Free Republic
Browse · Search
Religion
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

Catholic Caucus: Sunday Mass Readings, 06-16-13, Eleventh Sunday in Ordinary Time
USCCB.org/RNAB ^ | 06-16-13 | Revised New American Bible

Posted on 06/15/2013 11:37:21 PM PDT by Salvation

June 16, 2013

 

Eleventh Sunday in Ordinary Time

 

Reading 1 2 Sm 12:7-10, 13

Nathan said to David:
“Thus says the LORD God of Israel:
‘I anointed you king of Israel.
I rescued you from the hand of Saul.
I gave you your lord’s house and your lord’s wives for your own.
I gave you the house of Israel and of Judah.
And if this were not enough, I could count up for you still more.
Why have you spurned the Lord and done evil in his sight?
You have cut down Uriah the Hittite with the sword;
you took his wife as your own,
and him you killed with the sword of the Ammonites.
Now, therefore, the sword shall never depart from your house,
because you have despised me
and have taken the wife of Uriah to be your wife.’
Then David said to Nathan,
“I have sinned against the LORD.”
Nathan answered David:
“The LORD on his part has forgiven your sin:
you shall not die.”

Responsorial Psalm PS 32:1-2, 5, 7, 11

R. (cf. 5c) Lord, forgive the wrong I have done.
Blessed is the one whose fault is taken away,
whose sin is covered.
Blessed the man to whom the LORD imputes not guilt,
in whose spirit there is no guile.
R. Lord, forgive the wrong I have done.
I acknowledged my sin to you,
my guilt I covered not.
I said, “I confess my faults to the LORD,”
and you took away the guilt of my sin.
R. Lord, forgive the wrong I have done.
You are my shelter; from distress you will preserve me;
with glad cries of freedom you will ring me round.
R. Lord, forgive the wrong I have done.
Be glad in the LORD and rejoice, you just;
exult, all you upright of heart.
R. Lord, forgive the wrong I have done.

Reading 2 Gal 2:16, 19-21

Brothers and sisters:
We who know that a person is not justified by works of the law
but through faith in Jesus Christ,
even we have believed in Christ Jesus
that we may be justified by faith in Christ
and not by works of the law,
because by works of the law no one will be justified.
For through the law I died to the law,
that I might live for God.
I have been crucified with Christ;
yet I live, no longer I, but Christ lives in me;
insofar as I now live in the flesh,
I live by faith in the Son of God
who has loved me and given himself up for me.
I do not nullify the grace of God;
for if justification comes through the law,
then Christ died for nothing.

Gospel Lk 7:36—8:3

A Pharisee invited Jesus to dine with him,
and he entered the Pharisee’s house and reclined at table.
Now there was a sinful woman in the city
who learned that he was at table in the house of the Pharisee.
Bringing an alabaster flask of ointment,
she stood behind him at his feet weeping
and began to bathe his feet with her tears.
Then she wiped them with her hair,
kissed them, and anointed them with the ointment.
When the Pharisee who had invited him saw this he said to himself,
“If this man were a prophet,
he would know who and what sort of woman this is who is touching him,
that she is a sinner.”
Jesus said to him in reply,
“Simon, I have something to say to you.”
“Tell me, teacher, ” he said.
“Two people were in debt to a certain creditor;
one owed five hundred days’ wages and the other owed fifty.
Since they were unable to repay the debt, he forgave it for both.
Which of them will love him more?”
Simon said in reply,
“The one, I suppose, whose larger debt was forgiven.”
He said to him, “You have judged rightly.”

Then he turned to the woman and said to Simon,
“Do you see this woman?
When I entered your house, you did not give me water for my feet,
but she has bathed them with her tears
and wiped them with her hair.
You did not give me a kiss,
but she has not ceased kissing my feet since the time I entered.
You did not anoint my head with oil,
but she anointed my feet with ointment.
So I tell you, her many sins have been forgiven
because she has shown great love.
But the one to whom little is forgiven, loves little.”
He said to her, “Your sins are forgiven.”
The others at table said to themselves,
“Who is this who even forgives sins?”
But he said to the woman,
“Your faith has saved you; go in peace.”

Afterward he journeyed from one town and village to another,
preaching and proclaiming the good news of the kingdom of God.
Accompanying him were the Twelve
and some women who had been cured of evil spirits and infirmities,
Mary, called Magdalene, from whom seven demons had gone out,
Joanna, the wife of Herod’s steward Chuza,
Susanna, and many others who provided for them
out of their resources.

Or LK 7:36-50

A Pharisee invited Jesus to dine with him,
and he entered the Pharisee’s house and reclined at table.
Now there was a sinful woman in the city
who learned that he was at table in the house of the Pharisee.
Bringing an alabaster flask of ointment,
she stood behind him at his feet weeping
and began to bathe his feet with her tears.
Then she wiped them with her hair,
kissed them, and anointed them with the ointment.
When the Pharisee who had invited him saw this he said to himself,
“If this man were a prophet,
he would know who and what sort of woman this is who is touching him,
that she is a sinner.”
Jesus said to him in reply,
“Simon, I have something to say to you.”
“Tell me, teacher, ” he said.
“Two people were in debt to a certain creditor;
one owed five hundred day’s wages and the other owed fifty.
Since they were unable to repay the debt, he forgave it for both.
Which of them will love him more?”
Simon said in reply,
“The one, I suppose, whose larger debt was forgiven.”
He said to him, “You have judged rightly.”

Then he turned to the woman and said to Simon,
“Do you see this woman?
When I entered your house, you did not give me water for my feet,
but she has bathed them with her tears
and wiped them with her hair.
You did not give me a kiss,
but she has not ceased kissing my feet since the time I entered.
You did not anoint my head with oil,
but she anointed my feet with ointment.
So I tell you, her many sins have been forgiven
because she has shown great love.
But the one to whom little is forgiven, loves little.”
He said to her, “Your sins are forgiven.”
The others at table said to themselves,
“Who is this who even forgives sins?”
But he said to the woman,
“Your faith has saved you; go in peace.”


TOPICS: Catholic; General Discusssion; Prayer; Worship
KEYWORDS: catholic; ordinarytime; prayer
For your reading, reflection, faith-sharing, comments, questions, discussion.

1 posted on 06/15/2013 11:37:21 PM PDT by Salvation
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: nickcarraway; NYer; ELS; Pyro7480; livius; ArrogantBustard; Catholicguy; RobbyS; marshmallow; ...
Alleluia Ping!
 
If you aren’t on this ping list NOW and would like to be, 
please Freepmail me.

2 posted on 06/15/2013 11:41:02 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: All

From: 2 Samuel 12:7-10, 13

David’s Repentance (continued)


[7] Nathan said to David, “You are the man. Thus says the LORD, the God of Is-
rael, ‘I anointed you king over Israel, and I delivered you out of the hand of Saul;
[8] and I gave you your master’s house, and your master’s wives into your bosom,
and gave you the house of Israel and of Judah; and if this were too little, I would
add to you as much more. [9] Why have you despised the word of the Lord, to
do what is evil in his sight? You have smitten Uriah the Hittite with the sword,
and have taken his wife to be your wife, and have slain him with the sword of the
Ammonites. [10] ‘Now therefore the sword shall never depart from your house,
because you have despised me, and have taken the wife of Uriah the Hittite to
be your wife.’

[13] David said to Nathan, “I have sinned against the LORD.” And Nathan said
to David, “The LORD also has put away your sin; you shall not die.

*********************************************************************************************
Commentary:

12:1-25. Nathan’s intervention (vv. 1-15), David’s repentance (vv. 16-19), and the
birth of Solomon (vv. 20-25) are the main subjects in this chapter. Nathan makes
an appeal to David with one of the most beautiful parables in the Old Testament
and gets the king to condemn his own conduct: “the man who has done this de-
serves to die” (v. 5). In reply, Nathan tells him the penalty the Lord has decreed,
which in line with the law of vengeance or retaliation has three parts to it, corres-
ponding to David’s triple crime—murder, adultery and the fact that the victim was
a blameless man. On account of the murder, the sword will not depart from Da-
vid’s house (V. 10): this punishment will affect his eldest sons, Amnon, Absalom
and Adonijah, who will die violent deaths. For the adultery, his wives will be vio-
lated in public (v. 11), which will happen when Absalom takes his father’s harem
(cf. 16:20-23). And for the killing of an innocent man, his own recently born son
will not survive (v. 14).

David’s repentance is exemplary (vv. 16-19): he weeps for his sin, and fasts and
pleads for his little son: so, in spite of his weaknesses and sins, he still trusts
in the Lord and shows himself to be “a man after (the Lord’s) own heart” (1 Sam
13:14). David is a model of penance because, by acknowledging his sin, he ob-
tained divine forgiveness. His repentance finds expression in Psalm 51, which
so beautifully and piously records the sinful king’s supplication to the Lord:
“Have mercy on me, O God, according to your steadfast love; according to
your abundant mercy blot out my transgressions. Wash me thoroughly from
my iniquity, and cleanse me from my sin!” (Ps 51:1-2).

The birth of a new son (vv. 20-25) brings this account to an end and makes it
clear that Solomon was born within marriage; his birth causes David great joy
and he is given a second name in a message from Nathan—”Jedidiali” (v. 25);
beloved of the Lord. This means that, from birth, Solomon is the one chosen
by God to advance his plan of salvation for Israel.

Great was David’s sin, and heartfelt his contrition. But God’s forgiveness is grea-
test of all. “In the course of its history, Israel was able to discover that God had
only one reason to reveal himself to theirs, a single motive for choosing them
from among all peoples as his special possession—his sheer gratuitous love.
And thanks to the prophets Israel understood that it was again out of love that
God never stopped saving them and pardoning their unfaithfulness and sins”
(”Catechism of the Catholic Church”, 218).

*********************************************************************************************
Source: “The Navarre Bible: Text and Commentaries”. Biblical text from the
Revised Standard Version and New Vulgate. Commentaries by members of
the Faculty of Theology, University of Navarre, Spain.

Published by Four Courts Press, Kill Lane, Blackrock, Co. Dublin, Ireland, and
by Scepter Publishers in the United States.


3 posted on 06/15/2013 11:42:09 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: All

From: Galatians 2:16, 19-21

Peter and Paul at Antioch (continued)


[16] [We] who know that a man is not justified by works of the law but through
faith in Jesus Christ, even we have believed in Christ Jesus, in order to be justified
by faith in Christ, and not by works of the law, because by works of the law shall
no one be justified.

[19] For I through the law died to the law, that I might live to God. [20] I have been
crucified with Christ; it is no longer I who live, but Christ who lives in me; and the
life I know live in the flesh I live by faith in the Son of God, who loved me and gave
himself for me. [21] I do not nullify the grace of God; for if justification were through
the law, then Christ died to no purpose.

*********************************************************************************************
Commentary:

16. “All that shadowy observance”, St Augustine comments, “had to cease in
an unnoticed way, gradually, as the pace grew of the wholesome preaching of
the grace of Christ […], during the lifetime of that generation of Jews who had ex-
perienced the physical presence of our Lord and had lived through the apostolic
times. This sufficed to make it clear that those practices were not to be deemed
hateful or idolatrous. But neither were they to be kept up any longer than that, in
case people might hold them to be necessary, as if salvation came from them or
could not be obtained without them” (Letter 82, II, 15).

We might say that there are three periods in observance of the prescriptions of
the Law. In the first period, prior to Christ’s passion, the precepts of the Law were
“alive”, that is, it was obligatory to keep them. A second period was between the
Passion and the spread of apostolic preaching: the Law’s precepts were already
“dead”, no longer obligatory, but there were not “lethal”: Jewish converts could
keep them provided that they did not rely on them, for Christ was already the ba-
sis of their hope. In the third stage, in which we find ourselves, observance of Je-
wish precepts as a means of salvation amounts to denying the redemptive power
of Christ and therefore they could be termed “lethal” (cf. St Thomas Aquinas,
Commentary on Gal, ad loc.).

St Augustine uses a very interesting comparison: with the arrival of faith in Christ
the old “sacraments” of the Law come to resemble the dead – who merit respect
and honour. They should be interred with all the necessary ritual, religiously, re-
verently. They should not be thrown out, to be devoured by predators. But if a
Christian now wants to keep them in force “disturbing the ashes which lie at rest,
he would not be a pious son or a relative who keeps vigil at the grave, but an im-
pious profaner of tombs” (Letter 82, ibid.).

19-20. Through the sacrament of Baptism we have been united to Christ in a un-
ion which far exceeds mere solidarity of feeling: we have been crucified with him,
dying with him to sin, so as to rise reborn into a new life (cf. note on Rom 6: 3-8).
This new life requires us to live in a new, supernatural way, which with the help
of grace gradually becomes stronger and stronger and acts to perfect man’s be-
haviour: he is no longer living on a purely natural level. “That is why a Christian
should live as Christ lived, making the affections of Christ his own, so that he
can exclaim with St Paul: ‘It is now no longer I who live, but Christ lives in me’
[…] to such an extent that each Christian is not simply alter Christus: another
Christ, but ipse Christus: Christ himself!” (St. J. Escriva, Christ is Passing By,
103 and 104).

The life in Christ which the Apostle is speaking about here is not a matter of fee-
lings: it is something real which grace brings about: “Paul’s soul was in between
God and his body: his body was alive, and moved, thanks to the action of Paul’s
soul; but his soul drew its life from Christ’s action. Therefore, in referring to the
life of the flesh, which he was living, St Paul speaks of ‘the life I now live in the
flesh’; but as far as relationship with God was concerned, Christ it was who was
living in Paul, and therefore he says, ‘I live by faith in the Son of God’: it is he
who lives in me and makes me act” (St Thomas Aquinas Commentary on Gal,
ad loc.). This is why the Apostle goes as far as to say elsewhere, “to me to live
is Christ” (Phil 1:21).

All this is a consequence of Christ’s love: he freely gave himself up to death out
of love for each and every one of us. We, like St Paul, can come to appreciate,
through faith, that Christ’s passion affects us personally. Fro this faith will arise
that love which “has the power to effect union […], which inspires those who love
to leave where they are, and which does not allow them to stay the way they are,
but rather transforms them into the object of their love” (Pseudo-Dionysius, De di-
vinis nominibis, 4). People who are very keen on academic pursuits or on sports
often refer to these things as being “their life”. If someone pursues only his own
interest, he is living for himself. If, on the contrary, he seeks the good of others,
we say that he “lives for others”. Therefore, if we love Jesus and are united to
him, we will live “for” him, “by” him, “through” him. “Do you love the earth?”, St
Augustine exclaims. “You will be earth. Do you love God? What am I to say?
That you will be God? I almost don’t dare to say it, but Scripture says it, ‘You
are gods, sons of the Most High’ (Ps 82:6)” (In Epist. Ioann. ad Parthos, II, 14).

This profound truth should move us to devote ourselves to an asceticism motiva-
ted by love: “Let us hasten, therefore, full of spirit, to the fight, fixing our gaze on
the crucified Jesus, who from the Cross offers us his help and promises us victo-
ry and laurels. If we happened to stumble in the past, it was because we did not
keep before our eyes the wounds and disgrace which our Redeemer suffered and
because we did not seek his help. For the future, let us not cease to keep before
our eyes him who suffered on our account and who is ever-ready to come to our
aid […]; if we do so, we shall surely emerge victorious over our enemies” (St Al-
phonsus Mary Liguori, The Love of Jesus Christ, 3).

*********************************************************************************************
Source: “The Navarre Bible: Text and Commentaries”. Biblical text from the
Revised Standard Version and New Vulgate. Commentaries by members of
the Faculty of Theology, University of Navarre, Spain.

Published by Four Courts Press, Kill Lane, Blackrock, Co. Dublin, Ireland, and
by Scepter Publishers in the United States.


4 posted on 06/15/2013 11:42:55 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: All

From: Luke 7:36 - 8:3

The Woman Who was a Sinner


[36] One of the Pharisees asked him to eat with him, and he went into the Pha-
risee’s house, and sat at table. [37] And behold, a woman of the city, who was
a sinner, when she learned that he was sitting at table in the Pharisee’s house,
brought an alabaster flask of ointment, [38] and standing behind him at his feet,
weeping, she began to wet his feet with her tears; and wiped them with the hair
of her head, and kissed his feet, and anointed them with the ointment. [39] Now
when the Pharisee who had invited him saw it, he said to himself, “If this man
were a prophet, he would have known who and what sort of woman this is who
is touching him, for she is a sinner.” [40] And Jesus answering said to him, “Si-
mon, I have something to say to you.” And he answered, “What is it, Teacher?”

[41] “A certain creditor had two debtors; one owed five hundred denarii and the
other fifty. [42] When they could not pay, he forgave them both. Now which of
them will love him more?” [43] Simon answered, “The one, I suppose, to whom
he forgave more.” And he said to him, “You have judged rightly.” [44] Then tur-
ning toward the woman he said to Simon, “Do you see this woman? I entered
your house, you gave me no water for my feet, but she has wet my feet with her
tears and wiped them with her hair. [45] You gave me no kiss, but from the time
I came in she has not ceased to kiss my feet. [46] You did not anoint my head
with oil, but she has anointed my feet with ointment. [47] Therefore I tell you,
her sins, which are many, are forgiven little, for she loved much; but he who is
forgiven, loves little.” [48] And he said to her, “Your sins are forgiven.” [49] Then
those who were at table with him began to say among themselves, “Who is this,
who even forgives sins?” [50] And he said to the woman, “Your faith has saved
you; go in peace.”

The Holy Women


[8:1] Soon afterward he went on through cities and villages; preaching and bring-
ing the good news of God. And the twelve were with him, [2] and also some wo-
men who had been healed of evil spirits and infirmities; Mary, called Magdalene,
from whom seven demons had gone out, [3] and Joanna, the wife of Chuza, He-
rod’s steward, and Susanna, and many others, who provided for them out of
their means.

*********************************************************************************************
Commentary:

36-40. This woman, moved no doubt by grace, was attracted by Christ’s prea-
ching and by what people were saying about him.

When dining, people reclined on low divans leaning on their left arm with their
legs tucked under them, away from the table. A host was expected to give his
guest a kiss of greeting and offer him water for his feet, and perfumes.

41-50. In this short parable of the two debtors Christ teaches us three things—his
own divinity and his power to forgive sins; the merit the woman’s love deserves;
and the discourtesy implied in Simeon’s neglecting to receive Jesus in the con-
ventional way. Our Lord was not interested in these social niceties as such but
in the affection which they expressed; that was why he felt hurt at Simeon’s ne-
glect.

“Jesus notices the omission of the expression of human courtesy and refinement
which the Pharisee failed to show him. Christ is ‘erfectus Deus, perfectus homo’
(”Athanasian Creed”). He is perfect God, the second person of the Blessed Trini-
ty, and perfect man. He comes to save, not to destroy nature. It is from him that
we learn that it is unchristian to treat our fellow men badly, for they are creatures
of God, made in his image and likeness (Gen 1:26)” (St. J. Escriva, “Friends of
God”, 73).

Moreover, the Pharisee was wrong to think badly of this sinner and of Jesus: re-
ckoning that Christ did not know anything about her, he complained inwardly.
Our Lord, who could read the secret thoughts of men (which showed his divinity),
intervened to point out to him his mistake. True righteousness, says St Gregory
the Great (cf. “In Evangelia Homiliae”, 33), is compassionate; whereas false righ-
teousness is indignant. There are many people like this Pharisee: forgetting that
they themselves were or are poor sinners, when they see other people’s sin they
immediately become indignant, instead of taking pity on them, or else they rush
to judge them or sneer at them. They forget what St Paul says: “Let any one who
thinks that he stands take heed lest he fall” (1 Cor 10:12); “Brethren, if any man
is overtaken in any trespass, you who are spiritual should restore him in a spirit
of gentleness [...]. Bear one another’s burdens, and so fulfill the law of Christ”
(Gal 6:1-2).

We should strive to have charity govern all our judgments. Otherwise, we will ea-
sily be unjust towards others. “Let us be slow to judge. Each one see things from
his own point of view, as his mind, with all its limitations, tells him, and through
eyes that are often dimmed and clouded by passion.... Of what little worth are
the judgments of men! Don’t judge without sifting your judgment in prayer” (St. J.
Escriva, “The Way”, 451).

Charity and humility will allow us to see in the sins of others our own weak and
helpless position, and will help our hearts go out to the sorrow of every sinner
who repents, for we too would fall into sins as serious or more serious if God in
his mercy did not stay by our side.

“It was not the ointment that the Lord loved”, St Ambrose comments, “but the af-
fection; it was the woman’s faith that pleased him, her humility. And you also, if
you desire grace, increase your love; pour over the body of Jesus Christ your faith
in the Resurrection, the perfume of the holy Church and the ointment of charity
towards others” (”Expositio Evangelii sec. Lucam, in loc.”).

47. Man cannot merit forgiveness for his sins because, since God is the offended
party, they are of infinite gravity. We need the sacrament of Penance, in which
God forgives us by virtue of the infinite merits of Jesus Christ; there is only one in-
dispensable condition for winning God’s forgiveness—our love, our repentance. We
are pardoned to the extent that we love; when our heart is full of love there is no
longer any room in it for sin because we have made room for Jesus, and he says
to us as he said to this woman, “Your sins are forgiven.” Repentance is a sign
that we love God. But it was God who first loved us (cf.1 Jn 4:10). When God for-
gives us he is expressing his love for us. Our love for God is, then, always a res-
ponse to his initiative. By forgiving us God helps us to be more grateful and more
loving towards him. “He loves little”, St Augustine comments, “who has little for-
given. You say that you have not committed many sins: but why is that the case?
[...] The reason is that God was guiding you [...]. There is no sin that one man
commits, which another may not commit also unless God, man’s maker, guides
him” (”Sermon”, 99, 6). Therefore, we ought to fall ever more deeply in love with
our Lord, not only because he forgives us our sins but also because he helps us
by means of his grace not to commit them.

50. Jesus declares that it was faith that moved this woman to throw herself at
his feet and show her repentance; her repentance wins his forgiveness. Similar-
ly, when we approach the sacrament of Penance we should stir up our faith in
the fact that it is “not a human but a divine dialogue. It is a tribunal of divine jus-
tice and especially of mercy, with a loving judge who ‘has no pleasure in the
death of the wicked; I desire that the wicked turn back from his way and live’
(Ezek 33:11)” (St. J. Escriva, “Christ Is Passing By”, 78).

1-3. The Gospel refers a number of times to women accompanying our Lord.
Here St Luke gives us the name of three of them – Mary, called Magdalene, to
whom the risen Christ appeared beside the holy sepulchre (Jn 20:11-18; Mk 16:
9); Joanna, a lady of some position, whom we also meet among the women who
went to the tomb on the morning of the Resurrection (Lk 24:10), and Susanna,
whom the Gospel does not mention again. The role of these women consisted
in helping Jesus and his disciples out of their own resources, thereby showing
their gratitude for what Christ had done for them, and in cooperating his his mini-
stry.

Men and women enjoy equal dignity in the Church. Within the context of that
equality, women certainly have specific characteristics which must necessarily
be reflected in their role in the Church: “All the baptized, men and women alike,
share equally in the dignity, freedom and responsibility of the children of God….
Women are called to bring to the family, to society and to the Church, charac-
teristics which are their own and which they alone can give – their gentle warmth
and untiring generosity, their love for detail, their quick-wittedness and intuition,
their simple and deep piety, their constancy. . . . A woman’s femininity is gen-
uine only if she is aware of the beauty of this contribution for which there is no
substitute – and if she incorporates it into her own life” (St. J. Escriva, Conver-
sations, 14 and 87).

The Gospel makes special reference to the generosity of these woman. It is nice
to know that our Lord availed himself of their charity, and that they responded to
him with such refined and generous detachment that Christian women feel filled
with a holy and fruitful envy (cf. St. J. Escriva, The Way, 981).

*********************************************************************************************
Source: “The Navarre Bible: Text and Commentaries”. Biblical text from the
Revised Standard Version and New Vulgate. Commentaries by members of
the Faculty of Theology, University of Navarre, Spain.

Published by Four Courts Press, Kill Lane, Blackrock, Co. Dublin, Ireland, and
by Scepter Publishers in the United States.


5 posted on 06/15/2013 11:43:55 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: All
Scripture readings taken from the Jerusalem Bible, published and copyright © 1966, 1967 and 1968 by Darton, Longman & Todd

Readings at Mass


First reading 2 Samuel 12:7-10,13 ©
Nathan said to David, ‘The Lord the God of Israel says this, “I anointed you king over Israel; I delivered you from the hands of Saul; I gave your master’s house to you, his wives into your arms; I gave you the House of Israel and of Judah; and if this were not enough, I would add as much again for you. Why have you shown contempt for the Lord, doing what displeases him? You have struck down Uriah the Hittite with the sword, taken his wife for your own, and killed him with the sword of the Ammonites. So now the sword will never be far from your House, since you have shown contempt for me and taken the wife of Uriah the Hittite to be your wife.”’
  David said to Nathan, ‘I have sinned against the Lord.’ Then Nathan said to David, ‘The Lord, for his part, forgives your sin; you are not to die.’

Psalm Psalm 31:1-2,5,7,11 ©
Forgive, Lord, the guilt of my sin.
Happy the man whose offence is forgiven,
  whose sin is remitted.
O happy the man to whom the Lord
  imputes no guilt,
  in whose spirit is no guile.
Forgive, Lord, the guilt of my sin.
But now I have acknowledged my sins;
  my guilt I did not hide.
I said: ‘I will confess
  my offence to the Lord.’
And you, Lord, have forgiven
  the guilt of my sin.
Forgive, Lord, the guilt of my sin.
You are my hiding place, O Lord;
  you save me from distress.
  You surround me with cries of deliverance.
Forgive, Lord, the guilt of my sin.
Rejoice, rejoice in the Lord,
  exult, you just!
O come, ring out your joy,
  all you upright of heart.
Forgive, Lord, the guilt of my sin.

Second reading Galatians 2:16,19-21 ©
We acknowledge that what makes a man righteous is not obedience to the Law, but faith in Jesus Christ. We had to become believers in Christ Jesus no less than you had, and now we hold that faith in Christ rather than fidelity to the Law is what justifies us, and that no one can be justified by keeping the Law. In other words, through the Law I am dead to the Law, so that now I can live for God. I have been crucified with Christ, and I live now not with my own life but with the life of Christ who lives in me. The life I now live in this body I live in faith: faith in the Son of God who loved me and who sacrificed himself for my sake. I cannot bring myself to give up God’s gift: if the Law can justify us, there is no point in the death of Christ.

Gospel Acclamation Jn14:6
Alleluia, alleluia!
I am the Way, the Truth and the Life, says the Lord;
No one can come to the Father except through me.
Alleluia!
Or 1Jn4:10
Alleluia, alleluia!
God so loved us that he sent his Son
to be the sacrifice that takes our sins away.
Alleluia!
EITHER:
Gospel Luke 7:36-8:3 ©
One of the Pharisees invited Jesus to a meal. When he arrived at the Pharisee’s house and took his place at table, a woman came in, who had a bad name in the town. She had heard he was dining with the Pharisee and had brought with her an alabaster jar of ointment. She waited behind him at his feet, weeping, and her tears fell on his feet, and she wiped them away with her hair; then she covered his feet with kisses and anointed them with the ointment.
  When the Pharisee who had invited him saw this, he said to himself, ‘If this man were a prophet, he would know who this woman is that is touching him and what a bad name she has.’ Then Jesus took him up and said, ‘Simon, I have something to say to you.’ ‘Speak, Master’ was the reply. ‘There was once a creditor who had two men in his debt; one owed him five hundred denarii, the other fifty. They were unable to pay, so he pardoned them both. Which of them will love him more?’ ‘The one who was pardoned more, I suppose’ answered Simon. Jesus said, ‘You are right.’
  Then he turned to the woman. ‘Simon,’ he said ‘you see this woman? I came into your house, and you poured no water over my feet, but she has poured out her tears over my feet and wiped them away with her hair. You gave me no kiss, but she has been covering my feet with kisses ever since I came in. You did not anoint my head with oil, but she has anointed my feet with ointment. For this reason I tell you that her sins, her many sins, must have been forgiven her, or she would not have shown such great love. It is the man who is forgiven little who shows little love.’ Then he said to her, ‘Your sins are forgiven.’ Those who were with him at table began to say to themselves, ‘Who is this man, that he even forgives sins?’ But he said to the woman, ‘Your faith has saved you; go in peace.’
  Now after this he made his way through towns and villages preaching, and proclaiming the Good News of the kingdom of God. With him went the Twelve, as well as certain women who had been cured of evil spirits and ailments: Mary surnamed the Magdalene, from whom seven demons had gone out, Joanna the wife of Herod’s steward Chuza, Susanna, and several others who provided for them out of their own resources.
OR:
Gospel Luke 7:36-50 ©
One of the Pharisees invited Jesus to a meal. When he arrived at the Pharisee’s house and took his place at table, a woman came in, who had a bad name in the town. She had heard he was dining with the Pharisee and had brought with her an alabaster jar of ointment. She waited behind him at his feet, weeping, and her tears fell on his feet, and she wiped them away with her hair; then she covered his feet with kisses and anointed them with the ointment.
  When the Pharisee who had invited him saw this, he said to himself, ‘If this man were a prophet, he would know who this woman is that is touching him and what a bad name she has.’ Then Jesus took him up and said, ‘Simon, I have something to say to you.’ ‘Speak, Master’ was the reply. ‘There was once a creditor who had two men in his debt; one owed him five hundred denarii, the other fifty. They were unable to pay, so he pardoned them both. Which of them will love him more?’ ‘The one who was pardoned more, I suppose’ answered Simon. Jesus said, ‘You are right.’
  Then he turned to the woman. ‘Simon,’ he said ‘you see this woman? I came into your house, and you poured no water over my feet, but she has poured out her tears over my feet and wiped them away with her hair. You gave me no kiss, but she has been covering my feet with kisses ever since I came in. You did not anoint my head with oil, but she has anointed my feet with ointment. For this reason I tell you that her sins, her many sins, must have been forgiven her, or she would not have shown such great love. It is the man who is forgiven little who shows little love.’ Then he said to her, ‘Your sins are forgiven.’ Those who were with him at table began to say to themselves, ‘Who is this man, that he even forgives sins?’ But he said to the woman, ‘Your faith has saved you; go in peace.’

6 posted on 06/15/2013 11:49:33 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: All
Pray with Pope Benedict

Adoration with Pope energizing Catholics worldwide
Parishes Worldwide Prepare for Eucharistic Adoration Hour (June 2 at 11 am ET)
Pope [Francis] at Pentecost: Newness, harmony and mission
Audience: Do not be ‘part-time’ Christians
Pope Francis: Regina caeli
Pope to welcome 70,000 youths, confirm 44 (this Sunday) [Catholic Caucus]
Pope Francis’ General Audience focused on women. Feminists aren’t going to be happy
Cardinal Jorge Mario Bergoglio's "Letter On the Year of Faith" (Crossing Threshold of Faith)

Pope Francis – the real deal – has Audience with Cardinals
Benedict XVI's Final General Audience
On Ash Wednesday
On God As Creator of Heaven and Earth
On Abraham's Faith
On Christ As Mediator Between God and Man
On the Incarnation
On God the Almighty Father
Year of Faith: Indulgences and Places of Pilgrimage [Ecumenical]
On the Identity of Jesus

On the Faith of Mary, the Virgin Mother of Christ
Father Cantalamessa's 1st Advent Sermon (Catholic Caucus)
On The Unfolding of God's Self-Revelation
On the Beauty of God's Plan of Salvation
On Bearing Witness to the Christian Faith
On the Splendor of God's Truth
On the Knowledge of God
Archbishop Chaput says Year of Faith holds solution to relativism
Following the Truth: The Year Of Faith – 10 Things You Should Know [Catholic Caucus]
Papal Encyclical on Faith Announced

On the Desire for God
On the Ecclesial Nature of Faith
On the Nature of Faith
Catechism's benefits explained for Year of Faith (Catholic Caucus)
A Life of Faith: Papal Theologian Speaks on the Grace of Faith
ASIA/LAOS - "Year of Faith" amid the persecutions of Christians forced to become "animists"
From no faith to a mountain-top of meaning: Father John Nepil (Catholic Caucus)
Living the Year of Faith: How Pope Benedict Wants You to Begin [Catholic Caucus]
Share Your Faith in This Year of Faith: Two keys to help you do it.
On A New Series of Audiences for The Year of Faith

Pope will deliver year-long teaching series on restoring faith
Pope Benedict XVI Grants Plenary Indulgence to Faithful [Catholic Caucus]
Pope, at Marian shrine, entrusts Year of Faith, synod to Mary (Catholic Caucus)
Catholic Church Calls for Public Prayers in Offices on Fridays
Highlights in the Plan for Year of Faith: Traditional Events Will Take on Special Perspective
Catholic Church calls for public prayers in offices on Fridays
Vatican Unveils Logo for Year of Faith [Catholic Caucus]
Miami Prelate Recalls Pope's Visit to Cuba, Looks to Year of Faith [Catholic Caucus]
The World-Changing Year of Faith [Catholic Caucus]
Vatican to Issue Recommendations for Celebrating Year of Faith

7 posted on 06/15/2013 11:50:55 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: All
Perpetual Novena for the Nation (Ecumenical)
8 posted on 06/15/2013 11:51:52 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

To: All
Prayers for The Religion Forum (Ecumenical)
9 posted on 06/15/2013 11:52:29 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: All

 
 
Jesus, High Priest
 

We thank you, God our Father, for those who have responded to your call to priestly ministry.

Accept this prayer we offer on their behalf: Fill your priests with the sure knowledge of your love.

Open their hearts to the power and consolation of the Holy Spirit.

Lead them to new depths of union with your Son.

Increase in them profound faith in the Sacraments they celebrate as they nourish, strengthen and heal us.

Lord Jesus Christ, grant that these, your priests, may inspire us to strive for holiness by the power of their example, as men of prayer who ponder your word and follow your will.

O Mary, Mother of Christ and our mother, guard with your maternal care these chosen ones, so dear to the Heart of your Son.

Intercede for our priests, that offering the Sacrifice of your Son, they may be conformed more each day to the image of your Son, our Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ. Amen.

Saint John Vianney, universal patron of priests, pray for us and our priests

This icon shows Jesus Christ, our eternal high priest.

The gold pelican over His heart represents self-sacrifice.

The border contains an altar and grapevines, representing the Mass, and icons of Melchizedek and St. Jean-Baptiste Vianney.

Melchizedek: king of righteousness (left icon) was priest and king of Jerusalem.  He blessed Abraham and has been considered an ideal priest-king.

St. Jean-Baptiste Vianney is the patron saint of parish priests.


10 posted on 06/15/2013 11:53:11 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: All
Pray a Rosary each day for our nation.

Pray the Rosary

1.  Sign of the Cross:  In the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit.  Amen.

2.  The Apostles Creed:  I BELIEVE in God, the Father almighty, Creator of heaven and earth, and in Jesus Christ, His only Son, our Lord, who was conceived by the Holy Spirit, born of the Virgin Mary, suffered under Pontius Pilate, was crucified, died, and was buried. He descended into hell; on the third day he rose again from the dead; he ascended into heaven, and is seated at the right hand of God, the Father Almighty; from there He shall come to judge the living and the dead.

I believe in the Holy Spirit, the holy catholic Church, the communion of saints, the forgiveness of sins, the resurrection of the body, and the life everlasting. Amen.

3.  The Lord's Prayer:  OUR Father, who art in heaven, hallowed be Thy name. Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done on earth as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread and forgive us our trespasses as we forgive those who trespass against us. And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil. Amen.

4. (3) Hail Mary:  HAIL Mary, full of grace, the Lord is with thee. Blessed art thou amongst women and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus. Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners, now, and in the hour of our death. Amen. (Three times)

5. Glory Be:  GLORY be to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit. As it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be, world without end. Amen.

Fatima Prayer: Oh, my Jesus, forgive us our sins, save us from the fires of hell, lead all souls to heaven, especially those in most need of your mercy.

Announce each mystery, then say 1 Our Father, 10 Hail Marys, 1 Glory Be and 1 Fatima prayer.  Repeat the process with each mystery.

End with the Hail Holy Queen:

Hail, Holy Queen, Mother of Mercy, our life, our sweetness and our hope! To thee do we cry, poor banished children of Eve! To thee do we send up our sighs, mourning and weeping in this vale of tears! Turn then, most gracious advocate, thine eyes of mercy towards us; and after this, our exile, show unto us the blessed fruit of thy womb, Jesus!

O clement, O loving, O sweet Virgin Mary! Pray for us, O holy Mother of God, that we may be made worthy of the promises of Christ.

Final step -- The Sign of the Cross

 

The Mysteries of the Rosary

By tradition, Catholics meditate on these Mysteries during prayers of the Rosary.
The biblical references follow each of the Mysteries below.


The Glorious Mysteries
(Wednesdays and Sundays)
1.The Resurrection (Matthew 28:1-8, Mark 16:1-18, Luke 24:1-12, John 20:1-29) [Spiritual fruit - Faith]
2. The Ascension (Mark 16:19-20, Luke 24:50-53, Acts 1:6-11) [Spiritual fruit - Christian Hope]
3. The Descent of the Holy Spirit (Acts 2:1-13) [Spiritual fruit - Gifts of the Holy Spirit]
4. The Assumption [Spiritual fruit - To Jesus through Mary]
5. The Coronation [Spiritual fruit - Grace of Final Perseverance]


11 posted on 06/15/2013 11:54:33 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: All



~ PRAYER ~

St. Michael, the Archangel, defend us in battle
 Be our protection against the wickedness
and snares of the devil;
May God rebuke him, we  humbly pray,
 and do thou, O Prince of the heavenly host,
 by the power of God,
 Cast into hell Satan and all the evil spirits
who prowl through the world seeking the ruin of souls.
 Amen
+

12 posted on 06/15/2013 11:55:37 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: All

A Prayer for our Free Nation Under God
God Save Our Country web site (prayer warriors)
Prayer Chain Request for the United States of America
Pray for Nancy Pelosi
Prayer and fasting will help defeat health care reform (Freeper Prayer Thread)
Prayer Campaign Started to Convert Pro-Abortion Catholic Politicians to Pro-Life
[Catholic Caucus] One Million Rosaries
Non-stop Rosary vigil to defeat ObamaCare

From an Obama bumper sticker on a car:

"Pray for Obama.  Psalm 109:8"

   

PLEASE JOIN US -

Evening Prayer
Someone has said that if people really understood the full extent of the power we have available through prayer, we might be speechless.
Did you know that during WWII there was an advisor to Churchill who organized a group of people who dropped what they were doing every day at a prescribed hour for one minute to collectively pray for the safety of England, its people and peace?  


There is now a group of people organizing the same thing here in America. If you would like to participate: Every evening at 9:00 PM Eastern Time (8:00 PM Central) (7:00 PM Mountain) (6:00 PM Pacific), stop whatever you are doing and spend one minute praying for the safety of the United States, our troops, our citizens, and for a return to a Godly nation. If you know anyone else who would like to participate, please pass this along. Our prayers are the most powerful asset we have.    Please forward this to your praying friends.


13 posted on 06/15/2013 11:56:37 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 12 | View Replies]

To: All

June Devotion: The Sacred Heart

Since the 16th century Catholic piety has assigned entire months to special devotions. The month of June is set apart for devotion to the Sacred Heart of Jesus. "From among all the proofs of the infinite goodness of our Savior none stands out more prominently than the fact that, as the love of the faithful grew cold, He, Divine Love Itself, gave Himself to us to be honored by a very special devotion and that the rich treasury of the Church was thrown wide open in the interests of that devotion." These words of Pope Pius XI refer to the Sacred Heart Devotion, which in its present form dates from the revelations given to Saint Margaret Mary Alacoque in 1673-75.

The devotion consists in the divine worship of the human heart of Christ, which is united to His divinity and which is a symbol of His love for us. The aim of the devotion is to make our Lord king over our hearts by prompting them to return love to Him (especially through an act of consecration by which we offer to the Heart of Jesus both ourselves and all that belongs to us) and to make reparation for our ingratitude to God.

INVOCATION

O Heart of love, I put all my trust in Thee; for I fear all things from my own weakness, but I hope for all things from Thy goodness.
Saint Margaret Mary Alacoque

PRAYER TO THE SACRED HEART

Devotion to the Sacred Heart was the characteristic note of the piety of Saint Gertrude the Great (1256-1302), Benedictine nun and renowned mystic. She was, in fact, the first great exponent of devotion to the Sacred Heart. In our efforts to honor the Heart of Jesus we have this prayer as a model for our own:
Hail! O Sacred Heart of Jesus, living and quickening source of eternal life, infinite treasure of the Divinity, and burning furnace of divine love. Thou art my refuge and my sanctuary, 0 my amiable Savior. Consume my heart with that burning fire with which Thine is ever inflamed. Pour down on my soul those graces which flow from Thy love, and let my heart be so united with Thine, that our wills may be one, and mine in all things be conformed to Thine. May Thy divine will be equally the standard and rule of all my desires and of all my actions. Amen.
Saint Gertrude

FOR THE CHURCH

O most holy Heart of Jesus, shower Thy blessings in abundant measure upon Thy holy Church, upon the Supreme Pontiff and upon all the clergy; to the just grant perseverance; convert sinners; enlighten unbelievers; bless our relations, friends and benefactors; assist the dying; deliver the holy souls in purgatory; and extend over all hearts the sweet empire of Thy love. Amen.

A PRAYER OF TRUST

O God, who didst in wondrous manner reveal to the virgin, Margaret Mary, the unsearchable riches of Thy Heart, grant that loving Thee, after her example, in all things and above all things, we may in Thy Heart find our abiding home.
Roman Missal

ACT OF LOVE

Reveal Thy Sacred Heart to me, O Jesus, and show me Its attractions. Unite me to It for ever. Grant that all my aspirations and all the beats of my heart, which cease not even while I sleep, may be a testimonial to Thee of my love for Thee and may say to Thee: Yes, Lord, I am all Thine;
pledge of my allegiance to Thee rests ever in my heart will never cease to be there. Do Thou accept the slight amount of good that I do and be graciously pleased to repair all m] wrong-doing; so that I may be able to bless Thee in time and in eternity. Amen.
Cardinal Merry del Val

MEMORARE TO THE SACRED HEART
Remember, O most sweet Jesus, that no one who has had recourse to Thy Sacred Heart, implored its help, or sought its mercy was ever abandoned. Encouraged with confidence, O tenderest of hearts, we present ourselves before Thee, crushed beneath the weight of our sins. In our misery, O Sacred Heart of Jesus, despise not our simple prayers, but mercifully grant our requests. Amen.

Prayer Source: Prayer Book, The by Reverend John P. O'Connell, M.A., S.T.D. and Jex Martin, M.A., The Catholic Press, Inc., Chicago, Illinois, 1954

Only for Love: The Sacred Heart and the Priesthood [Catholic Caucus]

Catholic Word of the Day: LITANY OF THE SACRED HEART, 10-19-09
Devotion to the Sacred Heart of Jesus
Devotion to the Sacred Heart Today
The Biblical Foundation of Devotion to the Sacred Heart of Jesus [Ecumenical]
Heart to Heart (Sacred Heart of Jesus Devotion) [St. Margaret Mary Alacoque]
(June) The Month of the Sacred Heart {Catholic/Orthodox Caucus]
First Friday Devotion to the Sacred Heart of Jesus [St. Margaret Mary Alacoque]
The Heart of the World (On the Sacred Heart of Jesus) (Catholic Caucus)
The Sacred Heart Is The Holy Eucharist(Catholic Caucus)
The Origin of the Sacred Heart Badge

Importance of Devotion to the Sacred Heart
An Awesome Homily on the Solemnity of the Sacred Heart of Jesus by Father Edmond Kline
Catholic Prayer and Devotion: June the Month of the Sacred Heart
Catholic Devotions: Sacred Heart of Jesus
Pope Urges Jesuits to Spread Sacred Heart Devotion
Homilies preached by Father Altier on the Feast of the Sacred Heart
Catholic Meditation and Devotion: The Sacred Heart of Jesus
Daily Recomendation to the Sacred Heart of Jesus powerful prayer!
The Sacred Heart and the Eucharist
The Love of the Sacred Heart

On the Sacred Heart - "We Adore God's Love of Humanity"
HAURIETIS AQUAS (On Devotion To The Sacred Heart) - Encyclical by Pope Pius XII
Solemnity Most Sacred Heart of Jesus and Immaculate Heart of Mary
Sacred Heart a Feast of God's Love, Says John Paul II
The Sacred Heart of Jesus: Symbol of Combativity and the Restoration of Christendom
Devotion to the Sacred Heart of Jesus-The Early Church, Middle Ages up to St. Margaret Mary
See this Heart
‘God Will Act and Will Reign’
About Devotion To The Sacred Heart:The Story Of Saint Margaret Mary Alacoque
Rediscover Feast of Sacred Heart, John Paul II Tells Youth

 
 

"Behold this Heart which has loved men so much, and yet men do not want to love Me in return. Through you My divine Heart wishes to spread its love everywhere on earth."

- Jesus to Saint Margaret Mary

Our Lord also made 12 promises to St. Margaret Mary for those that are devoted to His Sacred Heart.

  1. I will give them all the graces necessary for their state in life.
  2. I will give peace in their families.
  3. I will console them in all their troubles.
  4. They shall find in My Heart an assured refuge during life and especially at the hour of death.
  5. I will pour abundant blessings on all their undertakings.
  6. Sinners shall find in My Heart the source and infinite ocean of mercy.
  7. Tepid souls shall become fervent.
  8. Fervent souls shall speedily rise to great perfection.
  9. I will bless the homes in which the image of My Sacred Heart shall be exposed and honoured.
  10. I will give to priests the power to touch the most hardened hearts.
  11. Those who propagate this devotion shall have their name written in My Heart, and it shall never be effaced.
  12. The all-powerful love of My Heart will grant to all those who shall receive Communion on the First Friday of nine consecutive months the grace of final repentance; they shall not die under My displeasure, nor without receiving their Sacraments; My Heart shall be their assured refuge at the last hour.


14 posted on 06/16/2013 12:00:04 AM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 13 | View Replies]

To: All

June 2013

Pope's Intentions

Mutual Respect. That a culture of dialogue, listening, and mutual respect may prevail among peoples.

New Evangelization. That where secularization is strongest, Christian communities may effectively promote a new evangelization.


15 posted on 06/16/2013 12:01:03 AM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 14 | View Replies]

To: All
Arlington Catholic Herald

GOSPEL COMMENTARY LK 7:36-50
Unilateral forgiveness
Fr. Paul Scalia

Jesus said to the woman, “Your sins are forgiven” (cf. Lk 7:36-50). What beautiful words from our Savior to this sinful woman. A wonderful act of forgiveness and mercy, except that ... she had not asked for it. In fact, no one in the Gospels asks for His forgiveness — not the paralytic lowered through the roof for healing, not the jeering crowd on Calvary. Yet He forgives them anyway. This woman, by her gestures of repentance — bathing His feet with tears, drying them with her hair, and anointing them with oil — she comes the closest. Her actions speak what she in fact never says: “Forgive me.”

All of which emphasizes God's initiative: He forgives before we ask. He bestows mercy even though we are unworthy of it. He does not require that we be perfect in order to be forgiven — that would be a contradiction. He does not insist that we ask in just the right way, with all our i’s dotted and t’s crossed. That would amount to Christian reincarnation: Keep trying until you get it right. No, He extends forgiveness before we are ready, before we even ask. So, when we ask for forgiveness we are not trying to change His mind, as if He has to be cajoled and persuaded. Rather, we are availing ourselves of something already extended to us. We ask for His forgiveness, not so that He will give (for He already has) but so that we can receive.

This should give us confidence in approaching the sacrament of penance. Forgiveness awaits us there already. We enter the confessional not to convince the minister to forgive but to avail ourselves of what he is there to give. The requirements for a good confession (examine the conscience, make a firm purpose of amendment, list the sins clearly and do not withhold mortal sins) are not tests or hurdles, but how we open the soul to receive forgiveness. And even after all that no one can say he confessed perfectly. No human act of repentance can sufficiently express the gravity of sin or make one worthy of mercy. So, like the woman in the Gospel, we sort of barge into the confessional and awkwardly but sincerely give expression as best we can to our sorrow for sin and desire for reconciliation. Forgiveness awaits us in the confessional. We simply need to avail ourselves of it.

Our Lord's initiative in forgiveness — His unilateral decision to forgive before anyone asks — should likewise shape our mercy toward others. We pray daily for a correspondence between God's mercy and ours: “Forgive us our trespasses as we forgive those who trespass against us.”

God extends forgiveness before we are worthy, before we even ask. We, however, hold grudges and say, “I will forgive so-and-so when he comes and asks.” Or “I will forgive her when she shows me she is sorry.” What if God did that? What if He withheld His mercy until we had performed some act worthy of it? We approach Him in confidence precisely because we know that He forgives despite our unworthiness. Others should feel the same freedom with us.

This is what it means to love one's enemies — to make the interior decision to forgive, whether or not the other asks for our forgiveness. The day may come when the person asks, in which case we can be reconciled. Other times, sadly, that day may never come — in which case we imitate Our Lord even more by bearing in our hearts forgiveness for those who have not asked. Christian forgiveness goes forth before the offender has repented,despite his unworthiness. That is how Christ acts towards us and how we ought to act toward others.

Fr. Scalia is Arlington Bishop Paul S. Loverde’s delegate for clergy.


16 posted on 06/16/2013 12:11:28 AM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 15 | View Replies]

To: All
Archdiocese of Washington

Always Remember: A Homily for the 11th Sunday of the Year

By:

Every now and then it will be said by some that the Church should speak less of sin and emphasize more positive things. It is said that honey attracts more flies than vinegar. And indeed, we in the Church have been collectively de-emphasizing sin to a large degree for more than forty years. But, despite predictions, our churches have been getting emptier and emptier. Maybe this is because people are a little more complicated than the “flies” in the old saying.

Jesus also gives the reason in today’s Gospel as to why our churches are getting emptier. Simply put there is less love. He says, But the one to whom little is forgiven, loves little. (Luke 7:47)

Why is there less love? As Jesus says, there is less love because there is less appreciation of what the Lord has done for us and the debt He paid for us. Because debt of sin is no longer preached as it should be, we are less aware of just how grave our condition is. Thus we under-appreciate what the Lord has done for us. This in turn diminishes love,  and a lack of love leads to absence and neglect.

Understanding sin is essential for us to understand what the Lord has done for us. Remembering what the Lord has done for us brings gratitude and love. To those who want the Church to de-emphasize sin Jesus warns, But the one to whom little is forgiven, loves little. (Luke 7:47)

Here then is the gospel in summary form, and the short, TV Mass version of my sermon. If you wish to ponder more, here follows a further commentary:

I. Rich Love – The Gospel opens with a sign of extravagant love. The text says, A Pharisee invited Jesus to dine with him, and he entered the Pharisee’s house and reclined at table. Now there was a sinful woman in the city who learned that he was at table in the house of the Pharisee. Bringing an alabaster flask of ointment, she stood behind him at his feet weeping and began to bathe his feet with her tears. Then she wiped them with her hair,
kissed them, and anointed them with the ointment.

One may argue as to the value of the ointment in this passage. Some have wished to opine that she was a wealthy on account of prostitution, and could thus afford an expensive ointment. Fine. But her tears were far more costly than any ointment. Yes, her tears are the most costly thing in her life, born on great pain and costly sorrow.

It is true, many of her sorrows are likely the result of her own foolishness. But that does not decrease her pain, it increases it. Yes, the most costly thing with which she anoints the Lord’s feet is her tears. There is nothing more precious to the Lord than the love of his faithful, than their sorrow for sins, and their turning to him in love and repentance; no greater gift.

In Jesus day people ate a formal dinner reclining on the floor, on a mat, on their left side. Their feet were behind them and they ate with their right hand. This explains the ability of the woman to approach Jesus’ feet from behind.

In this sense she is able to “surprise” Jesus by her love. Perhaps she was not ready to look upon his face and behold his holy countenance. Just his feet, the lowliest aspect of his sacred humanity, that is where she begins. She humbles herself to serve that part of him that most engages our lowly earth. There, even the Son of God had callouses, perhaps even a wound or two. Yes, there she saw reflected her own humility, saw her own callouses and wounds. There she would discover the first wounds the Savior endured for us; wounds that reflected that He knew what this world can do to a person.

She loves, sharing the incalculable gift of her own sorrows, sorrow for sin and sorrow on account of others who sinned against her. And there she found a friend in Jesus who, though sinless himself, had suffered mightily on account of the sins of others and would suffer more.

Such love, such relief. And, as we shall see, her love is rooted in an experience of mercy. And her experience of mercy is rooted in a deep knowledge of her sinfulness. That experience led her to deep gratitude for the love the Lord had shown her. As we shall also see, her experience of the depths of God’s mercy is something we must all some how experience.

And we too are called to go to the Lord in sorrow and love. And there at the foot of the cross we look up. And what is the first thing we see? His feet. And there, like the woman, we are called to love, to weeping for our sins, and to the remembrance of His mercy for us.

II. Rebuke - When the Pharisee who had invited him saw this he said to himself, “If this man were a prophet, he would know who and what sort of woman this is who is touching him, that she is a sinner.

Here is a dangerous comparison. The Pharisee accounts himself and others to be better or more holy than she. He seems to have no idea that he is also in need of grace and mercy as well.

There is a great danger in thinking that we can attain to heaven merely by being better than someone else. But that is NOT the standard. The Standard, to obtain heaven is to be like Jesus. And if we will lay hold of that, we will see that we are ALL going a lot of grace and mercy to even stand a chance! Yes, to this Pharisee and to some of us the cry must go out: “Danger (Will Robinson)!”

The danger for us is a danger that prevents us from experiencing God’s grace mercy and love. The danger is our prideful presumption that we are less needy that others who are more sinful.

While it is true that, a purely human level, some many have sins more serious than others, at the divine level we are ALL poor and blind beggars who don’t stand a chance in comparison with the perfection and holiness of God. Even if I were to have $500 in comparison to your $50, the true value necessary to be able to endure God’s holiness is $50 Trillion. Thus, whatever differences may exist between you and I are nothing in comparison to the boatloads of grace mercy we will both need to ever hope to see God.

The Pharisee’s exasperation is borne on a blindness to his own sin. And, being blind in this way, his heart is ill-equipped to love or even experience love. He has no sense he needs it all! His sense is that he is has earned God’s love and that God somehow owes him. But God does not owe him. His only hope is grace, love and mercy from God.

Having no sense of his sin, he smugly dismisses this woman’s action as reprehensible. And he even considers Jesus naïve and of no account for accepting her love. Yet, Jesus is not naïve and the Pharisee had ought to be rather more careful since the measure that he measures will be measured back to him. His lack of mercy for her, brings a standard of strict justice on him. But he cannot endure this sort of justice. He is badly misled.

III. RejoinderJesus said to him in reply, “Simon, I have something to say to you.” “Tell me, teacher, ” he said. “Two people were in debt to a certain creditor; one owed five hundred days’ wages and the other owed fifty. Since they were unable to repay the debt, he forgave it for both. Which of them will love him more?” Simon said in reply, “The one, I suppose, whose larger debt was forgiven.” He said to him, “You have judged rightly.

And here comes the central point of this gospel, a point we have too widely set aside today. And the point is simply that, to appreciate the glory of the good news, we must first lay hold of the of the bad news. We must grasp the depths of our sin to appreciate the heights of God’s love and mercy.

But in this modern age which minimizes sins and has said, in effect, “I’m OK you’re OK,” little penetration of the depths of sin is made. And thus, there is little appreciation for the glory for God’s steadfast love and mercy.

Jesus could not be clearer, until we know the bill of our sins and grasp that we cannot even come close to paying it, we will make light of mercy and consider the gift of salvation wrought for us as of little or no account.

How tragic it is then, that many preachers in Church have stopped preaching sin. The effect of course, as was mentioned above, has been to minimize love and empty our churches. Knowing our sin, if such knowledge is of the Holy Spirit, leads to love. Jesus now points to the woman as a picture of what is necessary.

IV. Remembrance - Jesus points to the Woman and says, “Do you see this woman? When I entered your house, you did not give me water for my feet, but she has bathed them with her tears and wiped them with her hair. You did not give me a kiss, but she has not ceased kissing my feet since the time I entered. You did not anoint my head with oil, but she anointed my feet with ointment. So I tell you, her many sins have been forgiven because she has shown great love. But the one to whom little is forgiven, loves little.

Yes, behold her love, a love which is the fruit of a remembrance of what the Lord has done for her. She knows and remembers that she has been forgiven much. It is fixed in her mind what the Lord has done for her and she is grateful and different.

And here is the heart of what it means to remember. Has not the Lord told us all to remember what he has done for us? Indeed, he says it at every Mass: Do this in remembrance of me.
What does it mean to remember? It means to have so present in my mind and heart what the Lord has done for you that you’re grateful, and you’re different.

This woman cannot forget what Jesus has done for her. She remembers, she is grateful and she is different.

We too must be willing to go to the foot of the cross and let it dawn on us what the Lord has done for us, to let it dawn so that we are grateful and different, so that we are moved to love for the Lord and for others.

Go with me to the foot of the cross and pray (in the words of psalm 38):

Foul and festering are my sores,
at the face of my own foolishness.
I am stooped and turned deeply inward
And I walk about, all the day in sorrow.

I am afflicted and deeply humiliated
I groan in the weeping of my heart.

Before you O Lord are all my desires,
And my weeping is not hid from you.
My hearts shudders, my strength forsakes me,
And the very light itself has gone from my eyes.

But it is there, at the foot of the cross, that his mercy dawns on us, there in the shadow of our own sins does the power of his mercy break through our broken and humbled hearts:

I Love the Lord for he has heard
The voice of my lamentation.
For he turned his ear to me
On the day I called to him!

The lines of death had surrounded me,
And the anguish of Hell had found me.
In my tribulation and sorrow I called on the Lord,
“O Lord save my soul!”

Ah, The Lord is merciful and just,
Our God has had mercy!
The Lord guards his little ones.
I was humbled and he saved me!

Be turned back my soul to your rest,
My eyes, from tears, and my feet from slipping!
For I will walk in the presence of the Lord,
In the land of the living. (Psalm 116)

Always remember what the Lord has done for you. Go to the foot of the Cross. Let the Lord show you what he has done for you. Always remember and never forget. If you do, you will be grateful and different.

Some time ago the world cast off sorrow for sin as “unhealthy.” And, sadly, the larger part of the Church bought into the self esteem craze of the 1970s and 80s. It is true, there such a thing as morbid and unhealthy guilt. But there is also a godly sorrow of which St. Paul writes:

If I caused you sorrow by my letter, I do not regret it. Though I did regret it—I see that my letter hurt you, but only for a little while— yet now I am happy, not because you were made sorry, but because your sorrow led you to repentance. For you became sorrowful as God intended and so were not harmed in any way by us. Godly sorrow brings repentance that leads to salvation and leaves no regret, but worldly sorrow brings death. See what this godly sorrow has produced in you: what earnestness, what eagerness to clear yourselves, what indignation, what alarm, what longing, what concern, what readiness to see justice done. (2 Cor 7:8-11)

It is time for us all to rediscover godly sorrow, a sorrow for sins that comes from the Holy Spirit and which is the root of love and gratitude for the salvation of God. Without it we are too easily like the Pharisee in today’s Gospel: arrogant, harsh, dismissive, and self satisfied. As the Lord says, The one to whom little is forgiven, loves little. But with it we are like the woman: grateful, loving, serving, and extravagant.

Remember what the Lord has done for you. That is, let what the Lord has done for you be so present in your mind and heart that you are grateful and you are different.

Always Remember.


17 posted on 06/16/2013 12:19:54 AM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 16 | View Replies]

To: All
Sunday Gospel Reflections

11th Sunday in Ordinary Time
Reading I:
2Sm 12:7-10,13 II: Gal 2:16,19-21
Gospel
Luke 7:36-50

36 A Pharisee invited him to dine with him, and he entered the Pharisee's house and reclined at table.
37 Now there was a sinful woman in the city who learned that he was at table in the house of the Pharisee. Bringing an alabaster flask of ointment,
38 she stood behind him at his feet weeping and began to bathe his feet with her tears. Then she wiped them with her hair, kissed them, and anointed them with the ointment.
39 When the Pharisee who had invited him saw this he said to himself, "If this man were a prophet, he would know who and what sort of woman this is who is touching him, that she is a sinner."
40 Jesus said to him in reply, "Simon, I have something to say to you." "Tell me, teacher," he said.
41 "Two people were in debt to a certain creditor; one owed five hundred days' wages and the other owed fifty.
42 Since they were unable to repay the debt, he forgave it for both. Which of them will love him more?"
43 Simon said in reply, "The one, I suppose, whose larger debt was forgiven." He said to him, "You have judged rightly."
44 Then he turned to the woman and said to Simon, "Do you see this woman? When I entered your house, you did not give me water for my feet, but she has bathed them with her tears and wiped them with her hair.
45 You did not give me a kiss, but she has not ceased kissing my feet since the time I entered.
46 You did not anoint my head with oil, but she anointed my feet with ointment.
47 So I tell you, her many sins have been forgiven; hence, she has shown great love. But the one to whom little is forgiven, loves little."
48 He said to her, "Your sins are forgiven."
49 The others at table said to themselves, "Who is this who even forgives sins?"
50 But he said to the woman, "Your faith has saved you; go in peace."


Interesting Details
One Main Point

Jesus is portrayed as friends of sinners, a constant theme in Luke. Accepting Jesus means the openness to accept God's plan of forgiveness.


Reflections
  1. How would you express your love for Jesus? For other people?

18 posted on 06/16/2013 12:23:59 AM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 17 | View Replies]

To: All
Sunday, June 16, 2013
Eleventh Sunday in Ordinary Time
First Reading:
Psalm:
Second Reading:
Gospel:
2 Samuel 12:7-10, 13
Psalm 32:1-2, 5, 7, 11
Galatians 2:16, 19-21
Luke 7:36

My Lord and my God, take from me everything that distances me from you. My Lord and my God, give me everything that brings me closer to you. My Lord and my God, detach me from myself to give my all to you.

-- St. Nicholas of Flüe


19 posted on 06/16/2013 12:27:01 AM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 18 | View Replies]

To: All
Just A Minute Just A Minute (Listen)
Some of EWTN's most popular hosts and guests in a collection of one minute inspirational messages. A different message each time you click.

20 posted on 06/16/2013 12:27:43 AM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 19 | View Replies]

To: All



The Angelus 

The Angel of the Lord declared to Mary: 
And she conceived of the Holy Spirit. 

Hail Mary, full of grace, the Lord is with thee; blessed art thou among women and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus.
Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners, now and at the hour of our death. Amen. 

Behold the handmaid of the Lord: Be it done unto me according to Thy word. 

Hail Mary . . . 

And the Word was made Flesh: And dwelt among us. 

Hail Mary . . . 


Pray for us, O Holy Mother of God, that we may be made worthy of the promises of Christ. 

Let us pray: 

Pour forth, we beseech Thee, O Lord, Thy grace into our hearts; that we, to whom the incarnation of Christ, Thy Son, was made known by the message of an angel, may by His Passion and Cross be brought to the glory of His Resurrection, through the same Christ Our Lord.

Amen. 


21 posted on 06/16/2013 12:30:19 AM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 20 | View Replies]

To: All
A Prayer for Fathers

A Prayer for Fathers

Most gracious Heavenly Father,

We thank you for our earthly fathers, those to whom you have entrusted the responsibility to provide loving protection of their families and guidance of their children. We thank you, also, for our priests and bishops, whose spiritual fatherhood is so vital to the faith of your people.

May our earthly fathers imitate the manly courage of Abraham, Jesse and Joseph, and all the holy fathers of the past in providing wise counsel to the children you have given to their care. And may our spiritual fathers be guided by the examples of Saints Peter and Paul, all the Apostles and their saintly successors. Give them valiant faith in the face of confusion and conflict, hope in time of trouble and sorrow, and steadfast love for you, for their families, and for all your people throughout the world.

Assist all fathers of families, all spiritual fathers, and all Christian men, that through your Grace they may steadily grow in holiness and in knowledge and understanding of your Truth. May they generously impart this knowledge to those who rely on them.

As you, our Heavenly Father, so loved the world, sending your only Son to be our Savior and Redeemer, we ask you to help all men to imitate His fatherly gentleness and mercy toward those who are weak; His humility, perfect obedience to your Will, and fearless witness to your Truth. May their lives be examples to all of heroic faithfulness to you.

We ask your blessing on all those to whom you have entrusted fatherhood. May your Holy Spirit constantly inspire them with justice and mercy, wisdom and strength, fidelity and self-giving love. May they receive your Grace abundantly in this earthly life, and may they look forward to eternal joy in your presence in the life to come.

We ask this through Jesus Christ, your Son and Our Lord, AMEN.

o o +++ o o

Prodigal Son - Pencil drawing by Helen Hull Hitchcock


22 posted on 06/16/2013 7:35:55 AM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 21 | View Replies]

To: All
Holy Husbands: A Heavenly Gift
What Happened to Dads?
"Be a Dad!" (Book Review)
Divine Fatherhood is the Source of Human Fatherhood: Fathers as Gift
Priests of the Domestic Church: A Father's Day Homily (Tissue Alert)

A Prayer for Fathers
No Better Gift for Father’s Day
Gift of Fatherhood: Kneel before the Father from Whom Every Family in Heaven on Earth is named
Fathers are important
Fathers
Fatherhood and Religion
The New Catholic Manliness (about priests)
Dads: Men for All Seasons
The Father of Fathers
On The Demise of Fatherhood

Father’s Day 2009: “An End to Buffoonish Fathers”
Of Treacheries, Tykes, and the Trinity (Fatherhood, Family, Effects of Abortion)
Priests and the importance of fatherhood [Catholic Caucus]
[OPEN] The Government, Divorce, and the War on Fatherhood
Study Shows Christianity Makes Men Better Husbands and Fathers
Study Shows Christianity Makes Men Better Husbands and Fathers (Open)
Honoring Thy Fathers
Priests of the Domestic Church: A Father's Day Homily
The Blueprint for Heroic Family Life [Fathers' Day] [Ecumenical]
Honoring Thy Fathers

A Father's Tough Love
Children Who Have An Active Father Figure Have Fewer Psychological And Behavioral Problems
Where Have All the Christian Men Gone? My Conversation with John Eldredge
The Transforming Power of Prayer [Part 1] (Catholic Man)
The Transforming Power of Prayer, Part 2 (Catholic Man)
The 10 Paradoxes of Fatherhood, There is a certain immediacy about motherhood that cannot
The Story of Champions [Father's Day]
What Makes a Man a Hero? [Father's Day]
The New Catholic Manliness
Applying St. Benedict's Rule to Fatherhood and Family Life - Using 6th-Century Wisdom Today

23 posted on 06/16/2013 7:43:53 AM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 22 | View Replies]

To: All


Information:
St. John Francis Regis
Feast Day: June 16
Born: January 31, 1597, Fontcouverte, Aude, Languedoc, France
Died: December 30, 1640, La Louvesc, Dauphine, France
Canonized: April 5, 1737, Rome by Pope Clement XII
Major Shrine: La Lovesc
Patron of: lacemakers, social workers



24 posted on 06/16/2013 7:47:34 AM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 23 | View Replies]

To: All
Interactive Saints for Kids

St. John Francis Regis

Feast Day: June 16
Born: 1597 :: Died: 1640

Jean-Francois Regie was born at Font-Couverte, Languedoc in France and was the son of a wealthy merchant. He was educated at the Jesuit College and when he was eighteen, he joined the Jesuit order.

In the seminary (where men are trained to become priests), John's love for God and his vocation showed in the way he prayed. He was also eager to teach catechism in the parishes when he could. He was so good as a Catechist that children he taught helped bring their parents back to the Church.

After he was ordained a priest, St. John Francis began his work as a missionary preacher. He gave very simple talks that came right from his heart. He willingly spoke to the poor, ordinary folks and they came in great crowds to hear him. Many farmers, workers and country folk were converted.

He spent his mornings praying, performing the sacrament of Reconciliation and preaching. In the afternoon, he would visit prisons and hospitals. He lived on apples, black bread and whatever came his way not bothering with proper meals because he preferred to spend his time preaching, teaching and hearing confessions.

St. John Francis journeyed to wild mountain parishes even on the coldest days of winter to preach his missions. "I have seen him stand all day on a heap of snow at the top of a mountain preaching," one priest said, "and then spend the whole night hearing confessions." Sometimes he would start off for a far-away town at three o'clock in the morning with a few apples in his pocket for his day's food.

Once, on his way to a village, St. John Francis fell and broke his leg. But he kept on going, leaning on a stick and on his companion's shoulder. When he reached the village, he went at once to hear confessions. He did not have his leg taken care of. At the end of the day, when the doctor looked at it, his leg was already completely healed.

He started hostels for women who had fallen into sin but wanted to change and called them the “Daughters of Refuge”. Because of this, he was often attacked by bad men for saving them. He also helped many country girls stay away from the big, bad cities by setting up a center for lacemaking and embroidery where they could work to earn a living.

He sarted a granary (a barn or shed to store grains) for the poor which sometimes refilled by a miracle before it got empty. St. John Francis died on one of his preaching missions. He became very ill while lost at night in the woods. Just before he died, he exclaimed: "I see Our Lord and his mother opening heaven for me." He died on December 31, 1640.

In 1806, St. John Vianney, the Cure of Ars joined the crowds as a pilgrim going to pray at the shrine of St. John Francis Regis. And he believed that his pilgrimage and the payers of this saint helped make him a priest too.


25 posted on 06/16/2013 7:50:56 AM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 24 | View Replies]

To: Salvation
Luke
  English: Douay-Rheims Latin: Vulgata Clementina Greek NT: Byzantine/Majority Text (2000)
  Luke 7
36 And one of the Pharisees desired him to eat with him. And he went into the house of the Pharisee, and sat down to meat. Rogabat autem illum quidam de pharisæis ut manducaret cum illo. Et ingressus domum pharisæi discubuit. ηρωτα δε τις αυτον των φαρισαιων ινα φαγη μετ αυτου και εισελθων εις την οικιαν του φαρισαιου ανεκλιθη
37 And behold a woman that was in the city, a sinner, when she knew that he sat at meat in the Pharisee's house, brought an alabaster box of ointment; Et ecce mulier, quæ erat in civitate peccatrix, ut cognovit quod accubuisset in domo pharisæi, attulit alabastrum unguenti : και ιδου γυνη εν τη πολει ητις ην αμαρτωλος [και] επιγνουσα οτι ανακειται εν τη οικια του φαρισαιου κομισασα αλαβαστρον μυρου
38 And standing behind at his feet, she began to wash his feet, with tears, and wiped them with the hairs of her head, and kissed his feet, and anointed them with the ointment. et stans retro secus pedes ejus, lacrimis cœpit rigare pedes ejus, et capillis capitis sui tergebat, et osculabatur pedes ejus, et unguento ungebat. και στασα παρα τους ποδας αυτου οπισω κλαιουσα ηρξατο βρεχειν τους ποδας αυτου τοις δακρυσιν και ταις θριξιν της κεφαλης αυτης εξεμασσεν και κατεφιλει τους ποδας αυτου και ηλειφεν τω μυρω
39 And the Pharisee, who had invited him, seeing it, spoke within himself, saying: This man, if he were a prophet, would know surely who and what manner of woman this is that toucheth him, that she is a sinner. Videns autem pharisæus, qui vocaverat eum, ait intra se dicens : Hic si esset propheta, sciret utique quæ et qualis est mulier, quæ tangit eum : quia peccatrix est. ιδων δε ο φαρισαιος ο καλεσας αυτον ειπεν εν εαυτω λεγων ουτος ει ην προφητης εγινωσκεν αν τις και ποταπη η γυνη ητις απτεται αυτου οτι αμαρτωλος εστιν
40 And Jesus answering, said to him: Simon, I have somewhat to say to thee. But he said: Master, say it. Et respondens Jesus, dixit ad illum : Simon, habeo tibi aliquid dicere. At ille ait : Magister, dic. και αποκριθεις ο ιησους ειπεν προς αυτον σιμων εχω σοι τι ειπειν ο δε φησιν διδασκαλε ειπε
41 A certain creditor had two debtors, the one who owed five hundred pence, and the other fifty. Duo debitores erant cuidam fœneratori : unus debebat denarios quingentos, et alius quinquaginta. δυο χρεωφειλεται ησαν δανειστη τινι ο εις ωφειλεν δηναρια πεντακοσια ο δε ετερος πεντηκοντα
42 And whereas they had not wherewith to pay, he forgave them both. Which therefore of the two loveth him most? Non habentibus illis unde redderent, donavit utrisque. Quis ergo eum plus diligit ? μη εχοντων δε αυτων αποδουναι αμφοτεροις εχαρισατο τις ουν αυτων ειπε πλειον αυτον αγαπησει
43 Simon answering, said: I suppose that he to whom he forgave most. And he said to him: Thou hast judged rightly. Respondens Simon dixit : Æstimo quia is cui plus donavit. At ille dixit : Recte judicasti. αποκριθεις δε ο σιμων ειπεν υπολαμβανω οτι ω το πλειον εχαρισατο ο δε ειπεν αυτω ορθως εκρινας
44 And turning to the woman, he said unto Simon: Dost thou see this woman? I entered into thy house, thou gavest me no water for my feet; but she with tears hath washed my feet, and with her hairs hath wiped them. Et conversus ad mulierem, dixit Simoni : Vides hanc mulierem ? Intravi in domum tuam, aquam pedibus meis non dedisti : hæc autem lacrimis rigavit pedes meos, et capillis suis tersit. και στραφεις προς την γυναικα τω σιμωνι εφη βλεπεις ταυτην την γυναικα εισηλθον σου εις την οικιαν υδωρ επι τους ποδας μου ουκ εδωκας αυτη δε τοις δακρυσιν εβρεξεν μου τους ποδας και ταις θριξιν της κεφαλης αυτης εξεμαξεν
45 Thou gavest me no kiss; but she, since she came in, hath not ceased to kiss my feet. Osculum mihi non dedisti : hæc autem ex quo intravit, non cessavit osculari pedes meos. φιλημα μοι ουκ εδωκας αυτη δε αφ ης εισηλθον ου διελιπεν καταφιλουσα μου τους ποδας
46 My head with oil thou didst not anoint; but she with ointment hath anointed my feet. Oleo caput meum non unxisti : hæc autem unguento unxit pedes meos. ελαιω την κεφαλην μου ουκ ηλειψας αυτη δε μυρω ηλειψεν μου τους ποδας
47 Wherefore I say to thee: Many sins are forgiven her, because she hath loved much. But to whom less is forgiven, he loveth less. Propter quod dico tibi : remittuntur ei peccata multa, quoniam dilexit multum. Cui autem minus dimittitur, minus diligit. ου χαριν λεγω σοι αφεωνται αι αμαρτιαι αυτης αι πολλαι οτι ηγαπησεν πολυ ω δε ολιγον αφιεται ολιγον αγαπα
48 And he said to her: Thy sins are forgiven thee. Dixit autem ad illam : Remittuntur tibi peccata. ειπεν δε αυτη αφεωνται σου αι αμαρτιαι
49 And they that sat at meat with him began to say within themselves: Who is this that forgiveth sins also? Et cœperunt qui simul accumbebant, dicere intra se : Quis est hic qui etiam peccata dimittit ? και ηρξαντο οι συνανακειμενοι λεγειν εν εαυτοις τις ουτος εστιν ος και αμαρτιας αφιησιν
50 And he said to the woman: Thy faith hath made thee safe, go in peace. Dixit autem ad mulierem : Fides tua te salvam fecit : vade in pace. ειπεν δε προς την γυναικα η πιστις σου σεσωκεν σε πορευου εις ειρηνην

26 posted on 06/16/2013 8:23:27 AM PDT by annalex (fear them not)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: annalex
36. And one of the Pharisees desired him that he would eat with him. And he went into the Pharisee's house, and sat down to meat.
37. And, behold, a woman in the city, which was a sinner, when she knew that Jesus sat at meat in the Pharisee's house, brought an alabaster box of ointment,
38. And stood at his feet behind him weeping, and began to wash his feet with tears, and did wipe them with the hairs of her head, and kissed his feet, and anointed them with the ointment.
39. Now when the Pharisee which had bidden him saw it, he spoke within himself, saying, This man, if he were a prophet, would have known who and what manner of woman this is that touches him: for she is a sinner.
40. And Jesus answering said to him, Simon, I have somewhat to say to you. And he said, Master, say on.
41. There was a certain creditor which had two debtors: the one owed five hundred pence, and the other fifty.
42. And when they had nothing to pay, he frankly forgave them both. Tell me therefore, which of them will love him most?
43. Simon answered and said, I suppose that he, to whom he forgave most. And he said to him, you have rightly judged.
44. And he turned to the woman, and said to Simon, See you this woman? I entered into your house, you gave me no water for my feet: but she has washed my feet with tears, and wiped them with the hairs of her head.
45. You gave me no kiss: but this woman since the time I came in has not ceased to kiss my feet.
46. My head with oil you did not anoint: but this woman has anointed my feet with ointment.
47. Wherefore I say to you, Her sins, which are many, are forgiven; for she loved much: but to whom little is forgiven, the same loves little.
48. And he said to her, Your sins are forgiven.
49. And they that sat at meat with him began to say within themselves, Who is this that forgives sins also?
50. And he said to the woman, Your faith has saved you: go in peace.

THEOPHYL; Having said just before, And the people that heard him justified God, being baptized with the baptism of John the same Evangelist builds up in deed what he had proposed in word, namely, wisdom justified by the righteous and the penitent, saying, And one of the Pharisees desired him, &c.

GREG. NYSS. This account is full of precious instruction. For there are very many who justify themselves, being puffed up with the dreamings of an idle fancy, who before the time of Judgment comes, separate themselves as lambs from the herds, not willing even to join in eating with the many, and hardly with those who go not to extremes, but keep the middle path in life. St. Luke, the physician of souls rather than of bodies, represents therefore our Lord and Savior most mercifully visiting others, as it follows, And he went into the Pharisees' house, and sat down to meat. Not that He should share any of his faults, but might impart somewhat of His own righteousness.

CYRIL; A woman of corrupt life, but testifying her faithful affection, comes to Christ, as having power to release her from every fault, and to grant her pardon for the crimes she had committed. For it follows, And behold a woman in the city which was a sinner brought an alabaster box of ointment.

THEOPHYL; Alabaster is a kind of white marble tinged with various colors, which is generally used for vessels holding ointment, because it is said to be the best sort for preserving the ointment sweet.

GREG. For this woman, beholding the spots of her shame, ran to wash them at the fountain of mercy, and blushed not at seeing the guests, for since she was courageously ashamed of herself within, she thought there was nothing which could shame her from without. Observe with what sorrow she is wrung who is not ashamed to weep even in the midst of a feast!

GREG. NYSS. But to mark her own unworthiness, she stands behind with downcast eyes, and with her hair thrown about embraces His feet, and washing them with her tears, betokened a mind distressed at her state, and imploring pardon. For it follows, And standing behind, she began to wash his feet with her tears.

GREG. For her eyes which once coveted after earthly things, she was now wearing out with penitential weeping. She once displayed her hair for the setting off of her face, she now wiped her tears with her hair. As it follows, And she wiped them with the hairs of her head. She once uttered proud things with her mouth, but kissing the feet of the Lord, she impressed her lips on the footsteps of her Redeemer. She once used ointment for the perfume of her body; what she had unworthily applied to herself, she now laudably offered to God. As it follows, And she anointed with ointment. As many enjoyments as she had in herself, so many offerings did she devise out of herself. She converts the number of her faults into the same number of virtues, that as much of her might wholly serve God in her penitence, as had despised God in her sin.

CHRYS. Thus the harlot became then more honorable than the virgins. For no sooner was she inflamed with penitence, than she burst forth in love for Christ. And these things indeed which have been spoken of were done outwardly, but those which her mind pondered within itself, were much more fervent. God alone beheld them.

GREG. But the Pharisee beholding these things despises them, and finds fault, not only with the woman who was a sinner, but with the Lord who received her, as it follows, Now when the Pharisee who had bidden him saw it, he spoke within himself, saying, This man, if he were a prophet, would have known who and what manner of woman this is which touches him. We see the Pharisee really proud in himself, and hypocritically righteous, blaming the sick woman for her sickness, the physician for his aid. The woman surely if she had come to the feet of the Pharisee would have departed with the heel lifted up against her. For he would have thought that he was polluted by another's sin, not having sufficient of his own real righteousness to fill him. So also some gifted with the priests' office, if perchance they have done any just thing outwardly or slightly, forthwith despise those who are put under them, and look with disdain on sinners who are of the people. But when we behold sinners, we must first bewail ourselves for their calamity, since we perhaps have had and are certainly liable to a similar fall. But it is necessary that we should carefully distinguish, for we are bound to make distinction in vices, but to have compassion on nature. For if we must punish the sinner, we must cherish a brother. But when by penance he has himself punished his own deed, our brother is no more a sinner, for he punished in himself what Divine justice condemned. The Physician was between two sick persons, but the one preserved her faculties in the fever, the other lost his mental perception. For she wept at what she had done; but the Pharisee, elated with a false sense of righteousness, overrated the vigor of his own health.

TIT. BOST. But the Lord not hearing his words, but perceiving his thoughts, showed Himself to be the Lord of Prophets, as it follows, And Jesus answering said to him, Simon, I have something to say to you.

GLOSS. And this indeed He spoke in answer to his thoughts; and the Pharisee was made more attentive by these words of our Lord, as it is said, And he said, Master, say on.

GREG. A parable concerning two debtors is opposed to him, of whom the one owed more, the other less; as it follows, There was a certain creditor which had two debtors , &c.

TIT. BOST. As if He said, Nor are you without debts. What then! If you are involved in fewer debts, boast not thyself, for you art still in need of pardon. Then He goes on to speak of pardon, And when they had nothing to pay, he freely forgave them both.

GLOSS. For no one can of himself escape the debt of sin, but only by obtaining pardon through the grace of God.

GREG. But both debtors being forgiven, the Pharisee is asked which most loved the forgiver of the debts. For it follows, Who then will love him most? To which he at once answers, I suppose, that be to whom he forgave most. And here we must remark, that while the Pharisee is convicted upon his own grounds, the madman carries the rope by which he will be bound; as it follows, But he said to him, you have rightly judged.

The good deeds of the sinful woman are enumerated to him, and the evils of the pretended righteous; as it follows, And he turned to the woman, and said to Simon, See you this woman? I entered into your house, you gave me no water for my feet, but she has washed my feet with her tears.

TIT. BOST. As if He said, To provide water is easy, to pour forth tears is not easy. You have not provided even what was at hand, she has poured forth what was not at hand; for washing my feet with her tears, she washed away her own stains.

She wiped them with her hair, that so she might draw to herself the sacred moisture, and by that by which she once enticed youth to sin, might now attract to herself holiness.

CHRYS. But as after the breaking of a violent storm there comes a calm,, so when tears have burst forth, there is peace, and gloomy thoughts vanish; and as by water and the Spirit, so by tears and confession we are again made clean. Hence it follows, Wherefore I say to you, Her sins which are many are forgiven, for she loves much. For those who have violently plunged into evil, will in time also eagerly follow after good, being conscious to what debts they have made themselves responsible.

GREG. The more then the heart of the sinner is burnt up by the great fire of charity, so much the more is the rust of sin consumed. TIT. BOST. But it more frequently happens that he who has sinned much is purified by confession, but he who has sinned little, refuses from pride to come to be healed thereby. Hence it follows, But to whom little is forgiven, the same loves little.

CHRYS. We have need then of a fervent spirit, for nothing hinders a man from becoming great. Let then no sinner despair, no virtuous man fall asleep; neither let the one be self-confident, for often the harlot shall go before him, nor the other distrustful, for he may even surpass the foremost. Hence it is also here added, But he said to her, Your sins are forgiven you.

GREG. Behold she who had come sick to the Physician was healed, but because of her safety others are still sick; for it follows, And they that sat at meat began to say within themselves, Who is this that forgives sins also. But the heavenly Physician regards not those sick, whom He sees to be made still worse by His remedy, but her whom He had healed He encourages by making mention of her own piety; as it follows, But he said to the woman, Your faith has made you whole; for in truth she doubted not that she would receive what she sought for.

THEOPHYL. But after having forgiven her sins, He stops not at the forgiveness of sins, but adds good works, as it follows, Go in peace, i.e. in righteousness, for righteousness is the reconciliation of man to God, as sin is the enmity between God and man; as if He said, Do all things which lead you to the peace of God.

AMBROSE; Now in this place many seem to be perplexed with the question, whether the Evangelists do not appear to have differed concerning the faith.

GREEK EX. For since the four Evangelists relate that Christ was anointed with ointment by a woman, I think that there were three women, differing according to the quality of each, their mode of action, and the difference of times. John, for example, relates that Mary, the sister of Lazarus, six days before the Passover, anointed the feet of Jesus in her own house; but Matthew, after that the Lord had said, You know that after two days will be the Passover, adds, that in Bethany, at the house of Simon the leper, a woman poured ointment upon the head of our Lord, but did not anoint His feet as Mary. Mark also says the same as Matthew; but Luke gives the account not near the time of the Passover, but in the middle of the Gospel. Chrysostom explains it that there were two different women, one indeed who is described in John, another who is mentioned by the three.

AMBROSE; Matthew has introduced this woman as pouring ointment upon the head of Christ, and was therefore unwilling to call her a sinner, for the sinner, according to Luke, poured ointment upon the feet of Christ. She cannot then be the same, lest the Evangelists should seem to be at variance with one another. The difficulty may be also solved by the difference of merit and of time, so that the former woman may have been yet a sinner, the latter now more perfect.

AUG. For I think we must understand that the same Mary did this twice, once indeed as Luke has related, when at first coming with humility and weeping, she was thought worthy to receive forgiveness of sins. Hence John, when he began to speak of the resurrection of Lazarus, before he came to Bethany, says, But it was Mary who anointed our Lord with ointment, and wiped his feet with her hair, whose brother Lazarus was sick. Mary therefore had already done this; but what she again did in Bethany is another occurrence, which belongs not to the relation of Luke, but is equally told by the other three.

GREG. Now in a mystical sense the Pharisee, presuming upon his pretended righteousness, is the Jewish people; the woman who was a sinner, but who came and wept at our Lord's feet, represents the conversion of the Gentiles.

AMBROSE; Or, the leper, is the prince of this world; the house of Simon the leper, is the earth. The Lord therefore descended from the higher parts to this earth; for this woman could not have been healed, who bears the figure of a soul or the Church, had not Christ come upon earth. But rightly does she receive the figure of a sinner, for Christ also took the form of a sinner. If then you make your soul approach in faith to God, it not with foul and shameful sins, but piously obeying the word of God, and in the confidence of unspotted purity, ascends to the very head of Christ. But the head of Christ is God. But let him who holds not the head of Christ, hold the feet, the sinner at the feet, the just at the head; nevertheless she also who sinned, has ointment.

GREG. What else is expressed by the ointment, but the sweet savor of a good report? If then we do good works by which we may sprinkle the Church with the sweet odor of a good report, what else do we but pour ointment upon the body of our Lord. But the woman stood by His feet, for we stood over against the feet of the Lord, when yet in our sins we resisted His ways. But if we are converted from our sins to true repentance, we now again stand by His feet, for we follow His footsteps whom we before opposed.

AMBROSE; Bring you also repentance after sin. Wherever you hear the name of Christ, speed thither; into whatever house you know that Jesus has entered, thither hasten; when you find wisdom, when you find justice sitting in any inner chamber, run to its feet, that is, seek even the lowest part of wisdom; confess your sins with tears. Perhaps Christ washed not His own feet, that we might wash them with our tears. Blessed tears, which can not only wash away our own sin, but also water the footsteps of the heavenly Word, that His goings may abound in us. Blessed tears, in which there is not only the redemption of sinners, but the refreshing of the righteous.

GREG. For we water the feet of our Lord with tears if we are moved with compassion to any even the lowest members of our Lord. We wipe our Lord's feet with our hair, when we show pity to His saints (with whom we suffer in love) by the sacrifice of those things with which we abound.

AMBROSE; Throw about your hair, scatter before Him all the graces of your body. The hair is not to be despised which can wash the feet of Christ.

GREG. The woman kisses the feet which she has wiped. This also we fully do when we ardently love those whom we maintain by our bounty. By the feet also may be understood tile mystery itself of the Incarnation. We then kiss the feet of the Redeemer when we love with our whole heart the mystery of the Incarnation. We anoint the feet with ointment, when we proclaim the power of His humanity with the good tidings of holy eloquence. But this also the Pharisee sees and grudges, for when the Jewish people perceives that the Gentiles preach God, it consumes away by its own malice. But the Pharisee is thus repulsed, that as it were through Him that false people might be made manifest, for in truth that unbelieving people never offered to the Lord even those things which were without them; but the Gentiles being converted, poured forth not only their substance but their blood. Hence He says to the Pharisee, You gave me no water for my feet, but she has washed my feet with her tears; for water is without us, the moisture of tears is within us. That unfaithful people also gave no kiss to the Lord, for it was unwilling to embrace Him from love whom it obeyed from fear, (for the kiss is the sign of love,) but the Gentiles being called cease not to kiss the feet of their Redeemer, for they ever breathe in His love.

AMBROSE; But she is of no slight merit of whom it is said, From the time that she entered has not ceased to kiss my feet, so that sue knew not to speak aught but wisdom, to love aught but Justice, to touch aught but chastity, to kiss aught but modesty.

GREG. But it is said to the Pharisee, My head with oil you did not anoint, for the very power even of Divinity on which the Jewish people professed to believe, he neglects to celebrate with due praise. But she has anointed my feet with ointment. For while the Gentile people believed the mystery of His incarnation, it proclaimed also His lowest powers with the highest praise.

AMBROSE; Blessed is he even who can anoint with oil the feet of Christ, but more blessed is he who anoints with ointment, for the essence of many flowers blended into one, scatters the sweets of various odors. And perhaps no other than the Church alone can bring that ointment which has innumerable flowers of different perfumes, and therefore no one can love so much as she who loves in many individuals. But in the Pharisee's house, that is, in the house of the Law and the Prophets, not the Pharisee, but the Church is justified. For the Pharisee believed not, the Church believed. The Law has no mystery by which secret faults are cleansed, and therefore that which is wanting in the Law is made up in the Gospel.

But the two debtors are the two nations who are responsible for payment to the usurer of the heavenly treasury. But we do not owe to this usurer material money, but the balance of our good deeds, the coin of our virtues, the merits of which are estimated by the weight of sorrow, the stamp of righteousness, the sound of confession. But that denarius is of no slight value on which the image of the king is found. Woe to me if I shall not have what I received. Or because there is hardly any one who can pay the whole debt to the usurer, woe to me if I shall not seek the debt to be forgiven me.

But what nation is it that owes most, if not we to whom most is lent? To them were entrusted the oracles of God, to us is entrusted the Virgin's offspring, Immanuel, i. e. God with us, the cross of our Lord, His death, His resurrection. It cannot then be doubted that he owes most who receives most. Among men he perhaps offends most who is most in debt. By the mercy of the Lord the case is reversed, so that he loves most who owes most, if so be that he obtains grace. And therefore since there is nothing which we can worthily return to the Lord, woe be to me also if I shall not have loved. Let us then offer our love for the debt, for he loves most to whom most is given.

Catena Aurea Luke 7
27 posted on 06/16/2013 8:24:05 AM PDT by annalex (fear them not)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 26 | View Replies]

To: annalex


Christ in the House of Simon

Dieric Bouts the Elder

1440s
Oil on wood, 40,5 x 61 cm
Staatliche Museen, Berlin

28 posted on 06/16/2013 8:24:30 AM PDT by annalex (fear them not)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 27 | View Replies]

To: annalex


Christ at Simon the Pharisee

Pieter Pauwel Rubens

1618-20
Oil on canvas transferred from wood, 189 x 285 cm
The Hermitage, St. Petersburg

29 posted on 06/16/2013 8:24:57 AM PDT by annalex (fear them not)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 28 | View Replies]

To: annalex

30 posted on 06/16/2013 8:26:52 AM PDT by annalex (fear them not)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 29 | View Replies]

To: annalex
Luke
  English: Douay-Rheims Latin: Vulgata Clementina Greek NT: Byzantine/Majority Text (2000)
  Luke 8
1 AND it came to pass afterwards, that he travelled through the cities and towns, preaching and evangelizing the kingdom of God; and the twelve with him: Et factum est deinceps, et ipse iter faciebat per civitates, et castella prædicans, et evangelizans regnum Dei : et duodecim cum illo, και εγενετο εν τω καθεξης και αυτος διωδευεν κατα πολιν και κωμην κηρυσσων και ευαγγελιζομενος την βασιλειαν του θεου και οι δωδεκα συν αυτω
2 And certain women who had been healed of evil spirits and infirmities; Mary who is called Magdalen, out of whom seven devils were gone forth, et mulieres aliquæ, quæ erant curatæ a spiritibus malignis et infirmatibus : Maria, quæ vocatur Magdalene, de qua septem dæmonia exierant, και γυναικες τινες αι ησαν τεθεραπευμεναι απο πνευματων πονηρων και ασθενειων μαρια η καλουμενη μαγδαληνη αφ ης δαιμονια επτα εξεληλυθει
3 And Joanna the wife of Chusa, Herod's steward, and Susanna, and many others who ministered unto him of their substance. et Joanna uxor Chusæ procuratoris Herodis, et Susanna, et aliæ multæ, quæ ministrabant ei de facultatibus suis. και ιωαννα γυνη χουζα επιτροπου ηρωδου και σουσαννα και ετεραι πολλαι αιτινες διηκονουν αυτοις απο των υπαρχοντων αυταις

31 posted on 06/16/2013 8:27:27 AM PDT by annalex (fear them not)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 30 | View Replies]

To: annalex
1. And it came to pass afterward, that he went throughout every city and village, preaching and showing the glad tidings of the kingdom of God: and the twelve were with him,
2. And certain women, which had been healed of evil spirits and infirmities, Mary called Magdalene, out of whom went seven devils,
3. And Joanna the wife of Chuza Herod's steward, and Susanna, and many others, which ministered to him of their substance.

THEOPHYL. He who descended from heaven, for our example and imitation, gives us a lesson not to be slothful in teaching. Hence it is said, And it came to pass afterward that he went, &c.

GREG. NAZ. For He passes from place to place, that He may not only gain many, but may consecrate many places. He sleeps and labors, that He may sanctify sleep and labor. He weeps, that He may give a value to tears. He preaches heavenly things, that He may exalt His hearers.

TIT BOST. For He who descends from heaven to earth, brings tidings to them that dwell on earth of a heavenly kingdom But who ought to preach the kingdom of heaven? Many prophets came, yet preached not the kingdom of heaven, for how could they pretend to speak of things which they perceived not?

ISID. PELEUS. Now this kingdom of God some think to be higher and better than the heavenly kingdom, but some think it to be one and the same in reality but called by different names; at one time the kingdom of God from Him who reigns, but at another the kingdom of heaven from the Angels and Saints, His subjects, who are said to be of heaven.

THEOPHYL; But like the eagle, enticing its young ones to fly, our Lord, step by step, raises up His disciples to heavenly things. He first of all teaches in the synagogues, and performs miracles. He next chooses twelve whom He names Apostles; He afterwards takes them alone with Him, as He preached throughout the cities and villages, as it follows, And the twelve were with him.

THEOPHYL. Not teaching or preaching, but to be instructed by Him. But lest it should seem that the women were hindered from following Christ, it is added, And certain women which had been healed of evil spirits and infirmities, Mary called Magdalene, out of whom went seven devils.

THEOPHYL; Mary Magdalene is the same of whose repentance, without mention of her name, we have just read. For the Evangelist, when he relates her going with our Lord, rightly distinguishes her by her known name, but when describing the sinner but penitent, He speaks of her generally as a woman; lest the mark of her former guilt should blacken a name of so great report. Out of whom seven devils are reported to have gone, that it might be shown that she was full of all vices.

GREG. For what is understood by the seven devils, but all vices? For since all time is comprehended by seven days, rightly by the number seven is universality represented: Mary therefore had seven devils, for she was full of every kind of vice. It follows, And Joanna the wife of Chuza Herod's steward, and Susanna, and many others who ministered to him of their substance.

JEROME; It was a Jewish custom, nor was it thought blamable, according to the ancient manners of that nation, that women should afford of their substance food and clothing to their teachers. This custom, as it might cause offense to the Gentiles, St. Paul relates he had cast off. But these ministered to the Lord of their substance, that He might reap their carnal things, from whom they had reaped spiritual things. Not that the Lord needed the food of His creatures, but that He might set an example to masters, that they ought to be content with food and clothing from their disciples.

THEOPHYL; But Mary is by interpretation, "bitter sea," because of the loud wailing of her penitence; Magdalene, "a tower, or rather belonging to a tower," from the tower of which it is said, you art become my hope, my strong tower from the face of my enemy. Joanna is by interpretation "the Lord her grace," or "the merciful Lord," for from Him comes every thing that we dive upon. But if Mary, cleansed from the corruption of her sins, points to the Church of the Gentiles, why does not Joanna represent the same Church formerly subject to the worship of idols?

For every evil spirit whilst he acts for the devil's kingdom, is as it were Herod's steward. Susanna is interpreted, "a lily," or its grace, because of the fragrance and whiteness of the heavenly life, and the golden heat of inward love.

Catena Aurea Luke 8
32 posted on 06/16/2013 8:27:56 AM PDT by annalex (fear them not)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 31 | View Replies]

To: annalex


Christ in Heaven with Four Saints and a Donor

Domenico Ghirlandaio

c 1492
Tempera on wood, 308 x 199 cm
Pinacoteca Comunale, Volterra

33 posted on 06/16/2013 8:28:21 AM PDT by annalex (fear them not)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 32 | View Replies]

To: All
Catholic Culture

Daily Readings for: June 16, 2013
(Readings on USCCB website)

Collect: O God, strength of those who hope in you, graciously hear our pleas, and, since without you mortal frailty can do nothing, grant us always the help of your grace, that in following your commands we may please you by our resolve and our deeds. Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son, who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.

Ordinary Time: June 16th

Eleventh Sunday of Ordinary Time; Father's Day

Old Calendar: Fourth Sunday after Pentecost

Now there was a sinful woman in the city who learned that he was at table in the house of the Pharisee. Bringing an alabaster flask of ointment, she stood behind him at his feet weeping and began to bathe his feet with her tears. Then she wiped them with her hair, kissed them, and anointed them with the ointment (Luke 7:37-38).

Click here for commentary on the readings in the Extraordinary Form of the Roman Rite.


Sunday Readings
The first reading is taken from 2 Samuel 12:7-10; 13. This incident in the life of King David has been preserved in the Sacred Scripture because it contains a lesson for all men. It shows us the weakness of human nature, even in one so exalted as the king whom God had placed over his people. At the same time it shows the infinite mercy of God when he is dealing with a repentant sinner.

The second reading is from St. Paul to the Galatians 2:16; 19-21. He is speaking here to Peter who had come to Antioch and had given some scandal to the Gentile Christians.

The Gospel is from St. Luke 7:36-50. While the mercy of God for sinners and the willingness, even eagerness, with which He welcomes back the sinner is the principal teaching in this gospel story, most if not all of us, can be cheered by that teaching. But there are two other lessons in it for us. The first lesson is that the pardoned sinner should show gratitude to God. One of the greatest proofs of gratitude is the firm resolution to avoid offending our good God anymore. Do we really mean it when we solemnly promise in our act of contrition in confession "never more to offend you and to amend my life"?

There is great danger that we may make this promise out of habit of routine, without seriously intending or meaning what we say. Non-Catholics often accuse us of hypocrisy in this. "You Catholics can sin and just tell it in confession, be forgiven, and go back and sin again." This is not so. The priest's power to forgive sin, given by Christ himself, has effect only on a repentant sinner. If one goes to confession with serious sins and has no intention of avoiding those sins and the occasions which cause them, that person is not only not forgiven, but is adding a further sin by abusing and insulting God in that great gift of His mercy, the Sacrament of Penance. Such cases are rare, thank God. We are repentant and we mean to avoid such sins in future. However, the fact that one may fall again is always possible. This does not prove the previous confession to be invalid. But the person's attempts to avoid the occasions will be proof of sincere repentance. It will also be a sign of gratitude to the merciful God who forgave the sins.

The second reading is for those amongst us who succeed, thanks to God's grace, in avoiding serious sins. We must avoid the sin of the Pharisees. They were, on the whole, devout men and did many a good deed. However, they gave all the credit, not to God, but to themselves. They grew proud of their good works and despised all others who did not do as they did.

The good Christian must avoid any such temptation. We must never say, as the Pharisee did, "thank God I am not like the rest of men, tax-gatherers and sinners," but rather say what the saints said when they saw or heard of some great sinner: "there would be St. Francis only for the grace of God."

Yes, the avoidance of serious sin is something for which we must thank God. We should never praise ourselves because of this, and never, never should we despise the neighbor who is not so fortunate. Instead, we must help that neighbor by every means in our power to return to God's friendship through sincere repentance. This will prove our love for God and neighbor, and our sincere appreciation of the great graces given us by our merciful Lord to keep us free from grave sins.

Excerpted from The Sunday Readings by Fr. Kevin O'Sullivan, O.F.M.


34 posted on 06/16/2013 3:34:07 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 33 | View Replies]

To: All
The Word Among Us

Meditation: Luke 7:36–8:3

 

11th Sunday in Ordinary Time

Your faith has saved you; go in peace. (Luke 7:50)

Ignoring the gasps that must have been uttered by the guests, the woman burst into Simon’s house and made her way toward Jesus. His earlier acts of kindness had stirred her heart and filled her with courage. A seed of faith was growing in her, and she was compelled to worship him because of the love she was beginning to experience.

Surely the guests were disgusted. Didn’t Jesus know who this woman was? She didn’t deserve to speak to him, let alone touch him. Sensing their discomfort, Jesus told Simon a story about two men who owed money to a moneylender. In a sweeping move of undeserved kindness, the moneylender forgave their debts completely. Perhaps all the guests felt that their observance of the Law had earned them the right to be with Jesus. And here was Jesus, commending this woman for her faith! What kind of faith did she have? Weren’t they better than her?

Simon’s guests seemed to have had a different understanding of faith. For them, it had something to do with their religious standing or their outward appearance. None of them was caught up in obvious sin, after all. But the faith Jesus saw in this “sinful” woman was different. He saw an open heart and a willingness to change her ways. He saw a heart that was pierced with love. And for that, heaven’s doors were opened to her.

What a generous God we have! He always welcomes us. He is always ready to forgive us, to deliver us, and to teach us. He hears our every cry for help, and it delights him when we run to him. Today, let’s all take on the faith that this woman had by simply turning to Jesus and telling him that we want to be with him. He will take care of the rest.

“Thank you, Jesus, for the seed of faith that you have given me. I come to you today, with all my sins and failings, and lay them at your feet. I know you can heal me and save me!”

2 Samuel 12:7-10, 13; Psalm 32:1-2, 5, 7, 11; Galatians 2:16, 19-21

 

Questions for Reflection or Group Discussion

1. In today’s first reading, Nathan reveals to David the consequences of his murder of Uriah. Why do you think David is still called a “man after God’s heart” (1 Samuel 13:14, Acts 13:22), in spite of this horrible sin?

2. The responsorial psalm speaks of the fruit of repentance in the psalmist’s life: “I confess my faults to the Lord, and you took away the guilt of my sin.” How would you describe the fruits of repentance and the Sacrament of Reconciliation in your life?

3. In the second reading, Paul says that he has been “crucified with Christ.” What do you think this mean? In what ways have you been “crucified with Christ”?

4. In the Gospel, the woman with the alabaster jar performs a great deed out of love for Jesus. Then Jesus proclaims these amazing words, “So I tell you her many sins have been forgiven, because she has shown great love. But the one to whom little is forgiven, loves little.” What do these words mean to you, and how do they apply to your life?

5. The meditation ends with these words. “What a generous God we have! He always welcomes us. He is always ready to forgive us, to deliver us, and to teach us. He hears our every cry for help, and it delights him when we run to him. Today, let’s all take on the faith that this woman had by simply turning to Jesus and telling him that we want to be with him. He will take care of the rest.” What steps can you take to draw closer to the Lord and experience more deeply his love, healing, deliverance, and forgiveness? What steps can you take to give what you have received from the Lord to others?

6. Take some time now to pray and ask the Lord to deepen your faith in him and in his great mercy, as you give him all your burdens. Use the prayer at the end of the meditation as a starting point.


35 posted on 06/16/2013 5:24:22 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 34 | View Replies]

To: All
A Christian Pilgrim

THE REPENTANT WOMAN

 (A biblical reflection on the 11th Sunday in Ordinary Time [Year C]- June 16, 2013) 

First Reading: 2Sam 12:7-10,13; Psalms: Ps 32:1-2,5,7,11; Second Reading: Gal 2:16,19-21; Gospel Reading: Luke 7:36-8:3 (Luke 7:36-50) 

KAKI YESUS DIBERSIHKAN - 1

If I have any regret about the New Testament it’s that none of the writers was a woman. We miss the feminine understanding of the story of Jesus Christ. Luke is the writer who comes closest to feminine sensitivity. Immediately after this story of repentant woman he draws our attention to the role of several woman in the ministry of Jesus.

Luke sometimes pairs off the story of a man with a corresponding episode about a woman. Invariably the woman will be shown as more open to faith than the man. For instance, Zechariah and Mary both received angelic annunciations but his doubting is in sharp contrast to her faith and obedience.

Much of the important action in Luke’s gospel takes place at tables. In this story we meet the man who is master of the table. He is a Pharisee, somebody very concerned about the rightness of life and very much given to warning people about the danger of contamination …… or the occasions of sin.

In one way he represents the power of the male world. He had the initiative, organizational ability and necessary wherewithal to invite guests to a banquet. It was customary to invite some special guest whose wisdom would enrich the table. Simon – it’s significant that we are told his name but not the woman’s – had sufficient influence to get Jesus as his star turn. Simon was a religious man with power and influence. But later in the story his weakness will be revealed.

A woman came in. Unnamed, she is one of Luke’s anonymous little people, so dearly loved by God. But even worse than having no name, she actually had a bad name in the town. A bad name doesn’t just happen: it has to be spread. Whose tongues did the spreading? I bet it was all the “good” people.

This “bad” woman needed to put her life together …… to reach reconciliation within herself. By God’s grace she found the source of reconciliation …… in Jesus, come to save sinners.

See how this woman goes to confession. Her language is made up of tears and touch. Her actions are with kisses and an extravagant anointing. Did Jesus ask her “How many times?” or that most naïve of questions, “Did you take pleasure in it?”

Lucky for her that she did not come along centuries later in search of reconciliation. A wooden grill would not have understood her tears nor responded to her deep need for touch. In addition to his purple stole, every minister of reconciliation should come equipped with a spare packet of Kleenex!

The story comes back to the man. “He said to himself” …… it’s always a bad sign when you start talking to yourself: it shows there’s a big argument going on inside: an argument with that part of life you’re repressing. And when we are attempting to deny part of our reality, one of the defence mechanisms we employ is to shelter behind a law. It protects our feeling of righteousness.

KAKI YESUS DIURAPI - 2

The law said that a rabbi should stay at a safe distance from any woman in public. Now here was a woman with a bad name, and this man, Jesus, is letting Himself be touched by the evil creature. Thus Simon is staying in his head, judging and assessing guilt. His mental powerhouse is now shown to be the trap that imprisons him for he is incapable of responding with feminine heart to the situation.

How can one break through the defensive screen? Jesus uses the story of the two debtors to unhinge the prison door. He invites Simon to come out from behind his defensive screen by responding to a question. Not about debts or correctness of behaviour, but about love. “Which of the two will love him more?” Jesus sees the entire encounter, not as an issue about sins and contamination by bad people, but as a day when love is released from beneath the crushing burden of guilt and debt. She must have been released of a terrible burden, such is the extravagance of her love. “Her many sins must have been forgiven her, or she would not have shown such love”.

Simon, the conscientious Pharisee, worked hard on the duties of his love for God. But the anonymous feminine heart discovered that religion begins in letting God love us.

As a man ordained to priestly ministry in the Church I feel uncomfortably close to Simon the Pharisee. What challenges me is that many of us who frequently, even daily, occupy seats at the table of the Lord, may be veryu distant from His heart because of our cold judgments and unfeeling principles. Jesus may be far closer to the hearts of some who are barred from receiving Him at the altar. Like the unnamed woman, they may not sit with Him at table, but they know of His mercy and they come from behind Him to touch Him in prayer.

Perhaps it’s better to have loved extravagantly, though not always properly, than to have lived ever so rightly, though not lovingly. Best of all, of course, is to live rightly and to love extravagantly.

Note: Taken from Fr. Silvester O’Flynn OFMCap., THE GOOD NEWS OF LUKE’S YEAR, Dublin, Ireland: Cathedral Books/The Columbia Press, Revised Edition, 1991 (1994 reprinting), pages 155-157.


36 posted on 06/16/2013 5:33:22 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 35 | View Replies]

To: All
Sunday Scripture Study

 

Eleventh Sunday in Ordinary Time - Cycle C

June 16, 2013

Click here for USCCB readings

Opening Prayer  

First Reading: 2 Samuel 12:7-10, 13

Psalm: 32:1-2, 5, 7, 11

Second Reading: Galatians 2:16, 19-21

Gospel Reading: Luke 7:36—8:3

  • The setting for the Gospel Reading appears to take place in the city of Nain (Luke 7:11) where Jesus has raised a widow’s son from the dead (verses 11-17). We hear that, while in that area, his reputation as a healer and miracle worker spread among the people (verses 16 and 21).
  • Simon, one of the local members of the Pharisee religious party, invites Jesus to dine with him at his house. This was early in Jesus ministry, before the later heated controversies between Jesus and the Pharisees. Still, Simon must have felt he was performing a great act of tolerance to have this itinerant preacher in his home. As such he neglected some of the common courtesies that hosts traditionally extended to their guests.
  • In the midst of this meal, a woman who was a known sinner in the area approaches Jesus (this woman has sometimes been identified as Mary Magdalene, who is mentioned at the end of this Sunday’s reading (Luke 8:2), but from the text, there is no evidence to make this connection.).
  • In a spirit of repentance (no doubt she was driven to contrition by hearing and seeing Jesus as he ministered around the area) she performs the acts of hospitality that Simon should have provided. Jesus makes it clear that her great love is a testimony to the fact that she has been forgiven, not the other way around. This is also the point of Jesus’ parable (Luke 7:41-43).

 

QUESTIONS:

  • If you are not familiar with the events surrounding the First Reading, read 2 Samuel 11:1 through 12:14 (and Psalm 51—David’s response to this incident). What common themes do you see there and in the Gospel Reading?
  • In a verse preceding this Sunday’s Gospel (John 7:29), how did Jesus distinguish those who would believe in him and those that wouldn’t? Based on their actions and attitudes, how do you think that Simon and the women fit into these two groups?
  • Jesus announces that the woman “was forgiven much because she loved much” (Luke 7:47). If she was forgiven because of her great love, what do you think prompted her love in the first place? In our relationships with God, who do you think takes the initiative? Who do you identify with more, Simon the Pharisee, or the sinful woman—or both? Why?
  • Based on how much Jesus has forgiven you, how much should you love him?

Closing Prayer

Catechism of the Catholic Church:  §§ 575, 588, 2712

 

A man turning from an evil life is bound to be rendered desperate by the knowledge of his sins, if he does not also know how good God is, how kind and gentle, and how ready to forgive.  --St. Bernard of Clairvaux


37 posted on 06/16/2013 6:06:42 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 36 | View Replies]

To: All
 
Marriage = One Man and One Woman
Til' Death Do Us Part

Daily Marriage Tip for June 16, 2013:

(Father’s Day) What is one specific thing about your husband’s parenting that you admire? His patience with the kids, his willingness to enter into their play, his way of encouraging them? Tell him today!


38 posted on 06/16/2013 6:13:47 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 37 | View Replies]

To: All
You Are Being Listened To
Pastor’s Column
11th Sunday Ordinary Time
June 16, 2013
 
          This has been an interesting week in the news, hasn’t it?  Apparently there has been more data collection in this country than many of us were aware of until this week. Well, regardless of how we individually feel about this national issue, it is a very interesting revelation in the light of the gospel, because this is precisely what Jesus promises us is going on right now in the spiritual world – recording and videotaping, watching and promising to play back for us and everyone else absolutely all we are doing now, what we have done in the past and what we will do in the future!
          Think about it for a minute: what did Christ really say about this? “There is nothing concealed that will not be revealed, nor secret that will not be made known (Mt 10:26).” Or: “By your words you will be acquitted, and by your words you will be condemned (Mt 12:37).” And how about this one from Revelation: “And the book of life was opened, and other books were opened which recorded what the dead have done with their lives, by which they were judged (Rev. 20:12).”
          This world is set up in such a way as there is absolutely no right to privacy when it comes to God.  As a matter of fact, Christ also has assured us that not only is everything recorded and listened to, (and, in fact, we are being watched remotely right now by God), that, in fact, everyone in heaven who is interested can see us, and the entire movie of our lives can be played for everyone.  How about that? What can we do about this? We can go to confession! The only people who get caught like this are the ones who think they can get away with something, and ultimately, we can’t.
          In this Sunday’s gospel (Luke 7: 36-8:3), a woman known as a notorious sinner crashes a dinner party given by a self-righteous Pharisee (who sees only a sinner when he looks at her), and immediately begins to wash Jesus’ feet with her tears and dry them with her hair. Then she breaks a very expensive jar of oil all over his feet! But what the Pharisee didn’t know was that Jesus had forgiven this woman’s many sins. And she was very grateful.
          The first detail to note is that she “let her hair down.” In the culture of the times, this meant she was a person of ill-repute. In other words, she acknowledged her sins before God. She knew her sins and she knew Jesus had forgiven her. And she showed her repentance by being willing to be humiliated, if necessary, to show her gratitude to Jesus. When was the last time you were this grateful for being forgiven by Jesus in the Sacrament of Reconciliation?
          This very scene often plays out in our own reconciliation room. How many times I have seen people leaving the confessional in tears, because they were so grateful to be forgiven! What this sinful woman had that the self-righteous Pharisee did not was that she was deeply aware of her sins and was willing to come forward to be forgiven.
                                                                                                Father Gary

39 posted on 06/16/2013 6:21:49 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 38 | View Replies]

To: Salvation
St. Paul Center Blog

Many Sins, Great Love: Scott Hahn Reflects on the 11th Sunday in Ordinary Time

Posted by Dr. Scott Hahn on 06.14.13 |


Anointing

2 Samuel 12: 7–10, 13
Psalm 32: 1–2, 5,7,11
Galatians 2:16, 19–21
Luke 7:36–50

In this Sunday’s readings we are like the fallen king, David, and the woman who weeps at Jesus’ feet.

Like David, the Lord has rescued us from sin and death, anointed us with His Spirit in baptism and in confirmation. He has made us heirs of His promise to the children of Israel.

And like David, and like the woman in the Gospel, we fall into sin. Our crimes may not be as grave as David’s (see 2 Samuel 11:1–26) or as “many” as that woman’s (see Luke 7:47).

But we often squander the great gift of salvation we’ve been given. Often we fail to live up to the great calling of being sons and daughters of God.

The good news of today’s readings, the good news of Jesus Christ, is that we can return to God in the sacrament of confession. Each of us can repeat Paul’s wondrous words in this week’s Epistle: “The Son of God has loved me and given himself up for me.”

Our faith will save us, as Jesus tells the woman today. Our faith that no matter how many our sins, or how serious, if we come to him in true sorrow and repentance we will hear his words of forgiveness. Like David. Like the woman in the Gospel this Sunday.

We hear David’s heartfelt confession in the First Reading. The Psalmist, too, confesses his sins to God. And we hear our Lord’s tender words of mercy and pardon in the Gospel.

By His word of healing and his promise of peace, He makes it possible for us to join Him at the banquet table of the Eucharist.

We can’t be like the Pharisee in the Gospel. We should never disdain the sinner or doubt the Lord’s power to convert even the worst of sinners.

Instead, we should pledge today to better imitate that sinful woman. In gratitude for the debt we’ve been forgiven, let us promise to live by faith and for God alone. Like her, let us devote our lives to serving Him with great love.


40 posted on 06/16/2013 6:41:05 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 39 | View Replies]

To: All
 
11th Sunday -- A God of Extravagance



"Her many sins are forgiven. . . because she has shown great love."
 


Sam 12: 7-10, 13
Gal 2: 16, 19-21
Lk 7: 36 – 8: 3a

Recently at one of his now famous daily homilies, Pope Francis reflected on sin and forgiveness.  As he said: “The fact we are all sinners is not the problem — the real problem is not repenting of sin, not being ashamed of what we have done.” (Homily 5/17/13).

Such a view may not be seen as exactly politically correct these days. Yet, I can’t think of a more direct and simple commentary on our culture today.  Personal responsibility for one’s choices seems lacking to say the least.  We fall into the blame game.  We blame our parents for the way we were raised, we blame the culture around us, we claim self-defense (which may be true of course), we claim ignorance, and then we forget the details of the event and in short accept no responsibility for our actions.  If all this is true, then sin does not exist, except for the “biggies” which of course we don’t do.  And if sin does not exist, if all we do is make mistakes or present ourselves as victims of our past or the culture we live in, then forgiveness carries no responsibility?

Our Gospel this Sunday (Lk 7: 36 – 8:3a) is one of the most striking scenes of the New Testament.  It’s close to the edge in a sense and on one level may seem a bit uncomfortable.  There’s no doubt that Jesus may have put himself in a somewhat compromising position as he dines with the Pharisees and encounters a woman there with a questionable “reputation.” She was “a woman in the city, who was a sinner.” In other words, a likely prostitute.  So, it makes one wonder how she was able to get in to this gathering of learned men. Maybe just pushed herself in with one single intent – to meet Jesus.

Two levels are related here.  The expectation of the Pharisees, those who prided themselves as guardians of the Jewish Law, who invite Jesus to dinner and have bought in to the fact that everyone in society has their proper place.  They are learned in the Law and so recognize in Jesus an astute Rabbi who also is skilled in interpretation.  So, was this just “let’s have a lively dinner conversation” or maybe a set up? 

Was the nameless woman a trap by Simon the Pharisee who wanted to corner Jesus as the same crowd had attempted when another woman was caught in adultery and they brought her to him?  Then, as now, Jesus was not particularly selective about those he would mingle with so on that level, the presence of this woman is not surprising but he skillfully turns the table with a parable about forgiveness; a parable that cuts to the heart of the matter and rises above any attempt at deception.

The story he tells is of two debtors one of whom owed their creditor 500 denarii (the woman?) and the other who owed 50 (Simon the Pharisee?). Neither debtor was able to pay back what they owed so the creditor forgave both debts.  An obviously impossible situation if all we consider is good business practice.  But, Jesus’ story has a moral objective. The one who was forgiven the larger debt loved and was more grateful for the creditor’s mercy. 

As the woman approached Jesus, undoubtedly in a repentant manner, “She stood behind him at his feet, weeping, and began to bathe his feet with her tears and to dry them with her hair.” This was not a show to be noticed or some attempt to seduce Jesus but Our Lord was able to recognize her true repentance and sorrow.  Though she had the greater “debt” in the amount of her sin, because “she has shown great love” she is forgiven her indebtedness. As Jesus tenderly says to her, “Your faith has saved you; go in peace.” In short, this is what God is like and we see it in the act of his Son.

Meanwhile, wouldn’t you love to see the face of Simon and others assembled in their self-righteous assurance? Was he moved by this act of mercy?  Did he understand that the same forgiveness is offered to him, though his sin may have been less?

God knows our sin. Jesus did not deny that the woman was a sinner.  “So, I tell you her many sins have been forgiven . . .” But the greater act is that of what Our Lord offers every one of us – his extravagant mercy.  God wants to forgive us.  He desires that we grow in his grace.  He wants us to avoid sin in all its forms and live lives that reflect the Gospel.  And when we fall short, he is there waiting not with condemnation but with mercy. 

Simon was unable to see all of this for himself and because of his blindness he was not forgiven.  But the woman, far more sinful than he, recognized in Jesus one who could save her and break the chain of unhealthy behavior.

So, it seems the lesson is clear. As Pope Francis reminded us: ““The fact we are all sinners is not the problem — the real problem is not repenting of sin, not being ashamed of what we have done.”

We have a sacrament to heal our wounded souls in Reconciliation, we have a God who wants to forgive and desires the best for us, and we have the Holy Eucharist which is sacred food for our souls and the Bread of Life.  We say, “Lord, have mercy” and “I am not worthy that you should enter under my roof . . .” at every Mass. Is this just Catholic guilt to make me feel uncomfortable or an invitation to wipe the feet of Christ in repentance?  I think the second. Like the woman, we are called to a faith built upon trust.  Even if our "faith" wavers, the invitation compels us to trust in Christ anyway.  As Jesus said to the woman: "Your faith has saved you; go in peace." These words may even remind you of the words of the priest at the end of the Sacrament of Reconciliation after absolution is offered.  

The minute we say, “I have sinned” and work to turn our lives around is the beginning of our new life in Christ. Whether our debt be small or enormous the same mercy is offered to us.  In our first reading we see that even the great King David, once he acknowledged what he had done, was repentant and forgiven.


O God, strength of those who hope in you,
graciously hear our pleas,
and , since without you mortal frailty can do nothing,
grant us always the help of your grace,
that in following your commands
we may please you by our resolve and our deeds.

(Collect for Sunday)    
 
Fr. Tim 

41 posted on 06/16/2013 7:15:07 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 40 | View Replies]

To: All
Insight Scoop

Sinners, Prophets, and the Business of Heaven

A Scriptural Reflection on the Readings for Sunday, June 16, 2013 | Carl E. Olson

Readings:

2 Sm 12:7-10, 13
Ps 32:1-2, 5, 7, 11
Gal 2:16, 19-21
Lk 7:36—8:3 or 7:36-50

What did the most famous king in the Old Testament and a poor, anonymous woman in the Gospels have in common? They were both sinners. They were both in need of forgiveness. And they both knew it.

King David’s sin is as well-known as the woman’s sin in today’s Gospel reading is unknown. David, having witnessed the beauty of the wife of Uriah the Hittite, one of David’s loyal warriors, arranged to have Uriah put on the front lines of battle, where he was killed. It was the darkest moment of David’s often magnificent and noble life, and the king finally confessed to the prophet Nathan, “I have sinned against the Lord.” In the Psalm written after Nathan had confronted him about his murderous actions, the repentant David wrote, “Create in me a clean heart, O God, and put a new and right spirit within me. … Deliver me from bloodguilt, O God, O God of my salvation, and my tongue will sing aloud of your deliverance” (Psa. 51:10, 14).

David’s life and sin were chronicled in great detail, by others and by himself. His remorse was expressed with poetic poignancy by his own pen. It is quite a contrast to the sinful woman who came to the house of the Pharisee where Jesus was invited to dine. Her name is not given, her sins are not described or listed, and if she uttered any words, they are not recorded. She may have been a prostitute; whatever the case, her sins were apparently public and well-known. 

These various facts and details are not of primary concern to Luke the Evangelist because he is intent on revealing Christ’s mercy, love, and power to forgive sins. “You perceive,” wrote St. Peter Chrysologus about this particular story, “that Christ came to the Pharisee’s table not to be filled with food for the body but to carry on the business of heaven while he was in the flesh.” 

A significant amount of this business of heaven was worked out within the earthly context of Jesus’ ongoing debates and confrontations with the Pharisees. The host, the Pharisee Simon, was concerned with judging—was Jesus a true prophet?—which is why Jesus asked him a question that required his judgment as a Pharisee, an interpreter of the Law. Simon, in judging rightly the answer to Jesus’ question, rendered judgment upon his own actions, or lack of actions. The problem was that Simon, like many of the Pharisees, was fixated on the letter of law, while failing to love the Giver of the law.

Put another way, Simon had asked Jesus into his home in order to judge Jesus, while the sinful woman sought out Jesus in order to kiss and anoint his feet. The Pharisee wished to stand face to face with the Incarnate Word in stubborn wariness; the woman desired only to worship at his feet in a silent act of vulnerable love. She did not have to give verbal expression to her sorrow and repentance for her actions spoke louder than words. Her sins, Jesus said, were forgiven “because she has shown great love” and because of her faith: “Your faith has saved you; go in peace.”

We are not saved by faith alone but, as the Apostle Paul told the Galatians, who were being tempted to embrace a form of Pharisaism: “For in Christ Jesus neither circumcision nor uncircumcision is of any avail, but faith working through love” (Gal. 5:6). Faith, James emphasized, is dead without works—and those works are animated by charity and oriented toward God and neighbor (James 2:8-18). 

“To err human,” wrote Alexander Pope, “to forgive divine.” That is the essential message of today’s readings, which unflinchingly point out man’s sinful ways while rejoicing in God’s merciful ways. All of us—famous kings and unnamed women and everyone between—are sinners, and Christ died for us so that we, as Paul writes, can be crucified with Christ and thus truly live by faith and love.

(This "Opening the Word" column originally appeared in the June 13, 2010, edition of Our Sunday Visitor newspaper.) 


42 posted on 06/16/2013 8:03:53 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 41 | View Replies]

To: Salvation
Regnum Christi

A Woman’s Love and Sorrow
| SPIRITUAL LIFE | SPIRITUALITY
Eleventh Sunday in Ordinary Time


Father Walter Schu, LC

Luke 7: 36 – 8:3

A Pharisee invited Jesus to dine with him, and he entered the Pharisee´s house and reclined at table. Now there was a sinful woman in the city who learned that he was at table in the house of the Pharisee. Bringing an alabaster flask of ointment, she stood behind him at his feet weeping and began to bathe his feet with her tears. Then she wiped them with her hair, kissed them, and anointed them with the ointment. When the Pharisee who had invited him saw this he said to himself, "If this man were a prophet, he would know who and what sort of woman this is who is touching him, that she is a sinner." Jesus said to him in reply, "Simon, I have something to say to you." "Tell me, teacher," he said. "Two people were in debt to a certain creditor; one owed five hundred days´ wages and the other owed fifty. Since they were unable to repay the debt, he forgave it for both. Which of them will love him more?" Simon said in reply, "The one, I suppose, whose larger debt was forgiven." He said to him, "You have judged rightly." Then he turned to the woman and said to Simon, "Do you see this woman? When I entered your house, you did not give me water for my feet, but she has bathed them with her tears and wiped them with her hair. You did not give me a kiss, but she has not ceased kissing my feet since the time I entered. You did not anoint my head with oil, but she anointed my feet with ointment. So I tell you, her many sins have been forgiven; hence, she has shown great love. But the one to whom little is forgiven, loves little." He said to her, "Your sins are forgiven." The others at table said to themselves, "Who is this who even forgives sins?" But he said to the woman, "Your faith has saved you; go in peace." Afterward he journeyed from one town and village to another, preaching and proclaiming the good news of the kingdom of God. Accompanying him were the Twelve and some women who had been cured of evil spirits and infirmities, Mary, called Magdalene, from whom seven demons had gone out, Joanna, the wife of Herod´s steward Chuza, Susanna, and many others who provided for them out of their resources.

Introductory Prayer: Lord, I believe in you. I believe that you love me, that you are close by my side, and that you will be walking with me throughout this day. I trust in you, Lord. I trust you more than I trust myself, because you are infinitely good and all powerful. I love you, Jesus. I love you because you died on the cross for me, to save me.

Petition: Lord, bring me to a true conversion of heart.

1. Tears of Love and Sorrow: How could the woman who was a sinner — and such a sinner — dare to enter the house of Simon the Pharisee when it was filled with distinguished guests? Two things moved her: She trusted Jesus, and she was overwhelmed by the guilt of her sins. She already knew Jesus, how he preached, how he had treated other sinners, others who were suffering inner anguish like she was. All her years of guilt, self-accusation, and near despair are released in a flood of silent tears that bathe Christ’s feet — tears of love and trusting sorrow. In an exquisitely feminine gesture, she wipes Christ’s feet with her hair and pours out all of her most precious ointment upon them. What heart could fail to be moved by the scene? What heart has not experienced Christ’s silent acceptance of its own poor tears of repentance, wrenched from a conscience laden down by sin?

2. “If This Man Were a Prophet”: Simon the Pharisee considers himself righteous before God and men. So the woman’s display causes him to doubt Jesus’ identity: “If this man were a prophet….” True righteousness, says St. Gregory the Great, is compassionate; whereas false righteousness is indignant. Simon feels no need for forgiveness. “The one thing which shuts a man off from God is self-sufficiency…. The better a man is, the more he feels his sin…. It is true to say that the greatest of sins is to be conscious of no sin; but a sense of need will open the door to the forgiveness of God, because God is love, and love’s greatest glory is to be needed” (The Gospel of Luke, William Barclay, p. 95). Besides the sinful woman, Jesus also seeks to win Simon to himself. And so he begins a gentle rebuke of Simon for his lack of hospitality, to try to make him aware that he, too, is in need of God’s forgiveness.

3. “Your Sins Are Forgiven”: After planting the seeds that he hopes will give rise to love, Jesus turns back to the woman. He pronounces those words which no one else can say, words that free her from her crushing burden, words that bring peace to her soul and an end to her tears, words that change her life forever, making her an ardent disciple of the Lord: “Your sins are forgiven.” A few other words follow, just as gentle, just as encouraging, just as able to change a life: “Your faith has saved you; go in peace.” With what newfound dignity the woman slowly rises to her feet, faces the stunned and still hostile guests, and silently takes her leave of that company! Have our hearts and consciences been penetrated in the same way by those words of Christ we hear each time we receive the sacrament of reconciliation: “I absolve you from your sins”? Have our lives changed like hers did?

Conversation with Christ: Thank you, Lord, for your goodness of heart, for your insatiable zeal to reach every soul and win them over to you. Thank you for allowing me to express my love and sorrow to you in this meditation.

Resolution: I will strive to bring someone I know into contact with Christ’s mercy.


43 posted on 06/16/2013 8:08:29 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 42 | View Replies]

To: All
One Bread, One Body

One Bread, One Body

 

<< Sunday, June 16, 2013 >> 11th Sunday Ordinary Time
 
2 Samuel 12:7-10, 13
Galatians 2:16, 19-21

View Readings
Psalm 32:1-2, 5, 7, 11
Luke 7:36—8:3

 

SIN-SENSITIVE

 
"Little is forgiven the one whose love is small." —Luke 7:47
 

All great saints seem to have so many sins, not because they're great sinners, but because they're great lovers. We all commit many sins, but some are aware of it, while others are not. Love makes a person sin-sensitive. The more we love God, the less sins we commit, but the more we are aware of sins. "I tell you, that is why her many sins are forgiven — because of her great love" (Lk 7:47).

As long as Christianity is perceived to be a rule book, a moral code, or a theology, we are not aware of many sins. However, when it is a personal relationship with a living Savior, then every moment or circumstance is an opportunity for love or a sinful rejection of love. For example, Nathan reminded David that the Lord anointed, rescued, and blessed him. Then he brought up David's sin. Conscious of God's love, David confessed: "I have sinned against the Lord" (2 Sm 12:13).

Think about how much Jesus loves you. He really died and suffered for you. Count your blessings. As love wells up in you, you suddenly notice that you haven't thought of God for three hours, didn't say anything about Him at lunch, let fear stifle the Spirit at work. You have sinned; you have been insensitive to His love and constant presence. Ask Jesus to pour out His love in your heart (see Rm 5:5). Then repent.

 
Prayer: Father, may Your love sensitize me.
Promise: "I have been crucified with Christ, and the life I live now is not my own; Christ is living in me. I still live my human life, but it is a life of faith in the Son of God, Who loved me and gave Himself for me." —Gal 2:19-20
Praise: Praise You, risen Jesus! You live in us, and we live in You (Jn 6:56; 17:23). Glory be to You forever!

44 posted on 06/16/2013 9:03:51 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 43 | View Replies]

To: All
 

45 posted on 06/16/2013 9:05:20 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 44 | View Replies]

To: All

http://resources.sainteds.com/showmedia.asp?media=../sermons/homily/2013-06-16-Homily%20Fr%20Gary.mp3&ExtraInfo=0&BaseDir=../sermons/homily


46 posted on 06/23/2013 7:44:53 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 45 | View Replies]

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
Religion
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson