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Slovenia celebrates Reformation Day - the begining of slovenian literature
RTV SLO ^ | 31. October 2013 | Korab Jorgacieski, Radio Si

Posted on 10/31/2013 6:40:27 AM PDT by Alex Murphy

Reformation Day is a public holiday in Slovenia. It's dedicated to the Reformation and Protestant movement which gave the first printed book in Slovenian language.

In 1550 Primož Trubar, a Protestant priest, published his Abecedarium spelling book and Catechism in Slovenian language. The day has been observed as a bank holiday since 1992. The main ceremony ahead of the event was held yesterday in Kranj.

On the eve of the holiday another one of Trubar's most important works was revealed. The Slovenian Academy of Sciences and Arts presented pictures of a preserved copy of Primož Trubar’s "Cerkovna ordninga". It was sent by German experts and discovered in a library south of Hannover. It was released in 1564 in Tübingen and will be on display next year in June. Before it was believed that only one copy remained intact in the Vatican.


TOPICS: History; Mainline Protestant; Religion & Politics; Worship
KEYWORDS: reformationday
Reformation Day is a public holiday in Slovenia. It's dedicated to the Reformation and Protestant movement which gave the first printed book in Slovenian language. In 1550 Primož Trubar, a Protestant priest, published his Abecedarium spelling book and Catechism in Slovenian language. The day has been observed as a bank holiday since 1992. The main ceremony ahead of the event was held yesterday in Kranj.
1 posted on 10/31/2013 6:40:28 AM PDT by Alex Murphy
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To: Alex Murphy

Maybe this somehow offsets what was done to the Prussian and Cornish languages by Protestantism. Maybe. No, not really.


2 posted on 10/31/2013 8:05:50 AM PDT by vladimir998
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To: vladimir998

Okay, never heard this one before. What’s your conspiracy theory about how evil Protestants wiped out those languages?


3 posted on 10/31/2013 8:14:56 AM PDT by Boogieman
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To: Alex Murphy
Religions:

Catholic 57.8%, Muslim 2.4%, Orthodox 2.3%, other Christian 0.9%, unaffiliated 3.5%, other or unspecified 23%, none 10.1% (2002 census)


National and bank holidays in Slovenia:

- 1 January: New Year
- 8 February: Slovenian cultural festival – Prešeren Day
- 31 March: Easter
- 1 April: Easter Monday
- 27 April: Uprising Against the Occupation Day
- 1 and 2 May: Labour Day
- 25 June: National Day
- 15 August: Feast of the Assumption
- 17 August: Merging of Prekmurje Slovenians with the rest of Slovenia after World War I (not a bank holiday)
- 15 September: Merging of Primorska with the rest of Slovenia (not a bank holiday)
- 31 October: Reformation Day
- 1 November: All Saints Day
- 23 November: Rudolf Maister Day (not a bank holiday)
- 25 December: Christmas
- 26 December: Independence and Unity Day


Awfully ecumenical of that Papist majority authorizing a Protestant Holy Day...(I sure as heck wouldn't)

4 posted on 10/31/2013 9:09:07 AM PDT by markomalley (Nothing emboldens the wicked so greatly as the lack of courage on the part of the good -- Leo XIII)
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To: Boogieman

No conspiracy theory at all. Look up the Prayerbook Rebellion.

Because I am in a hurry I’ll have to rely on Wikipedia:

Many escaped, including Arundell, who fled to Launceston. There, he was later to be captured and taken to London with Wynslade, who was caught at Bodmin. In total, over 5,500 people lost their lives in the rebellion. Further orders were issued on behalf of the king by the Lord Protector the Duke of Somerset and Archbishop Thomas Cranmer for the continuance of the onslaught. Under Sir Anthony Kingston, English and mercenary forces then moved throughout Devon and into Cornwall and executed or killed many people before the bloodshed finally ceased. Proposals to translate the Prayer Book into Cornish were also suppressed.
The loss of life in the Prayer Book Rebellion and subsequent reprisals as well as the introduction of the English Prayer Book is seen as a turning point in the Cornish language, for which – unlike Welsh — a complete bible translation was not produced. Research has also suggested that, prior to the rebellion, the Cornish language had strengthened and more concessions had been made to Cornwall as a “nation”, and that anti-English sentiment had been growing stronger, providing additional impetus for the rebellion.[19] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prayer_Book_Rebellion#Aftermath


5 posted on 10/31/2013 10:51:38 AM PDT by vladimir998
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To: vladimir998

So, inter-ethnic hostilities between neighbors are now the fault of Protestantism? Can we similarly blame Catholicism when their followers go and commit some unneighborly atrocities?


6 posted on 10/31/2013 11:57:00 AM PDT by Boogieman
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To: Boogieman

“So, inter-ethnic hostilities between neighbors are now the fault of Protestantism?”

It was not inter-ethnic so much as inter-religious. There was no notable problem before the Anglican Church.

“Can we similarly blame Catholicism when their followers go and commit some unneighborly atrocities?”

No. There you would have to blame Catholics, not Catholicism for Catholicism had no problem with any particular ethnic group, but Protestantism in several cases did because of the differences in religion and the rise of the heretical/schismatic nation state. Look at Ireland, for instance. The English (really the Anglo-Normans) invaded. Both the English and the Irish were Catholics. They celebrated the same holy days, honored the same pope, and held to the same doctrines. Only when the English became Protestants did their war against the Irish really turn genocidal. Scottish Presbyterians were brought in by the thousands to oust Catholics from their ancestral homes and farms. The Irish language was banned - and that still comes up as an issue even now: http://www.belfasttelegraph.co.uk/news/local-national/high-court-challenge-over-irish-language-ban-fails-28486155.html The Protestants (and it has to be PROTESTANTS because you can’t just say only the English nor only the Scots - they were united in Protestantism even when from different sects) sought to destroy the Irish people as a people. I don’t believe that would have been the case unless Protestantism had come along and made the already separate peoples so much more divided and not just divided, but entirely different in world view, daily life, etc. For now the Irish - in their own country - were not just viewed as another people, but as a race that served Satan because the Irish were Catholics and the Protestants had creeds that said the pope was the anti-Christ.

Example: Westminster Confession of Faith (17th century):

VI. There is no other head of the Church but the Lord Jesus Christ: nor can the Pope of Rome in any sense be head thereof; but is that Antichrist, that man of sin and son of perdition, that exalteth himself in the Church against Christ, and all that is called God.

And they still do:

http://www.ianpaisley.org/antichrist.asp

People complain about excesses by inquisitors, and understandably so, but you will not find an official Catholic creed where a Church (any Protestant sect) or any Protestant leader or Protestant people is labeled as the anti-Christ. Now, if the pope is labeled as the anti-Christ, then his followers are the servants, even if unwittingly, of Satan. Right? That sure makes genocide easier to stomach doesn’t it? And that is EXACTLY what the Protestants believed.


7 posted on 10/31/2013 5:01:19 PM PDT by vladimir998
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To: markomalley

Note that Slovenia is one of the most atheistnations around. Spa Catholic protestant discussion about whattheycelebrate woyldnt affect them


8 posted on 11/02/2013 10:04:58 AM PDT by Cronos (Obama’s dislike of Assad is not based on Assad’s brutality but that he isn't a jihadi Moslem)
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