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Catholic Caucus: Daily Mass Readings, 10-21-13
USCCB.org/RNAB ^ | 10-21-13 | Revised New American Bible

Posted on 10/20/2013 8:44:17 PM PDT by Salvation

Monday of the Twenty-ninth Week in Ordinary Time
Lectionary: 473

Reading 1 Rom 4:20-25

Brothers and sisters:
Abraham did not doubt God’s promise in unbelief;
rather, he was empowered by faith and gave glory to God
and was fully convinced that what God had promised
he was also able to do.
That is why it was credited to him as righteousness.
But it was not for him alone that it was written
that it was credited to him;
it was also for us, to whom it will be credited,
who believe in the one who raised Jesus our Lord from the dead,
who was handed over for our transgressions
and was raised for our justification.

Responsorial Psalm Lk 1:69-70, 71-72, 73-75

R. (see 68) Blessed be the Lord, the God of Israel; he has come to his people.
He has come to his people and set them free.
He has raised up for us a mighty savior,
born of the house of his servant David.
R. Blessed be the Lord, the God of Israel; he has come to his people.
Through his holy prophets he promised of old
that he would save us from our enemies,
from the hands of all who hate us.
He promised to show mercy to our fathers
and to remember his holy covenant.
R. Blessed be the Lord, the God of Israel; he has come to his people.
This was the oath he swore to our father Abraham:
to set us free from the hands of our enemies,
free to worship him without fear,
holy and righteous in his sight all the days of our life.
R. Blessed be the Lord, the God of Israel; he has come to his people.

Gospel Lk 12:13-21

Someone in the crowd said to Jesus,
“Teacher, tell my brother to share the inheritance with me.”
He replied to him,
“Friend, who appointed me as your judge and arbitrator?”
Then he said to the crowd,
“Take care to guard against all greed,
for though one may be rich,
one’s life does not consist of possessions.”

Then he told them a parable.
“There was a rich man whose land produced a bountiful harvest.
He asked himself, ‘What shall I do,
for I do not have space to store my harvest?’
And he said, ‘This is what I shall do:
I shall tear down my barns and build larger ones.
There I shall store all my grain and other goods
and I shall say to myself, “Now as for you,
you have so many good things stored up for many years,
rest, eat, drink, be merry!”’
But God said to him,
‘You fool, this night your life will be demanded of you;
and the things you have prepared, to whom will they belong?’
Thus will it be for the one who stores up treasure for himself
but is not rich in what matters to God.”


TOPICS: Catholic; General Discusssion; Prayer; Worship
KEYWORDS: catholic; ordinarytime; prayer
For your reading, comments, reflection, faith-sharing, Lectio Divina, etc.
1 posted on 10/20/2013 8:44:17 PM PDT by Salvation
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To: All

I still don’t have my ping list, so please FReepmail me if you would like to be pinged for the Daily Readings.

Thanks!


2 posted on 10/20/2013 8:50:33 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

From: Romans 4:20-25

The Example of Abraham (Continuation)


[20] No distrust made him (Abraham) waver concerning the promise of God, but
he grew strong in his faith as he gave glory to God, [21] fully convinced that God
was able to do what he had promised. [22] That is why his faith was “reckoned to
him as righteousness.” [23] But the words, “it was reckoned to him,” were written
not for his sake alone, [24] but for ours also. It will be reckoned to us who believe
in him that raised from the dead Jesus our Lord, [25] who was put to death for our
trespasses and raised for our justification.

*********************************************************************************************
Commentary:

24-25. The faith of which St Paul is speaking includes among its basic truths the
redemptive Death of Christ and his Resurrection, two events which are indissolub-
ly linked, two ways in which God’s justice and mercy are manifested.

*********************************************************************************************
Source: “The Navarre Bible: Text and Commentaries”. Biblical text from the
Revised Standard Version and New Vulgate. Commentaries by members of
the Faculty of Theology, University of Navarre, Spain.

Published by Four Courts Press, Kill Lane, Blackrock, Co. Dublin, Ireland, and
by Scepter Publishers in the United States.


3 posted on 10/20/2013 9:01:26 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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From: Luke 12:13-21

Parable of the Rich Fool


[13] One of the multitude said to Him (Jesus), “Teacher, bid my brother divide
the inheritance with me.” [14] But He said to him, “Man, who made Me a judge
or divider over you?” [15] And He said to them, “Take heed, and beware of all co-
vetousness; for man’s life does not consist in the abundance of his possessions.”
[16] And He told them a parable, saying, “The land of a rich man brought forth
plentifully; [17] and he thought to himself, ‘What shall I do, for I have nowhere to
store my crops?’ [18] And he said, ‘I will do this: I will store all my grain and my
goods. [19] And I will say to my soul, Soul, you have ample goods laid up for
many years; take your ease, eat, drink, be merry.’ [20] But God said to him,
‘Fool! This night your soul is required of you; and the things you have prepared,
whose will they be?’ [21] So is he who lays up treasure for himself and is not
rich toward God.”

*********************************************************************************************
Commentary:

13. This man is only interested in his own problems; he sees in Jesus only a tea-
cher with authority and prestige who can help sort out his case (cf. Deuteronomy
21:17). He is a good example of those who approach religious authorities not to
seek advice on the way they should go in their spiritual life, but rather to get them
to solve their material problems. Jesus vigorously rejects the man’s request — not
because He is insensitive to the injustice which may have been committed in this
family, but because it is not part of His redemptive mission to intervene in matters
of this kind. By His word and example the Master shows us that His work of sal-
vation is not aimed at solving the many social and family problems that arise in
human society; He has come to give us principles and moral standards which
should inspire our actions in temporal affairs, but not to give us precise, techni-
cal solutions to problems which arise; to that end He has endowed us with intel-
ligence and freedom.

15-21. After His statement in verse 15, Jesus tells the parable of the foolish rich
man: what folly it is to put our trust in amassing material goods to ensure we
have a comfortable life on earth, forgetting the goods of the spirit, which are what
really ensure us — through God’s mercy — of eternal life.

This is how St. Athanasius explained these words of our Lord: “A person who
lives as if he were to die every day — given that our life is uncertain by definition
— will not sin, for good fear extinguishes most of the disorder of our appetites;
whereas he who thinks he has a long life ahead of him will easily let himself be
dominated by pleasures” (”Adversus Antigonum”).

19. This man’s stupidity consisted in making material possession his only aim in
life and his only insurance policy. It is lawful for a person to want to own what he
needs for living, but if possession of material resources becomes an absolute, it
spells the ultimate destruction of the individual and of society. “Increased posses-
sion is not the ultimate goal of nations nor of individuals. All growth is ambivalent.
It is essential if man is to develop as a man, but in a way it imprisons man if he
considers it the supreme good, and it restricts his vision. Then we see hearts har-
den and minds close, and men no longer gather together in friendship but out of
self-interest, which soon leads to strife and disunity. The exclusive pursuit of pos-
sessions thus becomes an obstacle to individual fulfillment and to man’s true
greatness. Both for nations and for individual, avarice is the most evident form
of underdevelopment” (Paul VI, “Populorum Progressio”, 19).

*********************************************************************************************
Source: “The Navarre Bible: Text and Commentaries”. Biblical text from the
Revised Standard Version and New Vulgate. Commentaries by members of
the Faculty of Theology, University of Navarre, Spain.

Published by Four Courts Press, Kill Lane, Blackrock, Co. Dublin, Ireland, and
by Scepter Publishers in the United States.


4 posted on 10/20/2013 9:03:22 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

http://universalis.com/20131021/mass.htm
Readings at Mass
________________________________________
First reading Romans 4:20-25 ©

Since God had made him a promise, Abraham refused either to deny it or even to doubt it, but drew strength from faith and gave glory to God, convinced that God had power to do what he had promised. This is the faith that was ‘considered as justifying him.’ Scripture however does not refer only to him but to us as well when it says that his faith was thus ‘considered’; our faith too will be ‘considered’ if we believe in him who raised Jesus our Lord from the dead, Jesus who was put to death for our sins and raised to life to justify us.
________________________________________
Canticle Luke 1:69-75 ©

Blessed be the Lord, the God of Israel! He has visited his people.
He has raised up for us a mighty saviour
in the house of David his servant,
as he promised by the lips of holy men,
those who were his prophets from of old.
Blessed be the Lord, the God of Israel! He has visited his people.
A saviour who would free us from our foes,
from the hands of all who hate us.
So his love for our fathers is fulfilled
and his holy covenant remembered.
Blessed be the Lord, the God of Israel! He has visited his people.
He swore to Abraham our father
to grant us that free from fear,
and saved from the hands of our foes,
we might serve him in holiness and justice
all the days of our life in his presence.
Blessed be the Lord, the God of Israel! He has visited his people.
________________________________________
Gospel Acclamation Ps24:4,5
Alleluia, alleluia!
Teach me your paths, my God,
make me walk in your truth.
Alleluia!
Or Mt5:3
Alleluia, alleluia!
How happy are the poor in spirit:
theirs is the kingdom of heaven.
Alleluia!
________________________________________
Gospel Luke 12:13-21 ©

A man in the crowd said to Jesus, ‘Master, tell my brother to give me a share of our inheritance.’ ‘My friend,’ he replied, ‘who appointed me your judge, or the arbitrator of your claims?’ Then he said to them, ‘Watch, and be on your guard against avarice of any kind, for a man’s life is not made secure by what he owns, even when he has more than he needs.’
Then he told them a parable: ‘There was once a rich man who, having had a good harvest from his land, thought to himself, “What am I to do? I have not enough room to store my crops.” Then he said, “This is what I will do: I will pull down my barns and build bigger ones, and store all my grain and my goods in them, and I will say to my soul: My soul, you have plenty of good things laid by for many years to come; take things easy, eat, drink, have a good time.” But God said to him, “Fool! This very night the demand will be made for your soul; and this hoard of yours, whose will it be then?.” So it is when a man stores up treasure for himself in place of making himself rich in the sight of God.’


5 posted on 10/20/2013 9:06:14 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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The Light of Faith (Lumen Fidei)[Catholic Caucus]

Year of Faith: Does God Command Evil Actions in the Bible? Part II (Part I linked
Francis "Lights" Up – Pope's First Encyclical Due Friday
Pope: Homily at Mass for Evangelium Vitae Day [full text]
Adoration with Pope energizing Catholics worldwide
Parishes Worldwide Prepare for Eucharistic Adoration Hour (June 2 at 11 am ET)
Pope [Francis] at Pentecost: Newness, harmony and mission
Audience: Do not be ‘part-time’ Christians
Pope Francis: Regina caeli
Pope to welcome 70,000 youths, confirm 44 (this Sunday) [Catholic Caucus]
Pope Francis’ General Audience focused on women. Feminists aren’t going to be happy

Cardinal Jorge Mario Bergoglio's "Letter On the Year of Faith" (Crossing Threshold of Faith)
Pope Francis – the real deal – has Audience with Cardinals
Benedict XVI's Final General Audience
On Ash Wednesday
On God As Creator of Heaven and Earth
On Abraham's Faith
On Christ As Mediator Between God and Man
On the Incarnation
On God the Almighty Father
Year of Faith: Indulgences and Places of Pilgrimage [Ecumenical]
On the Identity of Jesus

On the Faith of Mary, the Virgin Mother of Christ
Father Cantalamessa's 1st Advent Sermon (Catholic Caucus)
On The Unfolding of God's Self-Revelation
On the Beauty of God's Plan of Salvation
On Bearing Witness to the Christian Faith
On the Splendor of God's Truth
On the Knowledge of God
Archbishop Chaput says Year of Faith holds solution to relativism
Following the Truth: The Year Of Faith – 10 Things You Should Know [Catholic Caucus]
Papal Encyclical on Faith Announced

On the Desire for God
On the Ecclesial Nature of Faith
On the Nature of Faith
Catechism's benefits explained for Year of Faith (Catholic Caucus)
A Life of Faith: Papal Theologian Speaks on the Grace of Faith
ASIA/LAOS - "Year of Faith" amid the persecutions of Christians forced to become "animists"
From no faith to a mountain-top of meaning: Father John Nepil (Catholic Caucus)
Living the Year of Faith: How Pope Benedict Wants You to Begin [Catholic Caucus]
Share Your Faith in This Year of Faith: Two keys to help you do it.
On A New Series of Audiences for The Year of Faith

Pope will deliver year-long teaching series on restoring faith
Pope Benedict XVI Grants Plenary Indulgence to Faithful [Catholic Caucus]
Pope, at Marian shrine, entrusts Year of Faith, synod to Mary (Catholic Caucus)
Catholic Church Calls for Public Prayers in Offices on Fridays
Highlights in the Plan for Year of Faith: Traditional Events Will Take on Special Perspective
Catholic Church calls for public prayers in offices on Fridays
Vatican Unveils Logo for Year of Faith [Catholic Caucus]
Miami Prelate Recalls Pope's Visit to Cuba, Looks to Year of Faith [Catholic Caucus]
The World-Changing Year of Faith [Catholic Caucus]
Vatican to Issue Recommendations for Celebrating Year of Faith

6 posted on 10/20/2013 9:14:12 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Jesus, High Priest
 

We thank you, God our Father, for those who have responded to your call to priestly ministry.

Accept this prayer we offer on their behalf: Fill your priests with the sure knowledge of your love.

Open their hearts to the power and consolation of the Holy Spirit.

Lead them to new depths of union with your Son.

Increase in them profound faith in the Sacraments they celebrate as they nourish, strengthen and heal us.

Lord Jesus Christ, grant that these, your priests, may inspire us to strive for holiness by the power of their example, as men of prayer who ponder your word and follow your will.

O Mary, Mother of Christ and our mother, guard with your maternal care these chosen ones, so dear to the Heart of your Son.

Intercede for our priests, that offering the Sacrifice of your Son, they may be conformed more each day to the image of your Son, our Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ. Amen.

Saint John Vianney, universal patron of priests, pray for us and our priests

This icon shows Jesus Christ, our eternal high priest.

The gold pelican over His heart represents self-sacrifice.

The border contains an altar and grapevines, representing the Mass, and icons of Melchizedek and St. Jean-Baptiste Vianney.

Melchizedek: king of righteousness (left icon) was priest and king of Jerusalem.  He blessed Abraham and has been considered an ideal priest-king.

St. Jean-Baptiste Vianney is the patron saint of parish priests.

7 posted on 10/20/2013 9:15:21 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Pray a Rosary each day for our nation.

Pray the Rosary

1.  Sign of the Cross:  In the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit.  Amen.

2.  The Apostles Creed:  I BELIEVE in God, the Father almighty, Creator of heaven and earth, and in Jesus Christ, His only Son, our Lord, who was conceived by the Holy Spirit, born of the Virgin Mary, suffered under Pontius Pilate, was crucified, died, and was buried. He descended into hell; on the third day he rose again from the dead; he ascended into heaven, and is seated at the right hand of God, the Father Almighty; from there He shall come to judge the living and the dead.

I believe in the Holy Spirit, the holy catholic Church, the communion of saints, the forgiveness of sins, the resurrection of the body, and the life everlasting. Amen.

3.  The Lord's Prayer:  OUR Father, who art in heaven, hallowed be Thy name. Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done on earth as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread and forgive us our trespasses as we forgive those who trespass against us. And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil. Amen.

4. (3) Hail Mary:  HAIL Mary, full of grace, the Lord is with thee. Blessed art thou amongst women and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus. Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners, now, and in the hour of our death. Amen. (Three times)

5. Glory Be:  GLORY be to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit. As it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be, world without end. Amen.

Fatima Prayer: Oh, my Jesus, forgive us our sins, save us from the fires of hell, lead all souls to heaven, especially those in most need of your mercy.

Announce each mystery, then say 1 Our Father, 10 Hail Marys, 1 Glory Be and 1 Fatima prayer.  Repeat the process with each mystery.

End with the Hail Holy Queen:

Hail, Holy Queen, Mother of Mercy, our life, our sweetness and our hope! To thee do we cry, poor banished children of Eve! To thee do we send up our sighs, mourning and weeping in this vale of tears! Turn then, most gracious advocate, thine eyes of mercy towards us; and after this, our exile, show unto us the blessed fruit of thy womb, Jesus!

O clement, O loving, O sweet Virgin Mary! Pray for us, O holy Mother of God, that we may be made worthy of the promises of Christ.

Final step -- The Sign of the Cross

 

The Mysteries of the Rosary

By tradition, Catholics meditate on these Mysteries during prayers of the Rosary.
The biblical references follow each of the Mysteries below.


The Joyful Mysteries
(Mondays and Saturdays)

1. The Annunciation (Luke 1:26-38) [Spiritual fruit - Humility]
2. The Visitation (Luke 1: 39-56) [Spiritual fruit - Love of Neighbor]
3. The Nativity (Luke 2:1-20) [Spiritual fruit - Poverty of Spirit]
4. The Presentation (Luke 2:21-38) [Spiritual fruit - Purity of mind & body]
5. The Finding of Jesus in the Temple (Luke 2:41-52) [Spiritual fruit - Obedience ]

8 posted on 10/20/2013 9:16:34 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
 

October Devotion: The Holy Rosary
 

This feast was established by Pope Pius V to commemorate the great victory of the Christian army against the Turks in the Battle of Lepanto in 1571.

All soldiers on the battlefield prayed the Rosary for three hours and the wind has shifted in their favor. They were able to defeat an army three times bigger, in one of the greatest naval victory in history.

Pope Pius V named this the Feast of Our Lady of Victories, to be celebrated on October 7th.

In 1573, Pope Gregory XIII changed the title of this memorial to Feast of the Holy Rosary.

 

 

Pope Paul VI established the form that we celebrate this feast today, in 1969 under the name “Our Lady of the Rosary”.

“The celebration of this day invites all to mediate upon the mysteries of Christ, following the example of the Blessed Virgin Mary who was so singularly associated with the incarnation, passion and glorious resurrection of the Son of God.”



Madonna del Rosario

Caravaggio

1607

Pray the Rosary

1.  Sign of the Cross:  In the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit.  Amen.

2.  The Apostles Creed:  I BELIEVE in God, the Father almighty, Creator of heaven and earth. I believe in Jesus Christ, His only Son, our Lord. He was conceived by the power of the Holy Spirit and born of the Virgin Mary. He suffered under Pontius Pilate, was crucified, died, and was buried. He descended to the dead. On the third day He rose again. He ascended into heaven and sits at the right hand of God, the Father Almighty. From thence He shall come to judge the living and the dead. I believe in the Holy Spirit, the holy catholic Church, the communion of saints, the forgiveness of sins, the resurrection of the body, and the life everlasting. Amen.

3.  The Lord's Prayer:  OUR Father, who art in heaven, hallowed be Thy name. Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done on earth as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread and forgive us our trespasses as we forgive those who trespass against us. And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil. Amen.

4. (3) Hail Mary:  HAIL Mary, full of grace, the Lord is with thee. Blessed art thou amongst women and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus. Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners, now, and in the hour of our death. Amen. (Three times)

5. Glory Be:  GLORY be to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit. As it was in the beginning, is now, and will be forever. Amen.

Fatima Prayer: Oh, my Jesus, forgive us our sins, save us from the fires of hell, lead all souls to heaven, especially those in most need of your mercy.

Announce each mystery, then say 1 Our Father, 10 Hail Marys, 1 Glory Be and 1 Fatima prayer.  Repeat the process with each mystery.

End with the Hail Holy Queen:

Hail, Holy Queen, Mother of Mercy, our life, our sweetness and our hope! To thee do we cry, poor banished children of Eve! To thee do we send up our sighs, mourning and weeping in this vale of tears! Turn then, most gracious advocate, thine eyes of mercy towards us; and after this, our exile, show unto us the blessed fruit of thy womb, Jesus!

O clement, O loving, O sweet Virgin Mary! Pray for us, O holy Mother of God, that we may be made worthy of the promises of Christ.

Final step -- The Sign of the Cross

The Mysteries of the Rosary

By tradition, Catholics meditate on these Mysteries during prayers of the Rosary.
The biblical references follow each of the Mysteries below.
 

The Joyful Mysteries
(Mondays and Saturdays)
1. The Annunciation (Luke 1:26-38) [Spiritual fruit - Humility]
2. The Visitation (Luke 1: 39-56) [Spiritual fruit - Love of Neighbor]
3. The Nativity (Luke 2:1-20) [Spiritual fruit - Poverty of Spirit]
4. The Presentation (Luke 2:21-38) [Spiritual fruit - Purity of mind & body]
5. The Finding of Jesus in the Temple (Luke 2:41-52) [Spiritual fruit - Obedience ]

The Luminous Mysteries or Mysteries of Light
(Thursdays) see Rosarium Virginis Mariae
1. Jesus' Baptism in the Jordan (II Corinthians 5:21, Matthew 3:17 and parallels) [Spiritual fruit - Gratitude for the gift of Faith]
2. Jesus' self-manifestation at the wedding of Cana (John 2:1- 12) [Spiritual fruit - Fidelity]
3. Jesus' proclamation of the Kingdom of God, with His call to conversion (Mark 1:15, Mark 2:3-13; Luke 7:47- 48, John 20:22-23) [Spiritual fruit - Desire for Holiness]
4. Jesus' Transfiguration (Luke 9:35 and parallels) [Spiritual fruit - Spiritual Courage]
5. Jesus' institution of the Eucharist, as the sacramental expression of the Paschal Mystery. (Luke 24:13-35 and parallels, 1 Corinthians 11:24-25) [Spiritual fruit - Love of our Eucharistic Lord]

The Sorrowful Mysteries
(Tuesdays and Fridays)
1. The Agony in the Garden (Matthew 26:36-46, Luke 22:39-46) [Spiritual fruit - God's will be done]
2. The Scourging at the Pillar (Matthew 27:26, Mark 15:15, John 19:1) [Spiritual fruit - Mortification of the senses]
3. The Crowning with Thorns (Matthew 27:27-30, Mark 15:16-20, John 19:2) [Spiritual fruit - Reign of Christ in our heart]
4. The Carrying of the Cross (Matthew 27:31-32, Mark 15:21, Luke 23:26-32, John 19:17) [Spiritual fruit - Patient bearing of trials]
5. The Crucifixion (Matthew 27:33-56, Mark 15:22-39, Luke 23:33-49, John 19:17-37) [Spiritual fruit - Pardoning of Injuries]

The Glorious Mysteries
(Wednesdays and Sundays)
1.The Resurrection (Matthew 28:1-8, Mark 16:1-18, Luke 24:1-12, John 20:1-29) [Spiritual fruit - Faith]
2. The Ascension (Mark 16:19-20, Luke 24:50-53, Acts 1:6-11) [Spiritual fruit - Christian Hope]
3. The Descent of the Holy Ghost (Acts 2:1-13) [Spiritual fruit - Gifts of the Holy Spirit]
4. The Assumption [Spiritual fruit - To Jesus through Mary]
5. The Coronation [Spiritual fruit - Grace of Final Perseverance]

 

The Fifteen Promises Granted to Those Who Recite the Rosary [Catholic Caucus]
Essays for Lent: The Rosary

Radio Replies Second Volume - The Rosary
Town Rejects Rosary as Offensive and the Prayers that Changed Everything
No-contact order over a student's rosary
Collecting 860 rosaries result of a lifelong passion (Catholic Caucus)
After rosary campaign, Florida sheriff abruptly shuts down abortion clinic on Marian feast
Public Rosary in San Francisco to draw thousands [Catholic Caucus]
Chicago's Incredible Floating Rosary
Enourmous Rosary floats over Chicago
Surprised by the Joyful Mysteries (of the Rosary) [Catholic Caucus]
HISTORY OF THE ROSARY [Catholic/Orthodox Caucus]

The Rosary-a tool for evangelization [Catholic Caucus]
OUR LADY AND HEAVEN’S PEACE PLAN (Say the Rosary) [Ecumenical]
[CATHOLIC/ORTHODOX CAUCUS] 5th Joyful Mystery: The Finding in the Temple (Patristic Rosary)
[CATHOLIC/ORTHODOX CAUCUS] 4th Joyful Mystery: The Presentation (Patristic Rosary)
[CATHOLIC/ORTHODOX CAUCUS] 3rd Joyful Mystery: The Nativity (Patristic Rosary)
Praying the Holy Rosary in October
[CATHOLIC/ORTHODOX CAUCUS] 2nd Joyful Mystery: The Visitation (Patristic Rosary)
[CATHOLIC/ORTHODOX CAUCUS] 1st Joyful Mystery: The Annuniciation (Patristic Rosary)
[CATHOLIC CAUCUS] On the Rosary
Lists Every Catholic Should be Familiar With: 15 [20] Mysteries of the Holy Rosary & When They Are Prayed

It Was the Rosary: Mainz Priest Talks About His Vocation
Rosary to Halt Construction of NYC Mosque (Catholic Caucus)
British Soldier Shot in Afghanistan is Saved by His ROSARY...Like His Great-Grandfather in WWII
Catholic Caucus: Rosary Beads Saved My Life, British Soldier Says
British soldier shot in Afghanistan is saved my his ROSARY
Rosary returned to Vietnam vet as pledged 44 years ago
Rosary for the Bishop celebrates six months of prayer, global expansion
Rosary Rallies for Priests Give Final Flourish to Their Special Year (ECUMENICAL)
The Unseen Power of the Rosary
Worldwide Rosary Relay to Offer Prayer for Priests

Boy Suspended For Rosary -- Reinstated
NY school sued after teen suspended over rosary
Student Suspended for Wearing Rosary Beads
[CATHOLIC CAUCUS] The 3:30 Beads!
Catholic Biblical Apologetics: Private Devotions to Mary: The Rosary
Benedict XVI Promotes Rosary in Fatima [Catholic Caucus]
Archbishop Naumann, Bishop Finn Lead Mother's Day Rosary at Planned Parenthood
Did the Apostles Pray the Rosary? (First Novena to the Holy Spirit?) [Catholic Caucus]
The Importance of the Meditated Holy Rosary -- What the Popes have to say [Catholic Caucus]
A Ladder from Earth to Heaven: The Rosary for All Christians

Jesus is in the Holy Rosary
The Rosary, a powerful weapon against the devil
History of The Scriptural Rosary [Ecumenical]
The Lord Is with Thee
Rosary of Our Lady's Tears(Catholic Prayer Thread)
The Rosary and Me - Catholic/Orthodox Caucus
Rosary promoted as path to Christ and peace [at third annual Rosary Bowl NW]
The Efficacy and Power of One Hail Mary [Ecumenical]
“ Let Us Do It!“ (Sunday: Rosary to be simultaneously prayed on five continents)
The Fruits of the Mysteries of the Rosary

[Catholic Caucus] One Million Rosaries
The Family Rosary [Try it for Lent!] (Catholic Caucus)
History of the Scriptural Rosary - Meditating on The Word
Rosary Resurgence [Ecumenical]
Beginning Catholic: How to Pray the Rosary: Contemplating Christ With Mary [Ecumenical]
[Oregon] Rosary Bowl focuses on links between prayer, evangelization
Praying the Rosary By Bishop Fulton J. Sheen(Catholic Caucus)
Rosary-Prayers Aiming to Break Record [Catholic Caucus]
Rosary vs. Repetitious Prayer [Ecumenical]
The Luminous Mysteries [of the Rosary]: Knowing Jesus in His Public Ministry

Rosary Is a School of Mary, Says Pope: Encourages Recitation [Catholic/Orthodox Caucus]
New campaign launched to promote family rosary
The Rosary and the Republic
Chant the Rosary... in Latin!
(...)and the rosary
Estimated 50,000 recite rosary in event at Rose Bowl
Our Lady of Victory (HLI Page)
Rosary to Mark St. Martha's Feast
Pray the Rosary
Rosary Aids Spiritual Growth, Says Pope


Image Detail

Remembering Lepanto
The Battle that Saved the Christian West (October 7, 1571: Battle of Lepanto)
Battle of Lepanto: Armada of the Cross
Remember Lepanto
How Europe Escaped Speaking Arabic
Bishop compares election to Battle of Lepanto
Bishop compares election to Battle of Lepanto
The Battle of Lepanto
Civilization in the Balance: The Battle of Lepanto and Election ‘08
LEPANTO

A Call To Prayer: This Lepanto Moment [Repost]
Lepanto, 1571: The Battle That Saved Europe
Celebrating the Battle of Lepanto
Clash of civilizations: Battle of Lepanto revisited
Lepanto, Bertone e Battesimo, Oh My!
Lepanto Sunday
Our Lady of the Rosary of La Naval (A Mini-Lepanto in the Philippines)
Swiss Guards at the Battle of Lepanto, 7 October 1571
Battle of Lepanto
LEPANTO, 7 OCTOBER 1571: The Defense of Europe

Battle of Lepanto
Remember Lepanto!
The Battle of Lepanto
On This Day In History, The Battle of Lepanto
The Battle of Lepanto
Chesterton's Lepanto
The Miracle At Lepanto...
Lepanto
The Naval Battle of Lepanto
The Battle of Lepanto

9 posted on 10/20/2013 9:31:08 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
October 2013

Pope's Intentions

People in Despair: That those feeling so crushed by life that they wish to end it may sense the nearness of God's love.

World Mission Day: That the celebration of World Mission Day may help all Christians realize that we are not only receivers but proclaimers of God's word.

10 posted on 10/20/2013 9:32:12 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Salvation

http://dailygospel.org/main.php?language=AM&module=commentary&localdate=20131021
Monday of the Twenty-ninth week in Ordinary Time
Commentary of the day
Isaac the Syrian (7th century), monk near Mosul, saint of the Orthodox churches
Ascetical discourses, 1st series, no. 38
“This night your life will be demanded of you”
O Lord, make me worthy of renouncing my own life for the life that is yours. The life of this world is like that of those who serve as letters for making up words. But the life of the world to come is like something written without a single mistake in books sealed with the royal seal in which there is nothing to add and nothing missing. And so, so long as we are in the midst of change, let us pay attention to ourselves. So long as we have control over the manuscript of our lives, over what we have written with our own hands, let us strive to add to it whatever good we have done and erase the mistakes of our former behavior. So long as we are in this world God does not set his seal on either good or evil. He does so only at the moment of our passing when our work has been accomplished, at the time we are about to leave.

As Saint Ephrem says: we must imagine our souls as being like a ship ready for the voyage but not knowing when the wind will come, or like an army that does not know when the trumpet will sound to call to battle. If this is what he says about the ship and the army waiting for something that will possibly never happen, how much more should we not prepare ourselves before that day comes suddenly, before the bridge is lowered and the harbor of the new world opened. May Christ, the mediator of our life, grant we may be ready.


11 posted on 10/20/2013 9:37:36 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Monday, October 21, 2013
Weekday
First Reading:
Psalm:
Gospel:
Romans 4:20-25
Luke 1:69-75
Luke 12:13-21

My eyes are ever towards the Lord: for He shall pluck my feet out of the snare: look Thou upon me, and have mercy on me; for I am alone and poor.

-- Psalm xxiv. 15,16


12 posted on 10/20/2013 9:46:14 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Just A Minute Just A Minute (Listen)
Some of EWTN's most popular hosts and guests in a collection of one minute inspirational messages. A different message each time you click.

13 posted on 10/20/2013 9:52:37 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All



The Angelus 

The Angel of the Lord declared to Mary: 
And she conceived of the Holy Spirit. 

Hail Mary, full of grace, the Lord is with thee; blessed art thou among women and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus.
Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners, now and at the hour of our death. Amen. 

Behold the handmaid of the Lord: Be it done unto me according to Thy word. 

Hail Mary . . . 

And the Word was made Flesh: And dwelt among us. 

Hail Mary . . . 


Pray for us, O Holy Mother of God, that we may be made worthy of the promises of Christ. 

Let us pray: 

Pour forth, we beseech Thee, O Lord, Thy grace into our hearts; that we, to whom the incarnation of Christ, Thy Son, was made known by the message of an angel, may by His Passion and Cross be brought to the glory of His Resurrection, through the same Christ Our Lord.

Amen. 


14 posted on 10/20/2013 9:59:16 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Salvation

Thank you for posts. Amen


15 posted on 10/20/2013 11:17:00 PM PDT by johngrace (I am a 1 John 4! Christian- declared at every Sunday Mass , Divine Mercy and Rosary prayers!)
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To: johngrace

You’re so welcome. It’s great to be back.


16 posted on 10/21/2013 7:53:11 AM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Salvation

You got the ole computer running. Lol


17 posted on 10/21/2013 7:53:54 AM PDT by johngrace (I am a 1 John 4! Christian- declared at every Sunday Mass , Divine Mercy and Rosary prayers!)
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To: johngrace

No, it’s a brand new one. Struggling with a new OS, though.


18 posted on 10/21/2013 7:55:47 AM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Salvation

Information:

Feast Day: October 21
Born: 291 at Gaza, Palestine
Died: 371 at Cyprus

Read more: http://www.ewtn.com/saintsHoly/saints/H/sthilarion.asp#ixzz2iMvFQOzy


19 posted on 10/21/2013 7:58:23 AM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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http://wf-f.org/05-3-WomenSaints.html
The Women Saints of Britain

Saint Margaret Chitheroe
by Joanna Bogle
If a group of Catholics in Britain was asked to name some female saints, it is likely that the first names that came to mind would not be British ones. Probably, an initial list would produce names like Bernadette of Lourdes, Thérèse of Lisieux, Margaret-Marie Alacoque, Teresa of Avila, Catherine of Sienna, Claire of Assisi.

But, as an English Catholic, I have become increasingly interested in the women saints who lived in my country, spoke my language, and have a special message for Catholic women today who seek to uphold the Faith amid many pressures. They include Anne Line, Margaret Clitheroe, and Margaret Ward, all martyred during the Reformation period for their loyal adherence to the Catholic Church and the pope. All were canonized by Pope Paul VI in 1970. The first of these, Anne Line, is a Christmas martyr, in that she was arrested on Candlemas Day and met her death soon afterward. And she is a London saint, which strikes a chord with me as a fellow Londoner.

Saint Anne Line
A while ago, a friend contacted me and said, “we ought to find out about Anne Line!” She had learned something of her story and wanted to know more. We set out together by car from my house in the southern suburbs and — after, I’m afraid, a couple of dreadful muddles — we eventually arrived at Dunmow in Essex on the other side of London, where Anne, who was martyred in 1601, is honored.

She grew up at Dunmow, the daughter of William Heigham, who was a staunch supporter of Calvinist doctrines, and who disowned both her and her brother when they announced their conversion to Catholicism as young adults. Anne married a fellow convert, Roger Line, but their time together was short, as not long after the wedding he was arrested for attending Mass — at that time a serious offense — and exiled. He died abroad in 1594.

Anne devoted the rest of her life to harboring priests and making arrangements for them to say Mass. It is thanks to women of her caliber that the Faith was preserved in England, and the risks she took were great. Eventually, she was arrested when she had arranged for Mass to be celebrated by a Jesuit, Father Francis Page, in her house. It was Candlemas Day, 1601. Tried at the Old Bailey, she was hanged on February 27, 1601, affirming her faith and refusing to express regret at having helped a priest.

Today, there are two churches in Essex named after Anne Line — both modern and very ugly, but with real devotion to the saint. On our little pilgrimage, we visited both of these, met with great friendliness — cups of tea, warm welcome from clergy and from various parishioners who were about — and realized that there is a genuine local cult that reflects a real gratitude for the gift of the Catholic Faith that has been passed on to us.

Saint Margaret Clitheroe
In the north of England, a shrine in York welcomes pilgrims who want to honor the memory of Saint Margaret Clitheroe. “The Pearl of York”, born Margaret Middleton, was the daughter of a candlemaker who was also Sheriff of York. She was not raised a Catholic but became one shortly after her marriage to John Clitheroe, a wealthy butcher. He was not a Catholic, but had a brother who was a priest.

Margaret and John were a devoted couple. In addition to raising their children, Margaret began instructing a number of others in the Faith, and providing facilities for priests, including her brother-in-law, to say Mass. In York, a little house in The Shambles, a butcher’s shop over which the Clitheroe family lived, now honors the memory of all of this.

Eventually, Margaret’s work was discovered and she was arrested. Rather than have her children forced to give evidence against her, or lie in her defense, she chose not to plead before the court, and was sentenced to be pressed to death as a punishment for this. It was a slow and cruel death as weights were loaded on to a board, which crushed her down.

Her courage and faith drew admiration from many, and significance was seen in the fact that the date of her death was Good Friday. Her husband was devastated by her death: “Let them take all I have and save only her, she is the best wife in all England, and the best Catholic”. Their daughter became a nun and both sons became priests.

Saint Margaret Ward
Saint Margaret Ward is a London martyr whose story is bound up with the River Thames and the grim Tower that stands on its banks. She lived for a while in Whitehall and, using her good political and social connections, was able to visit the Tower of London where a priest, Father William Watson, was imprisoned. She made arrangements for him to escape and provided a rope, enlisting the help of a boatman, John Roche.

Roche switched clothes with the priest as part of the escape plan, and Father Watson was able to get away — but Roche and Margaret were later arrested and imprisoned. Margaret was subjected to a hideous torture, being flogged and hung up by her wrists, her toes just occasionally able to touch the ground, so that eventually some of her limbs dislocated and she became partially paralyzed. After a brief trial, she was executed at Newgate. Her story was recorded partly due to the hero priest Father Robert Southwell, who was later himself to undergo similar cruelties before being hanged, drawn, and quartered.

Today, the place-names have not changed and even the streets still follow the same routes that Margaret Ward, Margaret Clitheroe, and Anne Line knew. The Thames still flows through London past the Tower. But Catholics are free to practice their faith, and the names of these women martyrs ought to be honored by all who share the Faith for which they suffered.

As women, they have a particular message for us, especially in these days when we are frequently told that women should feel oppressed by the Church as they are not able to be ordained as priests. These courageous women martyrs from long ago — who like us were also busy with homes and family responsibilities, knew that loyalty to the Catholic Church — to the pope in Rome, and to the truths of an unchanging Faith is fundamental. They did not feel that the Church oppressed them: on the contrary, the truths taught by the Catholic Church were glorious and spoke of eternity, of a covenant made by God with His people and cherished down through the centuries. Now they are enjoying the “Marriage Feast of the Lamb” in Heaven, we could ask their intercession for our work as Catholic women today.

Our present Pope Benedict needs our loyalty and our prayers. No one is going to imprison or torture us for our loyalty to Rome, for going to Mass and for affirming our allegiance to the teachings of our Church.

Sometimes, we may find that we are hurt by attacks on the Church, by media distortions of basic teachings, by insults hurled at the pope, by crude jokes or simply by silly remarks from people who have not bothered to discover what Catholicism is really all about. Before we allow any of this to disturb our commitment to the Faith we might remember the courage of these women martyrs.

________________________________________
Joanna Bogle, a contributing editor of Voices, writes from London. She is a well known author and journalist, who writes and lectures on issues of the Catholic faith, and appears frequently on the radio.
________________________________________
Editor note:
Saint Margaret Chitheroe
Martyr – ca 1556 – March 25, 1586
Feast day – March 26 (United Kingdom)
Margeret Clitherow (or Clitheroe) was born in York, England in about 1556, two years before the reign of Elizabeth I began . In 1571, Margaret married John Clitherow, a wealthy butcher and a chamberlain of the city. Though her husband belonged to the Church of England, he had a brother who was a Catholic priest and Margaret became a Catholic a few years after their marriage. She hid priests from the authorities during this time of persecution of Catholics. Some of the priests were martyred.

On March 10, 1586, Margaret was arrested for harboring priests, attending Mass, etc. She refused to plead, as the only witnesses against her would be her own young children and servants, whom she could not bear to involve in the trial. She was condemned to be pressed to death. “God be thanked, I am not worthy of so good a death as this”, she said. Although she was probably with child at the time, this horrible sentence was carried out on March 25 (Feast of the Annunciation), 1586. She was laid on the ground, a sharp stone beneath her back, her hands stretched out in the form of a cross and bound to two posts. A door was placed on her, which was weighted down with stones until she was crushed to death. Her last words during an agony of fifteen minutes, were “Jesu! Jesu! Jesu! have mercy on me!”

Her sons Henry and William became priests, and her daughter Anne entered Saint Ursula’s convent in Louvain, Belgium. The biography of Margaret Clitherow, was written by her confessor, John Mush.

She was canonized by Pope Paul VI in 1970 as one of the forty martyrs of England and Wales. Her feast day is March 26


20 posted on 10/21/2013 8:08:12 AM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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http://holyspiritinteractive.net/kids/saints/1021_hilarion.asp
St. Hilarion

Feast Day: October 21
Born: 291 :: Died: 371

Hilarion was born at Tabatha, south of Gaza in Palestine. He was the son of Pagan parents who did not believe in God. When he was a teenager he left his home in Palestine to study in Alexandria in Egypt.

There at the age of 15, he learned about the Christian faith, and soon was baptized. His conversion started him out on a glorious journey leading him closer to God. Before long, he was off to visit the famous St. Anthony of Egypt in the desert.

Hilarion wanted to be alone to serve Jesus, whom he had just come to love. He stayed two months with St. Anthony, but it was not quiet enough there for him.

Many people came to St. Anthony for help. Hilarion could not find the peace he was looking for, so he left. After giving everything he had to the poor, he went into the wilderness to live alone as a hermit.

He wore a shirt made of hair and skins and a short shepherd’s cloak. He fasted during the day and had a small meal after sunset. He supported himself by weaving baskets but spent the rest of his time in prayer.

Hilarion faced many temptations and at times he felt that God did not hear his prayers at all. But he did not let these temptations stop him from praying even harder.
After twenty years in the desert, the holy man worked his first miracle. He was also able to drive demons out of people.

Soon many people began coming to his hut to beg his help. Several men asked him to let them stay with him to learn from him how to pray and do penance.

In his great love for God and people, the saint invited them to stay. But finally, when he was sixty-five, he began to travel. He went from one country to another in search of peace and quiet.

However, the fame of his miracles of mercy always brought crowds of visitors. A few years before his death in 371, Hilarian finally found a lonely cave in Cyprus and at last felt that he was truly alone with God. He was eighty years old when he died


21 posted on 10/21/2013 8:12:26 AM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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CATHOLIC ALMANAC

Monday, October 21

Liturgical Color: Green

Today the Church honors St. Margaret
Clitherow, one of the Martyrs of
England. Because she hid priests and
allowed Masses to be said on her
property during a time of persecution,
she was pressed to death at Tyburn in 1556.

22 posted on 10/21/2013 3:33:28 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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http://www.catholicculture.org/culture/liturgicalyear/calendar/day.cfm?date=2013-10-21

Daily Readings for:October 21, 2013
(Readings on USCCB website)

Collect: Almighty ever-living God, grant that we may always conform our will to yours and serve your majesty in sincerity of heart. Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son, who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.
RECIPES

o Ancient Roman Fava Bean Dip
o Skewered Beef Roman Style
o Spiedino Romano
ACTIVITIES

o Religion in the Home for Elementary School: October
o Religion in the Home for Preschool: October
o What is a Nameday?
PRAYERS

o Collect for Feast of St. Ursula
o
o Ordinary Time: October 21st
o Monday of the Twenty Ninth Week of Ordinary Time
o
Old Calendar: St. Hilarion (Hilary), abbot; Saints Ursula and companions, virgins and martyrs

According to the 1962 Missal of Bl. John XXIII the Extraordinary Form of the Roman Rite, today is the feast of St. Hilarion, who was born of pagan parents near Gaza in Palestine toward the close of the third century. He studied at Alexandria and became a Christian at the age of 15. Following the example of St. Anthony in Egypt, Hilarion resolved to become a hermit in the desert, and Anthony himself trained the youth. He gave all his possessions to the poor, and became the father of monasticism in Palestine and Syria, famous for his miracles and sanctity. He lived to be over 80, dying on the island of Cyprus in 372.

This date is also the commemoration of St. Ursula and her companions. In medieval times her legend developed into many versions; but all that may be said with certainty of these martyrs is that they suffered martyrdom at or near Cologne, and were sufficiently well known to have had a church built in their honor during the fourth century.

________________________________________
Sts. Ursula and Companions
According to a legend that appeared in the tenth century, Ursula was the daughter of a Christian King in Britain and was granted a three-year postponement of a marriage she did not wish to a pagan prince. With ten ladies in waiting, each attended by a thousand maidens, she embarked on a voyage across the North Sea, sailed up the Rhine to Basle, Switzerland, and then went to Rome. On their way back they were all massacred by pagan Huns at Cologne in about 451 when Ursula refused to marry their chieftain.

According to another legend, America was settled by British colonizers and soldiers after Emperor Magnus Clemens Maximus conquered Britain and Gaul in 383. The ruler of the settlers, Cynan Meiriadog, called on King Dionotus of Cornwall for wives for the settlers, whereupon Dionotus sent his daughter Ursula, who was to marry Cynan, with eleven thousand noble maidens and sixty thousand common women. Their fleet was shipwrecked and all the women were enslaved or murdered.
The legends are pious fictions, but what is true is that one Clematius, a senator, rebuilt a basilica in Cologne that had originally been built, probably at the beginning of the fourth century, to honor a group of virgins who had been martyred at Cologne. They were evidently venerated enough to have had a church built in their honor, but who they were and how many of them there were are unknown. From these meager facts, the legend of Ursula grew and developed.

Excerpted from Dictionary of Saints, John J. Delaney

The 11,000 number probably resulted from a misreading of the term “11M” which indicated 11 Martyrs, but which a copyist took for a Roman numeral. St. Ursula is the namesake for the Ursuline Order, founded for the education of young Catholic girls and women.

Patron: Catholic education (especially of girls); Cologne, Germany; educators; holy death; schoolchildren; students; teachers; Ursuline order.

Symbols: Large mantle lined with ermine; two arrows; three arrows; dove; book; ship; white banner charged with red cross; book and arrow; crown; pilgrim’s staff; arrow and furled banner; clock; maiden shot with arrows, often accompanied by a varied number of companions who are being martyred in assorted, often creative ways.

Things to Do:

• Read a more detailed account of St. Ursula and her companions in the Catholic Encyclopedia.
• Take a few minutes to view the beautiful paintings from the life of St. Ursula by Vittore Carpaccio at the Web Gallery of Art. If you are really into art you might also look at Hans Memling’s Saint Ursula Shrine at the same site.
________________________________________
St. Hilarion

St. Hilary was born at Tabatha near Gaza, Palestine, in the year 291. His pagan parents sent him, while still a youth, to study at Alexandria. He was remarkable for his diligence and good manners, and he shortly became a convert to Christianity, making great progress in faith and charity. He was zealous in visiting churches, in fasting and prayer, in scorning all earthly joys and pleasures. Lured by the fame of St. Anthony, Egypt’s illustrious hermit, he entered the desert and for two months remained his disciple. While absent, his parents died. Now Hilary gave all he had to the poor, and although hardly fifteen years old (306), he returned to the desert, built a little hut scarcely large enough to accommodate himself, and slept on the bare ground.

Most of his time was spent in reading and in meditating upon holy Scripture. A few figs and a little soup from herbs sufficed for his nourishment, but this he never took before the setting of the sun. Because of his mortifications and humility, he triumphed over fierce assaults by the evil one and healed many who were possessed. After founding numerous hermitages (he had two thousand followers) and working countless miracles, he became ill at the age of eighty. In his last agony he encouraged himself by saying: “Go thither, my soul, why do you fear? Why do you tremble? Seventy years you have served Christ, and now you fear death?” The day of Hilary’s death is given as October 21, 371. His grave is on the island of Cyprus. St. Jerome wrote the life of the holy hermit twenty years after his death.

Excerpted from The Church’s Year of Grace, Pius Parsch

Symbols: Hour glass; basket; dragon.

Things to Do:
• Read St. Jerome’s Life of St. Hilarion written in 390.


23 posted on 10/21/2013 3:54:44 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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http://www.regnumchristi.org/english/articulos/articulo.phtml?se=363&ca=975&te=735&id=20302
Bigger Barns?
| SPIRITUAL LIFE | SPIRITUALITY

Monday of the Twenty-Ninth Week in Ordinary Time

Father Steven Reilly, LC

Luke 12:13-21

Someone in the crowd said to Jesus, “Teacher, tell my brother to share the inheritance with me.” He replied to him, “Friend, who appointed me as your judge and arbitrator?” Then he said to the crowd, “Take care to guard against all greed, for though one may be rich, one´s life does not consist of possessions.” Then he told them a parable. “There was a rich man whose land produced a bountiful harvest. He asked himself, ´What shall I do, for I do not have space to store my harvest?´ And he said, ´This is what I shall do: I shall tear down my barns and build larger ones. There I shall store all my grain and other goods and I shall say to myself, “Now as for you, you have so many good things stored up for many years, rest, eat, drink, be merry!” But God said to him, ´You fool, this night your life will be demanded of you; and the things you have prepared, to whom will they belong?´ Thus will it be for the one who stores up treasure for himself but is not rich in what matters to God.”

Introductory Prayer: O God, I come to you today with all my human frailty. You know me better than I know myself. I am in your presence to accompany and console you, not to seek consolation or a nice feeling for myself. Even if I get distracted during our time together, I offer myself to you completely.

Petition: Lord, give me wisdom to understand what is truly important in this life.

1. The Scorecard of Life: Driving down the road, a bumper sticker is often seen: “The one who dies with the most toys wins.” This is a contemporary rendition of the mantra of Jesus’ rich fool: “Eat, drink and be merry.” Juggling credit cards and all kinds of financing schemes, many people live life like the rich fool in today’s Gospel. Is the drive for material pleasure, or security, impoverishing my soul?

2. A Bigger Barn vs. a Bigger Heart: What will truly make us happy? Glossy magazine ads are, for some, a source of inspiration on this point. Basically, they are about “bigger barns”: a hotter car, redder lipstick, spectacular vacations. The rich fool believes that by increasing his capacity for material pleasure, he will be happier. But it’s an illusion. Like the running wheel for a gerbil, it is lots of movement without getting anywhere. We invest energy and effort acquiring things, but the bigger barn brings us little joy. That’s because our hearts — not our barns — are what really need to be enlarged. Our heart longs for love. That Augustinian restlessness will never leave us in peace until we have encountered the Lord who loves us and discovered him in the relationships ordained by his providence.

3. When the Final Curtain Is Drawn: At the end of this parable, Jesus in essence says, “You can’t take it with you.” There’s a place in Rome in which this is graphically depicted. The Capuchin church of St Mary of the Immaculate Conception, on Via Veneto, is affectionately known as the “Bone Church.” Inside there is an amazingly designed and arranged display made completely out of the bones of four thousand Capuchin friars! While it may strike at modern sensitivities as somewhat morbid, like today’s Gospel it teaches an important lesson. All those bones look alike. Unless you are a forensic expert, you cannot tell who was fat or thin, smart or dull, handsome or homely. Death is the great leveler. Earthly advantages dissolve. Material goods stay in this world. We go to the Lord to render an account of our lives at death. As the little sign on the wall of the Capuchin ossarium says, “One day, we were like you. One day, you will be like us.”

Conversation with Christ: Lord Jesus, so often I find my eyes looking on the good things of this world more as ends than means. I need to keep my priorities straight always: you first and then everything else, inasmuch as they lead me to you. Give me the wisdom to realize that life is short and it must be lived for you alone.

Resolution: I will live charity today as fervently as if I knew this day were my last.


24 posted on 10/21/2013 4:09:46 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Marriage = One Man and One Woman Til' Death Do Us Part

Daily Marriage Tip for October 21, 2013:

Do you know the names of the people on your street? Who is home when? The more you know your neighbors, the better they can be extra eyes, ears, and a helpful hand to your children. Be those eyes for your neighbor’s children too.

25 posted on 10/21/2013 4:30:31 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Salvation

Rich Toward God

by Food For Thought on October 21, 2013 •

Everyone needs provisions – call it a salary, a home, presentable clothes, health insurance, etc. God knows we need these things while we live here on earth; in fact, He promised us that He would take care of all our needs if we seek His righteousness first (Luke 12:31). The Lord is not teaching us to shun working for a good living in this parable.

What He is concerned about is the disposition of our hearts regarding wealth. What is truly valuable to us? And how do we relate our wealth to God?

From the parable we can see that the rich man’s every waking moment revolved around amassing wealth. It defined him as a person, and governed the way he planned his life. He even came to the conclusion that life was “good” because he was very rich. But he was wrong – the moment he died, all the wealth he had accumulated was given to someone else. His life’s work came to nothing, making him a fool in God’s eyes.

We have to look at ourselves soberly, and identify those things that we treasure. Have these things become our standard, our reason for being? Could we live without them? Remember, you can’t take them with you when you leave this world.

Let us make sure that when we stand before the Lord, we do not bog down our relationship with Him by just talking about money, the way the man in the crowd was doing. He is telling us, “Watch out!” to make sure that our need for provision does not turn into a love for provision. Let us instead be rich toward God, treasuring our closeness to Him most of all.


26 posted on 10/21/2013 4:45:09 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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One Bread, One Body

<< Monday, October 21, 2013 >>

Romans 4:20-25
View Readings
Luke 1:69-75 Luke 12:13-21

INDEPENDENCE DAY

“I will say to myself: You have blessings in reserve for years to come. Relax!” —Luke 12:19

The man in today’s Gospel was already rich (Lk 12:16). He had several grain bins on his property (Lk 12:18). It had been a year since his last harvest, and still he had no room to store this year’s harvest. Therefore, his grain bins contained at least a year’s foodstores in reserve. Then he “had a good harvest” (Lk 12:16), so large he was bursting at the seams. God blessed this man in ways foretold by the prophets (see Am 9:13-14; Is 30:23-25).
This man’s speech reveals his heart (Lk 6:45). Though rich, he was worried about his future. He could have thanked God for a bountiful harvest; instead, he told himself he was finally financially secure enough to “relax” (Lk 12:19). He could have shared his plenty with the hungry, thus growing rich for God. Instead, he only thought of growing rich for himself (Lk 12:21).

The man rejoiced most of all because he trusted in his reserves rather than in God. When deciding how to handle his harvest, he consulted himself rather than God. Now he would be self-sufficient, independent of a God he never thanks or mentions. His actions and words show he does not trust the very God Who continues to bless him so abundantly, Who cannot be outgiven, and Who continues to provide for him. In His mercy, God reserved a place for this man and all others who insist upon being independent of God “for years to come” (Lk 12:19). It’s called hell.
Some of us could also fall into this “trap” of desiring to be secure for the rest of our life (1 Tm 6:9). Repent! Trust in God alone.

Prayer: Father, I trust You alone for my daily needs (Mt 6:11). May I never turn from You in times of prosperity (Prv 30:7-9).

Promise: “Our faith will be credited to us also if we believe in Him Who raised Jesus our Lord from the dead.” —Rm 4:24

Praise: After nursing a grudge and judging his in-laws for seventeen years, John finally forgave them.


27 posted on 10/21/2013 5:02:36 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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"As a mother comforts her child, so will I comfort you . . ."

28 posted on 10/21/2013 5:21:24 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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