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Catholic Caucus; Sunday Mass Readings, 06-09-13, Tenth Sunday in Ordinary Time
USCCB.org/RNAB ^ | 06-09-13 | Revised New American Bible

Posted on 06/09/2013 6:25:47 AM PDT by Salvation

June 9, 2013

 

Tenth Sunday in Ordinary Time

 

Reading 1 1 Kgs 17:17-24

Elijah went to Zarephath of Sidon to the house of a widow.
The son of the mistress of the house fell sick,
and his sickness grew more severe until he stopped breathing.
So she said to Elijah,
“Why have you done this to me, O man of God?
Have you come to me to call attention to my guilt
and to kill my son?”
Elijah said to her, “Give me your son.”
Taking him from her lap, he carried the son to the upper room
where he was staying, and put him on his bed.
Elijah called out to the LORD:
“O LORD, my God,
will you afflict even the widow with whom I am staying
by killing her son?”
Then he stretched himself out upon the child three times
and called out to the LORD:
“O LORD, my God,
let the life breath return to the body of this child.”
The LORD heard the prayer of Elijah;
the life breath returned to the child’s body and he revived.
Taking the child, Elijah brought him down into the house
from the upper room and gave him to his mother.
Elijah said to her, “See! Your son is alive.”
The woman replied to Elijah,
“Now indeed I know that you are a man of God.
The word of the LORD comes truly from your mouth.”

Responsorial Psalm Ps 30:2, 4, 5-6, 11, 12, 13

R. (2a) I will praise you, Lord, for you have rescued me.
I will extol you, O LORD, for you drew me clear
and did not let my enemies rejoice over me.
O LORD, you brought me up from the nether world;
you preserved me from among those going down into the pit.
R. I will praise you, Lord, for you have rescued me.
Sing praise to the LORD, you his faithful ones,
and give thanks to his holy name.
For his anger lasts but a moment;
a lifetime, his good will.
At nightfall, weeping enters in,
but with the dawn, rejoicing.
R. I will praise you, Lord, for you have rescued me.
Hear, O LORD, and have pity on me;
O LORD, be my helper.
You changed my mourning into dancing;
O LORD, my God, forever will I give you thanks.
R. I will praise you, Lord, for you have rescued me.

Reading 2 Gal 1:11-19

I want you to know, brothers and sisters,
that the gospel preached by me is not of human origin.
For I did not receive it from a human being, nor was I taught it,
but it came through a revelation of Jesus Christ.

For you heard of my former way of life in Judaism,
how I persecuted the church of God beyond measure
and tried to destroy it, and progressed in Judaism
beyond many of my contemporaries among my race,
since I was even more a zealot for my ancestral traditions.
But when God, who from my mother’s womb had set me apart
and called me through his grace,
was pleased to reveal his Son to me,
so that I might proclaim him to the Gentiles,
I did not immediately consult flesh and blood,
nor did I go up to Jerusalem
to those who were apostles before me;
rather, I went into Arabia and then returned to Damascus.

Then after three years I went up to Jerusalem
to confer with Cephas and remained with him for fifteen days.
But I did not see any other of the apostles,
only James the brother of the Lord.

Gospel Lk 7:11-17

Jesus journeyed to a city called Nain,
and his disciples and a large crowd accompanied him.
As he drew near to the gate of the city,
a man who had died was being carried out,
the only son of his mother, and she was a widow.
A large crowd from the city was with her.
When the Lord saw her,
he was moved with pity for her and said to her,
“Do not weep.”
He stepped forward and touched the coffin;
at this the bearers halted,
and he said, “Young man, I tell you, arise!”
The dead man sat up and began to speak,
and Jesus gave him to his mother.
Fear seized them all, and they glorified God, exclaiming,
“A great prophet has arisen in our midst, ”
and “God has visited his people.”
This report about him spread through the whole of Judea
and in all the surrounding region.


TOPICS: Catholic; General Discusssion; Prayer; Worship
KEYWORDS: catholic; ordinarytime; prayer
For your reading, reflection, faith-sharing, comments, questions, discussion.

1 posted on 06/09/2013 6:25:47 AM PDT by Salvation
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To: nickcarraway; NYer; ELS; Pyro7480; livius; ArrogantBustard; Catholicguy; RobbyS; marshmallow; ...
Alleluia Ping!
 
If you aren’t on this ping list NOW and would like to be, 
please Freepmail me.

2 posted on 06/09/2013 6:27:05 AM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

From: 1 Kings 17:17-24

The Son of the Widow of Zarephath Restored to Life


[17] After this the son of the woman, the mistress of the house, became ill; and
his illness was so severe that there was no breath left in him. [18] And she said
to Elijah, “What have you against me, O man of God? You have come to me to
bring my sin to remembrance, and to cause the death of my son!” [19] And he
said to her, “Give me your son.” And he took him from her bosom, and carried
him up into the upper chamber, where he lodged, and laid him upon his own bed.
20] And he cried to the LORD, “O LORD my God, hast thou brought calamity
even upon the widow with whom I sojourn, by slaying her son?” [21] Then he
stretched himself upon the child three times, and cried to the LORD, “O LORD
my God, let this child’s soul come into him again.” [22] And the LORD hear-
kened to the voice of Elijah; and the soul of the child came into him again, and
he revived. [23] And Elijah took the child, and brought him down from the upper
chamber into the house, and delivered him to his mother; and Elijah said, “See,
your son lives.” [24] And the woman said to Elijah, “Now I know that you are a
man of God, and that the word of the LORD in your mouth is truth.”

*********************************************************************************************
Commentary:

1 Kings 17:1-2 – 2 Kings 1:18. The ample coverage given to the reign of Ahab is
not so much due to the actions of the king as to the fact that God raised up at
this time prophets who played a critical role in maintaining knowledge and wor-
ship of the God of Israel when they were under threat. The most outstanding of
these prophets is Elijah. It is quite likely that the narratives to do with Elijah
were lifted straight out of another text and inserted here, like other accounts of
prophets of the same time — an unnamed prophet (chap. 20) and Micaiah the
son of Imlah (chap. 22), both of whom speak to the king on God’s behalf during
the war against Syria.

17:1-19:21. The great drought, which is the backdrop of chapters 17-19, seems
to be a divine punishment for the king’s idolatry reported in the previous chapter;
but the main thing it does is to provide an opportunity to show the superiority of
the God of Israel over the Canaanite god Baal. Elijah, whose name means “my
God is the Lord”, is an itinerant prophet who, like the patriarchs, moves around
the country in obedience to the word of the Lord.

God makes himself known in a new way through the prophet Elijah. The same
God who manifested himself as friend and protector of the patriarchs, and who
gave the Law to Moses, now reveals himself as the Lord of creation and of na-
ture. To the Canaanites the god Baal was master of the forces of nature — rain,
storms, fertility etc. Through the prophet Elijah the true God reveals himself to
be distinct from and higher than all those forces, no matter what their power (cf.
19:11-13), as well as being their Lord (cf. 17:1). Elijah is the champion of the
rights of God and of the poor (cf. chap 21) and in this sense he is a model for
all the prophets that will come after him, the so-called writer prophets. “Elijah
is the ‘father’ of the prophets, ‘the generation of those who seek him, who seek
the face of the God of Jacob’ (Ps 24:6)” (Catechism of the Catholic Church,
2582).

*********************************************************************************************
Source: “The Navarre Bible: Text and Commentaries”. Biblical text from the
Revised Standard Version and New Vulgate. Commentaries by members of
the Faculty of Theology, University of Navarre, Spain.

Published by Four Courts Press, Kill Lane, Blackrock, Co. Dublin, Ireland, and
by Scepter Publishers in the United States.


3 posted on 06/09/2013 6:36:05 AM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

From: Galatians 1:11-19

God’s Call


[11] For I would have you know, brethren, that the gospel which was preached by
me is not man’s gospel. [12] For I did not receive it from man, nor was I taught it,
but it came through a revelation of Jesus Christ.

[13] For you have heard of my former life in Judaism, how I persecuted the church
of God violently and tried to destroy it; [14] and I advanced in Judaism beyond ma-
ny of my own age among my people, so extremely zealous was I for the traditions
of my fathers. [15] But when he who had set me apart before I was born, and had
called me through his grace, [16] was pleased to reveal his Son to me, in order
that I might preach him among the Gentiles, I did not confer with flesh and blood,
[17] nor did I go up to Jerusalem to those who were apostles before me, but I
went away into Arabia; and again I returned to Damascus.

[18] Then after three years I went up to Jerusalem to visit Cephas, and remained
with him fifteen days. [19] But I saw none of the other apostles except James the
Lord’s brother.

*********************************************************************************************
Commentary:

11-12. “What shall I do, Lord?” (Acts 22:10), Paul asked at the moment of his
conversion. Jesus replied, ‘Rise, and go into Damascus, and there you will be
told all that is appointed for you to do” (ibid.). The former persecutor, now under
the influence of grace, will receive instruction and Baptism through the ordinary
course of divine Providence—from a man, Ananias. Thereby Jesus led him to hu-
mility, obedience and abandonment. The Gospel which St Paul preached was i-
dentical with that preached by the other Apostles, and already had the character
of “tradition” in the nascent Church (cf. 1 Cor 15:3; Gal 2:2). This is compatible
with Paul’s claim—made in this passage—that his Gospel does not come from
any man but through a revelation from Jesus Christ. Firstly, because on seeing
the risen Christ he was given supernatural light to understand that Jesus was not
only the Messiah but also the Son of God; and also because this first revelation
was followed by many others to which he refers in his epistles (cf. 1 Cor 11:23;
13:3-8 and especially 2 Cor 12:1-4).

St Paul’s was a unique case, because normally a person came to know the Gos-
pel of Christ by receiving it or learning it from those who had seen Christ during
his life on earth and listened to his teachings. This was what happened in St
Luke’s case, for example (cf. Lk 1:2). St Paul still felt the need to go to Jeru-
salem to hear the Apostles’ preaching (cf. below 1:16-18), especially that of St
Peter.

13-14. The Acts of the Apostles tell us about Paul’s religious zeal; a Pharisee,
he had studied under Gamaliel (cf. Acts 22:3; Phil 3:5) and had consented to
and been present at the martyrdom of Stephen (cf. Acts 7:58; 8:1). Saul had
stood out as a persecutor of Christians, so keen was he to seek them out and
imprison them, even going beyond Judea to do so (cf. Acts 9:1-2). Clearly he
had been a man convinced of his Jewish faith, a zealous keeper of the Law,
and proud to be a Jew (cf. Rom 11:1 ; 2 Cor 11:22). Such was the fear the early
Christians had of him that they could not bring themselves to believe in his con-
version (cf. Acts 9:26). However, this same fervor and passion, to use St Augus-
tine’s comparison (cf. “Contra Faustum”, XXII, 70) was like a dense jungle — a
serious obstacle and yet an indication of immensely fertile soil. Our Lord sowed
the seed of the Gospel in that soil and it produced a very rich crop.

Everyone, no matter how irregular his life may have been, can produce good re-
sults like this—with the help of grace, which does not displace nature but heals
and purifies it, and then raises and perfects it: Courage! You...can! Don’t you see
what God’s grace did with sleepy-headed Peter, the coward who had denied him
..., and with Paul, his fierce and relentless persecutor?” (St. J. Escriva, “The
Way”, 483).

15-16. More than once in Scripture we read about God choosing certain people
for special missions even when they were still in their mother’s womb (cf. Jer 1:5;
Is 49:1-5; Lk 1:15; etc.). This emphasizes the fact that God makes a gratuitous
choice: there is no question of the person’s previous merits contributing to God’s
decision. Vocation is a supernatural divine gift, which God has planned from all
eternity. When God made his will known on the road to Damascus (cf. Acts 9:
3-6), St Paul “did not confer with flesh and blood”, that is, did not seek advice
from anyone, because he was absolutely sure that God himself had called him.
Nor did he consent to the prudence of the flesh, seeking to “play safe”: his self-
surrender was immediate, total and unconditional. When the Apostles heard Je-
sus inviting them to follow him, they “immediately left their nets” (Mt 4:20, 22;
Mk 1:18) and followed the Master, leaving everything behind (cf. Lk 5:11). We
see the same thing happening in Saul’s case: he responds immediately. If he
makes his way to Ananias, he does so on the explicit instructions of Jesus—in
order to receive instruction and Baptism and to discover what his mission is to
be (Acts 9:15-16).

God’s call, therefore, should receive an immediate response. “Consider the faith
and obedience of the Apostles”, St John Chrysostom says. “They are in the
midst of their work (and you know how attractive fishing is!). When they hear his
command, they do not vacillate or lose any time: they do not say, ‘Let’s go home
and say goodbye to our parents.’ No, they leave everything and follow him [...].
That is the kind of obedience Christ asks of us — not to delay even a minute, no
matter how important the things that might keep us” (”Hom. on St Matthew”, 14,
2). And St Cyril of Alexandria comments: “For Jesus also said, ‘No one who puts
his hand to the plough and looks back is fit for the Kingdom of God’, and he
looked back who asked permission to return home and speak to his parents. But
we see that the holy Apostles did not act in that way; rather they followed Jesus,
immediately leaving the boat and their parents behind. Paul also acted immedia-
tely. He ‘did not confer with flesh and blood’. That is how those who want to fol-
low Christ must act” (”Commentarium in Lucam”, 9).

A person has a duty to follow Christ even if his relatives are opposed to his doing
so or want him to delay making a final decision, perhaps because they feel that
would be the more (humanly) prudent course: “A person should honor his parents,
but God he should obey. We should love the one who has begotten us, but the
first place should be given to him who created us”, St Augustine says, not min-
cing words (”Sermon 100”).

Even if we are unsure as to whether we are strong enough to persevere, this
should not delay us or concern us: it should simply lead us to pray confidently
for God’s help, because, as Vatican II teaches, when God calls a person, he
“must reply without taking counsel with flesh and blood and must give himself
fully to the work of the Gospel. However, such an answer can only be given with
the encouragement and help of the Holy Spirit [...]. Therefore, he must be pre-
pared to remain faithful to his vocation for life, to renounce himself and everything
that up to this he possessed as his own, and to make himself ‘all things to all
men’ (1 Cor 9:22)” (”Ad Gentes”, 24).

17-19. After a period of time devoted to penance and prayer, St Paul made his
way to Jerusalem (cf. Acts 9:26-30) to see Cephas, that is, Peter. His stay of
two weeks is an important indication of Paul’s recognition of and veneration for
Peter, chosen as he had been as the foundation stone of the Church.

In subsequent generations, right down the centuries, Christians have shown their
love for Peter and his successors, traveling to Rome often at great personal effort
and sometimes, even, risk. “Catholic, apostolic, “Roman”! I want you to be very
Roman. And to be anxious to make your ‘path to Rome’, “videre Petrum” — to see
Peter (St. J. Escriva, “The Way”, 520). Solidarity with and veneration for the Pope
is, then, a clear, practical sign of good Christian spirit.

“James the Lord’s brother” (cf. notes on Mt 12:46-47 and 13:55) is, most com-
mentators think, James the Less (cf. Mk 15:40), also called the son of Alphaeus
(cf. Lk 6:15) and author of the letter which bears his name (cf. Jas 1:1).

*********************************************************************************************
Source: “The Navarre Bible: Text and Commentaries”. Biblical text from the
Revised Standard Version and New Vulgate. Commentaries by members of
the Faculty of Theology, University of Navarre, Spain.

Published by Four Courts Press, Kill Lane, Blackrock, Co. Dublin, Ireland, and
by Scepter Publishers in the United States.


4 posted on 06/09/2013 6:36:53 AM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

From: Luke 7:11-17

The Son of the Widow in Nain Restored to Life


[11] Soon afterwards He (Jesus) went to a city called Nain, and His disciples
and a great crowd went with Him. [12] As He drew near to the gate of the city,
behold, a man who had died was being carried out, the only son of his mother,
and she was a widow; and a large crowd from the city was with her. [13] And
when the Lord saw her, He had compassion on her and said to her, “Do not weep.”
[14] And He came and touched the bier, and the bearers stood still. And He said,
“Young man, I say to you, arise.” [15] And the dead man sat up, and began to
speak. And He gave him to his mother. [16] Fear seized them all; and they glo-
rified God, saying, “A great prophet has arisen among us!” and “God has visited
His people!” [17] And this report concerning Him spread through the whole of Ju-
dea and all the surrounding country.

*********************************************************************************************
Commentary:

11-17. “Jesus crosses paths again with a crowd of people. He could have
passed by or waited until they called Him. But He didn’t. He took the initiative,
because He was moved by a widow’s sorrow. She had just lost all she had, her
son.

“The evangelist explains that Jesus was moved. Perhaps He even showed signs
of it, as when Lazarus died. Christ was not, and is not, insensitive to the suffe-
ring that stems from love. He is pained at seeing children separated from their
parents. He overcomes death so as to give life, to reunite those who love one
another. But at the same time, He requires that we first admit the pre-eminence
of divine love, which alone can inspire genuine Christian living.

“Christ knows He is surrounded by a crowd which will be awed by the miracle
and will tell the story all over the countryside. But He does not act artificially,
merely to create an effect. Quite simply He is touched by that woman’s suffering
and cannot but console her. So He goes up to her and says, `Do not weep.’ It is
like saying, `I don’t want to see you crying; I have come on earth to bring joy and
peace.’ And then comes the miracle, the sign of the power of Christ who is God.
But first came His compassion, an evident sign of the tenderness of the heart of
Christ the man” (St. J. Escriva, “Christ Is Passing By”, 166).

15. This mother’s joy on being given back her son reminds us of the joy of our Mo-
ther the Church when her sinful children return to the life of grace. “The widowed
mother rejoiced at the raising of that young man,” St. Augustine comments. “Our
Mother the Church rejoices every day when people are raised again in spirit. The
young man had been dead physically; the latter, dead spiritually. The young man’s
death was mourned visibly; the death of the latter was invisible and unmourned.
He seeks them out Who knew them to be dead; only He can bring them back to
life” (”Sermon”, 98, 2).

*********************************************************************************************
Source: “The Navarre Bible: Text and Commentaries”. Biblical text from the
Revised Standard Version and New Vulgate. Commentaries by members of
the Faculty of Theology, University of Navarre, Spain.

Published by Four Courts Press, Kill Lane, Blackrock, Co. Dublin, Ireland, and
by Scepter Publishers in the United States.


5 posted on 06/09/2013 6:37:31 AM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Scripture readings taken from the Jerusalem Bible, published and copyright © 1966, 1967 and 1968 by Darton, Longman & Todd

Readings at Mass


First reading 1 Kings 17:17-24 ©
The son of the mistress of the house fell sick; his illness was so severe that in the end he had no breath left in him. And the woman said to Elijah, ‘What quarrel have you with me, man of God? Have you come here to bring my sins home to me and to kill my son?’ ‘Give me your son’ he said, and taking him from her lap, carried him to the upper room where he was staying and laid him on his own bed. He cried out to the Lord, ‘O Lord my God, do you mean to bring grief to the widow who is looking after me by killing her son?’ He stretched himself on the child three times and cried out to the Lord, ‘O Lord my God, may the soul of this child, I beg you, come into him again!’ The Lord heard the prayer of Elijah and the soul of the child returned to him again and he revived. Elijah took the child, brought him down from the upper room into the house, and gave him to his mother. ‘Look,’ Elijah said ‘your son is alive.’ And the woman replied, ‘Now I know you are a man of God and the word of the Lord in your mouth is truth itself.’

Psalm Psalm 29:2,4-6,11-13 ©
I will praise you, Lord, you have rescued me.
I will praise you, Lord, you have rescued me
  and have not let my enemies rejoice over me.
O Lord, you have raised my soul from the dead,
  restored me to life from those who sink into the grave.
I will praise you, Lord, you have rescued me.
Sing psalms to the Lord, you who love him,
  give thanks to his holy name.
His anger lasts a moment; his favour all through life.
  At night there are tears, but joy comes with dawn.
I will praise you, Lord, you have rescued me.
The Lord listened and had pity.
  The Lord came to my help.
For me you have changed my mourning into dancing:
  O Lord my God, I will thank you for ever.
I will praise you, Lord, you have rescued me.

Second reading Galatians 1:11-19 ©
The Good News I preached is not a human message that I was given by men, it is something I learnt only through a revelation of Jesus Christ. You must have heard of my career as a practising Jew, how merciless I was in persecuting the Church of God, how much damage I did to it, how I stood out among other Jews of my generation, and how enthusiastic I was for the traditions of my ancestors.
  Then God, who had specially chosen me while I was still in my mother’s womb, called me through his grace and chose to reveal his Son in me, so that I might preach the Good News about him to the pagans. I did not stop to discuss this with any human being, nor did I go up to Jerusalem to see those who were already apostles before me, but I went off to Arabia at once and later went straight back from there to Damascus. Even when after three years I went up to Jerusalem to visit Cephas and stayed with him for fifteen days, I did not see any of the other apostles; I only saw James, the brother of the Lord.

Gospel Acclamation cf.Ep1:17,18
Alleluia, alleluia!
May the Father of our Lord Jesus Christ
enlighten the eyes of our mind,
so that we can see what hope his call holds for us.
Alleluia!
Or Lk7:16
Alleluia, alleluia!
A great prophet has appeared among us;
God has visited his people.
Alleluia!

Gospel Luke 7:11-17 ©
Jesus went to a town called Nain, accompanied by his disciples and a great number of people. When he was near the gate of the town it happened that a dead man was being carried out for burial, the only son of his mother, and she was a widow. And a considerable number of the townspeople were with her. When the Lord saw her he felt sorry for her. ‘Do not cry’ he said. Then he went up and put his hand on the bier and the bearers stood still, and he said, ‘Young man, I tell you to get up.’ And the dead man sat up and began to talk, and Jesus gave him to his mother. Everyone was filled with awe and praised God saying, ‘A great prophet has appeared among us; God has visited his people.’ And this opinion of him spread throughout Judaea and all over the countryside.

6 posted on 06/09/2013 6:45:55 AM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Pray with Pope Benedict

Adoration with Pope energizing Catholics worldwide
Parishes Worldwide Prepare for Eucharistic Adoration Hour (June 2 at 11 am ET)
Pope [Francis] at Pentecost: Newness, harmony and mission
Audience: Do not be ‘part-time’ Christians
Pope Francis: Regina caeli
Pope to welcome 70,000 youths, confirm 44 (this Sunday) [Catholic Caucus]
Pope Francis’ General Audience focused on women. Feminists aren’t going to be happy
Cardinal Jorge Mario Bergoglio's "Letter On the Year of Faith" (Crossing Threshold of Faith)

Pope Francis – the real deal – has Audience with Cardinals
Benedict XVI's Final General Audience
On Ash Wednesday
On God As Creator of Heaven and Earth
On Abraham's Faith
On Christ As Mediator Between God and Man
On the Incarnation
On God the Almighty Father
Year of Faith: Indulgences and Places of Pilgrimage [Ecumenical]
On the Identity of Jesus

On the Faith of Mary, the Virgin Mother of Christ
Father Cantalamessa's 1st Advent Sermon (Catholic Caucus)
On The Unfolding of God's Self-Revelation
On the Beauty of God's Plan of Salvation
On Bearing Witness to the Christian Faith
On the Splendor of God's Truth
On the Knowledge of God
Archbishop Chaput says Year of Faith holds solution to relativism
Following the Truth: The Year Of Faith – 10 Things You Should Know [Catholic Caucus]
Papal Encyclical on Faith Announced

On the Desire for God
On the Ecclesial Nature of Faith
On the Nature of Faith
Catechism's benefits explained for Year of Faith (Catholic Caucus)
A Life of Faith: Papal Theologian Speaks on the Grace of Faith
ASIA/LAOS - "Year of Faith" amid the persecutions of Christians forced to become "animists"
From no faith to a mountain-top of meaning: Father John Nepil (Catholic Caucus)
Living the Year of Faith: How Pope Benedict Wants You to Begin [Catholic Caucus]
Share Your Faith in This Year of Faith: Two keys to help you do it.
On A New Series of Audiences for The Year of Faith

Pope will deliver year-long teaching series on restoring faith
Pope Benedict XVI Grants Plenary Indulgence to Faithful [Catholic Caucus]
Pope, at Marian shrine, entrusts Year of Faith, synod to Mary (Catholic Caucus)
Catholic Church Calls for Public Prayers in Offices on Fridays
Highlights in the Plan for Year of Faith: Traditional Events Will Take on Special Perspective
Catholic Church calls for public prayers in offices on Fridays
Vatican Unveils Logo for Year of Faith [Catholic Caucus]
Miami Prelate Recalls Pope's Visit to Cuba, Looks to Year of Faith [Catholic Caucus]
The World-Changing Year of Faith [Catholic Caucus]
Vatican to Issue Recommendations for Celebrating Year of Faith

7 posted on 06/09/2013 6:47:55 AM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Perpetual Novena for the Nation (Ecumenical)
8 posted on 06/09/2013 7:09:50 AM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Prayers for The Religion Forum (Ecumenical)
9 posted on 06/09/2013 7:10:27 AM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Al

 
 
Jesus, High Priest
 

We thank you, God our Father, for those who have responded to your call to priestly ministry.

Accept this prayer we offer on their behalf: Fill your priests with the sure knowledge of your love.

Open their hearts to the power and consolation of the Holy Spirit.

Lead them to new depths of union with your Son.

Increase in them profound faith in the Sacraments they celebrate as they nourish, strengthen and heal us.

Lord Jesus Christ, grant that these, your priests, may inspire us to strive for holiness by the power of their example, as men of prayer who ponder your word and follow your will.

O Mary, Mother of Christ and our mother, guard with your maternal care these chosen ones, so dear to the Heart of your Son.

Intercede for our priests, that offering the Sacrifice of your Son, they may be conformed more each day to the image of your Son, our Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ. Amen.

Saint John Vianney, universal patron of priests, pray for us and our priests

This icon shows Jesus Christ, our eternal high priest.

The gold pelican over His heart represents self-sacrifice.

The border contains an altar and grapevines, representing the Mass, and icons of Melchizedek and St. Jean-Baptiste Vianney.

Melchizedek: king of righteousness (left icon) was priest and king of Jerusalem.  He blessed Abraham and has been considered an ideal priest-king.

St. Jean-Baptiste Vianney is the patron saint of parish priests.


10 posted on 06/09/2013 9:07:45 AM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Pray a Rosary each day for our nation.

Pray the Rosary

1.  Sign of the Cross:  In the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit.  Amen.

2.  The Apostles Creed:  I BELIEVE in God, the Father almighty, Creator of heaven and earth, and in Jesus Christ, His only Son, our Lord, who was conceived by the Holy Spirit, born of the Virgin Mary, suffered under Pontius Pilate, was crucified, died, and was buried. He descended into hell; on the third day he rose again from the dead; he ascended into heaven, and is seated at the right hand of God, the Father Almighty; from there He shall come to judge the living and the dead.

I believe in the Holy Spirit, the holy catholic Church, the communion of saints, the forgiveness of sins, the resurrection of the body, and the life everlasting. Amen.

3.  The Lord's Prayer:  OUR Father, who art in heaven, hallowed be Thy name. Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done on earth as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread and forgive us our trespasses as we forgive those who trespass against us. And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil. Amen.

4. (3) Hail Mary:  HAIL Mary, full of grace, the Lord is with thee. Blessed art thou amongst women and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus. Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners, now, and in the hour of our death. Amen. (Three times)

5. Glory Be:  GLORY be to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit. As it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be, world without end. Amen.

Fatima Prayer: Oh, my Jesus, forgive us our sins, save us from the fires of hell, lead all souls to heaven, especially those in most need of your mercy.

Announce each mystery, then say 1 Our Father, 10 Hail Marys, 1 Glory Be and 1 Fatima prayer.  Repeat the process with each mystery.

End with the Hail Holy Queen:

Hail, Holy Queen, Mother of Mercy, our life, our sweetness and our hope! To thee do we cry, poor banished children of Eve! To thee do we send up our sighs, mourning and weeping in this vale of tears! Turn then, most gracious advocate, thine eyes of mercy towards us; and after this, our exile, show unto us the blessed fruit of thy womb, Jesus!

O clement, O loving, O sweet Virgin Mary! Pray for us, O holy Mother of God, that we may be made worthy of the promises of Christ.

Final step -- The Sign of the Cross

 

The Mysteries of the Rosary

By tradition, Catholics meditate on these Mysteries during prayers of the Rosary.
The biblical references follow each of the Mysteries below.


The Glorious Mysteries
(Wednesdays and Sundays)
1.The Resurrection (Matthew 28:1-8, Mark 16:1-18, Luke 24:1-12, John 20:1-29) [Spiritual fruit - Faith]
2. The Ascension (Mark 16:19-20, Luke 24:50-53, Acts 1:6-11) [Spiritual fruit - Christian Hope]
3. The Descent of the Holy Spirit (Acts 2:1-13) [Spiritual fruit - Gifts of the Holy Spirit]
4. The Assumption [Spiritual fruit - To Jesus through Mary]
5. The Coronation [Spiritual fruit - Grace of Final Perseverance]


11 posted on 06/09/2013 9:08:28 AM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All



~ PRAYER ~

St. Michael, the Archangel, defend us in battle
 Be our protection against the wickedness
and snares of the devil;
May God rebuke him, we  humbly pray,
 and do thou, O Prince of the heavenly host,
 by the power of God,
 Cast into hell Satan and all the evil spirits
who prowl through the world seeking the ruin of souls.
 Amen
+

12 posted on 06/09/2013 9:09:53 AM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

A Prayer for our Free Nation Under God
God Save Our Country web site (prayer warriors)
Prayer Chain Request for the United States of America
Pray for Nancy Pelosi
Prayer and fasting will help defeat health care reform (Freeper Prayer Thread)
Prayer Campaign Started to Convert Pro-Abortion Catholic Politicians to Pro-Life
[Catholic Caucus] One Million Rosaries
Non-stop Rosary vigil to defeat ObamaCare

From an Obama bumper sticker on a car:

"Pray for Obama.  Psalm 109:8"

   

PLEASE JOIN US -

Evening Prayer
Someone has said that if people really understood the full extent of the power we have available through prayer, we might be speechless.
Did you know that during WWII there was an advisor to Churchill who organized a group of people who dropped what they were doing every day at a prescribed hour for one minute to collectively pray for the safety of England, its people and peace?  


There is now a group of people organizing the same thing here in America. If you would like to participate: Every evening at 9:00 PM Eastern Time (8:00 PM Central) (7:00 PM Mountain) (6:00 PM Pacific), stop whatever you are doing and spend one minute praying for the safety of the United States, our troops, our citizens, and for a return to a Godly nation. If you know anyone else who would like to participate, please pass this along. Our prayers are the most powerful asset we have.    Please forward this to your praying friends.


13 posted on 06/09/2013 10:27:33 AM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

June Devotion: The Sacred Heart

Since the 16th century Catholic piety has assigned entire months to special devotions. The month of June is set apart for devotion to the Sacred Heart of Jesus. "From among all the proofs of the infinite goodness of our Savior none stands out more prominently than the fact that, as the love of the faithful grew cold, He, Divine Love Itself, gave Himself to us to be honored by a very special devotion and that the rich treasury of the Church was thrown wide open in the interests of that devotion." These words of Pope Pius XI refer to the Sacred Heart Devotion, which in its present form dates from the revelations given to Saint Margaret Mary Alacoque in 1673-75.

The devotion consists in the divine worship of the human heart of Christ, which is united to His divinity and which is a symbol of His love for us. The aim of the devotion is to make our Lord king over our hearts by prompting them to return love to Him (especially through an act of consecration by which we offer to the Heart of Jesus both ourselves and all that belongs to us) and to make reparation for our ingratitude to God.

INVOCATION

O Heart of love, I put all my trust in Thee; for I fear all things from my own weakness, but I hope for all things from Thy goodness.
Saint Margaret Mary Alacoque

PRAYER TO THE SACRED HEART

Devotion to the Sacred Heart was the characteristic note of the piety of Saint Gertrude the Great (1256-1302), Benedictine nun and renowned mystic. She was, in fact, the first great exponent of devotion to the Sacred Heart. In our efforts to honor the Heart of Jesus we have this prayer as a model for our own:
Hail! O Sacred Heart of Jesus, living and quickening source of eternal life, infinite treasure of the Divinity, and burning furnace of divine love. Thou art my refuge and my sanctuary, 0 my amiable Savior. Consume my heart with that burning fire with which Thine is ever inflamed. Pour down on my soul those graces which flow from Thy love, and let my heart be so united with Thine, that our wills may be one, and mine in all things be conformed to Thine. May Thy divine will be equally the standard and rule of all my desires and of all my actions. Amen.
Saint Gertrude

FOR THE CHURCH

O most holy Heart of Jesus, shower Thy blessings in abundant measure upon Thy holy Church, upon the Supreme Pontiff and upon all the clergy; to the just grant perseverance; convert sinners; enlighten unbelievers; bless our relations, friends and benefactors; assist the dying; deliver the holy souls in purgatory; and extend over all hearts the sweet empire of Thy love. Amen.

A PRAYER OF TRUST

O God, who didst in wondrous manner reveal to the virgin, Margaret Mary, the unsearchable riches of Thy Heart, grant that loving Thee, after her example, in all things and above all things, we may in Thy Heart find our abiding home.
Roman Missal

ACT OF LOVE

Reveal Thy Sacred Heart to me, O Jesus, and show me Its attractions. Unite me to It for ever. Grant that all my aspirations and all the beats of my heart, which cease not even while I sleep, may be a testimonial to Thee of my love for Thee and may say to Thee: Yes, Lord, I am all Thine;
pledge of my allegiance to Thee rests ever in my heart will never cease to be there. Do Thou accept the slight amount of good that I do and be graciously pleased to repair all m] wrong-doing; so that I may be able to bless Thee in time and in eternity. Amen.
Cardinal Merry del Val

MEMORARE TO THE SACRED HEART
Remember, O most sweet Jesus, that no one who has had recourse to Thy Sacred Heart, implored its help, or sought it mercy was ever abandoned. Encouraged with confidence, O tenderest of hearts, we present ourselves before Thee, crushes beneath the weight of our sins. In our misery, O Sacred Hear. of Jesus, despise not our simple prayers, but mercifully grant our requests.

Prayer Source: Prayer Book, The by Reverend John P. O'Connell, M.A., S.T.D. and Jex Martin, M.A., The Catholic Press, Inc., Chicago, Illinois, 1954

Only for Love: The Sacred Heart and the Priesthood [Catholic Caucus]

Catholic Word of the Day: LITANY OF THE SACRED HEART, 10-19-09
Devotion to the Sacred Heart of Jesus
Devotion to the Sacred Heart Today
The Biblical Foundation of Devotion to the Sacred Heart of Jesus [Ecumenical]
Heart to Heart (Sacred Heart of Jesus Devotion) [St. Margaret Mary Alacoque]
(June) The Month of the Sacred Heart {Catholic/Orthodox Caucus]
First Friday Devotion to the Sacred Heart of Jesus [St. Margaret Mary Alacoque]
The Heart of the World (On the Sacred Heart of Jesus) (Catholic Caucus)
The Sacred Heart Is The Holy Eucharist(Catholic Caucus)
The Origin of the Sacred Heart Badge

Importance of Devotion to the Sacred Heart
An Awesome Homily on the Solemnity of the Sacred Heart of Jesus by Father Edmond Kline
Catholic Prayer and Devotion: June the Month of the Sacred Heart
Catholic Devotions: Sacred Heart of Jesus
Pope Urges Jesuits to Spread Sacred Heart Devotion
Homilies preached by Father Altier on the Feast of the Sacred Heart
Catholic Meditation and Devotion: The Sacred Heart of Jesus
Daily Recomendation to the Sacred Heart of Jesus powerful prayer!
The Sacred Heart and the Eucharist
The Love of the Sacred Heart

On the Sacred Heart - "We Adore God's Love of Humanity"
HAURIETIS AQUAS (On Devotion To The Sacred Heart) - Encyclical by Pope Pius XII
Solemnity Most Sacred Heart of Jesus and Immaculate Heart of Mary
Sacred Heart a Feast of God's Love, Says John Paul II
The Sacred Heart of Jesus: Symbol of Combativity and the Restoration of Christendom
Devotion to the Sacred Heart of Jesus-The Early Church, Middle Ages up to St. Margaret Mary
See this Heart
‘God Will Act and Will Reign’
About Devotion To The Sacred Heart:The Story Of Saint Margaret Mary Alacoque
Rediscover Feast of Sacred Heart, John Paul II Tells Youth

 
 

"Behold this Heart which has loved men so much, and yet men do not want to love Me in return. Through you My divine Heart wishes to spread its love everywhere on earth."

- Jesus to Saint Margaret Mary

Our Lord also made 12 promises to St. Margaret Mary for those that are devoted to His Sacred Heart.

  1. I will give them all the graces necessary for their state in life.
  2. I will give peace in their families.
  3. I will console them in all their troubles.
  4. They shall find in My Heart an assured refuge during life and especially at the hour of death.
  5. I will pour abundant blessings on all their undertakings.
  6. Sinners shall find in My Heart the source and infinite ocean of mercy.
  7. Tepid souls shall become fervent.
  8. Fervent souls shall speedily rise to great perfection.
  9. I will bless the homes in which the image of My Sacred Heart shall be exposed and honoured.
  10. I will give to priests the power to touch the most hardened hearts.
  11. Those who propagate this devotion shall have their name written in My Heart, and it shall never be effaced.
  12. The all-powerful love of My Heart will grant to all those who shall receive Communion on the First Friday of nine consecutive months the grace of final repentance; they shall not die under My displeasure, nor without receiving their Sacraments; My Heart shall be their assured refuge at the last hour.


14 posted on 06/09/2013 10:28:02 AM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

June 2013

Pope's Intentions

Mutual Respect. That a culture of dialogue, listening, and mutual respect may prevail among peoples.

New Evangelization. That where secularization is strongest, Christian communities may effectively promote a new evangelization.


15 posted on 06/09/2013 10:28:37 AM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Daily Gospel Commentary

Tenth Sunday in Ordinary Time - Year C
Commentary of the day
Vatican Council II
Constitution on the Church in the modern world « Gaudium et spes» § 22 (©Libreria vaticana editrice)

"The Lord was moved with pity for her and said to her, 'Do not weep' "

He who is "the image of the invisible God", is himself the perfect man. To the sons of Adam he restores the divine likeness which had been disfigured from the first sin onward. Since human nature as he assumed it was not annulled, by that very fact it has been raised up to a divine dignity in our respect too. For by his incarnation the Son of God has united himself in some fashion with every man. He worked with human hands, he thought with a human mind, acted by human choice and loved with a human heart. Born of the Virgin Mary, he has truly been made one of us, like us in all things except sin.

As an innocent lamb he merited for us life by the free shedding of his own blood. In him God reconciled us to himself and among ourselves; from bondage to the devil and sin he delivered us, so that each one of us can say with the Apostle Paul: The Son of God "loved me and gave Himself up for me". By suffering for us he not only provided us with an example for our imitation, he blazed a trail, and if we follow it, life and death are made holy and take on a new meaning.

The Christian, conformed to the likeness of that Son who is “the firstborn of many brothers,” receives "the first-fruits of the Spirit" by which he becomes capable of discharging the new law of love. Through this Spirit, who is "the pledge of our inheritance", the whole person is renewed from within, even to the achievement of "the redemption of the body": "If the Spirit of him who raised Jesus from the death dwells in you, then he who raised Jesus Christ from the dead will also bring to life your mortal bodies because of his Spirit who dwells in you" ... Such is the mystery of man, and it is a great one, as seen by believers in the light of Christian revelation. Through Christ and in Christ, the riddles of sorrow and death grow meaningful. Apart from his Gospel, they overwhelm us. Christ has risen, destroying death by his death; he has lavished life upon us so that, as sons in the Son, we can cry out in the Spirit: “Abba, Father!”

( Biblical references : Col 1,15; Gal 2,20; 1P 2,21; He 10,20;  Rm 8,29.23; Eph 1,14; Rm 8,23.11; byzantine paschal liturgy; Rm 8,15)

 

16 posted on 06/09/2013 10:33:55 AM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Salvation
Luke
  English: Douay-Rheims Latin: Vulgata Clementina Greek NT: Byzantine/Majority Text (2000)
  Luke 7
11 And it came to pass afterwards, that he went into a city that is called Naim; and there went with him his disciples, and a great multitude. Et factum est : deinceps ibat in civitatem quæ vocatur Naim : et ibant cum eo discipuli ejus et turba copiosa. και εγενετο εν τω εξης επορευετο εις πολιν καλουμενην ναιν και συνεπορευοντο αυτω οι μαθηται αυτου ικανοι και οχλος πολυς
12 And when he came nigh to the gate of the city, behold a dead man was carried out, the only son of his mother; and she was a widow: and a great multitude of the city was with her. Cum autem appropinquaret portæ civitatis, ecce defunctus efferebatur filius unicus matris suæ : et hæc vidua erat : et turba civitatis multa cum illa. ως δε ηγγισεν τη πυλη της πολεως και ιδου εξεκομιζετο τεθνηκως υιος μονογενης τη μητρι αυτου και αυτη [ην] χηρα και οχλος της πολεως ικανος συν αυτη
13 Whom when the Lord had seen, being moved with mercy towards her, he said to her: Weep not. Quam cum vidisset Dominus, misericordia motus super eam, dixit illi : Noli flere. και ιδων αυτην ο κυριος εσπλαγχνισθη επ αυτη και ειπεν αυτη μη κλαιε
14 And he came near and touched the bier. And they that carried it, stood still. And he said: Young man, I say to thee, arise. Et accessit, et tetigit loculum. (Hi autem qui portabant, steterunt.) Et ait : Adolescens, tibi dico, surge. και προσελθων ηψατο της σορου οι δε βασταζοντες εστησαν και ειπεν νεανισκε σοι λεγω εγερθητι
15 And he that was dead, sat up, and began to speak. And he gave him to his mother. Et resedit qui erat mortuus, et cœpit loqui. Et dedit illum matri suæ. και ανεκαθισεν ο νεκρος και ηρξατο λαλειν και εδωκεν αυτον τη μητρι αυτου
16 And there came a fear on them all: and they glorified God, saying: A great prophet is risen up among us: and, God hath visited his people. Accepit autem omnes timor : et magnificabant Deum, dicentes : Quia propheta magnus surrexit in nobis : et quia Deus visitavit plebem suam. ελαβεν δε φοβος παντας και εδοξαζον τον θεον λεγοντες οτι προφητης μεγας εγηγερται εν ημιν και οτι επεσκεψατο ο θεος τον λαον αυτου
17 And this rumour of him went forth throughout all Judea, and throughout all the country round about. Et exiit hic sermo in universam Judæam de eo, et in omnem circa regionem. και εξηλθεν ο λογος ουτος εν ολη τη ιουδαια περι αυτου και εν παση τη περιχωρω

17 posted on 06/09/2013 11:09:23 AM PDT by annalex (fear them not)
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To: annalex
11. And it came to pass the day after, that he went into a city called Nain; and many of his disciples went with him, and much people.
12. Now when he came nigh to the gate of the city, behold, there was a dead man carried out, the only son of his mother, and she was a widow: and much people of the city was with her.
13. And when the Lord saw her, he had compassion on her, and said to her, Weep not.
14. And he came and touched the boy: and they that bore him stood still. And he said, Young man, I say to you, Arise.
15. And he that was dead sat up, and began to speak. And he delivered him to his mother.
16. And there came a fear on all: and they glorified God, saying, That a great prophet is risen up among us; and, That God has visited his people.
17. And this rumor of him went forth throughout all Judea, and throughout all the region round about.

CYRIL; The Lord joins one miracle upon another. In the former instance He came indeed when called for, but in this He came self-invited; as it is said, And it came to pass the day after that he went into a city called Nain.

THEOPHYL; Nain is a city of Galilee, within two miles of mount Tabor. But by the divine counsel there were large multitudes accompanying the Lord, that there might be many witnesses of so great a miracle. Hence it follows, And his disciples went with him, and much people.

GREG. NYSS. Now the proof of the resurrection we learn not so much from the words as from the works of our Savior, who, beginning His miracles with the less wonderful, reconciled our faith to far greater. First indeed in the grievous sickness of the centurion's servant, He verged upon the power of resurrection; afterwards with a higher power he led men to the belief in a resurrection, when He raised the widow's son, who was carried out to be buried; as it is said, Now when he came nigh to the gate of the city, behold, there was a dead man carried out, the only son of his mother.

TITUS BOST. But some one will say of the centurion's servant, that he was not going to die. That such an one might restrain his rash tongue, the Evangelist explains that the young man whom Christ came upon was already dead, the only son of a widow. For it follows, And she was a widow, and much people of the city was with her.

GREG. NYSS. He has told us the sum of misery in a few words. The mother was a widow, and had no further hope of baring children, she had no one upon whom she might look in the place of him that was dead. To him alone she had given suck, he alone made her home cheerful. All that is sweet and precious to a mother, was he alone to her.

CYRIL; These were sufferings to excite compassion, and which might well affect to mourning and tears, as it follows, And when the Lord saw her, he had compassion on her, saying, Weep not.

THEOPHYL; As if He said, Cease to weep for one as dead, whom you shall soon see rise again alive.

CHRYS. But when He bids us cease from weeping Who consoles the sorrowful, He tells us to receive consolation from those who are now dead, hoping for their resurrection. But life meeting death stops the bier, as it follows, And he came.

CYRIL; He performs the miracle not only in word, but also touches the bier, to the end that you might know that the sacred body of Christ is powerful to the saving of man. For it is the body of Life and the flesh of the Omnipotent Word, whose power it possesses. For as iron applied to fire does the work of fire, so the flesh, when it is united to the Word, which quickens all things, becomes itself also quickening, and the banisher of death.

TITUS BOST. But the Savior is not like to Elias mourning over the son of the widow of Sarepta, nor as Elisha who laid his own body upon the body of the dead, nor as Peter who prayed for Tabitha, but is none other than He who calls those things which be not, as though they were, who can speak to the dead as to the living, as it follows, And he said, Young man.

GREG. NYSS. When He said, Young man, He signified that he was in the flower of his age, just ripening into manhood, who but a little while before was the sight of his mothers eyes, just entering upon the time of marriage, the scion of her race, the branch of succession, the staff of her old age.

TITUS BOST. But straightway he arose to whom the command was made. For the Divine power is irresistible; there is no delay, no urgency of prayer, as it follows, And he that was dead sat up and began to speak, and he gave him to his mother. These are the signs of a true resurrection, for the lifeless body cannot speak, nor would the mother have carried back to her house her dead and lifeless son.

THEOPHYL; But well does the Evangelist testify that the Lord is first moved with compassion for the mother, and then raises her son, that in the one case He might set before us for our imitation an example of piety, in the other He might build up our belief in His wonderful power. Hence it follows, And there came a fear upon all, and they glorified God, &c.

CYRIL; This was a great thing in an insensible and ungrateful people. For in a short time afterward they would neither esteem Him as a prophet, nor allow that He did aught for the public good. But none of those that dwelt in Judea were ignorant of this miracle, as it follows, And this rumor of him went forth throughout all Judea.

MAXIM. But it is worthy of remark, that seven resurrections are related before our Lord's, of which the first was that of the son of the widow of Sarepta, the second of the Shunamite's son, the third which was caused by the remains of Elisha, the fourth which took place at Nain, as is here related, the fifth of the ruler of the Synagogue's daughter, the sixth of Lazarus, the seventh at Christ's passion, for many bodies of the saints arose. The eighth is that of Christ, who being free from death remained beyond for a sign that the general resurrection which is to come in the eighth age shall not be dissolved by death, but shall abide never to pass away.

THEOPHYL; But the dead man who was carried without the gate of the city in the sight of many' signifies a man rendered senseless by the deadening power of mortal sin, and no longer concealing his soul's death within the folds of his heart, but proclaiming it to the knowledge of the world, through the evidence of words or deeds as through the gate of the city. For the gate of the city, I suppose, is some one of the bodily senses. And he is well said to be the only son of his mother, for there is one mother composed of many individuals, the Church, but every soul that remembers that it is redeemed by the death of the Lord, knows the Church to be a widow.

AMBROSE; For this widow surrounded by a great multitude of people seems to be more than the woman who was thought worthy by her tears to obtain the resurrection of her only son, because the Church recalls the younger people from the funeral procession to life by the contemplation of her tears, who is forbid to weep for him to whom resurrection was promised.

THEOPHYL; Or the dogma of Novatus is crushed who ho endeavoring to do away with the purifying of the penitent, denies that the mother Church, weeping for tile spiritual extinction of her sons, ought to be consoled by tile hope of their restoration to life.

AMBROSE; This dead man was borne on the bier by the four material elements to the grave, but there was a hope of his rising again because he was borne on wood, which though before it did not benefit us, yet after Christ had touched it, began to profit to life, that it might be a sign that salvation was to be extended to the people by the wood of the cross. For we lie lifeless on the bier when either the fire of immoderate desire bursts forth, or the cold moisture breaks out, and through the sluggish state of our earthly body the vigor of our minds waxes dull.

THEOPHYL; Or the coffin on which the dead is carried is the ill at ease conscience of a desperate sinner. But they who carry him to be buried are either unclean desires, or the allurements of companions, who stood when our Lord touched the bier, because the conscience, when touched by dread of the judgment from on high, often checking its carnal lusts, and those who unjustly praise, returns to itself, and answers its Savior's call to life.

AMBROSE; If then your sin is so heavy that by your penitential tears you can not yourself wash it out, let the mother Church weep for you, the multitude standing by; soon shall you rise from the dead and begin to spear; the words of life; they all shall fear, (for by the example of one all are corrected;) they shall also praise God who has given us such great remedies for escaping death.

THEOPHYL; But God has visited His people not only by the one incarnation of His Word, but by ever sending It into our hearts.

THEOPHYL. By the widow also you may understand a soul that has lost her husband in the divine word. Her son is the understanding, which is carried out beyond the city of the living. Its coffin is the body, which some indeed have called the tomb. But the Lord touching him raises him up, causing him to become young, and rising from sin he begins to speak and teach others. For before he would not have been believed.

Catena Aurea Luke 7
18 posted on 06/09/2013 11:09:49 AM PDT by annalex (fear them not)
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To: annalex


The Resurrection of the Widow's Son

James Tissot

1886-96

19 posted on 06/09/2013 11:10:18 AM PDT by annalex (fear them not)
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To: All
Arlington Catholic Herald

GOSPEL COMMENTARY LK 7:11-17
Young man, I tell you, arise
Fr. Jack Peterson, YA

In our readings this Sunday, two widows mourn the loss of their sons. The darkness and pain of that experience can hardly be put into words … to compound the loss of their husband with the loss of their son. Few things in life can be as painful as these two losses for any woman.

It is beautiful to hear that God has compassion on both of them and miraculously returns their sons to life. In the reading from the first Book of Kings, the prophet Elijah intercedes on behalf of the mourning woman: “O Lord, my God, let the life breath return to the body of this child.” In the Gospel, Jesus is “moved with pity” for the mourning widow. Imagine this mother’s joy when she watches, as St. Luke recounts, “The dead man sat up and began to speak, and Jesus gave him to his mother.”

One reality that jumps off the page is that God hears the pain of these two women. This makes plenty of sense. God creates us in love. His care for His beloved children runs deeper than the oceans. So, of course, He knows when we are hurting. He hurts when we hurt. Again, Jesus is moved with pity for the woman in the Gospel and chooses to bring her son back to life for the sake of his mourning mother.

The healing miracles in the Bible invite us to beg the question: Why does God choose to heal in one situation and not in another? Well, we are treading on holy ground here. We are staring in the face of a mystery. God always has compassion for our suffering. Of this, there is no doubt. Sometimes He chooses to heal or restore to life in a miraculous, clear and instantaneous way. Sometimes, He does it over a period of time. Sometimes it is not His will to heal us. This mystery is connected to the mystery of suffering in our world.

Suffering can be a channel of God’s saving grace in our lives. It is often, unfortunately, the only way that God can get our attention. It is one of the most powerful ways that God can help us to realize our radical need for Him. It can be a way to purify our hearts of all selfishness and sin, making room for Him, His love and His grace to take over our hearts. It is a way to learn the all-important virtue of obedience. This was the case even for Jesus. The author of the Letter to the Hebrews proclaims in reference to Our Lord: “Son though he was, he learned obedience from what he suffered” (Heb 5: 8).

There is, of course, the most significant truth about human suffering in the world. God chose to dive into it and to use the self-surrender of His Son, Jesus, in His darkest and most painful hour to redeem the world and demonstrate the unfathomable depths of His love. “In this is love, not that we loved God but that he loved us and sent his Son to be the expiation for our sins” (1 Jn 4:10).

So, God decides in His infinite wisdom to allow suffering in our lives at certain times because it is the best channel of His grace in certain situations. Suffering is very hard to embrace, but when we understand that God has compassion on us, is present throughout every period of suffering, and is pouring grace into our lives through it, we find the way to cooperate with Him in transforming our lives and making us into brand-new creatures.

At other times, God chooses to heal in simple, instantaneous moments. It is possible to learn and be transformed by clear interventions of God as well. When this happens, we are overwhelmed by the love God that takes away a great evil and restores us to health in a flash. Jesus and the apostles healed numerous people in the New Testament. There were the 10 lepers, the woman afflicted with hemorrhages, the blind man Bartimaeus and so many others.

I am of the opinion that God wants to offer more instantaneous healings in our world today. This was an important part of Jesus’ public ministry. It is one way to manifest the establishment of His kingdom on earth. I think that we often do not have enough faith to ask for such interventions. We do not expect Jesus to act in that fashion today and thus we limit His capacity to do so because of our lack of trust.

Jesus stepped forward and touched the coffin … and He said, “Young man, I tell you, arise.”

Fr. Peterson is assistant chaplain at Marymount University in Arlington and director of the Youth Apostles Institute in McLean.


20 posted on 06/09/2013 1:02:57 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Archdiocese of Washington

A Prescription for Peace in A World of Woe. A Homily for the 10th Sunday of the Year

By:

Today’s Gospel provides a kind of prescription for peace in a world of woe. Lets look at this gospel in four stages.

I. The Place -  The text says plainly: Jesus journeyed to a city called Nain, and his disciples and a large crowd accompanied him.

The name of the city “Nain” means “Fair” in the sense of “beautiful.” For sitting upon a high hill, it had a magnificent view.

And here is a too is an apt description of this world which has its fair beauty, its magnificent vistas, its pleasures and offerings. As men and women of faith, we ought to appreciate the beauty of what God has done. We ought not, as the old saying goes, “Walk through a field and miss the color purple.” God has given us many gifts, and the mystic in all of us is invited to wonder and awe, to gratitude and serene joy.

Yes, we, with Jesus and his disciples are journeying to a city called “Nain” with its fair beauty.

And do not miss the word “journey” in this line. For, as we go through life, we are sorely tempted to walk right past “the color purple;” to be unreflective, and ungrateful. Part of life’s task is to make the journey that sees God’s glory, and that is able to be in living conscious contact with God at all times, seeing his beauty and glory on display and being in mystical contemplation of it. We need to journey to a city called “Nain” by having our eyes open to God’s fair beauty. This is the gift of wonder and awe.

If we can make this journey, we will have in place, the first prescription for peace. For the world, with all its woe, never looses the fair beauty of God’s glory. And appreciating this, gives serene peace even in the midst of storms. God is always present and speaking to us in what He has made and is sustaining.

II. The Pain - And yet, fair though this world is, the very next thing we encounter is pain. The text says, As he drew near to the gate of the city, a man who had died was being carried out, the only son of his mother, and she was a widow. A large crowd from the city was with her.….

For indeed, we live in a fallen world, governed by a fallen angel, and we have fallen natures. God had made paradise for us.  And while we do not fully know all the parameters of what that Paradise would have been, nevertheless, it is clear that Adam and Eve were driven from the best of what God had made.

Adam was told that the ground was now cursed on account of him, and it brought forth thorns and thistles in a kind of protest. Work for him became arduous and sweaty, and a kind of battle sets up against the forces of nature for him to get his food etc.

Eve will bring forth her children in pain. Strife and some degree of shame also went into her relationship with her husband, and he with her.

The first shedding of blood takes place as God kills an animal and clothes them in its skins. For the world is now grown cold and hostile.

And while the world is not lost all it’s fair beauty, yet still a long scarlet cord of suffering and death reaches from outside Eden’s closed gates to this moment outside the gates of Nain.

And such a pain it is! A woman, already a widow having lost her husband, has now lost her only son, and her livelihood as well.

And thus, we do well to maintain a sober perspective about this world. There is much to enjoy which comes to us from the hand of God. And yet we must also remember that we live in Paradise Lost. Its once and future glory is still on display, but it’s pain is very present.

Simple sobriety about this provides a kind of strange serenity. There are certain hard truths that, if we accept them, will set us free. And one of those hard truths is that life is hard. Joy will come with the morning light, but there are some nights of weeping to endure as we journey to a heavenly homeland where sorrows and sighs are no more.

Accepting the pain of this world is a second part of the prescription for peace in a world of woe.

III. The Portrait of Jesus - The Text says, When the Lord saw her, he was moved with pity for her. This woman’s sorrow becomes his own. And while there is a mystery to God’s allowance of suffering, we must never think that Lord is unmoved or uncaring regarding our sorrow.

There is an old saying that “Jesus did not merely come to get us out of trouble, but first to get into trouble with us.” Yes, He takes up our pain, and experiences it to the top. And old hymn says of him, Jesus knows all about our struggles, He will guide till the day is done; There’s not a friend like the lowly Jesus, No, not one! No, not one!

Note too that the word Pity comes from “pietas” a word for family love. Jesus looks at this woman and sees a sister, a Mother, a family member and he is moved with family love.

Learning to trust in Jesus’ love for us, especially when we suffer, is a critical part of the prescription for peace. We need to pray constantly in suffering: “Jesus I trust in your love for me!” This brings peace if we pray it in the Holy Spirit.

IV. The Preview - The text says, [Jesus] said to her, “Do not weep.” He stepped forward and touched the coffin; at this the bearers halted, and he said, “Young man, I tell you, arise!” The dead man sat up and began to speak, and Jesus gave him to his mother. –

We have here a directive of Jesus not to weep, but that directive is rooted in what he plans to do. This is more than a human, “Cheer up, don’t be sad” wish. Jesus is about to give her back her son, and, based on this fact, comes his directive “Do not weep.”

She and the others standing by and weeping with her are about to get a preview of what the Lord will do for all who believe when we are delivered from “Paradise Lost” to the Kingdom of Heaven.

In a very moving line we are told simply, “Jesus gave him to his mother.”

But do you realize that one day the Lord will do this for you? Jesus will return and restore everything and everyone, which the devil and this world have stolen from us. It will all be given back, and more than we can ever imagine add unto it.

We may of course all wish that the Lord had raised some of our loved ones as he did for this widow. But what is done here is a powerful preview for this widow and for us. But even if you have not had this particular preview of what the Lord will do, you have surely had others.

In my own life the Lord has given me victories over sufferings, and setbacks. I have experienced healings and restorations, as I pray and am sure you have too. These are previews and down payments, if you will, on the total restoration that the Lord is going to effect in your life. What ever you have lost, you will recover it all and far more beside.

What previews have you had in your life…what victories, what healing and restoration? These are like previews of the promised and more than full restoration. What is your testimony?

It is important for your to reflect on the previews the Lord has already give, for these are another important part of the prescription for peace: the promise of complete restoration and the previews or down payments he has already made.

Here then is a prescription for peace in a world of woe:

  1. Make the Journey to Nain, a place called fair and beautiful. That is let the Lord open your eyes to the beauty and blessings all around you, and come to see the magnificence of His glory on display at every moment. It will give you peace and serene joy.
  2. Ask the grace to accept that we currently and for a brief time live in Paradise Lost, and that life is hard. But this sober acceptance of life’s sorrows brings a paradoxical serenity as our resentments that we do not live in a perfect world goes away. Accepting that this world, with all its beauty, also has hardships brings peace and a determination to journey to the place where joys will never end.
  3. Accept the Lord’s love for you even in the mysterious allowance of suffering, accept that he is deeply moved and just say over and over, “Jesus, I trust in your Love for me.”
  4. Be alert to the previews that God has already given you and is giving of the future glory that awaits the faithful. And, having accepted this evidence, this testimony from the Holy Spirit, peacefully accept the Lord’s invitation not weep and his promise that you will recover it all, and much more besides.

A prescription for peace in a world of woe.


21 posted on 06/09/2013 2:26:59 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Salvation
Sunday Gospel Reflections

10th Sunday in Ordinary Time
Reading I:
1Kgs 17:17-24 II: Gal 1:11-19
Gospel
Luke 7:11-17

11 Jesus journeyed to a city called Nain, and his disciples and a large crowd accompanied him.
12 As he drew near to the gate of the city, a man who had died was being carried out, the only son of his mother, and she was a widow. A large crowd from the city was with her.
13 When the Lord saw her, he was moved with pity for her and said to her, "Do not weep".
14 He stepped forward and touched the coffin; at this the bearers halted, and he said, "Young man, I tell you, arise!"
15 The dead man sat up and began to speak, and Jesus gave him to his mother.
16 Fear seized them all, and they glorified God, exclaiming, "A great prophet has arisen in our midst," and "God has visited his people".
17 This report about him spread through the whole of Judea and in all the surrounding region.


Interesting Details
One Main Point

The Trinity gives us the compassionate Jesus as the prophet and the Word of God among us.


Reflections
  1. Who are the "widow without son" or the poor in my time and my town now?
  2. Do I live out His teaching of compassion in my family and community?
  3. How am I poor, and do I cry out to Jesus?
  4. Do I spread the Word? What do I spread?

22 posted on 06/09/2013 3:23:38 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Sunday, June 09, 2013
Tenth Sunday in Ordinary Time
First Reading:
Psalm:
Second Reading:
Gospel:
1 Kings 17:17-24
Psalm 30:2, 4-6, 11-13
Galatians 1:11-19
Luke 7:11-17

I have found David My servant, with My holy oil I have anointed him; for My hand shall help him, and My arm shall strengthen him. The enemy shall have no advantage over him, and the son of iniquity shall not hurt him.

-- Psalm 88: 21-23


23 posted on 06/09/2013 3:33:17 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Just A Minute Just A Minute (Listen)
Some of EWTN's most popular hosts and guests in a collection of one minute inspirational messages. A different message each time you click.

24 posted on 06/09/2013 3:34:10 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All



The Angelus 

The Angel of the Lord declared to Mary: 
And she conceived of the Holy Spirit. 

Hail Mary, full of grace, the Lord is with thee; blessed art thou among women and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus.
Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners, now and at the hour of our death. Amen. 

Behold the handmaid of the Lord: Be it done unto me according to Thy word. 

Hail Mary . . . 

And the Word was made Flesh: And dwelt among us. 

Hail Mary . . . 


Pray for us, O Holy Mother of God, that we may be made worthy of the promises of Christ. 

Let us pray: 

Pour forth, we beseech Thee, O Lord, Thy grace into our hearts; that we, to whom the incarnation of Christ, Thy Son, was made known by the message of an angel, may by His Passion and Cross be brought to the glory of His Resurrection, through the same Christ Our Lord.

Amen. 


25 posted on 06/09/2013 3:35:58 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Saint Ephrem, Deacon & Doctor of the Church

Saint Ephrem, Deacon & Doctor of the Church
Optional Memorial
June 9th


The Dormition of St. Ephrem, from Iveron Monastery on the Holy Mountain

Virtues are formed by prayer. Prayer preserves temperance. Prayer suppresses anger. Prayer prevents emotions of pride and envy. Prayer draws into the soul the Holy Spirit, and raises man to Heaven. -- Saint Ephraem

Saint Ephrem was born in Mesopotamia and ordained as a deacon of Edessa in whatis now Turkey, he vigorously combated the heresies of his time by writing poems and hymns about the Mysteries of Christ and the Blessed Virgin. He had a great devotion to Our Lady, and was in large part responsible for introducing hymns to public worship.

Source: Daily Roman Missal, Edited by Rev. James Socías, Midwest Theological Forum, Chicago, Illinois ©2003

 

Collect:
Pour into our hearts O Lord, we pray, the Holy Spirit,
at whose prompting the Deacon Saint Ephrem
exulted in singing of your mysteries
and from whom he received the strength
to serve you alone.
Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son,
who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
One God, for ever and ever. +Amen.

First Reading: Colossians 3:12-17
Put on then, as God's chosen ones, holy and beloved, compassion, kindness, lowliness, meekness, and patience, forbearing one another and, if one has a complaint against another, forgiving each other; as the Lord has forgiven you, so you also must forgive. And above all these put on love, which binds everything together in perfect harmony. And let the peace of Christ rule in your hearts, to which indeed you were called in the one body. And be thankful. Let the word of Christ dwell in you richly, teach and admonish one another in all wisdom, and sing psalms and hymns and spiritual songs with thankfulness in your hearts to God. And whatever you do, in word or deed, do everything in the name of the Lord Jesus, giving thanks to God the Father through Him.

Gospel Reading: Luke 6:43-45
"For no good tree bears bad fruit, nor again does a bad tree bear good fruit; for each tree is known by its own fruit. For figs are not gathered from thorns, nor are grapes picked from a bramble bush. The good man out of the good treasure of his heart produces good, and the evil man out of his evil treasure produces evil; for out of the abundance of the heart his mouth speaks.


Prayer for Strength in Weakness

Lord Jesus Christ, King of kings, you have power over life and death. You know even things that are uncertain and obscure, and our very thoughts and feelings are not hidden from you. Cleanse me from my secret faults, and I have done wrong and you saw it. You know how weak I am, both in soul and in body. Give me strength, O Lord, in my frailty and sustain me in my sufferings. Grant me a prudent judgement, dear Lord, and let me always be mindful of your blessings. Let me retain until the end your grace that has protected me till now.

St Ephrem of Syria, Deacon, Poet and Doctor


Related Links on the Vatican Website:

PRINCIPI APOSTOLORUM PETRO, Encyclical of Pope Benedict XV on St. Ephrem, October 5, 1920

Benedict XVI, General Audience, Paul VI Audience Hall, Wednesday, November 28, 2007, Saint Ephrem

Related Links on New Advent website:

Saint Ephraim the Syrian
- Nisibene Hymns
- Miscellaneous Hymns -- On the Nativity of Christ in the Flesh, For the Feast of the Epiphany, and On the Faith ("The Pearl")
- Homilies -- On Our Lord, On Admonition and Repentance, and On the Sinful Woman


26 posted on 06/09/2013 3:49:43 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Saint's Days are superseded by the Sunday liturgy.

Syrian Church Father St. Ephrem honored June 9
St. Ephrem the Syrian, If Christ is Not God, Our Salvation is a Lie (Rejecting the DaVinci Code)
Authority Over Demons (St. Ephrem the Syrian)
The Lenten Prayer of St. Ephrem the Syrian
Saint Ephrem: Doctor Of The Church

27 posted on 06/09/2013 3:54:58 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Information:
St. Ephrem of Syria
Feast Day: June 9
Born: 306 at Nisibis, Mesopotamia (in modern Syria)
Died: 9 June 373 at Edessa (in modern Iraq)
Patron of: Spiritual directors and spiritual leaders

28 posted on 06/09/2013 3:58:28 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Salvation
Interactive Saints for Kids

St. Ephrem

Feast Day: June 09
Born: 306 :: Died: 373

Ephrem was born at Nisibis in Mesopotamia (which is now Syria) and was born in a pagan family. Pagans are people who believe in false gods. When he was a teenager, he heard St. James preach about how Jesus had died for us so we could be saved. At the age of eighteen Ephrem asked to be baptized and joined the Catholic Church.

Ephrem then went into the hills found himself a cave near the city of Edessa in Syria and became a hermit. His clothes were just patched rags and he ate any fruit, vegetable or edible leaves that he could find.

Ephrem became angry easily but prayed sincerely about it. He slowly learnt to control his temper. People who met him thought he was just naturally very calm. He often went to preach in Edessa and Nisibis. When he spoke about God's judgment, the people wept.

He would tell them that he was a great sinner. He really meant it, too, because although his sins were small, they seemed very big to him. When St. Basil met him, he asked, "Are you Ephrem, the famous servant of Jesus?" Ephrem answered quickly, "I am Ephrem who walks unworthily on the way to salvation." Then he asked for and received advice from St. Basil on how to grow in the spiritual life.

Ephrem was made deacon of Edessa and spent his time writing spiritual books. He wrote in several languages - Syriac, Greek, Latin and Armenian. These works are so beautiful and spiritual that they have been translated into many languages and are read even today.

Ephrem also wrote hymns for public worship and introduced singing during the Mass. These hymns became very popular. As the people sang them, they learned much about the faith. That is why he is called "the harp of the Holy Spirit." Because he was such a great teacher through his writings, in 1920 he was proclaimed a Doctor of the Church.

Ephrem died in June, 373, at Edessa (which is now in Iraq).


29 posted on 06/09/2013 4:00:42 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Salvation
Catholic Culture

Daily Readings for: June 09, 2013
(Readings on USCCB website)

Collect: O God, from whom all good things come, grant that we, who call on you in our need, may at your prompting discern what is right, and by your guidance do it. Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son, who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.

Ordinary Time: June 9th

Tenth Sunday of Ordinary Time

Old Calendar: Third Sunday after Pentecost

A large crowd from the city was with her.
When the Lord saw her, he was moved with pity for her and said to her, “Do not weep.” He stepped forward and touched the coffin; at this the bearers halted, and he said, “Young man, I tell you, arise!” The dead man sat up and began to speak, and Jesus gave him to his mother. Fear seized them all, and they glorified God, exclaiming, “A great prophet has arisen in our midst, ”
and “God has visited his people.”

Click here for commentary on the readings in the Extraordinary Form of the Roman Rite.


Sunday Readings
The first reading is taken from 1 Kings 17:17:-24 and is about Elijah restoring a widow's son to life by interceding with God.

The second reading is from St. Paul's Letter to the Galatians 1:11-19. The Judaizers were saying that Paul had appointed himself an Apostle, ,and that he did not have the true Gospel. This he now solemnly denies, and insists that what he taught the Galatians was not invented by him or by any other mere man.

The Gospel is from St. Luke 7:11-17. The lesson we have to learn from this story today is the real, sincere compassion which Christ had for the human sufferings of men in this life. He became man in order to bring mankind into heaven. That was the principal motive of his Incarnation. The sorrows and trials of this earthly life are of relatively small importance when compared with the unending future of happiness which is prepared for us if we conduct ourselves, as he has ordained, during our few years on this planet of ours. Knowing our human nature better than we can ever hope to, and knowing how easily we can become entangled in the affairs of this world, and especially how easily sorrows and trials can depress us and make us forget our real goal in life, he has proved to us during his sojourn amongst us that he is interested in our earthly life as well.

Although he is now at the right hand of the Father, his interest in us is just as strong, and as sincere, as it was while he was here on earth. There are Christians who at times feel that they are getting more than their due share of earth's hardships, and that the all-merciful Savior seems to have forgotten or abandoned them. It is not so. We are all inclined to exaggerate our sufferings, to forget the months, the years of health and happiness which we have had. How many of us ever stop to think of the twenty-eight useful, healthy teeth we have had for years, until one or two of them begin to ache and pain? So it is with all the other numerous gifts given us by God.

Our Christian religion teaches us that trials and troubles are a very important part of our training for heaven. But of this we can rest assured : when God sends a cross, he also gives the strength to the one who has to shoulder it. Our part is to turn to the God of compassion and ask him for the grace and the strength to carry out his will. Such a prayer is never left unanswered. He will give us the strength. He will never let us be crushed by the cross which he sends.

We often see very sad cases where the bread-winner of the family is taken, and we may wonder why the good God allows this to happen. If we knew all the facts, however, and if we could read the divine plan, we might see that this very happening was a divine blessing for the departed one and for those left to suffer his loss.

There are divine miracles of healing going on around us today but they are not recognized as such. There are also savings from sudden death, of which those saved are utterly ignorant. It is only when we reach the future life that we shall be able to fully comprehend the divine compassion which regulated our lives from the cradle to the grave.

Be assured, then, that Christ still has compassion for all mankind. Put your trust in that compassion and thank him daily for it. He may not always save a beloved one from an early death, or save us from a long illness (a request we see as all-essential for us, and as a very apt occasion for Christ to prove his compassion), but that fervent request of ours is answered in another way, in a favor of which we had or could not have dreamed at that time.

Thank God each day for his mercies. Ask him daily for his divine compassion. Leave the decision to him who knows what our real needs are.

Excepted from The Sunday Readings, Fr. Kevin O'Sullivan, O.F.M.


30 posted on 06/09/2013 4:11:55 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Doctors of the Catholic Church






Saint Ephraem the Syrian is the Doctor of Deacons and Poets. "Born at Nisibis, then under Roman rule, early in the fourth century; died June, 373. The name of his father is unknown, but he was a pagan and a priest of the goddess Abnil or Abizal. His mother was a native of Amid. Ephraem was instructed in the Christian mysteries by St. James, the famous Bishop of Nisibis, and was baptized at the age of eighteen (or twenty-eight). Thenceforth he became more intimate with the holy bishop, who availed himself of the services of Ephraem to renew the moral life of the citizens of Nisibis, especially during the sieges of 338, 346, and 350. One of his biographers relates that on a certain occasion he cursed from the city walls the Persian hosts, whereupon a cloud of flies and mosquitoes settled on the army of Sapor II and compelled it to withdraw. " Taken from New Advent found at the end below.

Saint Ephraem the Syrian is the Doctor of Deacons and Poets. He is the only doctor known more as a deacon than a priest. Beside being a holy man of deep prayer and apostolic works, refugees, social workers, relief agents and others might petition Ephraem for more sensitivity in dealing with others as he did.

He made great contributions with songs and hymns in public worship making them most sensuous, sonorous, and efficacious for God’s people. He was imbued with God's Ghost and had a tremendous devotion both to the humanity of Jesus and Mary, his Mother. This type of devotion was rare at that time.

"The Harp of the Holy Spirit" as he is also known was a refugee, orator, and great defender of the faith. His prolific writings reveal his holy thinking process. His poetic account of the Last Supper, it has been said, inspired Dante. He became one of the first to introduce songs into the church's public worship as a means of instructing the faithful.

His writing about Mary was one of Ephrem's favorite devotions. He stressed her virginity and held that she was a virgin before the birth of Jesus, during His birth and after His birth. Ephrem's belief in the Immaculate Conception was shown by his constant dwelling on Mary's sinlessness. To Ephrem, Mary was Mother of God. He asked, "What mother has ever called her son, Son of the Most High?" He is probably the first writer to call Mary the Bride of Christ. Ephrem also speaks of Mary as a symbol of the Church, which depends on her. In fact, Ephrem's voluminous writings on Mary prove that he deserves the title of Marian Doctor. (O'Carroll, 132-3) See what the other Doctors had to say about St Mary, The Mother of Jesus of Nazareth and our own spiritual Mother.

THE DOCTORS AND ST MARY


St Ephraem, 306-373. Doctor of Deacons and Poets, Feast June 9th.


31 posted on 06/09/2013 4:21:51 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
The Word Among Us

Meditation: Luke 7:11-17

10th Sunday in Ordinary Time

“When the Lord saw her, he was moved with pity for her and said to her, ‘Do not weep.’”(Luke 7:13)

Vulnerable, destitute, defenseless—the situation of a widow in ancient times could be heartbreaking. Without a husband to protect and provide for her, a widow faced danger and poverty. This is why throughout the Hebrew Scriptures, God reminded his people to go out of their way to look after widows. A widow’s great comfort, of course, was a son if she had one. Filling the role of provider and protector in the place of his father, a son could guarantee safety and security. But what would happen if a widow’s only son died?

We meet two such widows in today’s readings. Staying in the house of a widow, Elijah begged God to bring life back to her son. And in the Gospel reading, Jesus interrupted a funeral procession to bring a young man back to life and give him back to his widowed mother. The reaction after each miracle was enthusiastic and hopeful: surely God was with his people! He had come to help the weakest and most vulnerable!

Whether or not we are widows, these readings tell us something important about God. Have you ever felt vulnerable or defenseless? Have you ever felt powerless in the face of circumstances outside your control? God cares! He who raised up the widow and orphan cares for you! He looks on you with compassion and says, “Do not weep” (Luke 7:13) .

God’s heart is moved when he sees you in a difficult situation. In fact, when you can’t rely on your own powers or abilities, he can draw you even closer to his side. So let God care for you today. Let him into the situations where you feel the least in control: an illness, a job loss, the challenge of starting over after the loss of a spouse or child. Ask your Father to walk with you, put his arm around you, and take care of you.

“Lord, in my vulnerability, I ask you to come close to me and show me your love. I trust in your protection!”

1 Kings 17:17-24; Psalm 30:2, 4-6, 11-13; Galatians 1:11-19

Questions for Reflection or Group Discussion

1. In the first reading, we see the great compassion the prophet Elijah had for the widow from Zarapeth, with whom he was staying. We also see the power of his prayers of intercession, which resulted in the widow’s son being restored to life. How strong is your confidence and trust in the Lord when you pray for others with serious needs? What are the obstacles that keep you from interceding for others with an expectant faith that the Lord will hear and answer your prayer in some way? What steps can you take to overcome them?

2. The responsorial psalm is a heartfelt psalm of praise and thanksgiving which ends with these words: “You changed my mourning into dancing. O Lord, my God, forever will I give you thanks.” In what areas of your life would you like to give thanks to the Lord for changing your “mourning into dancing”?

3. In the second reading, Paul says that his understanding of the truths of the Gospel did not come about by just personal study or rote acceptance of doctrines, but “through revelation of Jesus Christ.” What about you? In what way is your faith based on an interior revelation that Jesus Christ is who he says he, that is, your Lord and Savior, who died on the Cross for your sins?

4. In the Gospel, Jesus, moved with pity, raises a widow’s son from the dead (as did Elijah in the first reading). Notice the reaction from the crowd of people who witnessed this miraculous event. “Fear seized them all, and they glorified God, exclaiming, ‘A great prophet has arisen in our midst, and ‘God has visited his people.’” What is your reaction when you read the Gospel accounts of Jesus raising various people from the dead? Does it give you great confidence and faith that one day you will be raised from the dead, and you too will glorify God? If not. why not?

5. What is your reaction to these words from the meditation: “God’s heart is moved when he sees you in a difficult situation. In fact, when you can’t rely on your own powers or abilities, he can draw you even closer to his side.” Do you believe theses words apply to you right now? Why or why not? What about the words at the end of the meditation? “Ask your Father to walk with you, put his arm around you, and take care of you.”

6. Take some time now to pray and ask your heavenly Father to deepen your knowledge and experience of his great love for you. Use the prayer at the end of the meditation as a starting point.


32 posted on 06/09/2013 5:26:03 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
A Christian Pilgrim

I SAY TO YOU, ARISE!

 (A biblical reflection on the 10th Sunday in Ordinary Time [Year C] – June 9, 2013) 

Gospel Reading: Luke 7:11-17 

First Reading: 1Kings 17:17-24; Psalms: Ps 30: 2,4-6,11-13; Second Reading: Gal 1:11-19 

Widow_Of_Nain_Russian_Icon

The Scripture Text

Soon afterward He went to a city called Nain, and His disciples and a great crowd went with Him. As He drew near to the gate of the city, behold, a man who had died was being carried out, the only son of his mother, and she was a widow; and a large crowd from the city was with her. And when the Lord saw her, He had compassion on her and said to her, “Do not weep.” And He came and touched the bier, and the bearers stood still. And He said, “Young man, I say to you, arise.” And the dead man sat up, and began to speak. And He gave him to his mother. Fear seized them all; and they glorified God, saying, “A great prophet has arisen among us!” and “God has visited His people!” And this report concerning Him spread through the whole of Judea and all the surrounding country. (Lk 7:11-17 RSV) 

This is a story of grief and hope: of human grief which is lifted and transformed by the compassion of Jesus. Luke never tires of telling us of the immense compassion of God for the poor and broken-hearted.

The raising of the widow’s son shows Jesus to be the Lord (Kyrios) of life and death and it prepares the mind for the story of His resurrection. He is not some distant, aloof Lord, but His nearness is shown by His pity for the grieving mother. Not only was this widow bereft of family companionship but, as this was her only son, she was now utterly destitute, since she had lost all property rights which could be held only in a male name. But Jesus felt sorry for her. He was a man of compassion! And when He put His hand on the funeral bier He was breaking the laws of contamination through contact with a corpse. Compassion, however, is a virtue beyond the restriction of laws. So Jesus said: “Young man, I say to you, arise” (Lk 7:14).

Widow_Of_Nain_German_Hitda_Codex_sm

The early Christians remembered the important sayings of Jesus. They stored them in their hearts, pondered on them and lovingly lingered with them. The words of Jesus are a constant source of life and inspiration. Grief is an experience that we all have to go through. But it need not mean that we cease to live inside. We are drawn down into grief at any bereavement, for when a loved one departs, part of our heart goes too. We grieve also at the temporary absence of a loved one. Or, sometimes we are so shattered by failure that we fear we cannot start ever again. Or if we are deeply betrayed, how can we ever trust again? In some instances it is a deep-seated shame or guilt which drags one down into perpetual night. When our inner self feels consigned to the grave, then we need to hear again the voice of the Lord commanding our youthful spirit to arise:  “O soul of youth, I tell you to get up.”

The mission of Jesus was to raise up the fallen, restore courage to flagging hearts and offer renewal of life. In this life there is no fall so final that it is beyond the power of Jesus to enable one to start again. There is no sinful state beyond the reach of His pure, merciful hand. And there is no such word as “hopeless” for one who believes in Jesus Christ.

“I tell you to get up …… I say to you, arise!” The words of Jesus are to be stored up and lovingly echoed in the mind.

Short Prayer: Lord Jesus, may Your compassion for us fill us with compassion for others, especially those in our families and those who have knowledge of Your great love and mercy. Amen.


33 posted on 06/09/2013 5:37:44 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
A Christian Pilgrim

WIDOWS AND ONLY SONS

 (A biblical reflection on the 10th Sunday in Ordinary Time [Year C]- June 9, 2013) 

First Reading: 1Kings 17:17-24; Psalms: Ps 30: 2,4-6,11-13; Second Reading: Gal 1:11-19; Gospel Reading: Luke 7:11-17 

YESUS MENYEMBUHKAN ANAK JANDA DI NAIN

The movie entitled WITNESS tells the story of an Amish widow and her 5-year-old son. The little boy witnesses a murder committed by a police officer and becomes a murder target himself in a police cover-up.

Throughout this fast-paced movie of intrigue, suspense and narrow escapes, we share in the worries and fears of the Amish widow trying to protect her only son. We find our hearts reaching out with compassions toward her: “Good Lord,” we pray, “she’s already lost her husband. Don’t let any harm come to her little boy now.”

These feelings aroused in our hearts by the movie WITNESS are the same as those felt by Elijah and Jesus in today’s readings. In parallel stories, both Elijah and Jesus encounter widows who have just lost their only sons. The hearts of Elijah and Jesus are moved with pity, and they bring the sons back to life.

To appreciate the impact of these miracles, we must recall that in the Bible the widow was a frequent symbol of the poor and the helpless. In biblical times there was no job market for women, nor was there any welfare system as we know today.

So when Elijah and Jesus come across a widow who has lost not only her husband (which is bad enough), but also (to make matters worse) her only son, they meet someone who is indeed the poorest of the poor in their time. So they are moved with compassion to restore the women’s sons.

Commentator William Barclay remarks that, on the one hand, these stories are unparalleled for their pathos and poignancy in presenting human misery. But, on the other hand, they are overpowering for their revelations of divine mercy.

If we focus on just the gospel story, we find that it is highly symbolic.

First, the two crowds which converge. One crowd is a funeral procession following a dead man. the other crowd is a group of disciples following Jesus, the Lord of life. For a moment, life triumphs over death, a foreshadowing of the more definitive  triumph that will take place later when Jesus Himself will be raised from the dead once and for all.

Second, in the opening episode of this chapter, Jesus healed a centurion’s servant who was sick to the point of death. In today’s episode, Jesus restores a young man who had passed beyond the point of death. By putting these two stories together consecutively, Luke is making a significant statement: no suffering is beyond God’s power to relieve; no death is beyond God’s power to conquer.

Third, there is the element of faith. In previous miracle stories, like that of the centurion’s servant, faith was at work in the recipients beforehand. But here, in the widow of Naim story, faith is neither demanded nor sought beforehand. Instead, it is given as a gift afterwards. The whole incident is charged with God’s gracious and unconditional love.

Is this not the way God intervenes sometimes in our lives, too, when we’ve done nothing to earn or merit His amazing grace? Even when He’s uninvited, He sometimes invades the ground of our being and brings unexpected blessings for us.

Inspiring as the widow of Naim story is, it still leaves some of us asking: “If God is so good, why didn’t He bring back to life my husband or wife when they passed away? Why didn’t He restore my son or daughter when they died?”

Perhaps the only answer is: The Lord did not raise them from the dead when we wanted – but one day, in His own time, He will.

What is needed from us are not more questions, but silence in the presence of God; not more demands or ultimatums, but trust as we place our destiny in His hands.

Note: Taken from Fr. Albert Cylwicki CSB, HIS WORD RESOUNDS, Makati, Philippines: St. Paul Publications, 1988, pages 258-259.


34 posted on 06/09/2013 5:38:59 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Sunday Scripture Study

 

Tenth Sunday in Ordinary Time - Cycle C

June 9, 2013

Click here for USCCB readings

Opening Prayer  

First Reading: 1 Kings 17:17-24

Psalm: 30:2-6, 11-13

Second Reading: Galatians 1:11-19

Gospel Reading: Luke 5:1-11

  • In this Sunday’s Gospel, we find Jesus along with his disciples and a large crowd entering the small Galilean village of Nain. This village, not otherwise mentioned in the Bible, was about six miles southeast from Nazareth, about a 2 hour walk.
  • As they enter the village they meet a funeral cortège (also accompanied by a large crowd) on its way to bury a young man. Typically, a funeral procession of the time would include family, neighbors, hired musicians and hired mourners. This young man was the only son of a widow.
  • As a widow, with the loss of her only son, she would face a life of hardship, relying on the charity of others in the community (see Deuteronomy 26:12). “Moved with pity” for the widow, Jesus takes action without waiting to be asked. He says to the widow, “Do not weep,” and to the young man, “Arise!”
  • As in the account of Elijah we hear in this Sundays 1st Reading (which is the first account in the Bible where someone is raised from the dead), this is the first time in Jesus’ ministry where we hear he has raised the dead (see also Mark 5:21-24 and John 11:1-44). Thus, soon after he raises the widow’s son, he is able to confirm to John the Baptist’s disciples his credentials as the Messiah (see Luke 7:18:23).

 

QUESTIONS:

  • This Sunday’s Gospel resembles our 1st Reading, as well as another Old Testament event involving the prophet Elisha (see 2 Kings 4:8-37). How are these episodes similar to today’s Gospel? How are they different, especially in regards to Jesus’ authority?
  • In the 2nd Reading, St. Paul testifies that he was zealous in his religion over all others his age (see Galatians 1:13–14). If you were ever lukewarm about your faith, or even fell away from it for a while, how did you relate to friends or relatives who were still active? What brought you back to a serious practice of your faith?
  • In the Gospel Reading, how well witnessed was this miracle (see Luke 7:11-12) and other miracles of Jesus (see John 6:1-14 and 1 Corinthians 15:3-8)? How does this show that the life of Jesus (including the miracles performed by him) actually happened?
  • Why do you think Jesus felt it was necessary to touch the funeral bier? How can Jesus tell the widow who just lost her son not to weep (verse 13)? Is this a rebuke to her for showing sorrow in the face of tragedy—or does he mean to en-courage her and confirm that, in the Kingdom of God, death does not have the last word (1 Corinthians 15:51-58). How can we comfort those who are experiencing hardship and sorrow?

Closing Prayer

Catechism of the Catholic Church: §§ 994, 1503 (Gospel), 2583 (First Reading), 442 (Second Reading)

 

“If men go to so much trouble and effort to live here a little longer, ought they not strive so much harder to live eternally?”  --St. Augustine


35 posted on 06/09/2013 5:53:43 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
The Widow of Nain
Pastor’s Column
10th Sunday in Ordinary Time
June 9, 2013
 
“As he grew near to the gate of the city, a man who had died was being carried out, the only son of his mother, and she was a widow.… When the Lord saw her, he was moved with pity for her and said to her, ‘do not weep.’” 
                                                                   Luke 7:12–13
 
          In almost no other story do we see Jesus with more compassion than in this account of a poor widow who has just lost her only son.  In the culture of the times, this woman would have been left without support of any kind.  Jesus and the disciples just happen to encounter this woman, her dead son, and a very large group of villagers. The village itself is not far from both Nazareth and Capernaum, so Jesus must have travelled here often. So Jesus and the disciples were just passing by.
 
          What is the first thing that Jesus does? Jesus is moved with pity and tells this widow that she does not have to weep anymore.  Here in this story we see the pathos of human existence fully displayed, for what is more tragic than a parent who loses both their only child and their spouse?  Luke is careful to note twice that this is a young man – in other words, he has been cut down in the prime of life.  In fact, this widow and her son here represent every parent who has lost a child, every person who has lost a spouse, every tragic human condition.  Notice that the widow does not ask for help! In this case, Jesus, who has seen everything, is moved with pity. He can’t wait to help and even comes without being asked!
 
          We learn so much about how God acts in our lives by studying these stories.  Jesus usually waits for an invitation before he comes in or for a request before he heals.  Yet there are so many times when Christ has acted in our lives without being asked, without our even noticing, without any thank you from us! Here in this story Jesus merely has to see this tragedy and he immediately is moved to help.
 
          But notice that Jesus’ help comes only after the young man has died!  In the same way, God often acts immediately when we pray, though he is more likely to wait, and often he waits until it seems like it’s too late.  Even in Jesus’ own life the resurrection of the dead came only after the cross.  Though it seems at times that God does not see the tragedies of our lives, or that he does not care, or that he does not answer, in fact, God sees everything; God knows everything; God can’t wait to come to our aid.  If he delays, it will yet work to good in the end.  There will be a resurrection of the dead, and after this we will see how much God cares! We will be surprised that he wept every time we did, that suffering was never what he wanted, but was, in fact, the best, or he would never have allowed it in our lives.  We know from this story that when we weep, God weeps with us. We know this because of the way his son, Jesus, died. And, like the widow of Nain, even if he seems to delay, or appears not to hear, God will be there for us in the end.
                                                                                                          Father Gary

36 posted on 06/09/2013 6:16:50 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
St. Paul Center Blog

Restored to Life: Scott Hahn Reflects on the 10th Sunday in Ordinary Time

Posted by Dr. Scott Hahn on 06.07.13 |


resurrection of Nain 2

Readings:
1 Kings 17:17-24
Psalms 30: 2,4-6,11-13
Gal 1:11-19
Luke 7:11-17

Jesus in today’s Gospel meets a funeral procession coming out of the gates of the town of Nain.  Unlike when he raised Jairus’ daughter (Mark 5) or Lazarus (John 11), no one requests his assistance.  Moved by compassion for the widow who had lost her only son, Jesus steps forward and, laying his hand on the bier, commands him to arise.

The onlookers were reminded of the story of Elijah in the first reading who raised the dead child of the widow of Zarephath and “gave him [back] to his mother.”  They proclaimed that “a great prophet has arisen in our midst.”

Jesus of course is more than a prophet; he is the ruler over life and death.  In the Mosaic law, contact with a dead body renders an Israelite unclean for a week (Numbers 19:11-19).  Jesus’ touch and word reverses that; instead of being defiled by contact with death, he gave life.

Like the physical healings that he performed, Jesus’ raising people from the dead is a sign of the Messiah’s arrival (Luke 7:22).  But it is more than that; these healings are visible signs of the awakening and liberating of men from the spiritual death caused by sin (see Mark 2:1-12).

The Church Fathers return to this theme again and again.  St. Ambrose writes, “the widow signifies Mother Church, weeping for those who are dead in sin and carried beyond the safety of her gates.  The multitudes looking on will praise the Lord when sinners rise again from death and are restored to their mother.”

When we are dead in sin, it is the outstretched hand and the words of Christ spoken by his priest, that raise us from spiritual death and restore us to the arms of our mother, the Church.  With the Psalmist, then, we can sing “I will praise you, Lord, for you have rescued me.  You brought me up from the nether world; you preserved me from those going down into the pit.


37 posted on 06/09/2013 6:46:04 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Toward Sunday: A model for compassion
 
1 Kg 17: 17 – 24
Gal 1: 11-19
Lk 7: 11-17

It may be a somewhat unscientific study to say the older you get the more often you read the obituaries. While that in itself may seem a bit macabre, what might be even more informational is to note the survivors of the listed deceased.  We read, “wife of” or “husband of,” or “survived by,” then a list of family and friends that are left behind.  If you’re in the habit of at least an occasional look at the obituaries, you may take note of those who are grieving the loss of their loved ones. It is ancient tradition to pray for the dead but what about family and friends?  It might be good to also pray for those “survivors” of the deceased that their sadness may be healed.

So it seems with the Gospel this Sunday.  Jesus encounters an unexpected funeral procession as he enters the town of Nain. It may be interesting to note that Jesus was accompanied by an eager crowd as he entered the city.  Likely they were engaged in lively conversation or debate about some teaching or parable that Jesus had shared with them; a crowd very much alive.

As that crowd enters the city with Jesus, they face another throng.  This group is likely filled with mourners who are wailing the death of the only son of a widow.  As the mood suddenly changes from lively to somber, Jesus now turns his attention away from his crowd to that of the mourners and in particular to the widow herself.  He is filled “with pity for her” as Luke tells us. This scene may have indeed brought to the mind of Jesus his own mother and the fact that he too was her only son and that she too would feel the grief of this widow, yet even more due to the nature of Jesus’ death.

His compassion moves him to action.  He raises this young man back to life and returns him to his mother.  Her security is regained, her grief is healed, and her hopeless state is given a restored vision. While there is much of ancient Jewish culture here about the relationship between a Jewish mother and her first born son, the greater lesson may center on Jesus himself as the hope of all people. 

Our first reading this Sunday from Kings has a similar yet significantly different story. The prophet Elijah faces an irate widow who fears that the prophet may “kill my son” since he arrives at the moment her son stops breathing.  The timing for poor Elijah could not have been more awkward but as a prophet, he pleads with God that the “life breath return to the body of this child . . .” (1 Kg: 17).  Elijah does not heal the boy, he pleads with God to do so.

The parallel with the Gospel is obvious except that it is Jesus himself, considered by many to be a great prophet, who heals the widow’s son. Of his own power and authority Jesus brings new life and hope.  No intermediary prophet but Jesus himself.

This miracle story, as they all are, calls us to place our faith and hope in the person of Christ Jesus.  To see him as our ultimate hope in time of sadness and difficulty. But it also gives us a model of how we should live.  Every day the unmistakable “me first” culture of our time is evident.  We see and hear it in advertising, we encounter such attitudes in the out of control law suits filed for frivolous things and we may even recognize it in ourselves as we find great impatience waiting in line or driving in traffic for example. 

Here, in Jesus, we see the model of compassion and mercy.  While we may not be capable of raising the dead or healing a blind man, we are able to perform miracles of mercy and empathy with others. 

As we journey towards this Sunday, it might be good for all of us to examine our own behavior.  Do I write others off who may be in need of a kind word or some simple assistance because I’m too busy or just don’t feel I have the time to stop what I’m doing?

Do I have a prayer life that centers on myself, praying for my own needs and wants only or does my prayer include the needs of others?  Have I ever prayed for a more compassionate heart? 

More to come . . .
 
Fr. Tim

38 posted on 06/09/2013 6:55:32 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
 
Marriage = One Man and One Woman
Til' Death Do Us Part

Daily Marriage Tip for June 9, 2013:

We remember what we want to hear. When my husband asked me to take out the compost after dinner, I unintentionally but conveniently “forgot” because it was cold and I figured it could probably wait another day. Sound familiar?


39 posted on 06/09/2013 7:05:50 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Vultus Christi

Not noisy in speech

 on June 9, 2013 5:18 AM |
 
benedikt-1.jpg

CHAPTER VII. Of Humility

8 Feb. 9 June. 9 Oct.
The eleventh degree of humility is, that when a monk speaketh, he do so gently and without laughter, humbly, gravely, with few and reasonable words, and that he be not noisy in his speech, as it is written: "A wise man is known by the fewness of his words."

A Preference for Quietness

For Saint Benedict, humility is closely -- I should rather say -- inseparably bound up with one's speech, and with a marked preference for quietness. First of all, he would have his monk's speech be gentle. Our Lord says: "It is from the heart's overflow that the mouth speaks; a good man utters good words from his store of goodness" (Matthew 12:34-35). So too will the gentle-hearted man utter gentle words from his store of gentleness. Thus must a Benedictine return again and again to Our Lord's sweet invitation: "Come to me, all you that labour and are burdened; I will give you rest. Take my yoke upon yourselves, and learn from me; I am gentle and humble of heart; and you shall find rest for your souls. For my yoke is easy, and my burden is light" (Matthew 11:28-30).

Shrill Laughter

Secondly, Saint Benedict would have his monk speak without laughter. The kind of laughter that Saint Benedict condemns is the laughter of cruel sarcasm; the mocking laughter of the worldly and the jaded; the shrill laughter of the shallow-minded and superficial; the idiotic laughter of one who makes a joke of everything, even of things sacred.

The Loud and Boisterous

Thirdly, Saint Benedict teaches that it is not fitting that a monk be boisterous and loud-mouthed. We have all, I think, at one time or another witnessed the unpleasant arrival of a loud and boisterous person in a room of people. This is the kind of demeanour often affected by certain politicians and would-be-people-pleasers. Such behaviour, while it may be thought to put people at ease, has the opposite effect. It assaults the soul and makes one want to run for cover.

Few Words

Fourthly, Saint Benedict would have his monk learn to speak with few and reasonable words. The need to expatiate on every subject is a sure indicator of unchecked pride.

Quietly

Fifthly, Saint Benedict would have his monk speak quietly. The prideful man raises his voice so as to drown out every other speaker by dint of sheer volume. He seeks to impose himself in conversation by speaking more loudly than anyone else. Very often, people are so wearied by the proverbial "loud-mouth" that they instinctively recoil in his presence. A raised tone of voice is a sure indicator of pride; it is a attempt to control others and to impose oneself in a given situation.


40 posted on 06/09/2013 7:22:45 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Regnum Christi

From Death to Life
| SPIRITUAL LIFE | SPIRITUALITY
Tenth Sunday of Ordinary Time



Father Matthew Kaderabek, LC

 

Luke 7: 11-17

Jesus journeyed to a city called Nain, and his disciples and a large crowd accompanied him. As he drew near to the gate of the city, a man who had died was being carried out, the only son of his mother, and she was a widow. A large crowd from the city was with her. When the Lord saw her, he was moved with pity for her and said to her, "Do not weep." He stepped forward and touched the coffin; at this the bearers halted, and he said, "Young man, I tell you, arise!" The dead man sat up and began to speak, and Jesus gave him to his mother. Fear seized them all, and they glorified God, exclaiming, "A great prophet has arisen in our midst," and "God has visited his people." This report about him spread through the whole of Judea and in all the surrounding region.

Introductory Prayer: Jesus, what a joy and what a gift to have this time to be with you alone! I want to know you more deeply. I want to hope in you more firmly. I want to love you with greater constancy in my daily life. Only you can give me these gifts. Only you can make me a bold and joyful apostle of your Kingdom.

Petition: Lord Jesus, help me to appreciate and remain in the state of grace.

1. Compassionate and Merciful: Surrounded by many enthusiastic followers, Jesus encounters a funeral procession as he approaches the city gate. He stops walking, he stops his conversation, and he shifts his full attention to the grieving mother who has lost her only son. Luke explains that Jesus was “moved with pity.” Jesus, in his human nature, felt much compassion for this grieving woman. He “feels her pain.” How much more does Jesus in his divine nature comprehend the pain—physical, emotional or spiritual—that each of us encounters in our daily lives. As in the case of this widow, he meets each of us with compassion and will work a miracle if we let him. Sometimes the miracle is that he relieves our pain, as he does for the widow in this Gospel passage. But sometimes the miracle is that he forgives our sins or strengthens us to bear our pain for his sake, and for the sake of bringing more souls to eternal happiness in his kingdom.

2. The Church’s Joy: The Church, often called “Mother Church,” rejoices when her sinful children return to a life of grace through the sacrament of confession. Saints Ambrose and Augustine saw this Gospel story as reflecting this truth. St. Ambrose tells us that the Church is a mother who intercedes for each one of her children like the widow for her only son (Commentary on Saint Luke’s Gospel, V, 92). Saint Augustine points out: “The widowed mother rejoiced at the raising of that young man… Our Mother the Church rejoices every day when people are raised again in spirit. The young man had been dead physically; the latter, dead spiritually. The young man’s death was mourned visibly; the death of the latter was invisible and unmourned. He seeks them out who knew them to be dead; only he can bring them back to life” (Sermons, 98, 2).

3. Raised from Spiritual Death: Christ, in his endless mercy, wants eternal life for each one of us. The treasury of his compassion is inexhaustible, as Saint Faustina tells us. In his mercy, Jesus gave his earthly, ministerial priests the power to forgive sins (John 20:22-23). When our venial sins are confessed and forgiven, we receive more grace (a greater share in the divine life of the Trinity) and draw closer to Christ, receiving strength to avoid mortal sin. When our mortal sins are confessed and forgiven, we not only receive grace and draw closer to Christ, but we are raised from the worst kind of fate, namely, spiritual death, the eternal death of our soul. Praise God! No wonder Mother Church rejoices.

Conversation with Christ: Lord Jesus, through confession, I can be sure that I am forgiven, and you restore peace to my soul. Do not allow my pride and my shame ever to keep me from taking advantage of this beautiful sacrament, the sacrament of freedom.

Resolution: I will spend at least five minutes examining my conscience today and begin preparing my next confession, which I will go to this week.


41 posted on 06/09/2013 8:02:32 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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One Bread, One Body

One Bread, One Body

 


<< Sunday, June 9, 2013 >> 10th Sunday Ordinary Time
 
1 Kings 17:17-24
Galatians 1:11-19

View Readings
Psalm 30:2, 4-6, 11-13
Luke 7:11-17

 

FUNERAL HOME FAITH

 
"The Lord heard the prayer of Elijah; the life breath returned to the child's body and he revived." —1 Kings 17:22
 

Jesus interrupted a funeral procession, touched the litter, and said: " 'Young man, I bid you get up.' The dead man sat up" (Lk 7:14-15). He also raised Lazarus from the dead (Jn 11:43ff). Moreover, He promised we would do greater by far than He (Jn 14:12), and commanded us to "raise the dead" (Mt 10:8). Peter likewise raised the dead (Acts 9:40). Even Elijah and Elisha in the old covenant could raise the dead (1 Kgs 17:22; 2 Kgs 4:32ff; 13:21).

Modern Christians try to explain away the obvious Biblical teaching that followers of Jesus are to raise the dead. Although not everything in the Bible is intended to be taken literally, we have no indication in the Biblical text that references to raising the dead should be taken any other way. Those who have tried to raise the dead after discerning this to be the will of God have found that Jesus keeps His promises to give us power to fulfill His commands. However, most Christians have not had the faith to give it a try.

His "grace is sufficient," even to raise the dead. Trust Him.

 
Prayer: Father, may I not change the Bible to fit my limitations but change my life to fit the Bible's expectations.
Promise: "The gospel I proclaimed to you is no mere human invention. I did not receive it from any man, nor was I schooled in it. It came by revelation from Jesus Christ." —Gal 1:11-12
Praise: Praise Jesus, Whose grace is sufficient to help us carry the crosses of our lives! "Sing praise to the Lord, you His faithful ones, and give thanks to His holy name" (Ps 30:5).

42 posted on 06/09/2013 8:07:07 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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If people spent an hour a week in Eucharistic adoration, abortion would be ended.
--Mother Teresa of Calcutta
 
Mother-teresa_john-hardon
 
 

43 posted on 06/09/2013 8:09:01 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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http://resources.sainteds.com/showmedia.asp?media=../sermons/homily/2013-06-09-Homily%20Fr%20Gary.mp3&ExtraInfo=0&BaseDir=../sermons/homily


44 posted on 06/16/2013 7:19:31 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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