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Coptic churches burn in Egypt
Al Jazeera ^ | August 14, 2013

Posted on 08/14/2013 2:23:40 PM PDT by NYer


Supporters of the Muslim Brotherhood attend a protest in support of ousted Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi outside the Rabaa al-Adawiya mosque, in Cairo, Egypt, 12 August 2013. EPA/KHALED ELFIQI

Churches burned across Egypt following the security crackdown on pro-Muslim Brotherhood demonstrators. Online reports suggest up to 17 churches were burned across Egypt, along with other Christian-owned businesses and schools. 
 
Coptic witnesses and religious leaders said the attacks were carried out by supporters of the Muslim Brotherhood in areas without police protection. In some areas, the attacks reportedly came amid ongoing fighting between security forces and supporters of the Muslim Brotherhood. 
 
Egyptians on Twitter used #EgyChurch to crowdsource images and reports of the churches under attack.



St. Mary Church burning in Fayoum


Nuns of St. George church hiding on rooftop after church was burned by Morsi supporters


Another church set ablaze in Suez. As far as I know up till now 4-5 churches were torched in Menia, Sohag, Suez.


Many shared this photo reportedly of Muslims protecting a church in the governate of Sohag.


Smoke coming out of the Greek Church in #Suez People are Protecting it now


TOPICS: Current Events; Orthodox Christian; Religion & Politics
KEYWORDS: coptic; copticchurches; copticchurrch; copts; egypt; iran; kentucky; lebanon; morsi; qatar; randpaul; randpaultruthfile; randsconcerntrolls; syria

1 posted on 08/14/2013 2:23:40 PM PDT by NYer
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To: netmilsmom; thefrankbaum; Tax-chick; GregB; saradippity; Berlin_Freeper; Litany; SumProVita; ...

This is beyond catastrophic!! Please remember our Coptic brothers and sisters in your prayers!


2 posted on 08/14/2013 2:25:08 PM PDT by NYer ( "Run from places of sin as from the plague."--St John Climacus)
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To: All

Here is another church in كنيسه الامير تادرس المنيا قبل قليل . I don't read Arabic but perhaps someone in the forum can tell us where it is located.
3 posted on 08/14/2013 2:27:35 PM PDT by NYer ( "Run from places of sin as from the plague."--St John Climacus)
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To: NYer

Also, folks, if you know nothing about Coptic Christianity, it is one of the most beautiful and artistic religions in the world. Bless these poor people.


4 posted on 08/14/2013 2:28:04 PM PDT by miss marmelstein ( Richard Lives Yet!)
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To: All

... and yet another church, location undisclosed.

5 posted on 08/14/2013 2:29:22 PM PDT by NYer ( "Run from places of sin as from the plague."--St John Climacus)
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To: NYer

Clintons’ fault.


6 posted on 08/14/2013 2:30:21 PM PDT by Paladin2
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Comment #7 Removed by Moderator

To: miss marmelstein
Also, folks, if you know nothing about Coptic Christianity, it is one of the most beautiful and artistic religions in the world. Bless these poor people.

A while back, I purchased this book which takes the reader into the coptic monasteries.

Written as a journal, Journey Back to Eden recounts Mark Gruber's year of spiritual discovery among the austere desert monasteries of Egypt. His journey began almost accidentally as part of his doctoral research, but it became more, much more. His account - entertaining, poignant, and spiritually challenging - takes us back to the times of St. Anthony and the ancient Desert Fathers.

Father Mark Gruber, a Benedictine monk of St. Vincent Archabbey in Latrobe, Pennsylvania, came to Stony Brook University in the early 80s to study for his doctor of philosophy in anthropology.In his second year of study at Stony Brook, Father Gruber enrolled in a dissertation methodology class in order to hasten his degree program. Much to his astonishment, on the first day of class the professor announced that if students did not have dissertation topics, a compiled bibliography and completed research, they should not be in the class. When asked for his topic, Gruber responded, without thinking and knowing almost nothing about the topic, "Egypt. I shall investigate the Coptic people of Egypt." And thus, he began his study of the desert monasteries of the Coptic monks in Egypt, which would culminate in a year-long ethnographic fieldwork in Egypt.

Now, many years since his doctoral work was completed at Stony Brook University, Gruber has written a journal of his experiences as a student of anthropology and a Benedictine monk in a world in which the secular and spiritual are deeply intertwined. The book, Journey Back to Eden: My Life and Times among the Desert Fathers (Orbis: New York, 2002), offers readers an insight into the daily lives of the Coptic monks, Coptic Christians and the world in which they live, a world which is largely Arab and Islamic. It is an affectionate portrait, full of profound respect for the Coptic church.

Father Gruber's journal of his year with the Copts cannot be called a travelogue of the trials and tribulations of a young American student in Egypt. Throughout his day-to-day activities and frustrations lies a deeper insight into the people of a world in which all things are influenced by the spiritual. In the early days of his journey, for example, he tells of building a sand castle on a beach. Father Gruber is accosted by some young Muslim boys who accuse him of spreading Christianity in Egypt, mistaking his sand castle for a church. Egypt is truly a place of discovery, Gruber says, " ... seeing the character of these people and how deeply their religious concerns and issues preoccupy them and how they tend to interpret everything they experience through the prism of their faith. In seconds, the boys kicked down the towers of my castles and ran away ... triumphant or afraid?"

He also learns with some amazement of the Copts' respect for monks and priests, and he marvels at finding himself standing in churches using a handcross on lines of pilgrims who approach for blessings. On another occasion, he is baffled by an encounter with two Muslim brothers who, thinking there is a bad spirit in their house after their father's death, ask Father Gruber to bless the house. When he expresses his puzzlement, they respond that this is perfectly acceptable, and he should not fear any problems would persist. He is told not to interpret this as a secret vote of confidence from the Moslems. A friend tells him Moslems rationalize that the Muslim sheik is dealing with God directly and "if you want to resolve a problem with evil spirits, you need someone whose religion is of a lesser sort."

While the book can easily be read as a journal from beginning to end, its daily entries lend themselves to being read individually as spiritual and cultural reflections on an ancient people who can offer insights to modern Western man. Father Gruber's conversations with the monks lead to his understanding of the sense of humility and charity of the desert monks. His travels to 12 Coptic monasteries in the Egyptian desert describe monastic lifestyles steeped in silence, prayer and an austere existence devoid of any modern conveniences. At the same time, the monasteries, defined in many ways by climate and geography, are built on a deep sense of community. How is it that in a world of every modern convenience, where geography and climate play little role in movement and lifestyle, most Westerners remain isolated? As Father Gruber prepared to leave Egypt, he realized how intensely he was affected by the Copts of Egypt. Thus, this is essentially a book about a deeply spiritual pilgrimage and the profound impact it had on one man's life. The afterword strikes a note of longing to remain in Egypt tempered with a desire to return to America. "I shall only manage to return to the world from which I came if I consider myself a bearer of the desert harvest.... My eyes will be turning backward, even as I had once looked forward to a future horizon before I came here."

Catholic and Orthodox friends have all treasured this book and continue to share it with others.

8 posted on 08/14/2013 2:41:46 PM PDT by NYer ( "Run from places of sin as from the plague."--St John Climacus)
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To: NYer

From what I can tell, its Prince Tadros church, in a place called Minya.

“Prince Tadros church, Minya, a few moments ago”


9 posted on 08/14/2013 3:05:34 PM PDT by hannibaal
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To: NYer
Mohammed's promise to St. Catherine's Monastery, Sinai.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Achtiname_of_Muhammad

10 posted on 08/14/2013 3:16:11 PM PDT by CMB_polarization
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To: NYer

http://www.anglicannews.org/news/2013/08/urgent-prayers-needed-for-egypt.aspx


11 posted on 08/14/2013 3:24:25 PM PDT by elpadre (AfganistaMr Obama said the goal was to "disrupt, dismantle and defeat al-hereQaeda" and its allies.)
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To: NYer

Hussein’s removal of Mubarak is having the effect he desired.

Meanwhile, Wolf Blizter and CNN just reported on Egypt that the government there is “escalating” attacks on the “peaceful” Brotherhood protestors.


12 posted on 08/14/2013 3:41:46 PM PDT by BenLurkin (This is not a statement of fact. It is either opinion or satire; or both.)
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To: NYer

In fact, this really should be in News/Activism.


13 posted on 08/14/2013 3:42:24 PM PDT by BenLurkin (This is not a statement of fact. It is either opinion or satire; or both.)
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To: BenLurkin
Image and video hosting by TinyPic
14 posted on 08/14/2013 4:04:44 PM PDT by MtnMan101
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To: NYer

I see the MB is also attacking the Library in Alexandria.
AQ flag flying above some Churches..

Total savages.


15 posted on 08/14/2013 4:42:57 PM PDT by sockmonkey (Of Course I didn't read the article. After all, this is FreeRepublic..)
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To: BenLurkin

Of course, the Brotherhood people are not peaceful. They’re attacking churches.


16 posted on 08/14/2013 4:56:27 PM PDT by popdonnelly (The right to self-defense is older than the Constitution.)
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To: NYer
Lord Jesus, may this calamity unite all of Thy Church and bring her to glory in the Middle East and the United States.

In the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost, amen.


17 posted on 08/14/2013 5:44:12 PM PDT by annalex (fear them not)
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To: AdmSmith; AnonymousConservative; Berosus; bigheadfred; Bockscar; cardinal4; ColdOne; ...
Note: this topic was posted 8/14/2013. Thanks NYer.
Rand Slams Congress for Funding Egypt's Generals: 'How Does Your Conscience Feel Now?'
Sen. Rand Paul is hammering his fellow senators for keeping billions in financial aid flowing to Egypt's military -- even as Cairo's security forces massacre anti-government activists. [by "anti-government activists" is meant church-burning Christian-murdering jihadists]
[Posted on 08/15/2013 5:44:10 PM PDT by Hoodat]

18 posted on 06/12/2014 6:33:24 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: annalex; NYer

Copts are both Eastern Rite and Western Rite if I remember correctly.

Any idea on these destructions/torching of churches?


19 posted on 06/12/2014 6:43:13 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Salvation; NYer
The majority are pre-chalcedonian Oriental Orthodox, and some are Catholic. Both are traditional apostolic churches that predate the Reformation.
20 posted on 06/13/2014 5:14:31 AM PDT by annalex (fear them not)
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To: annalex; Salvation
Copts are both Eastern Rite and Western Rite if I remember correctly.

Annalex is correct - the Copts are pre-chalcedonian Oriental Orthodox for the most part. The Coptic Catholic Church is an Alexandrian Rite particular Church in full communion with the Catholic Church. At the Council of Florence on February 4, 1442, a Coptic Orthodox delegation signed the Cantate Domino, a document for the formal union with the Catholic Church and the bishop of Rome. Ibrahim Isaac Sidrak (born 19 August 1955 in Beni-Chokeir, Egypt) is the current Coptic Catholic Patriarch of Alexandria.

21 posted on 06/13/2014 5:34:31 AM PDT by NYer ("You are a puff of smoke that appears briefly and then disappears." James 4:14)
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22 posted on 09/20/2014 2:41:03 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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