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10 Reasons Why We Should Sing the Psalms
The Christian Post ^ | 7-15-13 | Uri Brito

Posted on 07/15/2013 5:03:05 PM PDT by ReformationFan

Many of us grew up in theological backgrounds where the psalms were known, but not sung. These theological backgrounds are anomalies throughout the history of the Church. E.F. Harrison observed that "Psalmody was a part of the synagogue service that naturally passed over into the life of the church." Calvin Stapert speaks of the fathers' "enthusiastic promotion of psalm-singing" which he says, "reached an unprecedented peak in the fourth century." James McKinnon speaks of "an unprecedented wave of enthusiasm" for the psalms in the second half of the fourth century. Hughes Oliphint Old argued that Calvin appealed to the church historians (e.g. Eusebius, Socrates, Sozomen) as well as the church fathers (e.g. Augustine, Basil, Chrysostom) for the singing of psalms. While the Reformers did not advocate the exclusive singing of Psalms they did express "a partiality for Psalms and hymns drawn from Scripture."

(Excerpt) Read more at christianpost.com ...


TOPICS: Evangelical Christian; Prayer; Theology; Worship
KEYWORDS: augustine; brito; calvin; luther; psalm; psalmody; psalms; singpsalms; uribrito

1 posted on 07/15/2013 5:03:05 PM PDT by ReformationFan
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To: ReformationFan

Miss my old exclusive Psalm-singing church. Now go to a PCA, and the new pastor removed the Trinity Psalters we used to use once a service, so Psalm-deprived entirely.


2 posted on 07/15/2013 5:08:04 PM PDT by rwfromkansas ("Carve your name on hearts, not marble." - C.H. Spurgeon)
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To: rwfromkansas

I’m PCA as well. I wish we had Trinity Psalters to sing out of. With the way things are going, I’m glad we still have and use the Trinity Hymnal.


3 posted on 07/15/2013 5:10:11 PM PDT by ReformationFan
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To: ReformationFan
"Calvin Stapert speaks of the fathers' "enthusiastic promotion of psalm-singing" which he says, "reached an unprecedented peak in the fourth century." James McKinnon speaks of "an unprecedented wave of enthusiasm" for the psalms in the second half of the fourth century."

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Oh gosh, ancient liturgies from the Nicene era as a templates for orthodoxy and orthopraxis?

`

`

I'm all for it, naturally.

4 posted on 07/15/2013 5:10:30 PM PDT by Mrs. Don-o ("If they refuse to listen even to the Church, treat them as you would a pagan or a tax collector.")
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To: ReformationFan

As a black Baptist minister told me a while back.

“White folks treat church like they’re going to God’s funeral”


5 posted on 07/15/2013 5:13:33 PM PDT by cripplecreek (REMEMBER THE RIVER RAISIN!)
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To: ReformationFan

Oh yes, as I grow older and older the Psalms and the old hymns have more and more meaning, more depth, more love and hope and so much more.
“Bless the Lord, O my soul and all that is within thee...”
ha ha always sing this one IF I/we forget to pray before we eat.


6 posted on 07/15/2013 5:14:13 PM PDT by Karliner ( Jeremiah 29:11, Romans 8:28- 8:38"...this is the end of the beginning."WC)
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To: ReformationFan

Have some major issues with CRC form of Hyper-Calvinism, but back in the day, their Psalter Hymnal was the best.


7 posted on 07/15/2013 5:16:15 PM PDT by SeaHawkFan
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To: ReformationFan
I have had a serious illness lately.

Nothing has comforted me more than reading the Psalms. God is speaking to me from bits and pieces every day.

Also, I am listening to John Michael Talbot lately who often takes his lyrics from the Psalms. When worry about my illness keeps me up at night I turn him on and go right to sleep.

Praise God.

8 posted on 07/15/2013 5:18:27 PM PDT by what's up
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To: what's up

“God is speaking to me from bits and pieces every day.

When worry about my illness keeps me up at night I turn him on and go right to sleep.”

What a beautiful message.


9 posted on 07/15/2013 5:42:24 PM PDT by Huskrrrr
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To: ReformationFan
I always enjoy listening to Laudate Dominum (1780), Wolfgang A. Mozart's musical rendition of Psalm 116 in the Vulgate Bible.
10 posted on 07/15/2013 5:45:03 PM PDT by Fiji Hill
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To: ReformationFan

Here is an old hymn that is from the 23rd Psalm, up-dated to a Celtic style. Very beautiful. Our small group is practicing this one to sing/play at church.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b3GFVW6m9Qo


11 posted on 07/15/2013 6:17:16 PM PDT by Shery (in APO Land)
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To: SeaHawkFan
Have some major issues with CRC form of Hyper-Calvinism, but back in the day, their Psalter Hymnal was the best.

Hypercalvinism?

Which Psalter Hymnal? Back in the day, our CRC pastor was on the committee for the '85 psalter hymnal (the grey one).

12 posted on 07/15/2013 6:30:49 PM PDT by Lee N. Field ("What is your only comfort, in life and death?" "That I an not my own, but belong, body and soul...")
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To: Lee N. Field

The one I was referring to was the one before that.


13 posted on 07/15/2013 6:37:40 PM PDT by SeaHawkFan
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To: ReformationFan

There is incredible potential here, as there maybe a dozen or more major musical expressions of the psalms, from the ancient Hebrew:

http://www.musicofthebible.com/teamim.htm

Through tracing the evolution of western music. Through the Middle Ages, and many of the classical composers.

Just a single psalm could be performed in the Hebrew manner, as a Gregorian chant, through Catholic and Protestant composers classical and modern, using their contemporary languages.


14 posted on 07/15/2013 6:57:38 PM PDT by yefragetuwrabrumuy (Best WoT news at rantburg.com)
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To: SeaHawkFan

We still have a couple copies of that.


15 posted on 07/15/2013 7:14:18 PM PDT by Lee N. Field ("What is your only comfort, in life and death?" "That I an not my own, but belong, body and soul...")
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To: Lee N. Field

Don’t even try to tell me you’ve never heard the term “hyper-Calvinism”.


16 posted on 07/15/2013 7:27:37 PM PDT by SeaHawkFan
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To: SeaHawkFan

No I certainly have heard the term. I just never encountered anything like it in my time in the CRC.


17 posted on 07/15/2013 7:40:45 PM PDT by Lee N. Field ("What is your only comfort, in life and death?" "That I an not my own, but belong, body and soul...")
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To: ReformationFan

Psalm singing beats out hymns. Good stuff.

BTW: find “Tellehim” by Steve Reich. Stunning rendition of some psalms.


18 posted on 07/15/2013 7:45:55 PM PDT by ctdonath2 (Making good people helpless doesn't make bad people harmless.)
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To: Lee N. Field
At one time, it was quite prevalent in the CRC.
19 posted on 07/15/2013 7:50:40 PM PDT by SeaHawkFan
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To: ReformationFan

Anyone else notice that when God spoke in the other books of the Bible that His part of the conversation looks like psalms? Paul mentioned talking to each other in songs. Heavenly.


20 posted on 07/15/2013 8:34:53 PM PDT by huldah1776
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To: yefragetuwrabrumuy

Bump....


21 posted on 07/15/2013 8:47:33 PM PDT by onedoug
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To: what's up

I hope you have the book “Streams in the Dessert” It’s a wonderful, daily reader written in the early part of the 1900s - I can’t remember when, but it is really good for when one is going thru troubling times. I just love it.


22 posted on 07/15/2013 8:49:15 PM PDT by dandiegirl
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To: Fiji Hill

That was beautiful. Thank you.


23 posted on 07/15/2013 10:10:01 PM PDT by ReformationFan
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To: Mrs. Don-o
Next thing you know, they're going to be bringing back chant (naturally, Greek chant vice Gregorian chant, but still...)
24 posted on 07/16/2013 3:19:36 AM PDT by markomalley (Nothing emboldens the wicked so greatly as the lack of courage on the part of the good -- Leo XIII)
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To: markomalley

Gregorian chant affects some people very deeply. It had an upsurge of popularity for a short time in the 1970s, and had an impact somewhat like when the Catholic church permitted the Latin mass again.


25 posted on 07/16/2013 7:57:12 AM PDT by yefragetuwrabrumuy (Best WoT news at rantburg.com)
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