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Vatican Spokesman: Donít Parse Pope Francis
First Things ^ | 10/4/13 | Matthew Schmitz

Posted on 10/05/2013 6:36:10 AM PDT by marshmallow

In response to Pope Francis’ latest interview, I urged people not to read Francis’ words too closely:

After two recent interview with La Repubblica and La Civiltà Cattolica, it has become clear that the dialogue he desires will be informal and unguarded. It is the kind of dialogue usually reserved for close friends and, of course, very susceptible to misunderstanding when it isn’t. This is why Francis has delivered his beautiful daily homilies ex tempore and chosen intimate interviews rather than public speeches as his preferred way of communicating with his Church and the world. Francis has decided to approach the world on casual terms, and the world has responded with overwhelming love for him, if not always perfect understanding of the faith.

How, then, should Christians read his interviews? Talmudic explanations of how what he said was not what he really meant or, on the other hand, what the faith really teaches miss the point. Francis is not so much aiming for precision as shooting the breeze.

That this has been Francis’ desire has long been clear, but now it’s been confirmed by Vatican spokesman Federico Lombardi. John Allen reports:

Perhaps the most insightful take on all this came from Lombardi himself, who said we’re seeing the emergence of a whole new genre of papal speech — informal, spontaneous and sometimes entrusted to others in terms of its final articulation. A new genre, Lombardi suggested, needs a “new hermeneutic,” one in which we don’t attach value so much to individual words as to the overall sense.

“This isn’t Denzinger,” he said, referring to the famous German collection of official church teaching, “and it’s not canon law.”

(Excerpt) Read more at firstthings.com ...


TOPICS: Catholic; Ministry/Outreach; Theology
KEYWORDS:

1 posted on 10/05/2013 6:36:10 AM PDT by marshmallow
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To: marshmallow

Oh boy.

He’s not shooting the breeze...he’s talking to journalists whose job is to quote him.

He needs to watch what he says.


2 posted on 10/05/2013 6:38:18 AM PDT by Claud
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To: marshmallow

Why didn’t this admonition need to be applied to previous Popes?


3 posted on 10/05/2013 6:39:13 AM PDT by oblomov
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To: marshmallow

By the way, we all need to study up on the episode of Pope Honorius I and the Monothelites. Honorius sent a letter to Sergius in which he waffled on monothelitism.

He was later condemned by an Ecumenical Council for it.

Francis is walking a dangerous path.


4 posted on 10/05/2013 6:44:15 AM PDT by Claud
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To: marshmallow

Of course not. We might clearly read that he is a heretic.


5 posted on 10/05/2013 6:57:59 AM PDT by piusv
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To: marshmallow

One of the few times I have agreed with Lombardi. Personally, I think Lombardi should be replaced, because he’s ineffective at best and usually even ends up making things worse - I’m surprised they kept him, except that he’s a Jesuit.

That said, I think he’s right. Benedict was very careful in his speech and the press still twisted it. The press loved JPII because he said things that were ambiguous or even downright heretical (think of Assisi) and also kissed the Koran, something that seems to be forgotten by his inexplicable conservative supporters. I say inexplicable, because until he became so frail that he wasn’t really in charge anymore and Ratzinger took over, JPII did little to further orthodoxy or even to deal with the scandals.

I actually think Francis is more orthodox than JPII, and pretty much on the same wavelength with BXVI. He just expresses it differently.

And I don’t think that’s because he’s a Jesuit or Latin American - I think it’s because of the influence of the Communion & Liberation movement (CL), which is very popular with Italian or Italian-identified intellectuals and was actually a great favorite of Pope BXVI. Look it up.


6 posted on 10/05/2013 7:41:48 AM PDT by livius
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To: oblomov
Why didn’t this admonition need to be applied to previous Popes?

It was, but not to the same degree. The modern media has always misunderstood religious statements, but it is getting worse. They apply the secular view of man.

7 posted on 10/05/2013 7:50:11 AM PDT by cotton
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To: marshmallow

I am seriously wondering about Francis’s mental state.


8 posted on 10/05/2013 7:58:20 AM PDT by Romulus
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To: Claud

“He needs to watch what he says.”

Or, we need to ignore him.


9 posted on 10/05/2013 8:38:51 AM PDT by sitetest (If Roe is not overturned, no unborn child will ever be protected in law.)
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To: cotton

Actually, I’m seeing Modernist statements and the modern world gets those.


10 posted on 10/05/2013 9:13:12 AM PDT by piusv
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To: sitetest
Or, we need to ignore him.

I've become a Pope Francis agnostic. I don't know if he is a great saintly pope, or a very bad pope. Only time will tell.

Until that time comes, for some of us peace of mind and personal sanity demand we ignore this Jesuit and all the spin on all sides.

11 posted on 10/05/2013 11:13:33 AM PDT by Brian Kopp DPM
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To: marshmallow; All

” I urged people not to read Francis’ words too closely:”


Even better if you don’t read them at all! Tee hee hee!


12 posted on 10/05/2013 12:05:29 PM PDT by Greetings_Puny_Humans
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To: marshmallow

The pope is a teacher, and when he preaches he should be trustworthy. If we can’t attach value to the individual words, which is to acknowledge that they are not themselves trustworthy in terms of teaching, then we should ignore him altogether. And what value is a pope which we must ignore? Ultimately, though, I am unconvinced by this excuse of informality. We are to believe that a man who is the supreme pastor of the Church, deeply steeped in the Gospel, cannot be both informal and trustworthy? He cannot speak spontaneously and still not say outrageously misleading things which, at the bare minimum, smack of heresy? No, sorry, that sounds like a cop out to me. The things which proceed out of the mouth, come forth from the heart. If, over and over, the pope insists on saying outrageous things, then there is every reason to imagine he might just very well believe outrageous things.


13 posted on 10/05/2013 2:09:59 PM PDT by cothrige
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To: cothrige

Your post makes way too much sense.


14 posted on 10/06/2013 5:50:58 AM PDT by piusv
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To: All
Francis has decided to approach the world on casual terms, and the world has responded with overwhelming love for him, if not always perfect understanding of the faith. How, then, should Christians read his interviews? Talmudic explanations of how what he said was not what he really meant or, on the other hand, what the faith really teaches miss the point. Francis is not so much aiming for precision as shooting the breeze.

Ping for later

15 posted on 10/06/2013 12:36:55 PM PDT by Alex Murphy (Just a common, ordinary, simple savior of America's destiny.)
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