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Pope at Mass: How to pray the Our Father
Radio Vaticana ^ | 6/20/2013

Posted on 06/20/2013 3:06:19 AM PDT by markomalley

To pray the Our Father we have to have a heart at peace with our brothers. We don't pray "my Father," but "our Father," because "we are not an only child, none of us are”. This was the focus of Pope Francis' homily at Mass Thursday morning in Casa Santa Marta. The Pope emphasized that we believe in a God who is a Father, who is "very close" to us, who is not anonymous, not "a cosmic God."

Prayer is not magic, rather it is entrusting ourselves to the Father’s embrace. Pope Francis centered his homily on the prayer of the "Our Father" taught by Jesus to His disciples, of which the Gospel speaks today. Jesus, he said, immediately gives us a piece of advice in prayer: "In praying, do not babble", do not make "worldly noises, vain noises”. And he warned that "prayer is not a magical thing, there is no magic with prayer." Someone once told me that when he went to a "witch doctor" they said a lot of words to heal him. But that "is pagan." Jesus teaches us, "we should not turn to Him with so many words," because "He knows everything." He adds, the first word is "Father," this "is the key of prayer." "Without saying, without feeling, that word – he warned - you cannot pray":

"To whom do I pray? To the Almighty God? He is too far off. Ah, I can’t hear Him. Neither did Jesus. To whom do I pray? To a cosmic God? That’s quite normal these days, is it not? ... praying to the cosmic God, right? This polytheistic model that comes from a rather light culture ... You must pray to the Father! It is a strong word, 'Father '. You must pray to Him who generated you, who gave you life. Not to everyone: everyone is too anonymous. To you. To me. To the person who accompanies you on your journey: He knows all about your life. Everything: what is good and what is not so good. He knows everything. If we do not start the prayer with this word, not just with our lips but with our hearts, we cannot pray in a Christian language".

"Father," he reiterated, "is a strong word" but "opens the door". At the time of sacrifice, the Pope said, Isaac realized that "something was wrong" because "he was missing a sheep," but he trusted his father and “confided his worries to his father’s heart" . "Father" is the word that "the son" who left with his legacy "and then wanted to return home" thought of. And that father "sees him come and goes running" to him, "he threw himself in his arms", "to cover him with love." "Father, I have sinned:" this is, the Pope said, "the key of every prayer, to feel loved by a father":

"We have a Father. Very close to us, eh! Who embraces us ... All these worries, concerns that we have, let's leave them to the Father, He knows what we need. But, Father, what? My father? No: Our Father! Because I am not an only child, none of us are, and if I cannot be a brother, I can hardly become a child of the Father, because He is a Father to all. Mine, sure, but also of others, of my brothers. And if I am not at peace with my brothers, I cannot say 'Father' to Him."

This, he added, explains the fact that Jesus, after having taught us the Our Father, stresses that if we do not forgive others, neither will the Father forgive us our sins. "It's so hard to forgive others – said the Pope - it is really difficult, because we always have that regret inside." We think, "You did this to me, you wait '... and I’ll repay him the favour ":

"No, you cannot pray with enemies in your heart, with brothers and enemies in your heart, you cannot pray. This is difficult, yes, it is difficult, not easy. 'Father, I cannot say Father, I cannot'. It’s true, I understand. 'I cannot say our, because he did this to me and this ...' I cannot! 'They must go to hell, right? I will have nothing to do with them'. It’s true, it is not easy. But Jesus has promised us the Holy Spirit: it is He who teaches us, from within, from the heart, how to say 'Father' and how to say 'our'. Today we ask the Holy Spirit to teach us to say 'Father' and to be able to say 'our', and thus make peace with all our enemies. "


TOPICS: Catholic
KEYWORDS:
Matt 6:14-15 [14] For if you will forgive men their offences, your heavenly Father will forgive you also your offences. [15] But if you will not forgive men, neither will your Father forgive you your offences.
1 posted on 06/20/2013 3:06:19 AM PDT by markomalley
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To: markomalley

I have been struggling with this recently, and I’ve realized that there’s a further step required. You can forgive someone, no longer be angry, not be intending to get even, all that ... but you might have drawn a conclusion from what occurred that will continue to poison the relationship. “I forgive him ... but I’ve learned that I can’t rely on him. I have to do everything for myself.”

This is difficult to overcome, because it seems perfectly reasonable, and yet, “Whatever does not proceed from faith is sin.” If I believe that the Spirit can work in me to conform me more closely to Christ, I have to believe that He is also working and changing others.


2 posted on 06/20/2013 4:28:48 AM PDT by Tax-chick (Does Bill have a job yet?)
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To: markomalley

“No, you cannot pray with enemies in your heart.”

Nice.


3 posted on 06/20/2013 4:49:41 AM PDT by gotribe (Limit The Government's Right To Bear Arms)
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To: markomalley

I don’t want this to sound wrong, but keep in mind I attended 13 years of Catholic school and taught CCD for years. I now belong to an Evangelical Free church which main goal is to teach scripture so people would hear the truth of the gospel and accept that truth and be saved.

I would have never guessed that a Catholic pope would be the one to start a revival. In all my years as a Catholic the Catholic Church was presented around the gospel. The Pope Francis is speaking in God’s language, not Catholic language. I pray this trickles down to the Bishops, Archbishops, Priest..... All that I have read and seen tells me this man is truly a man of God who has God’s word in hearts and lives it out. God bless him!


4 posted on 06/20/2013 4:58:26 AM PDT by Linda Frances (Woe to those who call evil good and good evil, who put darkness for light and light for darkness)
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To: Linda Frances

*groan*


5 posted on 06/20/2013 5:52:03 AM PDT by piusv
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To: Tax-chick

“I forgive him ... but I’ve learned that I can’t rely on him. I have to do everything for myself.”

Forgiveness doesn’t mean you have to leave out common sense.

If someone gives you a ride home, but gets into an accident because they are a bad driver - you can easily forgive them, but that doesn’t mean that you have to force yourself to get in their car again.


6 posted on 06/20/2013 6:38:18 AM PDT by kidd
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To: markomalley

bookmark


7 posted on 06/20/2013 6:45:27 AM PDT by GOP Poet
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To: piusv

agreed.


8 posted on 06/20/2013 7:02:44 AM PDT by raygunfan
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To: Linda Frances
It trickled down to you! Will you return to being an active Catholic?



9 posted on 06/20/2013 7:17:12 AM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Pope at Mass: How to pray the Our Father
Catholic Word of the Day: PATER NOSTER, 09-20-12
Following the Truth: Don’t Take The Our Father So Personally! [Catholic and Open]
Our Father
Introduction to the Perfect Prayer (Our Father...) [Catholic Caucus]
The Hidden and Mysterious Word in the Lord’s Prayer
The Our Father: More than Words, it is a Structure for the Spiritual life

Why the Our Father is a Pro-Life Prayer, Part 3
Why the Our Father is a Pro-life Prayer, Part 2
Why the Our Father is a Pro-life Prayer, Part 1
The Essentials of the Catholic Faith. Part Four: Lord, Teach Us To Pray, The Lord’s Prayer
The Essentials of the Catholic Faith, Part Four: Lord, Teach Us To Pray, The Invocation: Our Father, Who Art in Heaven”
The Essentials of the Catholic Faith, Part Four: Lord, Teach Us To Pray; First Petition: “Hallowed Be Thy Name”
The Essentials of the Catholic Faith, Part Four: Lord,Teach Us To Pray, Second Petition: “Thy Kingdom Come”
The Essentials of the Catholic Faith, Part Four: Lord, Teach Us To Pray, Third Petition: “Thy Will Be Done on Earth as It Is in Heaven"
The Essentials of the Catholic Faith, Part Four: Lord, Teach Us To Pray, Fourth Petition: “Give Us This Day Our Daily Bread"
The Essentials of the Catholic Faith, Part Four:Lord, Teach Us To Pray, Fifth Petition: “Forgive Us Our Trespasses As We Forgive Those Who Trespass Against Us”

The Essentials of the Catholic Faith, Part Four: Lord, Teach Us To Pray, Sixth Petition: “Lead Us Not into Temptation"
The Essentials of the Catholic Faith, Part Four: Lord, Teach Us To Pray, Seventh Petition: “Deliver Us from Evil. Amen”
Our Father and Hail Mary, sung in Syriac-Aramaic, the language of Jesus Christ
Our Father
Lord, Teach Us To Pray: The Lord’s Prayer [Ecumenical]
Ontario Premier's Plan to Scrap Lord's Prayer Backfires as Groundswell Grows in Opposition
The deity that won't stay dead
THY WILL BE DONE(Catholic/Orthodox Caucus meditaion St Peter Julian Eymard)
My Will v. Thy Will Be Done
The Our Father in the Catechesis of Teens

The Lord's Prayer
Lead Us Not into Temptation . . .
Our Father - In Heaven (Dr. Scott Hahn)
Praying in Jesus' Own Language
The Mass Explained
The 'Our Father': Appropriate gestures for prayer
The “Our Father” of “La Civiltà Cattolica” - (comparison to Muslim version)
Our Father
HOLDING HANDS AT THE OUR FATHER?
Our Father ... in Heaven

10 posted on 06/20/2013 7:20:10 AM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: kidd
If someone gives you a ride home, but gets into an accident because they are a bad driver - you can easily forgive them, but that doesn’t mean that you have to force yourself to get in their car again.

True, but if your spouse has incidents of unreliability, insisting that he can never improve in that area isn't good for the marriage.

11 posted on 06/20/2013 7:35:15 AM PDT by Tax-chick (Does Bill have a job yet?)
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To: markomalley

Anyone can say the “Our Father...” A good ol’ Hebrew prayer.


12 posted on 06/20/2013 7:45:39 AM PDT by onedoug
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To: onedoug

But Jews don’t say this prayer. They say the Shema.


13 posted on 06/20/2013 7:49:55 AM PDT by piusv
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To: piusv

Jesus said it. He was a Jew.


14 posted on 06/20/2013 7:56:31 AM PDT by onedoug
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To: onedoug
Just because Jesus said it, doesn't mean it was a prayer that Jews traditionally said at the time. In fact, didn't the Pharisees take issue with calling God our Father?

For this reason the Jews tried all the harder to kill him; not only was he breaking the Sabbath, but he was even calling God his own Father, making himself equal with God. (John 5:18)

15 posted on 06/20/2013 8:03:40 AM PDT by piusv
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To: Linda Frances

Nice words about the Pope. It seems many Protestants/non-Catholic Christians have a similar impression (”he’s not ‘Catholic’, he’s more a man of God).

I appreciate what you’re saying here; I would challenge you though to perhaps re-investigate what it means to be Catholic. I think if you do so with an open, objective heart and mind you will find what you thought it was to be Catholic before (when you grew up Catholic and taught CCD) was not real Catholicism, just a bunch of rules. And you will find true, authentic Catholicism is more close, dare I say an even richer form of Christianity than you are currently experiencing in the Evangelical Free church.

I suggest this simply because from my personal experience what I just said is so, and thus for love for you I suggest you may be missing out on something much greater than your current church can ever offer. Thus it’s a suggestion of utility, usefulness for your life, and that’s it. Not a “my Church is better than yours” and certainly not a “if you don’t believe as I do you’ll go to Hell”.

For me the Church is infinitely more useful than any drug, entertainment, and most of all more helpful for my life than any other faith system the world has to offer.

Just something to consider.


16 posted on 06/20/2013 8:11:50 AM PDT by FourtySeven (47)
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To: Tax-chick

I would agree that a spouse is a special case.


17 posted on 06/20/2013 8:31:15 AM PDT by kidd
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To: Linda Frances
Thank you for the encouragement and goodwill. I have to ask, in all sincerity of heart, how it is that you could have gone through 13 years of Catholic school and CCD "for years," and not gotten a solid Gospel-centered orientation? Where were you?

I'm asking because my experience is quite otherwise. When I was preparing for Confirmation (that would be 50 years ago) we were told that if we didn't yet have a personal Bible of our own, we should ask our parents for one for our birthday or Christmas. Our teacher, a SSJ nun, stuck with the motto "Ignorance of Scripture is ignorance of Christ. - St. Jerome." (See, 12-year-olds do remember some things!)

Things took a sharp downturn when I was in about 11th grade and the demolition of the Sacred Liturgy had hit full force: late 60's, everything had lost its muscle tone and gone sloppy: Sacred Liturgy, Sacred Scripture, sacred anything, out the window.

Still later, it depended on your your Diocese. I don't know how I could have survived as a Catholic in Seattle, Milwaukee or Raleigh; but Catholics who did, did so in parishes where both the Church and the Scripture counted for a lot.

I realize I'm meandering a bit, but here's what strikes me: if I'm understanding you correctly, you seem to be saying that when you were a Catholic, it seemed things were too much "Church" and not enough "Christ". By my experience has been that "Church" and "Christ" fare for better or for worse, together.

Meaning: in a parish where the "Catholic identity" was weak, the Gospel was weak: people were out there pursuing "human development" or "social justice" or "personal wellness" or "holistic spirituality" or some such, but it was neither particularly Catholic nor particularly Jesus Christ.

But if a parish was strongly Catholic, it was also strongly "Come to Jesus".

It's a big Church, so I hesitate to make generalizations based on the tiny slice known as "my own experience."

But do you see where I'm coming from?

Thanks again for your good remarks. You can see I'm turning them over in my mind!

18 posted on 06/20/2013 9:09:40 AM PDT by Mrs. Don-o (I have all faith, so as to remove mountains, but have not love, I am nothing." - 1 Cor. 13:2)
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To: piusv

Jesus seems to have been first to utter it, though it’s an Hebraic formulary nonetheless.

It’s also important to remember that Jesus himself was a Pharisee as attested to by their being the only ones to ordain rabbis through “simicha”, or the laying on of hands. And that he was referred to as rabbi throughout his career would otherwise seem a stolen title.

Though I believe he was “mashiach” in the Jewish sense in that America could not have been founded without his influence. And that’s no small thing.


19 posted on 06/20/2013 9:10:52 AM PDT by onedoug
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To: onedoug
It’s also important to remember that Jesus himself was a Pharisee ...

That's interesting. A guy on a thread earlier this week said Jesus was an Essene, and therefore (?) could not have meant it when He said that we were to love our enemies and pray for those who persecute us.

20 posted on 06/20/2013 10:55:12 AM PDT by Tax-chick (Does Bill have a job yet?)
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To: onedoug
Could you provide a source for it being a "Hebraic" formulary?

I'm totally good with being proven wrong on this. Being a Jewish convert, however, I have never heard of the Jews praying in this way.

I know the Sh'ma is the great prayer to God the Father.

21 posted on 06/20/2013 10:55:27 AM PDT by piusv
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To: Tax-chick

I have wonder whether we really know one way or the other.


22 posted on 06/20/2013 10:56:10 AM PDT by piusv
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To: piusv

As far as I know, we have not been given this information either in the Bible or in contemporaneous non-Scriptural sources. A case can be made for either contention, as well as for a variety of other factual assertions about Jesus’s life, using Scripture, information about Jewish belief and practice, and archaeological information.

However, “making a case” and “proving” are two very different things.


23 posted on 06/20/2013 11:11:54 AM PDT by Tax-chick (Does Bill have a job yet?)
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To: Mrs. Don-o
Forgive me, but I'm failing to see how a Catholic can view:

Pope Francis is speaking in God’s language, not Catholic language

as "good remarks".

I thought you and I were more on the same page, but definitely not here.

24 posted on 06/20/2013 11:29:29 AM PDT by piusv
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To: piusv

There has long been seen a relationship between the Lord’s Prayer and the Amidah, or Shmoneh Esreh in that they are petitionary and always in the collective “we” mode.

Whoever said poetry is boring?


25 posted on 06/20/2013 12:11:53 PM PDT by onedoug
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To: Mrs. Don-o
Still later, it depended on your your Diocese. I don't know how I could have survived as a Catholic in Seattle, Milwaukee or Raleigh; but Catholics who did, did so in parishes where both the Church and the Scripture counted for a lot.

It does depend a lot on the diocese. I grew up in WHY and found this interesting comment about WNY Catholics on FR some time back.

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/religion/2901874/posts?page=159#159

I’m sorry to hear it, metmom, though truthfully, it doesn’t surprise me. Central/Western NY is governed by the appalling bishops of Albany (Hubbard) and Rochester (Clark). I don’t know which one is worse; it’s a close call.

Both bishops allow and preach things in direct opposition to Vatican policy so it doesn’t surprise me that your family think they’re in the clear.

Combine poor catechesis with the extremely liberal political outlook of many in those areas, I can certainly see why your family have turned out the way they have. It isn’t easy being a conservative in ANY part of NY, trust me.

For all the accusations I've had lobbed at me about lying and leaving the church for reasons of morality, someone, at least, does recognize that not all Catholic churches are the same.

I rarely heard about Christ in the Catholic church outside of the mass and never heard of them being equated.

When people first started talking to me about Christ as in a personal relationship kind of way, it was like they were speaking a foreign language. It was almost inconceivable that Jesus would take a personal interest in me. Our parish was enormous and you hardly ever saw the same priest twice and none of them knew who you were.

Sure everyone heard the *God is love* mantra, but it had little bearing on anyone's personal life.

I only met a handful of Catholics in that area in my 30 years there that demonstrated any Christlikeness of any kind.

I'm glad to hear you had a different experience.

26 posted on 06/20/2013 12:29:22 PM PDT by metmom (For freedom Christ has set us free; stand firm therefore & do not submit again to a yoke of slavery)
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To: piusv; Linda Frances
Piusv: "Forgive me, but I'm failing to see how a Catholic can view-- 'Pope Francis is speaking in God’s language, not Catholic language'---as "good remarks".

I had in mind my appreciation that Linda Frances was writing with good will, based on her own experience, and in her own "voice" --- e.g. not cut-and-pasting off of some internet apologetic site. I always value "good remarks" whether I agree entirely or not.

The rest of my comments, in the paragraphs that followed, outlined my reasons for thinking that "God's language" and "Catholic language" are not in opposition or contrast to each other. I summed it up by saying, "My experience has been that "Church" and "Christ" fare for better or for worse, together."

In other words, "Church" and "Christ" tend to go up or go down in tandem. They don't compete: they coincide.

I hope I have not been too obscure. What say ye, Piusv? Linda Frances?

27 posted on 06/20/2013 1:11:24 PM PDT by Mrs. Don-o ("If I have all faith, so as to remove mountains, but have not love, I am nothing." - 1 Cor. 13:2)
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To: Mrs. Don-o

My apologies as I did not see that you did equate the two. They are, indeed, the same.

And I pray that Linda Frances considers a return to Christ’s Church.


28 posted on 06/20/2013 1:19:52 PM PDT by piusv
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To: metmom
I’m sorry to hear it, metmom, though truthfully, it doesn’t surprise me. Central/Western NY is governed by the appalling bishops of Albany (Hubbard) and Rochester (Clark). I don’t know which one is worse; it’s a close call. Both bishops allow and preach things in direct opposition to Vatican policy so it doesn’t surprise me that your family think they’re in the clear. Combine poor catechesis with the extremely liberal political outlook of many in those areas, I can certainly see why your family have turned out the way they have. It isn’t easy being a conservative in ANY part of NY, trust me.

For all the accusations I've had lobbed at me about lying and leaving the church for reasons of morality, someone, at least, does recognize that not all Catholic churches are the same.

I also recognize that not all Catholic churches are the same; however, the teachings are "officially" the same. Do certain priests take liberties in their homilies? Yes. Are certain bishops allowing pro-abort politicians to receive communion? Yes. Both examples are ridiculous IMO.

If this is partly why you left, I completely get it. Where you and I differ is that I believe that despite the issues within the Church, the Catholic Church is the Church Christ founded. As a result, I can leave a parish, but I can not leave the Church.

29 posted on 06/20/2013 1:33:32 PM PDT by piusv
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To: Tax-chick

This was one of the homilies at my ELCA church that they got right, which is that forgiving and forgetting are two different animals.

As to your last observation - that the Spirit can change people. That’s certainly true, however, then the entire subject turns on timetables and cost/benefit analysis. God doesn’t call for us to be pinatas, just forgiving.


30 posted on 06/20/2013 1:49:16 PM PDT by RinaseaofDs
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To: metmom
Ah, Western NY. I was up in the NW corner of PA (Erie) and we were painted with the same palette... under the colors of long-reigning liberal bishops. These were "Jean Jadot" and "Pio Laghi" appointees -- referring to the nuncios who promoted and nominated them over a period of a couple of decades.

You couldn't do much but hope they'd die repentantly. And (sigh) promptly.

I have a hunch that churches always need to be reformed in some way ("Ecclesia semper reformanda") but that different churches attempt to accomplish this in different ways.

Protestants have a greater leeway to either (1) leave one denominational subgroup and settle in with another, or (2) just start a new non-denom church. That's how you get the lengthy phone-book sections under "Churches" listing many named subsets: for instance, SBC, ABC, NBC, NBCA, and BBFI --- all Baptists --- plus pages and pages of phone-book columns called "Unaffiliated or Other".)

Catholics facing the same need of reform, tend to either (1)look for another parish (feasible in a big metropolitan area that has many dozen parishes; not so feasible in a place like Upper East TN, which has less than one Catholic parish per every 3 counties); or (2)take refuge in Ministries, Movements and Religious Orders.

For instance, say your parish ain't so hot; you may hang in there because your little parish Bible Study group is good (Ministry); or the Prolife group is vibrant (Movement); or your spiritual needs are pretty much addressed by the local Dominicans or Franciscans (Religious Orders.)

The other option for Catholics is to just stop going to church. These are the ex-Catholics, post-Catholics, quasi-Catholics and crypto-Catholics. But they'll all still call themselves "Catholics,", come hell or high water, no matter how far adrift they go --- which bugs me, but hey --- unless actually get motivated to sign up with other church. .

Roughly, Catholic movements and religious orders express the "reforming" impetus that amongst non-Catholics is more often expressed by forming a new denomination (or non-denomination.)

Mind you I'm not putting anybody down here: I'm just saying what I'm seeing.

I (me, myself) need to take more personal responsibility for "Ecclesia semper reformanda."

Prayers requested!!

31 posted on 06/20/2013 2:05:35 PM PDT by Mrs. Don-o ("If I have all faith, so as to remove mountains, but have not love, I am nothing." - 1 Cor. 13:2)
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To: RinaseaofDs
That’s certainly true, however, then the entire subject turns on timetables and cost/benefit analysis. God doesn’t call for us to be pinatas, just forgiving.

That's true, and I was not suggesting that there is a single process for every situation.

32 posted on 06/20/2013 6:15:30 PM PDT by Tax-chick (Does Bill have a job yet?)
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