jesus risen from the dead on at least two occasions, possibly more, that they’re going back to fishing!

We often think that if we were to see miracles, our faith would be strong. But, there is very little evidence for this. Many who see signs and wonders, wonder if what they have seen can be topped. Their fascination is engaged, but not their faith. Ultimately, faith produces miracles, it is not the result of it.

Peter’s return to fishing, is not only regrettable, it is scandalous. For in so doing, others say to him, “We will also go with you.” Too often, when we backslide, we bring others with us. More positively, if we grow in holiness, we will also bring others with us. Sadly, Peter is backslidden, and others follow him. As we shall see, the Lord will not abandon his church.

And while we may wonder at St. Peter. The fact is, we too easily backslide. We praise Jesus with our mouth, and yet from the same mouth come curses and gossip. We claim that we belong to Christ, are one body with him, are a Temple of the Holy Spirit, and yet, too often, from the same body comes forth fornication and other sexual impurity. We say that God is love, and yet from us to easily come anger and hatred and a lack of love for the poor and the troubled.

The things we have been called away from, we too easily run back to. The Lord points forward, but we run backward.

So often, as with the disciples in this gospel, the Lord must stand on the shore of our baptismal waters, and call us out of the past, and back into the future, a future of holiness and perfection. Too easily we run from this. But the Lord is faithful, and as we shall see, stands on the shore and calls us back. Would that we could say, in the words of an old Gospel song:  Goodbye world, I stay no longer with you, goodbye pleasures of sin, I stayed along with you! I’ve made up my mind to go God’s way the rest of my life! Another old gospel song from the 1940s says, No more, no more! I’ll never turn back no more! I’m going to keep on crossing till I reach the other shore. Rains may come, floods may roar, storms may race, and winds may blow, but I’ll never turn back, no more!

Would that this were the case,. But as it is, and as we shall see, the Lord keeps calling calling from the shore,  out onto the waves of our discontent.

II. Redeeming reminder - the text says, When it was already dawn, Jesus was standing on the shore; but the disciples did not realize that it was Jesus. Jesus said to them, “Children, have you caught anything to eat?” They answered him, “No.” So he said to them, “Cast the net over the right side of the boat and you will find something.” So they cast it, and were not able to pull it in because of the number of fish. So the disciple whom Jesus loved said to Peter, “It is the Lord.” When Simon Peter heard that it was the Lord, he tucked in his garment, for he was lightly clad, and jumped into the sea. The other disciples came in the boat, for they were not far from shore, only about a hundred yards, dragging the net with the fish.

The Lord stands on the shore and rehearses for them what he had done for them some three years earlier, when he called them from fishing to evangelizing. He does not excoriate them, call them fools or some other epitaph. He calls out to them, “Children…have you caught anything?!” And rather than rebuke them, he asked them to assess the data, whether the course of action they have chosen has yielded anything at all. They admit that they’ve caught nothing.

And yet, strangely, this whole incident seems familiar! For the Lord tells him to cast the net elsewhere and that they would find something. And suddenly the nets are full! Oh how this spoke to their hearts! It was just when it happened three years ago! Scripture says,

And when he had ceased speaking, he said to Simon, “Put out into the deep and let down your nets for a catch.” And Simon answered, “Master, we toiled all night and took nothing! But at your word I will let down the nets.” And when they had done this, they enclosed a great shoal of fish; and as their nets were breaking, they beckoned to their partners in the other boat to come and help them. And they came and filled both the boats, so that they began to sink. But when Simon Peter saw it, he fell down at Jesus’ knees, saying, “Depart from me, for I am a sinful man, O Lord.” For he was astonished, and all that were with him, at the catch of fish which they had taken; and so also were James and John, sons of Zebedee, who were partners with Simon. And Jesus said to Simon, “Do not be afraid; henceforth you will be catching men.” And when they had brought their boats to land, they left everything and followed him. (Luke 5:4ff)

St. John draws the obvious conclusion, “It is the Lord!”  The Lord has given them a redeeming reminder. He does not rebuke them, he has only reminded them. In effect, he says “Come out of the past! Remember the future to which I have summoned you, a future of going forth to the nations in announcing the Gospel for all to hear. Your life is not about fish, is about humanity!”

What reminders has the Lord put you in your life? How has he stood on the shore and called to you with some reminder? Perhaps it was a tattered old Bible, or perhaps an old hymn that you heard. Perhaps it was grandmother’s old rosary beads stored away in a dresser drawer. Perhaps you are summoned to a funeral or wedding.

Somehow, in moments like these, the Lord stands on the shore of  life and calls to you. He reminds you of your call, and wonders whether your present course is done anything for you whatsoever. Usually, it has not. Perhaps there is fleeting wealth or momentary popularity, but otherwise little else to show for it.

And thus, the Lord calls. He calls us back to the future, a future and a present oriented toward heaven. Since you have been raised to new life with Christ, seek the things that are above, rather than the earth below (Colossians 3:1).

Yes, Softly and tenderly Jesus is calling, calling for you and for me. See on  the portals he’s waiting and watching, watching for you and for me; Come home, come home! Ye who are weary come home! Earnestly, tenderly, Jesus is calling, calling oh sinner come home!  

Here then, is a redeeming reminder Jesus calling, softly and tenderly: come out of the past, come away from commercial fishing, look to future, the future of saving souls!

III. Reorienting Repast– the text says, When they climbed out on shore, they saw a charcoal fire with fish on it and bread. Jesus said to them, “Bring some of the fish you just caught.” So Simon Peter went over and dragged the net ashore full of one hundred fifty-three large fish. Even though there were so many, the net was not torn. Jesus said to them, “Come, have breakfast.” And none of the disciples dared to ask him, “Who are you?” because they realized it was the Lord. Jesus came over and took the bread and gave it to them, and in like manner the fish. This was now the third time Jesus was revealed to his disciples after being raised from the dead. When they had finished breakfast, Jesus said to Simon Peter, “Simon, son of John, do you love me more than these?” Simon Peter answered him, “Yes, Lord, you know that I love you.” Jesus said to him, “Feed my lambs.” He then said to Simon Peter a second time, “Simon, son of John, do you love me?” Simon Peter answered him, “Yes, Lord, you know that I love you.” Jesus said to him, “Tend my sheep.” Jesus said to him the third time, “Simon, son of John, do you love me?” Peter was distressed that Jesus had said to him a third time, “Do you love me?” and he said to him, “Lord, you know everything; you know that I love you.” Jesus said to him, “Feed my sheep.

Now in this somewhat lengthy passage, notice three basic elements whereby the Lord uses a meal, or a repast, to reorient them. To “reorient,” literally, means to turn someone back to the East, back toward the rising of the sun (Son), back toward the light and away from the dark. Re (again) +  oriens (East) = back to the East, back to the light.

Note first, the FISH are in is are plentiful numbers. But the number, 153, has significance more for humanity, then for fish. While much ink has been spilled on the significance of this number, the most likely explanation seems to be that this was the number of known nations at the time. And hence, that 153 fish are caught exactly, seems to be the Lord’s way of saying, “Not fish, but humanity, all the nations!” Hence we see that God can even use our sins, our backsliding, and turn it to  something he is called us away from, yes he can use our sins to be a teachable moment.

Notice next, the FIRE. As Peter comes onshore, we note that he sees a fire. And though the text is silent, it must’ve unnerved him! For here was a charcoal fire, the same sort of fire in the courtyard of Caiaphas the high priest wherein Peter had denied the Lord (Jn 18:18). Hurt, and unnerved by what he had done, or rather, failed to do,  Peter felt unworthy, and was still deeply troubled by the sin he committed in denying the Lord. Yes, this fire reminded him.

And yet, even his repentance is somewhat egocentric. It would seem, he wonders, “How could I have done this, I who promise the Lord to be with him even if all should rage against him!” And yet, in moment of cowardice, Peter denied the Lord. Oh yes, this fire, this charcoal fire, is bothersome indeed! The Lord stands next to it it looks to Peter much as he had done in the courtyard of Caiaphas when, after Peter denied him for the third time, the text says that Jesus turned and looked at Peter (Lk 22:61). How this fire bothered him!

And the FRANKNESS – But now ensues a tender, poignant, and powerful conversation. To us to read only English, the conversation focuses on the fact that three times, the Lord asked Peter, “Do you love me?” But in Greek, there are subtleties that we easily miss.

For the Lord does not ask Peter simply, “Do you love me?” And Peter answers, “Yes Lord, I love you.” No, the Greek text is more subtle and more specific. In Greek, the Lord asked Peter, Σίμων Ἰωάννου, ἀγαπᾷς με πλέον τούτων (Simon Joannou agapas me pleon touton? – Simon Son of John, do you Love (agapas) me more than these? ). Note therefore the request for agape love. But Peter replies, in the Greek text, κύριε, σὺ οἶδας ὅτι φιλῶ σε. (Kyrie, su oidas oti philo se – Lord, you know that I have brotherly (philo) love for you.

And thus we see, that the Lord asked for a agape love, a love that is the highest love, wherein we love God above all things, and above all people, including ourselves. But Peter does not answer, with agape love, but rather says, that he loves the Lord in a brotherly (phileo) sort of a way. And this is far short of what the Lord asked. (I realize there are debates about the Greek here, but am convinced that the two different verb forms are significant. More on the debate here: Agape vs Philo in John 21).

But despite this, the Lord has still has something important for St. Peter to do so. He says to him, despite his imperfect love, “Feed my lambs!”

A second time, the same dialogue sets up wherein the Lord asked Peter, Σίμων Ἰωάννου, ἀγαπᾷς με (Simon son of John, do you love (agapas) me?   Peter  responds, κύριε, σὺ οἶδας ὅτι φιλῶ σε (Lord you know that I have affectionate (philo = bortherly) love for you.”  But here too, the Lord had asked for unconditional, an ultimate love, but Peter can only return a lesser love, a brotherly love, a sort of affection. Yet again, the Lord does not reject Peter. He accepts what Peter has, and says to him still “Tend my sheep.”

Yet in the third  occasion, Jesus, accepting what Peter is able to offer ask him the third time, Σίμων Ἰωάννου, φιλεῖς με; (Simon, son of John, do you have affection (phileis) for me?  The third question,  which strikes Peter to the heart, causes him to exclaim that he  (only) has brotherly love. Yet again the Lord does not reject him, but rather assigns him, saying once again, feed my lambs.”

Here, is perhaps one of the most poignant, beautiful, and honest moments in Scripture. The Lord looking with love to a disciple, asking them for the highest love, and that disciple honestly answering, “I have only imperfect love to offer you.” For the first time in his life, perhaps, Peter is being absolutely honest. No more posing here, no more bragging. Only an honest answer, born in sober appreciation of his human lapses. There is nothing more beautiful than honest prayer. For honesty is a prelude to healing. Jesus accepts what Peter can offer, and as we shall see, promises him his heart will expand so that, one day, Peter will love the Lord totally, unconditionally, above all things, and above all people.

How about you? Are you hones with the Lord? Have you experienced his love in spite of your sin? Do you know he can use you even in your weakness if you are will to be hones with him?

IV–Required Remedy– the text says  Amen, amen, I say to you, when you were younger, you used to dress yourself and go where you wanted; but when you grow old, you will stretch out your hands, and someone else will dress you and lead you where you do not want to go.” He said this signifying by what kind of death he would glorify God. And when he had said this, he said to him, “Follow me.”

In this whole conversation, the Lord’s purpose is not to stalk Peter, or to badger him. Rather it is to lead him toward a necessary remedy, and point him back toward the future, a future filled with evangelical fervor, and sacrificial love. He  is week now, but the Lord will give him strength and, within ten days after his Ascension, the Holy Spirit will come and Peter will be quickened, strengthened in the faith.

But even here, the work the Lord needs to do is not finished, for the Lord speaks of the day, when Peter will finally have the grace to accept martyrdom. It will be a day, when someone will tie him fast and lead him off to where he would rather not go. But he will go! And he will die for Christ.

Finally Peter will be able to say, without any simulation or exaggeration, I love you Lord totally, with agape love, I love you above all things, above all people, and above my own very life.

For now, he is not ready, but the Lord will lead him by stages, and get him ready. Peter will one day be able to say I love you with agape, with total, with unconditional love, above all things, above all people, above my very self!

How will Peter get there? How will we get there?  The Lord says simply, “Follow me.”

So, fellow disciple, the Lord leads you to deeper love, to unconditional love, to love above all other loves! Only the Lord can do this. He did it for Peter, a hard case actually, and he can do it for you!

For now, He is standing on the shore and calling us to a richer future:


21 posted on 04/13/2013 10:30:58 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Sunday Gospel Reflections

3rd Sunday of Easter
Reading I:
Acts 5:27-32,40-41 II: Rev 5:11-14
Gospel
John 21:1-19

1 After this Jesus revealed himself again to the disciples by the Sea of Tibe'ri-as; and he revealed himself in this way.
2 Simon Peter, Thomas called the Twin, Nathan'a-el of Cana in Galilee, the sons of Zeb'edee, and two others of his disciples were together.
3 Simon Peter said to them, "I am going fishing." They said to him, "We will go with you." They went out and got into the boat; but that night they caught nothing.
4 Just as day was breaking, Jesus stood on the beach; yet the disciples did not know that it was Jesus.
5 Jesus said to them, "Children, have you any fish?" They answered him, "No."
6 He said to them, "Cast the net on the right side of the boat, and you will find some." So they cast it, and now they were not able to haul it in, for the quantity of fish.
7 That disciple whom Jesus loved said to Peter, "It is the Lord!" When Simon Peter heard that it was the Lord, he put on his clothes, for he was stripped for work, and sprang into the sea.
8 But the other disciples came in the boat, dragging the net full of fish, for they were not far from the land, but about a hundred yards off.
9 When they got out on land, they saw a charcoal fire there, with fish lying on it, and bread.
10 Jesus said to them, "Bring some of the fish that you have just caught."
11 So Simon Peter went aboard and hauled the net ashore, full of large fish, a hundred and fifty-three of them; and although there were so many, the net was not torn.
12 Jesus said to them, "Come and have breakfast." Now none of the disciples dared ask him, "Who are you?" They knew it was the Lord.
13 Jesus came and took the bread and gave it to them, and so with the fish.
14 This was now the third time that Jesus was revealed to the disciples after he was raised from the dead.
15 When they had finished breakfast, Jesus said to Simon Peter, "Simon, son of John, do you love me more than these?" He said to him, "Yes, Lord; you know that I love you." He said to him, "Feed my lambs."
16 A second time he said to him, "Simon, son of John, do you love me?" He said to him, "Yes, Lord; you know that I love you." He said to him, "Tend my sheep."
17 He said to him the third time, "Simon, son of John, do you love me?" Peter was grieved because he said to him the third time, "Do you love me?" And he said to him, "Lord, you know everything; you know that I love you." Jesus said to him, "Feed my sheep.
18 Truly, truly, I say to you, when you were young, you girded yourself and walked where you would; but when you are old, you will stretch out your hands, and another will gird you and carry you where you do not wish to go."
19 (This he said to show by what death he was to glorify God.) And after this he said to him, "Follow me."


Interesting Details
  • John's Gospel has two charcoal fire scenes. In chapter 18, Peter denied Jesus three times. In this chapter, Peter professed his love for Jesus three times. Love heals his sins and reunites him to Jesus.
  • From love comes deeds, namely feeding and tending Jesus' lambs and sheep (vv.15-17), even if the actions cost one's life (v. 18). The lambs and sheep belong to Jesus, not Peter.
  • Love also gives light: the beloved disciple recognized Jesus first (v.7). John's love also gave him advantages over Peter in other situations: John sat next to Jesus at the last supper (13:23); Peter relied on John to ask Jesus a question (13:24-25); and John, like Jesus, entered Caiapha's courtyard through the gate like a true shepherd, while Peter had to wait for John to lead him in like a sheep.
  • Regardless of an apparent pride among John's disciples about John's closeness to Jesus, they acknowledge in this appendix, chapter 21, that Jesus chose Peter to be the leader, but only after Peter professed what John has abundantly, namely love for Jesus.
  • The meal that Jesus prepares (vv.9-13) is an Eucharistic symbol. The disciples bring the whole world (153 fish) to Christ in this meal. The untorn net holding all these fish together points to a unity.

One Main Point

Out of love, Jesus' disciples are called to unite and bring the whole world to Christ in the Eucharistic celebration, where Christ feeds all.


Reflections
  1. When Jesus asks me, "Do you love me?" how would I reply?
  2. Out of love for Jesus, what does Jesus ask me to do here and now?
  3. To what extent would I accept his invitation for action?

22 posted on 04/13/2013 10:39:35 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Sunday, April 14, 2013
Third Sunday of Easter
First Reading:
Psalm:
Second Reading:
Gospel:
Acts 5:27-32, 40-41
Psalm 30:2, 4-6, 11-13
Revelation 5:11-14
John 21:1-19

When I am before the Blessed Sacrament I feel such a lively faith that I can't describe it. Christ in the Eucharist is almost tangible to me...When it is time for me to leave, I have to tear myself away from His sacred presence.

-- St Anthony of Claret


23 posted on 04/13/2013 10:49:57 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Just A Minute Just A Minute (Listen)
Some of EWTN's most popular hosts and guests in a collection of one minute inspirational messages. A different message each time you click.

24 posted on 04/13/2013 10:51:18 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

Regina Coeli

 

This prayer, which dates from the twelfth century, is substituted for the Angelus during Easter Season.

Glory to God in the highest!

In Latin

In English

Regina coeli, laetare, alleluia: Quia quem meruisti portare, alleluia. Resurrexit sicut dixit, alleluia. Ora pro nobis Deum, alleluia.

 

V. Gaude et laetare, Virgo Maria, Alleluia,

R. Quia surrexit Dominus vere, alleluia.

 

Oremus: Deus qui per resurrectionem Filii tui, Domini nostri Iesu Christi, mundum laetificare dignatus es: praesta, quaesumus, ut per eius Genetricem Virginem Mariam, perpetuae capiamus gaudia vitae. Per eundem Christum Dominum nostrum.

R. Amen.

Queen of Heaven rejoice, alleluia: For He whom you merited to bear, alleluia, Has risen as He said, alleluia. Pray for us to God, alleluia.

 

V. Rejoice and be glad, O Virgin Mary, alleluia.

R. Because the Lord is truly risen, alleluia.

 

Let us pray: O God, who by the Resurrection of Thy Son, our Lord Jesus Christ, granted joy to the whole world: grant we beseech Thee, that through the intercession of the Virgin Mary, His Mother, we may lay hold of the joys of eternal life. Through the same Christ our Lord.

R. Amen.


25 posted on 04/13/2013 10:53:40 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Salvation
John
  English: Douay-Rheims Latin: Vulgata Clementina Greek NT: Byzantine/Majority Text (2000)
  John 21
1 AFTER this, Jesus shewed himself again to the disciples at the sea of Tiberias. And he shewed himself after this manner. Postea manifestavit se iterum Jesus discipulis ad mare Tiberiadis. Manifestavit autem sic : μετα ταυτα εφανερωσεν εαυτον παλιν ο ιησους τοις μαθηταις [αυτου] επι της θαλασσης της τιβεριαδος εφανερωσεν δε ουτως
2 There were together Simon Peter, and Thomas, who is called Didymus, and Nathanael, who was of Cana of Galilee, and the sons of Zebedee, and two others of his disciples. erant simul Simon Petrus, et Thomas, qui dicitur Didymus, et Nathanaël, qui erat a Cana Galilææ, et filii Zebedæi, et alii ex discipulis ejus duo. ησαν ομου σιμων πετρος και θωμας ο λεγομενος διδυμος και ναθαναηλ ο απο κανα της γαλιλαιας και οι του ζεβεδαιου και αλλοι εκ των μαθητων αυτου δυο
3 Simon Peter saith to them: I go a fishing. They say to him: We also come with thee. And they went forth, and entered into the ship: and that night they caught nothing. Dicit eis Simon Petrus : Vado piscari. Dicunt ei : Venimus et nos tecum. Et exierunt, et ascenderunt in navim : et illa nocte nihil prendiderunt. λεγει αυτοις σιμων πετρος υπαγω αλιευειν λεγουσιν αυτω ερχομεθα και ημεις συν σοι εξηλθον και ενεβησαν εις το πλοιον ευθυς και εν εκεινη τη νυκτι επιασαν ουδεν
4 But when the morning was come, Jesus stood on the shore: yet the disciples knew not that it was Jesus. Mane autem facto stetit Jesus in littore : non tamen cognoverunt discipuli quia Jesus est. πρωιας δε ηδη γενομενης εστη ο ιησους εις τον αιγιαλον ου μεντοι ηδεισαν οι μαθηται οτι ιησους εστιν
5 Jesus therefore said to them: Children, have you any meat? They answered him: No. Dixit ergo eis Jesus : Pueri, numquid pulmentarium habetis ? Responderunt ei : Non. λεγει ουν αυτοις ο ιησους παιδια μη τι προσφαγιον εχετε απεκριθησαν αυτω ου
6 He saith to them: Cast the net on the right side of the ship, and you shall find. They cast therefore; and now they were not able to draw it, for the multitude of fishes. Dicit eis : Mittite in dexteram navigii rete, et invenietis. Miserunt ergo : et jam non valebant illud trahere præ multitudine piscium. ο δε ειπεν αυτοις βαλετε εις τα δεξια μερη του πλοιου το δικτυον και ευρησετε εβαλον ουν και ουκετι αυτο ελκυσαι ισχυσαν απο του πληθους των ιχθυων
7 That disciple therefore whom Jesus loved, said to Peter: It is the Lord. Simon Peter, when he heard that it was the Lord, girt his coat about him, (for he was naked,) and cast himself into the sea. Dixit ergo discipulus ille, quem diligebat Jesus, Petro : Dominus est. Simon Petrus cum audisset quia Dominus est, tunica succinxit se (erat enim nudus) et misit se in mare. λεγει ουν ο μαθητης εκεινος ον ηγαπα ο ιησους τω πετρω ο κυριος εστιν σιμων ουν πετρος ακουσας οτι ο κυριος εστιν τον επενδυτην διεζωσατο ην γαρ γυμνος και εβαλεν εαυτον εις την θαλασσαν
8 But the other disciples came in the ship, (for they were not far from the land, but as it were two hundred cubits,) dragging the net with fishes. Alii autem discipuli navigio venerunt (non enim longe erant a terra, sed quasi cubitis ducentis), trahentes rete piscium. οι δε αλλοι μαθηται τω πλοιαριω ηλθον ου γαρ ησαν μακραν απο της γης αλλ ως απο πηχων διακοσιων συροντες το δικτυον των ιχθυων
9 As soon then as they came to land, they saw hot coals lying, and a fish laid thereon, and bread. Ut ergo descenderunt in terram, viderunt prunas positas, et piscem superpositum, et panem. ως ουν απεβησαν εις την γην βλεπουσιν ανθρακιαν κειμενην και οψαριον επικειμενον και αρτον
10 Jesus saith to them: Bring hither of the fishes which you have now caught. Dicit eis Jesus : Afferte de piscibus, quos prendidistis nunc. λεγει αυτοις ο ιησους ενεγκατε απο των οψαριων ων επιασατε νυν
11 Simon Peter went up, and drew the net to land, full of great fishes, one hundred and fifty-three. And although there were so many, the net was not broken. Ascendit Simon Petrus et traxit rete in terram, plenum magnis piscibus centum quinquaginta tribus. Et cum tanti essent, non est scissum rete. ανεβη σιμων πετρος και ειλκυσεν το δικτυον επι της γης μεστον ιχθυων μεγαλων εκατον πεντηκοντα τριων και τοσουτων οντων ουκ εσχισθη το δικτυον
12 Jesus saith to them: Come, and dine. And none of them who were at meat, durst ask him: Who art thou? knowing that it was the Lord. Dicit eis Jesus : Venite, prandete. Et nemo audebat discumbentium interrogare eum : Tu quis es ? scientes, quia Dominus est. λεγει αυτοις ο ιησους δευτε αριστησατε ουδεις δε ετολμα των μαθητων εξετασαι αυτον συ τις ει ειδοτες οτι ο κυριος εστιν
13 And Jesus cometh and taketh bread, and giveth them, and fish in like manner. Et venit Jesus, et accipit panem, et dat eis, et piscem similiter. ερχεται ουν ο ιησους και λαμβανει τον αρτον και διδωσιν αυτοις και το οψαριον ομοιως
14 This is now the third time that Jesus was manifested to his disciples, after he was risen from the dead. Hoc jam tertio manifestatus est Jesus discipulis suis cum resurrexisset a mortuis. τουτο ηδη τριτον εφανερωθη ο ιησους τοις μαθηταις αυτου εγερθεις εκ νεκρων
15 When therefore they had dined, Jesus saith to Simon Peter: Simon son of John, lovest thou me more than these? He saith to him: Yea, Lord, thou knowest that I love thee. He saith to him: Feed my lambs. Cum ergo prandissent, dicit Simoni Petro Jesus : Simon Joannis, diligis me plus his ? Dicit ei : Etiam Domine, tu scis quia amo te. Dicit ei : Pasce agnos meos. οτε ουν ηριστησαν λεγει τω σιμωνι πετρω ο ιησους σιμων ιωνα αγαπας με πλειον τουτων λεγει αυτω ναι κυριε συ οιδας οτι φιλω σε λεγει αυτω βοσκε τα αρνια μου
16 He saith to him again: Simon, son of John, lovest thou me? He saith to him: Yea, Lord, thou knowest that I love thee. He saith to him: Feed my lambs. Dicit ei iterum : Simon Joannis, diligis me ? Ait illi : Etiam Domine, tu scis quia amo te. Dicit ei : Pasce agnos meos. λεγει αυτω παλιν δευτερον σιμων ιωνα αγαπας με λεγει αυτω ναι κυριε συ οιδας οτι φιλω σε λεγει αυτω ποιμαινε τα προβατα μου
17 He said to him the third time: Simon, son of John, lovest thou me? Peter was grieved, because he had said to him the third time: Lovest thou me? And he said to him: Lord, thou knowest all things: thou knowest that I love thee. He said to him: Feed my sheep. Dicit ei tertio : Simon Joannis, amas me ? Contristatus est Petrus, quia dixit ei tertio : Amas me ? et dixit ei : Domine, tu omnia nosti, tu scis quia amo te. Dixit ei : Pasce oves meas. λεγει αυτω το τριτον σιμων ιωνα φιλεις με ελυπηθη ο πετρος οτι ειπεν αυτω το τριτον φιλεις με και ειπεν αυτω κυριε συ παντα οιδας συ γινωσκεις οτι φιλω σε λεγει αυτω ο ιησους βοσκε τα προβατα μου
18 Amen, amen I say to thee, when thou wast younger, thou didst gird thyself, and didst walk where thou wouldst. But when thou shalt be old, thou shalt stretch forth thy hands, and another shall gird thee, and lead thee whither thou wouldst not. Amen, amen dico tibi : cum esses junior, cingebas te, et ambulabas ubi volebas : cum autem senueris, extendes manus tuas, et alius te cinget, et ducet quo tu non vis. αμην αμην λεγω σοι οτε ης νεωτερος εζωννυες σεαυτον και περιεπατεις οπου ηθελες οταν δε γηρασης εκτενεις τας χειρας σου και αλλος σε ζωσει και οισει οπου ου θελεις
19 And this he said, signifying by what death he should glorify God. And when he had said this, he saith to him: Follow me. Hoc autem dixit significans qua morte clarificaturus esset Deum. Et cum hoc dixisset, dicit ei : Sequere me. τουτο δε ειπεν σημαινων ποιω θανατω δοξασει τον θεον και τουτο ειπων λεγει αυτω ακολουθει μοι

Two aspects of this passage do not translate well.

The first two times Christ asks "lovest thou me" using the verb "agapo", "αγαπας με", yet St. Peter responds using a different verb, "φιλω σε". The third time both Jesus and St. Peter use the second verb, "φιλεις με" -- "φιλω σε". The former verb indicates a spiritual love, and the second, friendship.

The three charges are all worded differently (the English translation only picks up two variations). "βοσκε τα αρνια μου" is "feed my lambs", "ποιμαινε τα προβατα μου" is "shepherd (guide) my sheep", and finally "βοσκε τα προβατα μου" -- "feed my sheep"

26 posted on 04/14/2013 12:06:56 PM PDT by annalex (fear them not)
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To: annalex
1. After these things Jesus showed himself again to the disciples at the sea of Tiberias; and on this wise showed he himself.
2. There were together Simon Peter, and Thomas called Didymus, and Nathaniel of Cana in Galilee and the sons of Zebedee, and two other of his disciples.
3. Simon Peter says to them, I go a fishing They say to him, We also go with you. They went forth, and entered into a ship immediately; and that night they caught nothing.
4. But when the morning was now come, Jesus stood on the shore: but the disciples knew not that it was Jesus.
5. Then Jesus says to them, Children, have you any meat? They answered him, No.
6. And he said to them, Cast the net on the right side of the ship, and you shall find. They cast therefore, and now they were not able to draw it for the multitude of fishes.
7. Therefore that disciple whom Jesus love says to Peter, It is the Lord. Now when Simon Peter heard that it was the Lord, he girt his fisher's coat to him, (for he was naked,) and did cast himself into the sea.
8. And the other disciples came in a little ship, (for they were not far from land, but as it were two hundred cubits,) dragging the net with fishes.
9. As soon then as they were come to land, they saw a fire of coals there, and fish laid thereon, and bread.
10. Jesus says to them, Bring of the fish which you have now caught.
11. Simon Peter went up, and drew the net to land full of great fishes, an hundred and fifty and three: and for all there were so many, yet was not the net broken.

AUG. The preceding words of the Evangelist seem to indicate the end of the book, but He goes on farther to give an account of our Lord's appearance by the sea of Tiberias: After these things Jesus showed Himself again to the disciples at the sea of Tiberias.

CHRYS. He says, Afterwards, because He did not go continually with His disciples as before; and, manifested Himself, because His body being incorruptible, it was a condescension to allow Himself to be seen. He mentions the place, to show that our Lord had taken away a good deal of their fear, and that they no longer kept within doors, though they had gone to Galilee to avoid the persecution of the Jews.

BEDE. The Evangelist, after his wont, first states the thing itself, and then says how it took place: And on this wise showed He Himself.

CHRYS. As our Lord was not with them regularly, and the Spirit was as not given them, and they had received no commission, and had nothing to do, they followed the trade of fishermen: And on this wise showed He Himself. There were together Simon Peter, and Thomas called Didymus, and Nathaniel of Cana in Galilee he who was called by Philip and the sons of Zebedee, i.e. James and John, and two other of His disciples.

Simon Peter says to them, I go a fishing.

GREG. It may be asked, why Peter, who was a fisherman before his conversion, returned to fishing, when it is said, No man putting his hand to the plow, and looking back, is fit for the kingdom of God.

AUG. If the disciples had done this after the death of Jesus, and before His resurrection, we should have imagined that they did it in despair. But now after that He has risen from the grave, after seeing the marks of His wounds, after receiving, by means of His breathing, the Holy Ghost, all at once they become what they were before, fishers, not of men, but of fishes. We must remember then that they were not forbidden by their Apostleship from earning their livelihood by a lawful craft, provided they had no other means of living. For if the blessed Paul used not that power which he had with the rest of the preachers of the Gospel, as they did, but went a warfare upon his own resources, lest the Gentiles, who were aliens from the name of Christ, might be offended at a doctrine apparently venal; if, educated in another way, he learnt a craft he never knew before, that, while the teacher worked with his own hands, the hearer might not be burdened much more might Peter, who had been a fisherman, work at what he knew, if he had nothing else to live upon at the time. But how had he not, some one will ask, when our Lord promises, Seek you first the kingdom of God and His righteousness, and all these things shall be added to you? Our Lord, we answer, fulfilled this promise, by bringing them the fishes to catch: for who else brought them? He did not bring upon them that poverty which obliged them to go fishing, except in order to exhibit a miracle.

GREG. The craft which was exercised without sin before conversion, was no sin after it. Wherefore after his conversion Peter returned to fishing; but Matthew sat not down again for the receipt? of custom. For there are some businesses which cannot or it can hardly be carried on without sin; and these cannot be returned to after conversion.

CHRYS. The other disciples followed Peter: They say to him, We also go with you; for from this time they were all bound together; and they wished too to see the fishing: They went forth and entered into a ship immediately. And that night they caught nothing. They fished in the night, from fear.

GREG. The fishing was made to be very unlucky, in order to raise their astonishment at the miracle after: And that night they caught nothing

CHRYS. In the midst of their labor and distress, Jesus presented Himself to them: But when the morning was now come, Jesus stood on the shore: but the disciples knew not that it was Jesus.

He did not make Himself known to them immediately, but entered into conversation; and first He speak after human fashion: Then Jesus says to them, Children, have you any meat? as if He wished to beg some of them. They answered, No.

He then gives them a sign to know Him by: And He said to them, Cast the net on the right side of the ship, and you shall find. They cast therefore, and now they were not able to draw it for the multitude of fishes. The recognition of Him brings out Peter and John in their different tempers of mind; the one fervid, the other sublime; the one ready, the other penetrating.

John is the first to recognize our Lord: Therefore that disciple whom Jesus loved says to Peter, It is the Lord; Peter is the first to come to Him: Now when Simon Peter heard that it was the Lord, he girt his fisher's coat to Him, for he was naked.

BEDE. The Evangelist alludes to himself here the same way he always does. He recognized our Lord either by the miracle, or by the sound of His voice, or the association of former occasions on which He found them fishing. Peter was naked in comparison with the usual dress he wore, in the sense in which we say to a person whom we meet thinly clad, You are quite bare. Peter was bare for convenience sake, as fishermen are in fishing.

THEOPHYL. Peter's girding himself is a sign of modesty. He girt himself with a linen coat, such as Thamian and Tyrian fishermen throw over them, when they have nothing else on, or even over their other clothes.

BEDE. He went to Jesus with the ardor with which he did every thing: And cast himself into the sea.

And the other disciples came in a little ship. We must not understand here that Peter walked on the top of the water, but either swam, or walked through the water, being very near the land: For they were not far from land, but as it were about two hundred cubits,

GLOSS. Parenthesis; for it follows, dragging the net with fishes. The order is, The other disciples came in a little ship, dragging the net with fishes.

CHRYS. Another miracle follows: As soon then as they were come to land, they saw a fire of coals there, and fish laid thereon, and bread. He no longer works upon already existing materials, but in a still more wonderful way; showing that it was only in condescension that He wrought His miracles upon existing matter before His crucified.

AUG. We must not understand that the bread was laid on the coals, but read it as if it stood, They saw a fire of coals there, and fish laid on the coals; and they saw bread.

THEOPHYL. To show that it was no vision, He bade them take of the fish they had caught. Jesus says to them, Bring of the fish which you have now caught.

Another miracle follows of viz. that the net was not broken by the number of fish: Simon Peter went up, and drew the net to land full of great fishes, a hundred and fifty and three: and for all there were so many, yet was not the net broken.

AUG. Mystically, in the draught of fishes He signified the mystery of the Church, a such as it will be at the final resurrection of the dead. And to make this clearer, it is put near the end of the book. The number seven, which is the number of the disciples who were fishing, signifies the end of time; for time is counted by periods of seven days.

THEOPHYL. In the night time before the presence of the sun, Christ, the Prophets took nothing; for though they endeavored to correct the people, yet these often fell into idolatry.

GREG. It may be asked, why after His resurrection He stood on the shore to receive the disciples, whereas before He walked on the sea? The sea signifies the world, which is tossed about with various causes of tumults, and the waves of this corruptible life; the shore by its solidity figures the rest eternal. The disciples then, inasmuch as they were still upon the waves of this mortal life, were laboring on the sea; but the Redeemer having by His resurrection thrown off the corruption of the flesh, stood upon the shore.

AUG. The shore is the end of the sea, and therefore signifies the end of the world. The Church is here typified as she will be at the end of the world, just as other draughts of fishes typified her as she is now. Jesus before did not stand on the shore, but went into a ship which was Simon's, and asked him to put out a little from the land.

In a former draught the nets are not thrown to the right, or to the left, so that the good or the bad should be typified alone, but indifferently: Let down your nets for a draught, meaning that the good and bad were mixed together. But here it is, Cast the net on the right side of the ship; to signify those who should stand on the right hand, the good. The one our Lord did at the beginning of His ministry, the other after His resurrection, strewing therein that the former draught of fishes signified the mixture of bad and good, which composes the Church at present; the latter the good alone, which it will contain in eternity, when the world is ended, and the resurrection of the dead completed.

But they who belong to the resurrection of life, i.e. to the right hand, and are caught within the net of the Christian name, shall only appear on the shore, i.e. at the end of the world, after the resurrection: wherefore they were not able to draw the net into the ship, and unload the fishes, as they were before. The Church keeps these of the right hand, after death, in the sleep of peace, as it were in the deep, till the net come to shore. That the first draught was taken in two little ships, the last two hundred cubits from land, a hundred and a hundred, typifies, I think, the two classes of elect, circumcised and uncircumcised.

BEDE. By the two hundred cubits is signified the twofold grace of love; the love of God and the love of our neighbor; for by them we approach to Christ. The fish broiled is Christ who suffered. He deigned to be hid in the waters of human nature, and to be taken in the net of our night; and having become a fish by the taking of humanity, became bread to refresh us by His divinity.

GREG. To Peter was the holy Church committed; to him is it specially said, Feed My sheep. That then which is afterwards declared by word, is now signified by act. He it is who draws the fishes to the firm shore, because he it was who pointed out the stability of the eternal country to the faithful. This he did by word of mouth, by epistles; this he does daily by signs and miracles. After saying that the net was full of great fishes, the number follows: Full of great fishes, one hundred and fifty and three.

AUG. In the draught before, the number of the fishes is not mentioned, as if in fulfillment of the prophecy in the Psalm, If I should declare them, and speak of them, they should be more than l am able to express, but here there is a certain number mentioned, which we must explain.

The number which signifies the law is ten, from the ten Commandments. But when to the law is joined grace, to the letter spirit, the number seven is brought in, that being the number which represents the Holy Spirit, to Whom sanctification properly belongs. For sanctification was first heard of in the law, with respect to the seventh day; and Isaiah praises the Holy Spirit for His sevenfold work and office. The seven of the Spirit added to the ten of the law make seventeen, and the numbers from one up to seventeen when added together, make a hundred and fifty-three.

GREG. Seven and ten multiplied by three make fifty-one. The fiftieth year was a year of rest to the whole people from all their work. In unity is true rest; for where division is, true rest cannot be.

AUG. It is not then signified that only a hundred and fifty-three saints are to rise again to eternal life, but this number represents all who partake of the grace of the Holy Spirit. which number too contains three fifties, and three over, with reference to the mystery of the Trinity. And the number fifty is made up of seven sevens, and one in addition, signifying that those sevens are one.

That they were great fishes too, is not without meaning. For when our Lord says, I came not to destroy the law, but to fulfill, by giving, that is, the Holy Spirit through Whom the law can be fulfilled, He says almost immediately after, Whosoever shall do and teach them, the same shall be called great in the kingdom of hearer. In the first draught the net was broken, to signify schisms; but here to show that in that perfect peace of the blessed there would be no schisms, the Evangelist continues: And for all they were so great, yet was not the net broken; as if alluding to the case before, in which it was broken, and making a favorable comparison.

12. Jesus says to them, Come and dine. And none of the disciples dare ask him, Who are you? knowing that it was the Lord.
13. Jesus then comes, and takes bread and gives them, and fish likewise.
14. This is now the third time that Jesus showed himself to his disciples, after that he was risen from the dead.

AUG. The fishing being over, our Lord invites them to dine: Jesus says to them, Come and dine.

CHRYS. John does not say that He ate with them, but Luke does. He ate however not to satisfy the wants of nature, but to show the reality of His resurrection.

AUG. The bodies of the just, when they rise again, shall need neither the word of life that they die not of disease, or old age, nor any bodily nourishment to prevent hunger and thirst. For they shall be endowed with a sure and inviolable gift of immortality, that they shall not eat of necessity, but only be able to eat if they will. Not the power, but the need of eating and drinking shall be taken away from them; in like manner as our Savior after His resurrection took meat and drink with His disciples, with spiritual but still real flesh, not for the sake of nourishment, but in exercise of a power.

And none of His disciples dare ask Him, who are you? knowing that it was the Lord.

AUG. No one dared to doubt that it was He, much less deny it; so evident was it. Had any one doubted, he would have asked.

CHRYS. He means that they had not confidence to talk to Him, as before, but sat looking at Him in silence and awe, absorbed in regarding His altered and now supernatural form, and unwilling to ask any question. Knowing that it was the Lord, they were in fear, and only ate what, in exercise of His great power, He had created. He again does not look up to heaven, or do anything after a human sort, thus strewing that His former acts of that kind were done only in condescension: Jesus then comes, and takes bread, and gives them, and fish likewise.

AUG. Mystically, the fried fish is Christ Who suffered. And He is the bread that came down from heaven. To Him the Church is united to His body for participation of eternal bliss. Wherefore He says, Bring of the fishes which you have now caught; to signify that all of us who have this hope, and are in that septenary number of disciples, which represents the universal Church here, partake of this great sacrament, and are admitted to this bliss.

GREG. By holding this last feast with seven disciples, he declares that they only who are full of the sevenfold grace of the Holy Spirit, shall be with Him in the eternal feast. Time also is reckoned by periods of seven days, and perfection is often designated by the number seven. They therefore feast upon the presence of the Truth in that last banquet, who now strive for perfection.

CHRYS. Inasmuch, however, as He did not converse with them regularly, or in the same way as before, the Evangelist adds, This is now the third time that Jesus showed Himself to His disciples, after that He was risen from the dead.

AUG. Which has reference not to manifestations, but to days; i.e. the first day after He had risen, eight days after that, when Thomas saw and believed, and this day at the draught of fishes; and thenceforward as often as He sew them, up to the time of His ascension.

AUG . We find in the four Evangelists then occasions mentioned; on which our Lord was seen after His resurrection: one at the sepulcher by the women; a second by the one omen returning from the sepulcher; a third by Peter; a fourth by the two going to Emmaus; a fifth in Jerusalem, when Thomas was not present; a sixth when Thomas saw Him; a seventh at the sea of Tiberias; an eighth by all the eleven on a mountain of Galilee, mentioned by Matthew; a ninth when for the last time He sat at meat with the disciples; a tenth when He was seen no longer upon earth, but high up on a cloud.

15. So when they had dined, Jesus says to Simon Peter, Simon, son of Jonas, love you me more than these? He says to him, Yea, Lord; you know that I love you. He says to him, Feed my lambs.
16. He says to him again the second time, Simon, son of Jonas, love you me? He says to him, Yea, Lord; you know that I love you. He says, to him, Feed my sheep.
17. He says to him the third time, Simon, son of Jonas, love you me? Peter was grieved because he said to him the third time, Love you me? And he said to him, Lord, you know all things you know that I love you. Jesus says to him, Feed my sheep.

THEOPHYL. The dinner being ended, He commits to Peter the superintendence over the sheep of the world, not to the others: So when they had dined, Jesus says to Simon Peter, Simon, son of Jonas, Do love you Me more than these do?

AUG. Our Lord asked this, knowing it: He knew that Peter not only loved Him, but loved Him more than all the rest.

ALCUIN. He is called Simon, son of John, John being his natural father. But mystically, Simon is obedience, John grace, a name well befitting him who was so obedient to God's grace, that he loved our Lord more ardently than any of the others. Such virtue arising from divine gift, not mere human will.

AUG. While our Lord was being condemned to death, he feared, and denied Him. But by His resurrection Christ implanted love in his heart, and drove away fear. Peter denied, because he feared to die: but when our Lord was risen from the dead, and by His death destroyed death, what should he fear? He says to Him, Yea, Lord; you know that 1 love You. On this confession of his love, our Lord commends His sheep to him: He says to him, Feed My lambs. as if there were no way of Peter's showing his love for Him, but by being a faithful shepherd, under the chief Shepherd.

CHRYS. That which most of all attracts the Divine love is care and love for our neighbor. Our Lord passing by the rest, addresses this command to Peter: he being the chief of the Apostles, the mouth of the disciples, and head of the college. Our Lord remembers no more his sin in denying Him, or brings that as a charge against him, but commits to him at once the superintendence over his brethren. If you love Me, have rule over your brethren, show forth that love which you have evidenced throughout, and that life which you said you would lay down for Me, lay down for the sheep.

He says to him again the second time, Simon, son of Jonas, love you Me? He says to Him, Yea, Lord; you know that I love You. Well does He say to Peter, Love you Me, and Peter answer, Amo Te, and our Lord replies again, Feed My lambs. Whereby, it appears that amor and dilectio are the same thing: especially as our Lord the third time He speaks does not say, Diligis Me, but Amas Me.

He says to him the third time, Simon, son of Jonas, love you Me? A third time our Lord asks Peter whether he loves Him. Three confessions are made to answer to the three denials; that the tongue might show as much love as it had fear, and life gained draw out the voice as much as death threatened.

CHRYS. A third time He asks the same question, and gives the same command; to show of what importance He esteems the superintendence of His own sheep, and how He regards it as the greatest proof of love to Him.

THEOPHYL. Thence is taken the custom of threefold confession in baptism.

CHRYS. The question asked for the third time disturbed him: Peter was grieved because He said to him the third time, Love you Me? He was afraid perhaps of receiving a reproof again for professing to love more than he did. So he appeals to Christ Himself: And he said to Him, Lord, you know all things, i.e. the secrets of the heart, present and to come.

AUG. He was grieved because he was asked so often by Him Who knew what He asked, and gave the answer. He replies therefore from his inmost heart; you know that I love You.

AUG. He says no more, He only replies what he knew himself; he knew he loved Him; whether any else loved Him he could not tell, as he could not see into another's heart: Jesus says to him, Feed My sheep; as if to say, Be it the office of love to feed the Lord's flock, as it was the resolution of fear to deny the Shepherd.

THEOPHYL. There is a difference perhaps between lambs and sheep. The lambs are those just initiated, the sheep are the perfected.

ALCUIN. To feed the sheep is to support the believers in Christ from falling from the faith, to provide earthly sustenance for those under us, to preach and exemplify withal our preaching by our lives, to resist adversaries, to correct wanderers.

AUG. They who feed Christ's sheep, as if they were their own, not Christ's, show plainly that they love themselves, not Christ; that they are moved by lust of glory, power, gain, not by the love of obeying, ministering, pleasing God. Let us love therefore, not ourselves, but Him, and in feeding His sheep, seek not our own, but the things which are His. For whoso loves himself, not God, loves not himself: man that cannot live of himself, must die by loving himself; and he cannot love himself, who loves himself to his own destruction. Whereas when He by Whom we live is loved, we love ourselves the more, because we do not love ourselves; because we do not love ourselves in order that we may love Him by Whom we live

AUG. But unfaithful servants arose, who divided Christ's flock, and handed down the division to their successors: and you hear them say, Those sheep are mine, what seek you with my sheep, I will not let you come to my sheep. If we call our sheep ours, as they call them theirs, Christ has lost His sheep.

18. Verily, verily, I say to you, When you were young, you girded yourself, and walked where you would: but when you shall be old, you shall stretch forth your hands, and another shall gird you, and carry you whither you would not.
19a. This spoke he, signifying by what death he should glorify God.

CHRYS. Our Lord having made Peter declare his love, informs him of his future martyrdom; an intimation to us how we should love: Verily, verily, I say to you, When you were young, you girded yourself, and walked where you would. He reminds him of his former life, because, whereas in worldly matters a young man has powers, an old man none; in spiritual things, on the contrary, virtue is brighter, manliness stronger, in old age; age is no hindrance to grace. Peter had all along desired to share Christ's dangers; so Christ tells him, Be of good cheer; I will fulfill your desire in such a way, that what you has not suffered when young, you shall suffer when old: But when you are old. Whence it appears, that he was then neither a young nor an old man, but in the prime of life.

ORIGEN. It is not easy to find any ready to pass at once from this life; and so he says to Peter, When you are old, you shall stretch forth your hand.

AUG. That is, shall be crucified. And to come to this end, Another shall gird you, and carry you where you would not. First He said what would come to pass, secondly, how it would come to pass. For it was not when crucified, but when about to be crucified, that he was led where he would not. He wished to be released from the body, and be with Christ; but, if it were possible, he wished to attain to eternal life without the pains of death; to which he went against his will, but conquered by the force of his will, and triumphing over the human feeling, so natural a one, that even old age could not deprive Peter of it. But whatever be the pain of death, it ought to be conquered by the strength of love for Him, Who being our life, voluntarily also underwent death for us. For if there is no pain in death, or very little, the glory of martyrdom would not be great.

CHRYS. He says, Where you would not, with reference to the natural reluctance of the soul to be separated from the body; an instinct implanted by God to prevent men putting an end to themselves.

Then raising the subject, the Evangelist says, This spoke He, signifying by what death he should glorify God: not, should die: he expresses himself so, to intimate that to suffer for Christ was the glory of the sufferer. But unless the mind is persuaded that He is very God, the sight of Him can in no way enable us to endure death. Wherefore the death of the saints is certainty of divine glory.

AUG. He who denied and loved, died in perfect love for Him, for Whom he had promised to die with wrong haste. It was necessary that Christ should first die for Peter's salvation, and then Peter die for Christ's Gospel.

19b. And when he had spoken this, he says to him, Follow me.

AUG. Our Lord having foretold to Peter by what hat death he should glorify God, bids him follow Him. And when He had spoken this, He says to him, Follow Me. Why does He say, Follow Me, to Peter, and not to the others who were present, who as disciples were following their Master? Or if we understand it of his martyrdom, was Peter the only one who died for the Christian truth? Was not James put to death by Herod? Some one will say that James was not crucified, and that this was fitly addressed to Peter, because he not only died, but suffered the death of the cross, as Christ did.

Catena Aurea John 21
27 posted on 04/14/2013 12:07:23 PM PDT by annalex (fear them not)
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To: annalex


Appearence on Lake Tiberias

Duccio di Buoninsegna

1308-11
Tempera on wood, 36,5 x 47,5 cm
Museo dell'Opera del Duomo, Siena

28 posted on 04/14/2013 12:07:48 PM PDT by annalex (fear them not)
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To: annalex


The Stefaneschi Triptych: Martyrdom of Peter

Giotto di Bondone

c. 1330
Tempera on panel
Pinacoteca, Vatican

29 posted on 04/14/2013 12:08:13 PM PDT by annalex (fear them not)
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To: annalex


Christ's Charge to Peter

Raphael

1515
Distemper on paper, canvas backing, approx. 3 yd x 5 yd
(cartoon for a tapestry)
Victoria and Albert Museum, London

30 posted on 04/14/2013 12:08:40 PM PDT by annalex (fear them not)
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To: All


Information:
Sts. Tiburtius, Valerian, Maximus
Feast Day: April 14

31 posted on 04/14/2013 3:34:39 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Interactive Saints for Kids

Blessed Lidwina

Feast Day: April 14
Born: 1380 :: Died: 1433

Lidwina was born at Schiedam in Holland. The name Lidwina means "suffering." Her parents were poor folk. Lidwina was quite young, when a deep affection for Our Lady of Schiedam began to grow in her heart. When she was fifteen, Lidwina gave herself completely to God.

She may have become a nun later, but when she was sixteen, in a single afternoon, her whole life changed. Lidwina went skating with her friends and one of them accidentally bumped her. Lidwina fell down hard on the ice and broke a rib. She was in great pain.

But that fall brought other problems, too. In the days ahead, she had very bad headaches, nausea, fever, thirst and her whole body hurt badly.

Crying, Lidwina told her father she could not bear the pain anymore. But the pain got even worse. Sores began to form on her face and body. She also became blind in one eye. Finally, she got paralyzed and could no longer leave her bed.

Lidwina was upset and bitter. Why had God let this happen to her? What did he want from her? And what could she still give to him anyway?

Her parish priest, Father John, came to visit and pray with her. He helped her think of what Jesus had suffered. She began to realize the beautiful gift that she would give to Jesus: she would suffer for him. She would offer her sufferings to console him, who had suffered so much on the cross. Her suffering became a beautiful prayer to God.

For thirty-eight years, Lidwina suffered. It seemed impossible that she could remain alive in such serious condition. But she did. God comforted her in many ways. Lidwina was good to everyone who came to her poor little room. She prayed to God and suffered for their special intentions. They knew God would listen to Lidwina.

Lidwina's special love was for Jesus in the Holy Eucharist. For many years, she seemed to live only on Holy Communion. She saw visions of Heaven and Purgatory and Christ’s Passion. She was also visited by saints.

Miracles took place at her bedside and some people said she was possessed by evil spirits. She became completely blind for the last seven years of her life. She had a beautiful final vision of Jesus giving her Holy Communion shortly before she died.

Reflection: Let us pray today for a heart that is able to give thanks to God when suffering comes our way.


32 posted on 04/14/2013 3:42:15 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Catholic Culture

Daily Readings for: April 14, 2013
(Readings on USCCB website)

Collect: May your people exult for ever, O God, in renewed youthfulness of spirit, so that, rejoicing now in the restored glory of our adoption, we may look forward in confident hope to the rejoicing of the day of resurrection. Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son, who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.

Easter: April 14th

Third Sunday of Easter

Old Calendar: Second Sunday after Easter

"When it was already dawn, Jesus was standing on the shore; but the disciples did not realize that it was Jesus." For the third time Jesus appears to His disciples and on the lake of Genesareth renews the miraculous draught of fishes. The Fathers did not fail to see in the one hundred and fifty-three great fishes that Peter brought to land the neophytes born to supernatural life in the waters of baptism and brought by Peter to the feet of the risen Christ.

Click here for commentary on the readings in the Extraordinary Form of the Roman Rite.


Sunday Readings
The first reading is taken from the Acts of the Apostles, 5:27-32, 40b-41. The Apostles' failure to obey the Sanhedrin is obviously not due to pride or to their not knowing their place; the Sanhedrin is imposing a ruling which would have them go against God's law and their own conscience.

The second reading is from the Book of Revelation, 5:11-14. The host of angels around the throne act as a kind of guard of honor proclaiming the sublime perfection of Christ the Lamb; they list seven attributes which all point to the fact that he has everything that belongs to the Godhead.

The Gospel is from St. John, 21:1-19, The primary purpose in recounting this appearance of the Risen Christ to his Apostles, was to stress the actual conferring of the Primacy on Peter. From this very first meeting with Christ at the Jordan (Jn. 1:42) the Savior had told him that his name Simon bar-Jonah would be changed to Cephas, which means Rock. Some year or so later, at Caesarea Philippi, this change took place when Christ said to Simon, "You are (Peter) Rock. and upon this Rock I will build my Church . . . and I will give you the keys of the kingdom of heaven" (Matt. 16:18-19).

This promise, that Simon would be the foundation, the source of strength and unity, in the new Christian community, was made factual on the occasion described here by John. Christ uses a new metaphor—Simon (Peter) is to be the new shepherd—he would take the place of Christ, as head and director of the Christian flock. He would provide protection and pasturage for Christ's sheep and lambs. He would, in other words, be the keeper and head of Christ's Church.

That this position of authority was recognized by his fellow Apostles and by the first Christians, is evident in almost every page of the Acts—the book which describes the infant Church. It was Peter who presided at the election of Matthias, who succeeded Judas in the apostolic college (Acts 1:15-26): he gave the first Christian sermon after the descent of the Holy Spirit (2: 14-40); he worked the first recorded miracle wrought by any Apostle (3:1-11); he pronounced sentence on Ananiah and Sapphira (5:1-11); it was he who received the first Gentile convert into the Church (11:1-18) and it was he who defended Paul's action at the Council of Jerusalem (15:6-11).

In face of such evidence no serious historian can doubt but that the other Apostles and the first Christians saw in Peter the living head of the Church, the representative of Christ. The Church in the succeeding generations and centuries saw the successor of Peter, and the living representative of Christ in the occupant of the See of Rome, the bishopric held by Peter, when he was martyred for the faith. History is witness to this.

There were Christians who refused obedience to him, but not one of them claimed for himself the privilege of Peter and his successors. That the Church, the society founded by Christ to bring salvation to the world, should need a visible Head on earth, needs no further (and has not stronger) proof than that Christ himself saw it as necessary and arranged it accordingly. The power of the keys, given to Peter, were more necessary in the second and succeeding generations than in Peter's day, when the other Apostles were still alive. When Christ laid the foundation of his Church on a Rock. it was to be a Rock that would last as long as the Church. Peter died, but Peter's office will last until the last man goes to heaven. The Sheep and the Lambs of the twentieth and thirtieth centuries have as much need of pasturage and protection as, if not more than, those of the first century. Christ, our Savior and our Good Shepherd, provided for all time.

Excepted from The Sunday Readings, Fr. Kevin O'Sullivan, O.F.M.


33 posted on 04/14/2013 3:49:10 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
The Word Among Us

Meditation: Acts 5:27-32, 40-41

 3rd Sunday of Easter

We must obey God rather than men. (Acts 5:29)

Is this the same Peter who had denied that he even knew Jesus? Doesn’t it take years—if ever—for us to overcome our fears? Let’s take a look at what happened in Peter to bring about such a transformation.

Spiritual transformation is usually connected to the grace of repentance. Luke tells us that just after Peter denied knowing Jesus three times, “the Lord turned and looked” at him. That look must have broken Peter’s heart, because it moved him to “weep bitterly” (Luke 22:61, 62).

Jesus must have known that those tears would move Peter to repentance, because he told him at the Last Supper, “Once you have turned back, you must strengthen your brothers” (Luke 22:32). He told Peter to use this experience to warn, comfort, and sustain the members of his Church.

In addition to the grace of repentance, Peter received the grace of the Holy Spirit—a grace to help him keep Jesus in the forefront of his mind long after Jesus had ascended into heaven. It was the Holy Spirit, living and active in his heart, who kept encouraging and helping him to stay faithful to the call to obey God, even if it meant disobeying the Jewish elders.

Here’s the good news: what happened to Peter can happen to us. We can be transformed! When we confess our sins, Jesus doesn’t just forgive us. He teaches us how to use our experience of his mercy to comfort and sustain the people around us. And at the same time, he gives us a greater outpouring of his Spirit so that we can find the strength and courage to remain faithful to the Lord and his calling on our lives.

Obeying God’s commands is meant to be a joy, not a burden. If we can learn to rely on God’s grace—both the grace of repentance and the grace of the Holy Spirit—we will be transformed as well.

“Come, Holy Spirit, and change my heart!”

Psalm 30:2, 4-6, 11-13; Revelation 5:11-14; John 21:1-19

 

Questions for Reflection or Group Discussion

1. In the first reading, we hear these words “So they left the presence of the Sanhedrin, rejoicing that they had been found worthy to suffer dishonor for the sake of the name” (Acts (5:41). Why do you think the apostles were willing to suffer dishonor for Jesus? Would you be willing to suffer dishonor for Him, because you are a Catholic Christian? Why or why not?

2. In the Responsorial Psalm, the psalmist expresses his total confidence and faith that no matter what happens to him, the Lord will be with him and rescue him. His response to this is rejoicing, praise, and thanksgiving? How does your confidence in the Lord’s protection over your life (and your family) compare to the psalmist? What steps can you take to increase your own confidence and faith in the Lord? Can you share any examples of when the Lord rescued you from a difficult situation? What was your response to it?

3. The second reading gives us a glimpse of the celebration of praise and worship that goes on in Heaven. What is your reaction to this scene in Heaven? What do you think is the basis for this celebration? In what ways can we as Catholics share in this heavenly celebration?

4. In the Gospel reading, what do you think was Jesus’ reasons for his questions to Peter? Why the same question three times? Why do you think Peter seemed to be so uncomfortable with Jesus’ questions?

5. If Jesus were to ask you the same question he asked Peter, “Do you love me?”—what would be your action and why?

6. The meditation ends with these words, “Obeying God’s commands is meant to be a joy, not a burden. If we can learn to rely on God’s grace—both the grace of repentance and the grace of the Holy Spirit—we will be transformed as well.” In what ways have you experienced the grace of repentance and the grace of the Holy Spirit? How would you describe the impact it has had on how you live out your Christian walk?

7. Take some time now to pray and ask the Lord Jesus to transform you more and into his image and likeness. Use the prayer at the end of the meditation as a starting point.


34 posted on 04/14/2013 3:55:47 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
A Christian Pilgrim

LET US RESPOND TO JESUS WITH FAITH

(A biblical refection on THE THIRD SUNDAY OF EASTER – April 14, 2013) 

Gospel Reading: John 21:1-14 

First Reading: Acts 5:27-32,40-41; Psalms: Ps 30:2-6,11-13; Second Reading: Rev 5:11-14 

YESUS YANG SUDAH BANGKIT DI TEPI PANTAI DANAU

The Scripture Text

After this Jesus revealed Himself again to the disciples by the Sea of Tiberias; and He revealed Himself in this way. Simon Peter, Thomas called the Twin, Nathanael of Cana in Galilee, the sons of Zebedee, and two others of His disciples were together. Simon Peter said to them, “I am going fishing.” They said to him, “We will go with you.” They went out and got into the boat; but that night they caught nothing.

Just as day was breaking, Jesus stood on the beach; yet the disciples did not know that it was Jesus. Jesus said to them, “Cast the net on the right side of the boat, and you will find some.” So they cast it, and now they were not able to haul it is, for the quantity of fish. That disciple whom Jesus loved said to Peter, “It is the Lord!” When Simon Peter heard that it was the Lord, he put on his clothes, for he was stripped for work, and sprang into the sea. But the other disciples came in the boat, dragging the net full of fish, for they were not far from the land, but about a hundred yards off.

When they got out on land, they saw a charcoal fire there, with fish lying on it, and bread. Jesus said to them, “Bring some of the fish that you have just caught.” So Simon Peter went aboard and hauled the net ashore, full of large fish, a hundred and fifty three of them; and although there were so many, the net was not torn. Jesus said to them, “Come and have breakfast.” Now none of the disciples dared ask Him, “Who are You?” They knew it was the Lord. Jesus came and took the bread and gave it to them, and so with the fish. This was now the third time that Jesus was revealed to the disciples after He was raised from the dead. (Jn 21:1-14 RSV) 

IKAN PANGGANG GAYA YESUS PASTI ENAK NIH

Jesus can come at the most unexpected moments. The disciples, led by Peter, may have been feeling dejected and depressed. They had returned to their former way of life as fishermen, but they caught nothing. It was precisely at this time, when they probably least expected it, that Jesus revealed Himself to them again. As they listened to Him and followed His directions, they received a miraculous catch of fish. Then, when they came ashore, Jesus fed them and spoke with them. Once more He showed them that He was risen and that their lives were in His care. The disciples must have felt greatly strengthened.

Jesus wants us also to have a strong faith in His desire to provide for all of our needs. We may feel weighed down by life’s burdens; by the daily grind of making a living, caring for a family, carrying out all our responsibilities. Like Peter and the disciples, we may feel we are getting nowhere. Yet, Jesus often comes to us in unexpected ways and provides the miracles we need. Over and over, He intervenes and reminds us powerfully of His immense love. As the risen Lord, He is full of power and life, and He wants us to experience that power and life in our daily lives.

Our part is to respond to Jesus with faith. One way we can grow in our faith is by turning to the Lord very simply each day and asking Him to act in our lives. For example, we can make our own the prayer of the liturgy: “Lord, have mercy!”

Whatever circumstances we face, whether at home, at work, at school, or at church, Jesus wants to come to us and help us. As we (You and I) pray each day, let us expect the risen Lord to come to us and our loved ones with His power and grace. As we see Him intervening in our lives – sometimes in surprising and unexpected ways – our faith will be strengthened. We will grow in confidence that our loving Savior can, indeed, save us from every evil – even from the evil of eternal death.

Short Prayer: Lord Jesus, increase my faith in You and Your power to intervene in my life. Come powerfully, Lord, to deal with the greatest problems that I have right now. Transform them, Lord. Transform me too. And draw me closer to you. Amen.


35 posted on 04/14/2013 4:11:21 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
A Christian Pilgrim

STUBBORNNESS AND STUBBORNNESS

 (A biblical reflection on the 3rd Sunday of Easter [Year C] – 14th of April 2013)

First Reading: Acts 5:27-32,40-41; Psalms: Ps 30:2-6,11-13; Second Reading: Rev 5:11-14; Gospel Reading: Jn 21:1-19 (Jn 21:1-14) 

PETRUS DAN YOHANES DIADILI

THE world is always twenty minutes ahead of one man in Coventry, England. “In 1922,” he said, “the clocks were changed twenty minutes. I never accepted that. Nobody was going to take twenty minutes out of my life.” So he kept his watch set for the old time. He is twenty minutes late for every appointment. As a result, the determined man had been fired from half a dozen jobs. “They won’t beat me,” he declared. “I’m going to die twenty minutes late to show that I was right.” Holding rigidly to one’s outlook, even in a small matter such as twenty minutes of time, may bring a certain satisfaction, but it is terribly self-defeating. Before we are as stubborn as the man from Coventry, we had better make sure that we are right and that the matter is really worth while.

Stubbornness is a characteristic most of us have to claim as our own. And isn’t it  true that so often we are stubborn about things which really don’t matter, or concerning which we are far from being experts? Most of us have gotten into heated arguments about sports or the hair style of the young, and probably our discussions about politics have at times become hot enough to start a fire in a rain-soaked forest. And it is very likely that after hours of talk we haven’t budged an inch from our position, and neither has our opponent. Thousands of words exchanged with nothing accomplished.

Perhaps such “discussions” are actually a form of recreation with little harm done, but in some cases stubbornness can be very serious. Take the matter of changes in the Mass and in the discipline of our religion. I am not talking about changes arbitrarily invented by incompetent persons, but those introduced by the higher authority in the Church. Can we honestly pretend that we are virtuous when we obstinately refuse to participate fully in the Mass as it has been revised by the Church? Of course the opposite situation is equally wrong. A person who doggedly insists on freely improvising the prayer and ceremonies of the Mass with no regard for expect and well thought out directives of the Church, is way out of line.

YESUS DAN KEDUABELAS MURID-NYA

When is stubbornness a virtue? Peter and the other apostles in the first reading are a good example. They were every bit as stubborn as the man from Coventry who would not change his watch, but there were two big differences. The apostles were absolutely correct and the matter was of supreme importance. They really had no choice but to refuse obedience to the Jewish authorities who had forbidden them to preach Jesus as the Messiah. Peter summed up the situation perfectly: “Better for us to obey God than men!” For him the issue was clear-cut and he was sure of his ground. He had enjoyed a direct experience of the risen Christ, as we read in today’s Gospel. He knew that Jesus is Lord. Peter and the other apostles were indeed stubborn, but their stubbornness was a virtue, not a foolish obstinacy.

We should be stubborn when it is a matter of conscience. Pressure from other people must not be allowed to move us from our convictions, whether it be a question of extra-marital sex or racial prejudice, abortion or social injustice. On the other hand, we cannot blithely use “conscience” as an excuse for abandoning a moral teaching of the Church which we find difficult to follow. Theologians have always taught that conscience is the supreme norm of moral activity, but they insist that conscience must be informed. We have to work from facts, not from feelings alone. We must have a firm, solid foundation for our stand, unlike the man who said, “I have my mind made up; don’t confuse me with the facts.”

From their contact with the risen Lord, Peter and the other apostles received both enlightenment to form convictions and strength to follow through with those convictions, even to death. Today as we receive the risen Lord in Communion we should pray for the same enlightenment and strength so that in following our consciences we may indeed be obeying God Himself. 

Note: Written by Fr. Oscar J. Miller CM in Charles E. Miller CM, Fr. Oscar J. Miller CM and Fr. Michael M. Roebert, THE WORD MADE FLESH, Makati, Philippines: St. Paul Publications, 1983, pages 102-103.


36 posted on 04/14/2013 4:14:04 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
 
Marriage = One Man and One Woman
Til' Death Do Us Part

Daily Marriage Tip for April 14, 2013:

“Simon, son of John, do you love me?” (John 21:16) Sometimes married couples feel they have to fish for compliments or for those magic words, “I love you.” Can you be the first to say them to your beloved today? If you missed being first, try being the last.


37 posted on 04/14/2013 6:50:00 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Fishing All Night and Catching Nothing
Pastor’s Column
 
3rd Sunday of Easter
April 14, 2013
 
 
 
 
"Cast the net over the right side of the boat and
you will find something."
 
          Once, many years ago now, I journeyed to the Sea of Galilee and got on a traditional fishing boat much as Peter, James and John would have used (a picture of this boat is attached).  And during our time at sea, we naturally went fishing. The guide was casting his net over the side of the boat to show us how this was done at the time of Christ.   Of course, he caught nothing!  I remember that we fellow pilgrims, remembering this Sunday’s gospel (John 21:1-19), helpfully suggested he might try the other side where we were sure he would catch something! (Apparently he had heard this joke before).
 
          Perhaps it is significant that in the Gospels, the disciples never catch any fish on their own.  Certainly they must have been good fisherman, since they had their own business. Yet, again and again, they need Christ’s help to find the fish! This was true on the day when Christ first called them to be followers of his. Then, three years later, when Jesus, risen from the dead, is standing on the shore and observing his followers, once again we find them fishing all night and catching nothing.
 
          So often, we too can feel that our lives are often one exercise in futility after another, and without Christ, what comes of our life in the end?  What ultimately gives meaning to our lives, if not knowing that we are loved and have given love and that– most importantly -- there is a God and that he really loves us?  Once we understand what Christ is offering us in the Gospels, then every moment of our lives has meaning because we can do everything for Christ, and he helps us to avoid fishing expeditions that result in no catch of fish. With God, everything in our lives becomes fruitful when it is united to his will for us, and this makes all the difference.
 
          Christ gives the disciples a mission in today's Gospel – to spread the Good News of eternal salvation. As a matter of fact, we all have the same mission!  We fulfill our mission to give witness to Christ by paying attention to our words and deeds.  All that God asks of us is that we use the opportunities that he gives us, both great and small, to glorify him. Some are called, of course, to be professional fishermen – that includes us priests, religious, teachers, and workers in the church in all ways, but it really includes all of us. Christ isn't asking most of us to change our occupation, but he does ask us to change our outlook about what we do.
 
          Everything I do throughout the day should serve to glorify God. This is the way that Christ invites us to hauling in a great catch of fish for this world and in the world to come.
                                                                                   Father Gary               

38 posted on 04/14/2013 7:17:37 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Salvation

I tried to fix the dimension of that photograph, but I certainly didn’t succeed. Maybe next time.


39 posted on 04/14/2013 7:29:14 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

3rd Sunday of Easter: Missionary Disciples in Communion


 
Acts 5: 27-32
Rev. 5: 11-14
Jn 21: 1-19

This 3rd Sunday of our Easter journey presents a familiar invitation of Jesus to his disciples and Simon Peter in particular: “Follow Me.” Put in context of this resurrection story, it has a powerful significance. (Jn 21: 1-19).

It seems Jesus repeats a miracle he had done early on with the fishermen/disciples (Lk 5: 1-11).  However, this time it is the risen Lord who calls out to the disciples who have gone fishing after the events of that tragic but good Friday and the alleged reports of his appearance on that Sunday.  An amazing drought of fish are caught once again at the word of Jesus from the shore in the early morning: “Cast the net . . . and you will find something” (Jn 21: 6). And indeed, once again as at the beginning, they pull ashore an abundance of fish – 153 to be exact as John tells us.

On the fateful Thursday last supper evening, Jesus shared a meal with his disciples.  One that we still remember today in our celebration of the Eucharist.  Here on the shore of the Sea of Tiberius (Lake Galilee), he shares another meal.  Not in the darkness of night but in the light of a new day.  One was the last supper – here is the first breakfast! 

As the risen Lord shared that breakfast as the early morning sun was rising, so too is he present to us in the Holy Eucharist. As on the shore of the Sea, the risen Lord breaks bread with us every time we celebrate. 

As the beautiful resurrection story continues, Jesus calls Peter to reconciliation.  Three times, as Peter had denied Jesus three times not long before, he asks: “Simon, son of John, do you love me?” (Jn 21: 15 – 19). As Peter is reconciled to the Lord, three times redeems himself, Jesus solidifies the position of Peter among the disciples – “Feed my sheep/lambs.” Then simply invites him: “Follow Me.”

It is profoundly different than the original invitation when he first encountered these fishermen along the Sea at the beginning of his public ministry.  There, they followed him to the cross; now they follow him out to the world to be witnesses to his death and resurrection. Such is also the journey of all who come to believe in the risen Lord.

For the Christians of the early years, as they lived this new “way” of life, this Gospel passage must have held a particular relevance.  The boat of the disciples on the open sea was a symbol of the church.  The water Peter trudged through to meet the Lord, a sign of baptism where we are plunged in and rise to meet the light of a new life. The fish, all 153 of them, and the net could be a reminder of how they too were caught in great numbers by the preaching and witness of the Apostles.  The fish, bread and fire and the risen Lord who breaks bread and shares it, a sign of the holy Eucharist, wherein Christ is alive and present to believers.

But, in the end, it is the glow and presence of the risen Lord Jesus, now in the light of a new day, that we are all called to follow. 

In that following, we too hear Jesus asking us, “Do you love me?” Pope Francis, when Archbishop in 2007, spoke a great deal about reform when President of the Latin American Bishop’s Conference.  Many think he hasn’t changed direction but now as Pope will be able to take those same themes and expand them even more globally.

As then Archbishop Bergoglio said, as we follow the Lord, we are sent out to be “missionary disciples in communion.” The lay faithful in particular and clergy by association are, “converted followers of Jesus, who together with others who share Jesus’ life, faithfully seek to spread their joy, life and love to those who have not yet come into that two-fold communion.”

In short, it isn’t just about coming to Church and caring for those who believe as I do.  It is about, “a community of believers trained and inspired to go out to transform politics, society, education, neighborhoods, family and marriages.

It is a brotherhood of Good Samaritans drawing near to neighbors with love and mercy.”

In light of such a challenge, it may be good for us to reflect on God’s call in our own lives. Am I willing to follow the Lord and trust that he will lead me?  Our lives as priests are filled with constant surprises.  We never really know what the day will be like – surprising and unpredictable for sure.  We never know who will call or who or what will pull us away from what we intended to accomplish that day. (A little like raising children actually.) I’m always surprised by this.  But, in the end I think Jesus’ invitation to “follow me” is spoken in many ways through the events of our lives and the people we meet.  Certainly, in times of prayer and reflection but it is often fleshed out in our human encounters. 

Like the disciples, we need to say from our boats: “It is the Lord!”  May our Eucharistic assemblies always be a force to compel us beyond our boats and our internal fishing that we may take up the call to follow the Lord with truth and love.

“Lord, help us to hear your call, to listen with attentive eyes and hearts, and to act out of love for you.”
May your people exult for ever, O God,
in renewed youthfulness of spirit,
so that, rejoicing now in the restored glory of our adoption,
we may look forward in confident hope
to the rejoicing of the day of resurrection.

(Collect - Roman Missal) 
 
Fr. Tim

40 posted on 04/14/2013 7:30:42 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
St. Paul Center Blog

Fire of Love: Scott Hahn reflects on the 3rd Sunday of Easter

Posted by Dr. Scott Hahn on 04.12.13 |


Jesus Peter Apostles

Acts 5:27-32,40-41
Psalm 30:2,4-6,11-13
Revelation 5:11-14
John 21:1-19

There are two places in Scripture where the curious detail of a “charcoal fire” is mentioned.

One is in today’s Gospel, where the Apostles return from fishing to find bread and fish warming on the fire.

The other is in the scene in the High Priest’s courtyard on Holy Thursday, where Peter and some guards and slaves warm themselves while Jesus is being interrogated inside (see John 18:18).

At the first fire, Peter denied knowing Jesus three times, as Jesus had predicted (see John 13:38; 18:15-18, 25-27).

Today’s charcoal fire becomes the scene of Peter’s repentance, as three times Jesus asks him to make a profession of love. Jesus’  thrice repeated command “feed My sheep” shows that Peter is being appointed as the shepherd of the Lord’s entire flock, the head of His Church (see also Luke 22:32).

Jesus’ question: “Do you love me more than these?” is a pointed reminder of Peter’s pledge to lay down his life for Jesus, even if the other Apostles might weaken (see John 13:37; Matthew 26:33; Luke 22:33).

Jesus then explains just what Peter’s love and leadership will require, foretelling Peter’s death by crucifixion (“you will stretch out your hands”).

Before His own death, Jesus had warned the Apostles that they would be hated as He was hated, that they would suffer as He suffered (see Matthew 10:16-19,22; John 15:18-20; 16:2).
We see the beginnings of that persecution in today’s First Reading. Flogged as Jesus was, the Apostles nonetheless leave “rejoicing that they have been found worthy to suffer.”

Their joy is based on their faith that God will change their “mourning into dancing,” as we sing in today’s Psalm. By their sufferings, the know, they will be counted worthy to stand in heaven before “the Lamb that was slain,” a scene glimpsed in today’s Second Reading (see also Revelation 6:9-11).


41 posted on 04/14/2013 7:38:46 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Insight Scoop

The risen Christ to the restored Peter: "Feed my sheep!"

A Scriptural Reflection on the Readings for Sunday, April 14, 2013, Third Sunday of Easter | Carl E. Olson

Readings:
• Acts 5:27-32, 40b-41
• Ps 30:2, 4, 5-6, 11-12, 13
• Rev 5:11-14
• Jn 21:1-19

Years ago, not long after entering the Church, I called into a local radio program hosted by two Fundamentalist Protestants. They had been discussing Catholicism and making some claims that were more than a bit dubious in nature. In the course of our conversation (which was fairly civil, thankfully), the topic arose of a great apostasy in the early Church. Long story made short, they insisted the Church had “apostatized” within years—perhaps just months!—of Christ’s Resurrection and Ascension.

One reason for this belief (which I knew well from my Fundamentalist upbringing) was the assumption that the first Christians soon began embracing structures and doctrines that were “Romanish” in nature. Rather than deal with the historical record, these two sincere, intelligent men deemed it better to skip ahead to the present-day, seeking to restore the Church they thought Jesus really meant to establish. They made it clear they would not follow a pope.

That incident came to mind as I considered today’s readings. The readings during Easter—which include passages from Acts of the Apostles in place of the Old Testament readings—make numerous connections between the authority, mission, and power of the Risen Lord and the position and actions of the Apostles. There is a clear and consistent connection between the person of Jesus Christ and the people who took up “the Way” (Acts 9:22) and who were eventually called “Christians” (Acts 11:26). And this connection included structure and authority.

“Well, of course,” you might say, “everyone knows that.” But this basic and fundamental fact is routinely denied, especially by those who try to uproot Jesus from his historical moorings and detach him from the establishment of Church structure and use of ecclesial authority. A common line of attack is to pit Jesus against “organized religion,” which is almost always code for the Catholic Church and her Magisterium.

Today’s readings depict something different, however, from this rather anarchic interpretation. The Gospel reading is especially instructive. It describes a key encounter between the risen Christ and the apostles, focusing on the head apostle, Peter. Days earlier, the rash fisherman had denied Jesus three times while huddled in the cold near a charcoal fire (Jn. 18:18-27). Now he came from his boat to a charcoal fire started by his Master, who invited he and his companions to eat.

The Good Shepherd then asked Peter a single question three times: “Do you love me?”

In responding to Peter’s affirmative replies, Jesus did not say, “Be good” or “Hang in there!” Rather, he directed him to feed and tend his sheep. This is a reiteration and affirmation of the authority Jesus gave to Peter in granting him the keys of the Kingdom (Matt. 16:16-20). It builds upon an important and lengthy discourse by Jesus about his identity as the Good Shepherd (Jn. 10). We are familiar with the image of the humble, loving shepherd, but we sometimes overlook how this image is as much about royal authority and messianic identity as it is about pastoral care.

Jesus’ discourse was based in part on a prophecy given through Ezekiel: “And I will set up over them one shepherd, my servant David, and he shall feed them: he shall feed them and be their shepherd” (Ezek. 34:23). Jesus is the Davidic King, and he established a Kingdom that exceeds the wildest dreams of any earthly king. “My servant David shall be king over them,” God told Ezekiel, “and they shall all have one shepherd” (Ezek. 37:24).

But if Jesus is the one shepherd, why appoint Peter to also be a shepherd? Because the Vicar of Christ, the apostles, and the bishops are “partakers of His consecration and His mission” (Lumen Gentium, 28). They have a specific place in the Body of Christ, a vocation to pastor and feed the one flock of the one true God. And so Jesus, after asking his three questions of Peter, simply said: “Follow me.” Why? So we can find, receive, and follow him.

(This "Opening the Word" column originally appeared in the April 18, 2010, issue of Our Sunday Visitor newspaper.)


42 posted on 04/14/2013 7:47:44 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Regnum Christi

The Fisher of Men Is Not Let off the Hook
| SPIRITUAL LIFE | SPIRITUALITY
Third Sunday of Easter



Father James Swanson, LC

John 21: 1-19

After this, Jesus revealed himself again to his disciples at the Sea of Tiberias. He revealed himself in this way. Together were Simon Peter, Thomas called Didymus, Nathanael from Cana in Galilee, Zebedee´s sons, and two others of his disciples. Simon Peter said to them, "I am going fishing." They said to him, "We also will come with you." So they went out and got into the boat, but that night they caught nothing. When it was already dawn, Jesus was standing on the shore; but the disciples did not realize that it was Jesus. Jesus said to them, "Children, have you caught anything to eat?" They answered him, "No." So he said to them, "Cast the net over the right side of the boat and you will find something." So they cast it, and were not able to pull it in because of the number of fish. So the disciple whom Jesus loved said to Peter, "It is the Lord." When Simon Peter heard that it was the Lord, he tucked in his garment, for he was lightly clad, and jumped into the sea. The other disciples came in the boat, for they were not far from shore, only about a hundred yards, dragging the net with the fish. When they climbed out on shore, they saw a charcoal fire with fish on it and bread. Jesus said to them, "Bring some of the fish you just caught." So Simon Peter went over and dragged the net ashore full of one hundred fifty-three large fish. Even though there were so many, the net was not torn. Jesus said to them, "Come, have breakfast." And none of the disciples dared to ask him, "Who are you?" because they realized it was the Lord. Jesus came over and took the bread and gave it to them, and in like manner the fish. This was now the third time Jesus was revealed to his disciples after being raised from the dead. When they had finished breakfast, Jesus said to Simon Peter, "Simon, son of John, do you love me more than these?" He said to him, "Yes, Lord, you know that I love you." He said to him, "Feed my lambs." He then said to him a second time, "Simon, son of John, do you love me?" He said to him, "Yes, Lord, you know that I love you." He said to him, "Tend my sheep." He said to him the third time, "Simon, son of John, do you love me?" Peter was distressed that he had said to him a third time, "Do you love me?" and he said to him, "Lord, you know everything; you know that I love you." Jesus said to him, "Feed my sheep. Amen, amen, I say to you, when you were younger, you used to dress yourself and go where you wanted; but when you grow old, you will stretch out your hands, and someone else will dress you and lead you where you do not want to go." He said this signifying by what kind of death he would glorify God. And when he had said this, he said to him, "Follow me."

Introductory Prayer: Lord, I believe that you are present here and now as I turn to you in prayer. I trust and have confidence in your desire to give me every grace I need to receive today. Thank you for your love, thank you for your immense generosity toward me. I give you my life and my love in return.

Petition: Lord, you know that I love you, but increase my love.

1. Peter Receives Poor Job Performance Ratings: The Lord has given Peter a job, and he expects Peter to do it. But Peter has proven himself unworthy; he denied Jesus three times in the house of the High Priest on the night Jesus was handed over. When Jesus needed him most, Peter turned away from him. What is Jesus’ response? Does he take away the leadership position from Peter and give it to someone else? Hasn’t John shown that he is better suited to be the leader of the apostles, to be the rock Jesus can build his Church on? He never ran away or denied Jesus, even when the High Priest, knowing John was also a disciple, could easily have killed him along with Jesus. Yet Jesus does not take the job away from Peter and give it to John. Rather, he turns to Peter again and expresses his confidence in him.

2. Peter Overestimates Himself through Pride: Peter had a deep love for Jesus, but not deep enough. On the night of the Last Supper, he thought he was capable of dying for Jesus, but he was wrong. When the test came, Peter came up short. Like Peter, we tend to overestimate our own readiness to follow Jesus. We do fine under ordinary circumstances, but when difficult moments come – temptations, opposition, even persecution – we fail. Like Peter, we come up short. We love the Lord, but not enough. Jesus’ reaction to us is the same: He does not lose confidence in us. Neither does he let us off the hook. He expects us to grow into the job.

3. The Job Is Yours; Keep Working on the Qualifications: What is Peter’s shortcoming? He doesn’t love Jesus enough. His love was real, but there were still things greater than his love – his fear for instance. On the night of the Last Supper, he ran away when Jesus was arrested. He denied Jesus three times. In each instance, his fear was greater than his love. To be the first Pope, he needed greater love than that. He needed a love without limits. That is why Jesus asks him three times: “Do you love me?” He is telling Peter that the qualification for the job is unlimited love. Peter has to have an unlimited love in order to be the rock on which Jesus builds his Church. Jesus is not letting him off the hook. He isn’t giving the job to someone else. Peter has to get that love, just as I have to develop an unlimited love to qualify for the tasks in life that Jesus has given me.

Conversation with Christ: Lord, I know that when you gave me the responsibilities I have, you gave me the grace to fulfill them, too. Help me not to be lazy or irresponsible in serving you. Encourage me like you encouraged Peter, so I can fulfill all you expect from me in this life.

Resolution: I will work on improving myself today. Maybe I can find a spiritual book that will help me get closer to God. Maybe I can find a class or conference that will help me in some aspect of what God expects from me – parenting, prayer, charity, etc. – and sign up for it today.


43 posted on 04/14/2013 7:55:47 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
This Sunday's Gospel: Feed My Lambs

This Sunday’s Gospel: Feed My Lambs

Marcellino D'Ambrosio, Ph.D.

by Marcellino D'Ambrosio, Ph.D. on April 12, 2013 · 

On many occasions I’ve heard non-Catholics object to the papacy.  Often, they say something like this: “I just can’t believe that one man on earth, the Pope, is holier than everyone else.”  So who ever said that being sinless is either a prerequisite or a consequence of being named Pope?

For the Pope, the bishop of Rome, is the successor of Peter, who spent the last years of his life leading the Christians of the eternal city.  And here is an interesting fact.  None of the four  canonical gospels (not to mention Acts and Galatians) try to hide the fact that Peter sinned often and sinned big.  By the way, if the “patriarchal, controlling” leaders of the early Catholic Church altered the story about Jesus as the DaVinci Code suggests, don’t you think they would have “fixed” these embarrassing stories?

Yet while all agree Peter was weak and imperfect, they all also agree that he was given a unique responsibility.   Only Peter got a name-change from Jesus himself (from Simon to “Peter” meaning rock).  Only Peter was told by Christ on Holy Thursday night “I have prayed for you that your faith never fail and when you’ve repented, go and strengthen your brethren” (Lk 22: 31-32).  And when Jesus, after the resurrection, cooked a fish breakfast for the apostles (Jn 21), it was only to Peter that Jesus put the question “do you love me?”

shepherd

But why did Jesus ask him the same question three times?  Perhaps Peter needed to atone for his three-fold denial of Christ by a three-fold profession of love.  Perhaps, given Peter’s track record of getting it wrong, the Lord really wanted to be sure he got it right this time.  Here’s the point–

“Peter, your way of expressing penance for your sin and love for me will be to feed my sheep.  Remember, they are not your sheep, but mine.  Take care of them for me.  Do for them what I did for them.  Don’t just feed them.  Protect them.  Lay down your life for them if necessary.”

Peter’s role as a Shepherd is, in a way, unique because it is universal.  Despite his human frailty, he is given care of all the Churches.  And, if we take Lk 22:31-32 seriously, he is called to be the shepherd of all the shepherds.  That’s a big responsibility.  In fact, it is a crushing burden which he could never fulfill on his own power.  That’s why we pray for the Pope (meaning “Papa” or father) in every Catholic Eucharist across the globe – He needs the grace of the Holy Spirit to fulfill his role.  The bit about Peter stretching out his hands with others leading him where he does not want to go – it does not just refer to his crucifixion under Nero, but to the daily laying his life down for his flock, the “white martyrdom” that we can saw so clearly in the weary but relentless witness of John Paul II.

In another way, though, Peter’s role as a Shepherd is not unique.  It is exemplary for all of us sheep who are called to become ourselves shepherds and leaders, despite our own frailty and sinfulness.  Some are called to be bishops, successors of the apostles, entrusted with pastoral care of a portion of Christ’s flock.  Some are called to be priests and deacons, who assist a bishop in his apostolic mission.  Some are called to be catechists, youth ministers and teachers, who also play a role in the feeding of the sheep.

And most of us are called to be parents, shepherds of what the Second Vatican Council calls “the domestic church.”  Parents, say St. Thomas Aquinas and John Paul II, have a pastoral role much like that of a parish priest.  In fact John Paul II, in his letter Familiaris Consortio, says that the Catholic parent exercises “a true ministry of the Church.”

On whatever level, the call to feed and care for the sheep is a call to sacrifice, not privilege.  It has its moments of exaltation and profound satisfaction, but it has its moments of agony as well.  But if we’ve learned anything from the passion, it’s that suffering is the true and necessary test of love, as well as love’s most authentic and powerful expression.   So let us not be afraid to be shepherds.  The Good Shepherd will empower us with His Spirit.  And let’s pray with gratitude and compassion for those who shepherd us.

 


44 posted on 04/14/2013 8:07:08 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Salvation
Scripture Speaks: Third Sunday of Easter

Scripture Speaks: Third Sunday of Easter

Gayle Somers

by Gayle Somers on April 12, 2013 ·

Feed My Sheep

During Christ’s Passion, Peter stood near the warmth of a charcoal fire and denied knowing Him.  Today, Jesus and Peter meet again near a charcoal fire.  Why?

Gospel (Read Jn 21:1-19)

St. John tells us that an appearance of Jesus at the Sea of Tiberius (also called the Sea of Galilee) was “the third time Jesus was revealed to His disciples after being raised from the dead.”  As is always the case in St. John’s Gospel, there are layers of symbolism in the simple action described.  The disciples have already seen the Risen Lord, but they have not yet been commissioned by Him to make disciples of all nations (see Mt 28:15-20), nor have they received the promised Holy Spirit for the power they will need for this work (see Acts 1:4).  For now, they are still fishermen.  Surely they wondered what would come next.  With time on their hands and a living to earn, they decide to go fishing, which was usually done at night on that sea.

It was a fruitless night of work; they caught nothing.  At dawn, “Jesus was standing on the shore, but the disciples did not realize” that it was Him.  This is a common theme of Jesus’ post-Resurrection appearances.  The apostles have trouble recognizing Him (as we still do in the Eucharist, veiled as He is there).  See that He calls out to them with the term, “Children.”  By this first word of His address to them, He places the meaning of this episode within the context of the Kingdom His Father sent Him to build (recall that He taught the disciples to call God “Our Father” in prayer).  When they tell Him they have caught nothing, He directs them to cast their net in another direction, which results in a huge haul of fish.  Recall that at the outset of Jesus’ call to His disciples, it was a very similar action that drove Peter to his knees in recognition of his sin and Jesus’ holiness (see Lk 5:1-11).  John, who calls himself in this Gospel “the disciple whom Jesus loved,” knows instantly that the Man on the shore (the place of stability, as opposed to the frequent and unpredictable turbulence of the sea) is Jesus.  Peter immediately jumps into the water and swims toward Him, while the others get the boat and the full net back to shore.  Jesus has already set up a charcoal fire and is cooking fish and bread on it, but He wants some of the fish the disciples had caught.  This breakfast, then, is to be a combined effort of Jesus and His friends.  Peter drags up the net with one hundred fifty-three fish in it.  We have to wonder who counted them and why.  It is the kind of detail in St. John’s writing that usually has a deeper meaning.  St. Jerome tells us that at that time, Greek zoologists had counted one hundred fifty-three different kinds of fish.  This suggests that the full net represents the people the disciples would “catch”—all kinds of different people, from all nations, representing the whole of mankind, in the “net” of the Church that won’t break apart under Peter’s handling.

Jesus then cooks the fish and bread and feeds the disciples with it, calling to mind the feeding of the five thousand in Jn 6:1-14, these being the only two meals in the Gospel eaten by the Sea of Galilee and the only two where fish and bread are served.  However, Jesus had more on His mind than feeding His friends as He gathered them around the charcoal fire.  He wants to have a conversation with Peter, who had three times denied Him by the light of a similar fire (see Jn 18:18).  He repented with just one look from Jesus, crying tears of contrition and grief.  Jesus gives Peter three opportunities to confess his love for the Lord Whom he had denied; each confession brings a specific command to Peter to care for the flock entrusted to his care.  Jesus, the Good Shepherd (see Jn 10:1-21; Ezek 34), is about to depart.  We know He established Peter as the rock of the Church, entrusting him with the keys of the kingdom (see Mt 16:19).  By this charcoal fire, three times Jesus assures Peter that his denial has not disqualified him from his work of caring for God’s flock.  Jesus asks him to confess hislove for Him, not his potential for heroics.  Peter now knows well his own weakness, and so does Jesus (“Lord, You know everything”).  In meekness and humility, he vows his love and nothing else.  Ironically, although Peter had once foolishly boasted about his willingness to die (see Jn 13:37-38), Jesus now describes the martyr’s death that awaits Peter.  He has learned that martyrdom for the sake of Jesus is a grace given by God, not something to be grasped in man’s own bravado, a difficult but necessary lesson.  Now, when Peter hears the same words he had heard three years earlier from Jesus, “Follow Me” (see Mk 1:17), he knows exactly what they mean.

Possible response:  Lord Jesus, help me remember that You seek my love above all else, a love expressed in obedience.

First Reading (Read Acts 5:27-32, 40b-41)

Here we see the apostles in a setting radically different from the seaside in the Gospel.  They had disobeyed orders from the Sanhedrim not to preach in Jesus’ Name.  Peter speaks out boldly to explain their actions:  “We must obey God rather than men.”  He simply declares that they have been witnesses to the miracle of the Resurrection and have no choice but to announce this Good News to the people of Israel, who had long awaited their Messiah, regardless of the consequences.

Ordered again to keep quiet, they were dismissed.  Rather than shrink in fear or flare out in aggression, “they left… rejoicing that they had been found worthy to suffer dishonor for the sake of the Name.”  Although the disciples were not setting out to be heroes—they only wanted to share the glory of the Gospel with others—it was granted them to follow in the footsteps of Jesus and become heroic in their suffering.

For Peter, this time, there was no boasting—only joy.

Possible response:  Lord Jesus, help me be willing to be a witness to the miraculous truth I know about You.

Psalm (Read Ps 30:2, 4-6, 11-13)

Here is a song of praise for deliverance from enemies, from the netherworld, from weeping and mourning.  Its words would be appropriate on the lips of Jesus, of course, as well as on the disciples’ lips.  In fact, Jesus and all who trust in Him (people like us) can sing today:  “I will praise You, Lord, for You have rescued me.”

Possible response:  The psalm is, itself, a response to our other readings.  Read it again prayerfully to make it your own.

Second Reading (Read Rev 5:11-14)

Here we see Jesus in a setting radically different from the seaside in the Gospel.  St. John tells us of a vision of heaven given to him in which he sees “countless living creatures” crying out to sing praise to “the One Who sits on the throne and to the Lamb.”  This is the Jesus Who now reigns over His Church.  Jesus is conquering all His enemies; He is waiting for the day He will return to this world, finish His work, and celebrate with His Bride, the Church, into eternity.  Before the Sanhedrin, Peter and the apostles had confidence that the scene described here is actually true.  It gave them the courage to obey Jesus’ simple command to follow Him, given to them at the seaside and in every age to all people everywhere through the Church they built.

Will this obedience cost us anything?  Yes, it will, but if we remember that “worthy is the Lamb,” we will only rejoice if we are found worthy in this life to suffer for Him.

Possible response:  Lord Jesus, I need to remember this vision of Your glory and victory when my obedience to You costs me having my own way.


45 posted on 04/14/2013 8:09:46 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
One Bread, One Body

One Bread, One Body

 


<< Sunday, April 14, 2013 >> Third Sunday of Easter
 
Acts 5:27-32, 40-41
Revelation 5:11-14

View Readings
Psalm 30:2, 4-6, 11-13
John 21:1-19

 

THE HUNDRED-YARD DASH

 
"Actually they were not far from land — no more than a hundred yards." —John 21:8
 

When we sin, we distance ourselves from the Lord. Like Jonah, we try to get as far away from God as we can (see Jon 1:3). Like Jonah, however, we run into God no matter where we go. The psalmist questioned: "Where can I go from Your Spirit? From Your presence where can I flee? If I go up to the heavens, You are there; if I sink to the nether world, You are present there" (Ps 139:7-8). Nevertheless, if we insist on it, the Lord will let us finally escape from Him. This place of escape is called hell or eternal damnation where we can separate ourselves from God forever.

When we run away from God, the Lord will try to flush us out of our hiding place of sin (see Lk 15:4). As He did with Adam and Eve, the Lord will call to us: "Where are you?" (Gn 3:9) If we turn back to Him, He will meet us much more than halfway. Our heavenly Father will run out to meet us, throw His arms around our necks, and kiss us (Lk 15:20).

However, the Lord will not force Himself on us. We must repent. When Peter distanced himself from Jesus by going back into the fishing business and rejecting Jesus' call to be a fisher of men, Jesus reached out to Peter and got within a hundred yards of him (Jn 21:8). However, Peter had to jump in the lake and swim a hundred yards (Jn 21:7). In His love for us, Jesus will travel all time and space to be close to us. Through repentance, we must cover a few yards to get to Jesus.

In this Easter season, how close are you to Jesus? If you've distanced yourself from Him, repent and jump in the lake.

 
Prayer: Father, if I sin, may I make a hundred-yard dash back to You.
Promise: "We testify to this. So too does the Holy Spirit, Whom God has given to those that obey Him." —Acts 5:32
Praise: "Worthy is the Lamb That was slain to receive power and riches, wisdom and strength, honor and glory and praise!" (Rv 5:12)

46 posted on 04/14/2013 8:53:42 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

FOR THE ELDERLY

Dear Lord,
as my life declines 
and my energies decrease,
more than ever hold me by Your Power,
that I may not offend You,
but daily increase in Your Love.
Give me strength to work in Your Service 
till the last day of my life.
Help me to ever have 
an increasing dread of venial sin,
or whatever would cause 
the slightest withdrawal of Your love,
all day long,
and at night keep me close to Your Heart;
and should I die, ere the morning breaks,
may I go rejoicing in that vision 
of Your entrancing beauty,
never to be separated from You.

Amen.

47 posted on 04/14/2013 8:55:30 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

http://resources.sainteds.com/showmedia.asp?media=../sermons/homily/2013-04-14-Homily%20Father%20John%20Henderson.mp3&ExtraInfo=1&BaseDir=../sermons/homily


48 posted on 04/21/2013 6:09:39 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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