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Pope Francis: the humblest offer the world a lesson in solidarity
Radio Vaticana ^ | 7/25/2013

Posted on 07/25/2013 6:25:42 PM PDT by markomalley

Pope Francis on Thursday visited the Community of Varginha which is part of the Manguinhos Favela in Rio. Here he visited the local parish, prayed in the tiny Church of St. Jerome Emiliani, and addressed the community gathered to greet him in a football field.

Please find below the full text of the Pope's discourse.



Dear Brothers and Sisters,

It is wonderful to be here with you! From the start, my wish in planning this visit to Brazil was to be able to visit every district throughout the nation. I would have liked to knock on every door, to say “good morning”, to ask for a glass of cold water, to take a cafezinho, to speak as one would to family friends, to listen to each person pouring out his or her heart – parents, children, grandparents ... But Brazil is so vast! It is impossible to knock on every door! So I chose to come here, to visit your community, which today stands for every district in Brazil. How wonderful it is to be welcomed with such love, generosity, and joy! One need only look at the way you have decorated the streets of the community; this is a further mark of affection, it comes from your heart, from the heart of all Brazilians in festive mood. Many thanks to each of you for this kind welcome! And I thank Archbishop Orani Tempesta as well as Rangler and Joana for their kind words.

1. From the moment I first set foot on Brazilian soil, right up to this meeting here with you, I have been made to feel welcome. And it is important to be able to make people welcome; this is something even more beautiful than any kind of ornament or decoration. I say this because when we are generous in welcoming people and sharing something with them – some food, a place in our homes, our time – not only do we no longer remain poor: we are enriched. I am well aware that when someone needing food knocks at your door, you always find a way of sharing food; as the proverb says, one can always “add more water to the beans”! And you do so with love, demonstrating that true riches consist not in material things, but in the heart!

And the Brazilian people, particularly the humblest among you, can offer the world a valuable lesson in solidarity, a word that is too often forgotten or silenced, because it is uncomfortable. I would like to make an appeal to those in possession of greater resources, to public authorities and to all people of good will who are working for social justice: never tire of working for a more just world, marked by greater solidarity! No one can remain insensitive to the inequalities that persist in the world! Everybody, according to his or her particular opportunities and responsibilities, should be able to make a personal contribution to putting an end to so many social injustices. The culture of selfishness and individualism that often prevails in our society is not what builds up and leads to a more habitable world: it is the culture of solidarity that does so, seeing others not as rivals or statistics, but brothers and sisters.

I would like to encourage the efforts that Brazilian society is making to integrate all its members, including those who suffer most and are in greatest need, through the fight against hunger and deprivation. No amount of “peace-building” will be able to last, nor will harmony and happiness be attained in a society that ignores, pushes to the margins or excludes a part of itself. A society of that kind simply impoverishes itself, it loses something essential. Let us always remember this: only when we are able to share do we become truly rich; everything that is shared is multiplied! The measure of the greatness of a society is found in the way it treats those most in need, those who have nothing apart from their poverty!

2. I would also like to tell you that the Church, the “advocate of justice and defender of the poor in the face of intolerable social and economic inequalities which cry to heaven” (Aparecida Document, 395), wishes to offer her support for every initiative that can signify genuine development for every person and for the whole person. Dear friends, it is certainly necessary to give bread to the hungry – this is an act of justice. But there is also a deeper hunger, the hunger for a happiness that only God can satisfy. There is neither real promotion of the common good nor real human development when there is ignorance of the fundamental pillars that govern a nation, its non-material goods: life, which is a gift of God, a value always to be protected and promoted; the family, the foundation of coexistence and a remedy against social fragmentation; integral education, which cannot be reduced to the mere transmission of information for purposes of generating profit; health, which must seek the integral well-being of the person, including the spiritual dimension, essential for human balance and healthy coexistence; security, in the conviction that violence can be overcome only by changing human hearts.

I would like to add one final point. Here, as in the whole of Brazil, there are many young people. Dear young friends, you have a particular sensitivity towards injustice, but you are often disappointed by facts that speak of corruption on the part of people who put their own interests before the common good. To you and to all, I repeat: never yield to discouragement, do not lose trust, do not allow your hope to be extinguished. Situations can change, people can change. Be the first to seek to bring good, do not grow accustomed to evil, but defeat it. The Church is with you, bringing you the precious good of faith, bringing Jesus Christ, who “came that they may have life and have it abundantly” (Jn 10:10).

Today, to all of you, especially to the residents of this Community of Varginha, I say: you are not alone, the Church is with you, the Pope is with you. I carry each of you in my heart and I make my own the intentions that you carry deep within you: thanksgiving for joys, pleas for help in times of difficulty, a desire for consolation in times of grief and suffering. I entrust all this to the intercession of Our Lady of Aparecida, Mother of all the poor of Brazil, and with great affection I impart my blessing.


TOPICS: Catholic
KEYWORDS: brazil; popefrancis; romancatholicism
A couple of points that I would like to highlight from this:
1 posted on 07/25/2013 6:25:42 PM PDT by markomalley
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To: markomalley
There is neither real promotion of the common good nor real human development when there is ignorance of the fundamental pillars that govern a nation, its non-material goods: life, which is a gift of God, a value always to be protected and promoted; the family, the foundation of coexistence and a remedy against social fragmentation; integral education, which cannot be reduced to the mere transmission of information for purposes of generating profit; health, which must seek the integral well-being of the person, including the spiritual dimension, essential for human balance and healthy coexistence; security, in the conviction that violence can be overcome only by changing human hearts.

To me, that's it. Essentially, it depends on the individual and the conversion of the individual. Few people seem to know that when the Spanish friars arrived in what is now the US and preached to the Indians, conversion was voluntary. If they didn't convert, they could sign treaties with the Spanish government.

Individuals other than the royal family or leader were not important in indigenous groups, but once he or she converted, the entire tribe would come in. However, even then, even the most humble were taught (and evaluated!) by the Franciscans.

We need that again. We are in a desperate moral swamp, and it has nothing to do with economics.

2 posted on 07/25/2013 6:45:39 PM PDT by livius
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To: markomalley; Mrs. Don-o; livius
I thank Archbishop Orani Tempesta ...

Archbishop "Stormy Prayers," or am I mangling the roots too much?

3 posted on 07/26/2013 2:41:35 AM PDT by Tax-chick ("Thomas will explain everything.")
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To: livius; markomalley
The culture of selfishness and individualism that often prevails in our society is not what builds up and leads to a more habitable world: it is the culture of solidarity that does so, seeing others not as rivals or statistics, but brothers and sisters.

It seems we're all seeing the same points. What he's calling for is individual action based on individual conversion to Christ, because nothing else is worthy of God's beloved sons and daughters.

4 posted on 07/26/2013 2:54:24 AM PDT by Tax-chick ("Thomas will explain everything.")
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To: Tax-chick; markomalley; livius

“Praying up a Storm”, maybe?


5 posted on 07/26/2013 3:10:57 AM PDT by Mrs. Don-o (:o))
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To: Mrs. Don-o; markomalley

That’s better than my translation!

I’m so grateful to markomalley for posting all these texts (rather than the CBS or Reuters garble!). I can just see Pope Francis, with his big, “God is good all the time!” smile, pouring out love and peace and gratitude on the poor, the youth, the drug addicts ...

It’s as if he knows that carping and caviling and criticizing and judging people is like hitting them in the face with a dead fish, “not good enough, not good enough, you got it wrong ...”

God bless him!


6 posted on 07/26/2013 4:03:58 AM PDT by Tax-chick ("Thomas will explain everything.")
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To: Tax-chick; Mrs. Don-o; livius; ArrogantBustard
I’m so grateful to markomalley for posting all these texts (rather than the CBS or Reuters garble!)

Thanks.

What I personally find so amazing is that, in general, FReepers, who are the most cynical group in the country regarding the media, become totally credulous when the story topic has something to do with the Church. I have never in my life comprehended that concept.

What is yet more amazing is that this credulity includes some FReepers who identify themselves as Catholic.

7 posted on 07/26/2013 4:07:42 AM PDT by markomalley (Nothing emboldens the wicked so greatly as the lack of courage on the part of the good -- Leo XIII)
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To: markomalley

It seems like an intense focus on politics ... this is a site mainly about politics, after all ... puts some people into a, “We have no King but Caesar!” mindset, so that they have trouble seeing past politics to Christ and the individuals who make up His body on Earth.

That’s the sense I get from the many posts on the order of, “He should have said (yadda government this, politics that) instead of ‘Jesus offers love and healing to drug addicts, and so does the Church’.”


8 posted on 07/26/2013 4:16:35 AM PDT by Tax-chick ("Thomas will explain everything.")
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To: Tax-chick
That’s the sense I get from the many posts on the order of, “He should have said (yadda government this, politics that) instead of ‘Jesus offers love and healing to drug addicts, and so does the Church’.”

Sadly.

Myself, I ID myself as a Catholic, Conservative, FReeper...in that order.

I guess if our Church hierarchy in this country (e.g., the ubiquitous Bishop Blaire (D-CA)) would stop meddling in partisan politics and would take the lead of the Holy Father, it would be a lot easier for them to not interpret Francis' messages as political.

9 posted on 07/26/2013 4:22:13 AM PDT by markomalley (Nothing emboldens the wicked so greatly as the lack of courage on the part of the good -- Leo XIII)
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To: markomalley
I guess if our Church hierarchy in this country (e.g., the ubiquitous Bishop Blaire (D-CA)) would stop meddling in partisan politics and would take the lead of the Holy Father, it would be a lot easier for them to not interpret Francis' messages as political.

Maybe, but one of the lessons I've been drawing from Pope Francis's talks from the day of his election is that, if we wait for other people to be what we think they should be, we're never going to look at what we can be and do for Christ each day. We've got to see right through it and be Christ to the people He gives us, "while it is called 'today'."

10 posted on 07/26/2013 4:29:02 AM PDT by Tax-chick ("Thomas will explain everything.")
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To: Tax-chick
Maybe, but one of the lessons I've been drawing from Pope Francis's talks from the day of his election is that, if we wait for other people to be what we think they should be, we're never going to look at what we can be and do for Christ each day. We've got to see right through it and be Christ to the people He gives us, "while it is called 'today'."

And you are absolutely right.

11 posted on 07/26/2013 4:34:43 AM PDT by markomalley (Nothing emboldens the wicked so greatly as the lack of courage on the part of the good -- Leo XIII)
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To: markomalley
you are absolutely right

I'm just learning from the best!

12 posted on 07/26/2013 4:38:54 AM PDT by Tax-chick ("Thomas will explain everything.")
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To: markomalley
"Bishop Blaire (D-CA)"

Ouch.

Hurts.

13 posted on 07/26/2013 5:09:45 AM PDT by Mrs. Don-o (:o/)
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