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Catholic Caucus: Sunday Mass Readings, 11-03-13, Thirty-first Sunday in Ordinary Time
USCCB.org/RNAB ^ | 11-03-13 | Revised New American Bible

Posted on 11/02/2013 8:36:11 PM PDT by Salvation

November 3, 2013

 

Thirty-first Sunday in Ordinary Time

 

 

Reading 1 Wis 11:22-12:2

Before the LORD the whole universe is as a grain from a balance
or a drop of morning dew come down upon the earth.
But you have mercy on all, because you can do all things;
and you overlook people's sins that they may repent.
For you love all things that are
and loathe nothing that you have made;
for what you hated, you would not have fashioned.
And how could a thing remain, unless you willed it;
or be preserved, had it not been called forth by you?
But you spare all things, because they are yours,
O LORD and lover of souls,
for your imperishable spirit is in all things!
Therefore you rebuke offenders little by little,
warn them and remind them of the sins they are committing,
that they may abandon their wickedness and believe in you, O LORD!

Responsorial Psalm Ps 145:1-2, 8-9, 10-11, 13, 14

R. (cf. 1) I will praise your name for ever, my king and my God.
I will extol you, O my God and King,
and I will bless your name forever and ever.
Every day will I bless you,
and I will praise your name forever and ever.
R. I will praise your name for ever, my king and my God.
The LORD is gracious and merciful,
slow to anger and of great kindness.
The LORD is good to all
and compassionate toward all his works.
R. I will praise your name for ever, my king and my God.
Let all your works give you thanks, O LORD,
and let your faithful ones bless you.
Let them discourse of the glory of your kingdom
and speak of your might.
R. I will praise your name for ever, my king and my God.
The LORD is faithful in all his words
and holy in all his works.
The LORD lifts up all who are falling
and raises up all who are bowed down.
R. I will praise your name for ever, my king and my God.

Reading 2 2 Thes 1:11-2:2

Brothers and sisters:
We always pray for you,
that our God may make you worthy of his calling
and powerfully bring to fulfillment every good purpose
and every effort of faith,
that the name of our Lord Jesus may be glorified in you,
and you in him,
in accord with the grace of our God and Lord Jesus Christ.

We ask you, brothers and sisters,
with regard to the coming of our Lord Jesus Christ
and our assembling with him,
not to be shaken out of your minds suddenly, or to be alarmed
either by a "spirit," or by an oral statement,
or by a letter allegedly from us
to the effect that the day of the Lord is at hand.

Gospel Lk 19:1-10

At that time, Jesus came to Jericho and intended to pass through the town.
Now a man there named Zacchaeus,
who was a chief tax collector and also a wealthy man,
was seeking to see who Jesus was;
but he could not see him because of the crowd,
for he was short in stature.
So he ran ahead and climbed a sycamore tree in order to see Jesus,
who was about to pass that way.
When he reached the place, Jesus looked up and said,
"Zacchaeus, come down quickly,
for today I must stay at your house."
And he came down quickly and received him with joy.
When they all saw this, they began to grumble, saying,
"He has gone to stay at the house of a sinner."
But Zacchaeus stood there and said to the Lord,
"Behold, half of my possessions, Lord, I shall give to the poor,
and if I have extorted anything from anyone
I shall repay it four times over."
And Jesus said to him,
"Today salvation has come to this house
because this man too is a descendant of Abraham.
For the Son of Man has come to seek
and to save what was lost."



TOPICS: Catholic; General Discusssion; Prayer; Worship
KEYWORDS: catholic; ordinarytime; prayer
For your reading, reflection, faith-sharing, comments, questions, discussion.

1 posted on 11/02/2013 8:36:12 PM PDT by Salvation
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To: nickcarraway; NYer; ELS; Pyro7480; livius; ArrogantBustard; Catholicguy; RobbyS; marshmallow; ...

Catholic Ping!


2 posted on 11/02/2013 8:42:13 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

From: Wisdom 11:22-12:2

God, almighty and merciful


[22] Because the whole world before thee is like a speck that tips the scales,
and like a drop of morning dew that falls upon the ground.
[23] But thou are merciful to all, for thou canst do all things,
and thou dost overlook men’s sins, that they may repent.
[24] For thou lovest all things that exist,
and hast loathing for none of the things which thou has made,
for though wouldst not have made anything if thou hadst hated it.
[25] How would anything have endured if thou hadst not willed it?
Or how would anything not called forth by thee have been preserved?
[26] Thou sparest all things, for they are thine,
O Lord who lovest the living.

[1] For thy immortal spirit is in all things,
[2] Therefore thou dost correct little by little those who trespass,
and dost remind and warn them of the things wherein they sin,
that they may be freed from wickedness and put their trust in thee, O Lord.

*********************************************************************************************
Commentary:

11:21-12:2. The lessons given here about God’s steadfast love and mercy to-
wards all created things are not anything new, of course (cf. Hos 6:4-6; Jon
3:1-4:11), but maybe there were never quite as forcefully put as here (especially
vv. 23-26), and the style of sapiential argument spells out very well the universal
range of God’s mercy towards sinful man and the love that is at work in creation
and in its conservation. St. Thomas deals with this subject with his typical clarity:
God would never have created something which he would then not love, for it
derives from him and participates in his supreme goodness, even if only to a tiny
degree: “God loves all living things. He does not love in the same way as we do,
for our will does not make things good; human love is a movement of the will to-
ward its object […]; the love of god creates and fills all things with goodness”
(Summa theologiae, 1, 20, 2).

Therefore, when God punishes man, as he sometimes does, his intention is
always one of love and mercy. It is this divine purpose that 11:23-26 takes plea-
sure in showing to be all-encompassing: God is all-powerful; nothing, no one,
can resist him; his mercy does not stem from any weakness on his part; it is the
effect of love: he loves the living.

Origen used this passage to draw lessons about God’s all-embracing love:
“Because we are his children, the Lord encourages us to develop the same atti-
tude, and teaches us to do good works for all mankind. For that is why He is
called the ‘saviour of all people, especially of those who believe in him’ (1 Tim
4:10), and his Christ the ‘expiation of ours ins, and the sins of the whole world’
(1 Jn 2:2)” (Contra Celsum, 4, 28).

St Gregory the Great, in his homilies to the people of Rome, exhorted them to
appreciate God’s unlimited love for sinners: “Here we read that he appeals to all
those who are stained with sin, and cries out to all those who have abandoned
him. Let us not spurn the hand of mercy that he holds out to us; let us not fail to
see the great value of the love the Lord has for us. In his kindness he calls out to
those who have lost their way, and he prepares a place for us, for when we return
to his heart of mercy. Let each person consider the debt that weighs him down –
and all the while God waits and never loses his patience with us. Let those who
chose not to stay with him return to him; let those who failed to appreciate his love
stand close by his side, so that they may be raised up”(Homiliae in Evangelia, 33).

The passage also underlines God’s loving providence towards all created beings.
The Catechism of the Catholic Church, 301 puts it as follows: “With creation, God
does not abandon his creatures to themselves. He not only gives them being and
existence, but also, and at every moment, upholds and substains them in being,
enables them to act and bring them to their final end. Recognizing this utter
dependence with respect to the Creator is a source of wisdom and freedom, of joy
and confidence.”

*********************************************************************************************
Source: “The Navarre Bible: Text and Commentaries”. Biblical text from the
Revised Standard Version and New Vulgate. Commentaries by members of
the Faculty of Theology, University of Navarre, Spain.

Published by Four Courts Press, Kill Lane, Blackrock, Co. Dublin, Ireland, and
by Scepter Publishers in the United States.


3 posted on 11/02/2013 8:45:08 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

From: 2 Thessalonians 1:11-2:2

Prayer for perseverance


[11] To this end we always pray for you, that our God may make you worthy of
his call, and may fulfil every good resolve and work of faith by his power, [12] so
that the name of our Lord Jesus may be glorified in you, and you in him, accor-
ding to the grace of our God and the Lord Jesus Christ.

The coming of the Lord


[1] Now concerning the coming of our Lord Jesus Christ and our assembling to
meet him, we beg you, brethren, [2] not to be quickly shaken in mind or excited,
either by spirit or by word, or by letter purporting to be from us, to the effect that
the day of the Lord has come.

*********************************************************************************************
Commentary:

11. St Paul takes up the thread of the prayer he began in v. 4, asking God to
keep the believers true to their calling. He himself is a very good example of how
teachers of Christian doctrine should approach their work; he does not confine
himself to expounding the truths of faith: the first step he takes is to pray for his
work to be fruitful. St Augustine observes that anyone who wants to teach the
word of God “tries as far as possible to make his words understandable, pleasing
and persuasive. But he should be convinced that if he is to obtain a good result
it will be due more to the piety of his prayers than to his gifts of speech. And so,
praying for those he is to address, he should be more a supplicant than a spea-
ker. When the time comes for him to speak, before actually dong so he should
raise his parched soul to God that he may utter only what he has himself eaten
and drunk” (Christian Instruction, 4, 15).

The Apostle asks God to make the Thessalonians “worthy of his call”, that their
efforts should have the support of divine grace, for no supernatural action can be
planned, begun or brought to a conclusion without the grace of God (cf. Boniface
II, Per filium nostrum, Dz-Sch, 399). Hence the liturgical prayer: “Lord, be the
beginning and end of all that we do and say. Prompt our actions with your grace,
and complete them with your all-powerful help” (Liturgy of the Hours, morning
prayer, Monday Week 1).

12. The Greek formula here translated as “according to the grace of our God and
the Lord Jesus Christ” could also be interpreted as “according to the grace of our
God and Lord Jesus Christ” – in which case we would have here a confession of
Christological faith which would be of enormous value on account of its antiquity.
It would be an acknowledgment of Christ being both God (Theos) and Lord (Ky-
rios), that is, Jesus Christus, Dominus et Deus noster. However, the expression
“our God” often appears in Pauline writings (cf., in this very chapter, vv. 2 and 11);
he also frequently uses the formula “Lord Jesus Christ”. This suggests that there
is a distinction between “our God” and “the Lord Jesus Christ” (or even “our Lord
Jesus Christ”); hence the preferred translation.

1-2. The main theme of the letter is given here – the timing of the second coming
of the Lord. Some people had been unsettling the minds of the Thessalonians by
saying that the Parousia was about to happen.

The phrase “by spirit” is a reference to people claiming to have a charismatic
gift of prophecy from the Holy Spirit who were spreading their own ideas as if they
came from God. Others preferred to pass off what they had to say as coming from
St Paul (orally or in writing).

Those who try to mislead the people of God by teachings contrary to Christian
faith often use methods of the same sort. By twisting the meaning of Sacred
Scripture (cf. Mt 4:6) they not infrequently promote wrong teaching as if it were
a revelation from the Holy Spirit. The Second Vatican Council has reminded us
how to identify subjective interpretation of that kind: “The task of giving an au-
thentic interpretation, whether in its written form or in the form of Tradition, has
been entrusted to the living teaching office of the Church alone. Its authority is
exercised in the name of Jesus Christ” (Dei Verbum, 10).

Even in our own day there are sects and impressionable people who put a lot of
effort into working out when the second coming will take place, sometimes ma-
king specific predictions which the passage of time disproves. They are missing
the main point, which is that we should be always on the watch, always ready
joyfully to meet the Lord.

“To the effect that the day of the Lord has come”: this is literally what the Greek
says – or “as if the day of the Lord is here”, in the sense of “about to come any
minute now”. The New Vulgate [and the Navarre Spanish: trs.] translate it as “as
if the day of the Lord were imminent”, which is faithful to the tenor of the text and
reads more clearly.

*********************************************************************************************
Source: “The Navarre Bible: Text and Commentaries”. Biblical text from the
Revised Standard Version and New Vulgate. Commentaries by members of
the Faculty of Theology, University of Navarre, Spain.

Published by Four Courts Press, Kill Lane, Blackrock, Co. Dublin, Ireland, and
by Scepter Publishers in the United States.


4 posted on 11/02/2013 8:46:22 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

From: Luke 19:1-10

The Conversion of Zacchaeus


[1] He (Jesus) entered Jericho and was passing through. [2] And there was
a rich man named Zacchaeus; he was a chief tax collector, and rich. [3] And
he sought to see who Jesus was, but could not, on account of the crowd,
because he was small of stature. [4] So he ran on ahead and climbed up
into a sycamore tree to see Him, for He was to pass that way. [5] And when
Jesus came to the place, He looked up and said to him, “Zacchaeus, make
haste and come down; for I must stay at your house today.” [6] So he made
haste and came down, and received Him joyfully. [7] And when they saw it
they all murmured, “He has gone in to be the guest of a man who is a sinner.”
[8] And Zacchaeus stood and said to the Lord, “Behold, Lord, the half of my
goods I give to the poor; and if I have defrauded any one of anything, I restore
it fourfold.” [9] And Jesus said to him, “Today salvation has come to this house,
since he also is a son of Abraham. [10] For the Son of Man came to seek and
save the lost.”

*********************************************************************************************
Commentary:

1-10. Jesus Christ is the Savior of mankind; He has healed many sick people,
has raised the dead to life and, particularly, has brought forgiveness of sin and
the gift of grace to those who approach Him in faith. As in the case of the sinful
woman (cf. Luke 7:36-50), here He brings salvation to Zacchaeus, for the mission
of the Son of Man is to save that which was lost.

Zacchaeus was a tax collector and, as such, was hated by the people, because
the tax collectors were collaborators of the Roman authorities and were often
guilty of abuses. The Gospel implies that this man also had things to seek
forgiveness for (cf. verses 7-10). Certainly he was very keen to see Jesus (no
doubt moved by grace) and he did everything he could to do so. Jesus rewards
his efforts by staying as a guest in his house. Moved by our Lord’s presence
Zacchaeus begins to lead a new life.

The crowd begin to grumble against Jesus for showing affection to a man they
consider to be an evildoer. Our Lord makes no excuses for his behavior: He
explains that this is exactly why He has come—to seek out sinners. He is
putting into practice the parable of the lost sheep (cf. Luke 15:4-7), which was
already prophesied in Ezekiel: “I will seek the lost, and I will bring back the
strayed, and I will bind up the crippled, and I will strengthen the weak” (34:16).

4. Zacchaeus wants to see Jesus, and to do so he has to go out and mix with
the crowd. Like the blind man of Jericho he has to shed any kind of human
respect. In our own search for God we should not let false shame or fear of
ridicule prevent us from using the resources available to us to meet our Lord.
“Convince yourself that there is no such thing as ridicule for whoever is doing
what is best” ([St] J. Escriva, “The Way”, 392).

5-6. This is a very good example of the way God acts to save men. Jesus calls
Zacchaeus personally, using his name, suggesting he invite Him home. The
Gospel states that Zacchaeus does so promptly and joyfully. This is how we
should respond when God calls us by means of grace.

8. Responding immediately to grace, Zacchaeus makes it known that he will
restore fourfold anything he obtained unjustly—thereby going beyond what is laid
down in the Law of Moses (cf. Exodus 21:37f). And in generous compensation
he gives half his wealth to the poor. “Let the rich learn”, St. Ambrose comments,
“that evil does not consist in having wealth, but in not putting it to good use; for
just as riches are an obstacle to evil people, they are also a means of virtue for
good people” (”Expositio Evangelii Sec. Lucam, in loc.”). Cf. note on Luke
16:9-11).

10. Jesus’ ardent desire to seek out a sinner to save him fills us with hope of
attaining eternal salvation. “He chooses a chief tax collector: who can despair
when such a man obtains grace?” (St. Ambrose, “Expositio Evangelii Sec.
Lucam, in loc.”).

*********************************************************************************************
Source: “The Navarre Bible: Text and Commentaries”. Biblical text from the
Revised Standard Version and New Vulgate. Commentaries by members of
the Faculty of Theology, University of Navarre, Spain.

Published by Four Courts Press, Kill Lane, Blackrock, Co. Dublin, Ireland, and
by Scepter Publishers in the United States.


5 posted on 11/02/2013 8:47:21 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Jerusalem Bible published and copyright © 1966, 1967 and 1968 by Darton, Longman & Todd

Readings at Mass


First reading

Wisdom 11:22-12:2 ©

In your sight, Lord, the whole world is like a grain of dust that tips the scales,

like a drop of morning dew falling on the ground.

Yet you are merciful to all, because you can do all things

and overlook men’s sins so that they can repent.

Yes, you love all that exists, you hold nothing of what you have made in abhorrence,

for had you hated anything, you would not have formed it.

And how, had you not willed it, could a thing persist,

how be conserved if not called forth by you?

You spare all things because all things are yours, Lord, lover of life,

you whose imperishable spirit is in all.

Little by little, therefore, you correct those who offend,

you admonish and remind them of how they have sinned,

so that they may abstain from evil and trust in you, Lord.


Psalm

Psalm 144:1-2,8-11,13-14 ©

I will bless your name for ever, O God my King.

I will give you glory, O God my king,

  I will bless your name for ever.

I will bless you day after day

  and praise your name for ever.

I will bless your name for ever, O God my King.

The Lord is kind and full of compassion,

  slow to anger, abounding in love.

How good is the Lord to all,

  compassionate to all his creatures.

I will bless your name for ever, O God my King.

All your creatures shall thank you, O Lord,

  and your friends shall repeat their blessing.

They shall speak of the glory of your reign

  and declare your might, O God.

I will bless your name for ever, O God my King.

The Lord is faithful in all his words

  and loving in all his deeds.

The Lord supports all who fall

  and raises all who are bowed down.

I will bless your name for ever, O God my King.


Second reading

2 Thessalonians 1:11-2:2 ©

We pray continually that our God will make you worthy of his call, and by his power fulfil all your desires for goodness and complete all that you have been doing through faith; because in this way the name of our Lord Jesus Christ will be glorified in you and you in him, by the grace of our God and the Lord Jesus Christ.

  To turn now, brothers, to the coming of our Lord Jesus Christ and how we shall all be gathered round him: please do not get excited too soon or alarmed by any prediction or rumour or any letter claiming to come from us, implying that the Day of the Lord has already arrived.


Gospel Acclamation

cf.Lk19:38,2:14

Alleluia, alleluia!

Blessings on the King who comes,

in the name of the Lord!

Peace in heaven

and glory in the highest heavens!

Alleluia!

Or

Jn3:16

Alleluia, alleluia!

God loved the world so much that he gave his only Son:

everyone who believes in him has eternal life.

Alleluia!


Gospel

Luke 19:1-10 ©

Jesus entered Jericho and was going through the town when a man whose name was Zacchaeus made his appearance: he was one of the senior tax collectors and a wealthy man. He was anxious to see what kind of man Jesus was, but he was too short and could not see him for the crowd. So he ran ahead and climbed a sycamore tree to catch a glimpse of Jesus who was to pass that way. When Jesus reached the spot he looked up and spoke to him: ‘Zacchaeus, come down. Hurry, because I must stay at your house today.’ And he hurried down and welcomed him joyfully. They all complained when they saw what was happening. ‘He has gone to stay at a sinner’s house’ they said. But Zacchaeus stood his ground and said to the Lord, ‘Look, sir, I am going to give half my property to the poor, and if I have cheated anybody I will pay him back four times the amount.’ And Jesus said to him, ‘Today salvation has come to this house, because this man too is a son of Abraham; for the Son of Man has come to seek out and save what was lost.’


6 posted on 11/02/2013 8:52:00 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

Pope Francis: The Communion of Saints Is a "Solidarity Between Heaven and Earth" [weekly audience
On Mary, Model of Faith, Charity and Union with Christ [Weekly Audience]
Audience: Pope continues catechesis on Church as our Mother
The Light of Faith (Lumen Fidei)[Catholic Caucus]

Year of Faith: Does God Command Evil Actions in the Bible? Part II (Part I linked
Francis "Lights" Up – Pope's First Encyclical Due Friday
Pope: Homily at Mass for Evangelium Vitae Day [full text]
Adoration with Pope energizing Catholics worldwide
Parishes Worldwide Prepare for Eucharistic Adoration Hour (June 2 at 11 am ET)
Pope [Francis] at Pentecost: Newness, harmony and mission
Audience: Do not be ‘part-time’ Christians
Pope Francis: Regina caeli
Pope to welcome 70,000 youths, confirm 44 (this Sunday) [Catholic Caucus]
Pope Francis’ General Audience focused on women. Feminists aren’t going to be happy

Cardinal Jorge Mario Bergoglio's "Letter On the Year of Faith" (Crossing Threshold of Faith)
Pope Francis – the real deal – has Audience with Cardinals
Benedict XVI's Final General Audience
On Ash Wednesday
On God As Creator of Heaven and Earth
On Abraham's Faith
On Christ As Mediator Between God and Man
On the Incarnation
On God the Almighty Father
Year of Faith: Indulgences and Places of Pilgrimage [Ecumenical]
On the Identity of Jesus

On the Faith of Mary, the Virgin Mother of Christ
Father Cantalamessa's 1st Advent Sermon (Catholic Caucus)
On The Unfolding of God's Self-Revelation
On the Beauty of God's Plan of Salvation
On Bearing Witness to the Christian Faith
On the Splendor of God's Truth
On the Knowledge of God
Archbishop Chaput says Year of Faith holds solution to relativism
Following the Truth: The Year Of Faith – 10 Things You Should Know [Catholic Caucus]
Papal Encyclical on Faith Announced

On the Desire for God
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Catechism's benefits explained for Year of Faith (Catholic Caucus)
A Life of Faith: Papal Theologian Speaks on the Grace of Faith
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Share Your Faith in This Year of Faith: Two keys to help you do it.
On A New Series of Audiences for The Year of Faith

Pope will deliver year-long teaching series on restoring faith
Pope Benedict XVI Grants Plenary Indulgence to Faithful [Catholic Caucus]
Pope, at Marian shrine, entrusts Year of Faith, synod to Mary (Catholic Caucus)
Catholic Church Calls for Public Prayers in Offices on Fridays
Highlights in the Plan for Year of Faith: Traditional Events Will Take on Special Perspective
Catholic Church calls for public prayers in offices on Fridays
Vatican Unveils Logo for Year of Faith [Catholic Caucus]
Miami Prelate Recalls Pope's Visit to Cuba, Looks to Year of Faith [Catholic Caucus]
The World-Changing Year of Faith [Catholic Caucus]
Vatican to Issue Recommendations for Celebrating Year of Faith

7 posted on 11/02/2013 8:56:23 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
40 Days for Life runs [September 25] through November 3 in 306 cities
8 posted on 11/02/2013 8:57:44 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Perpetual Novena for the Nation (Ecumenical)
9 posted on 11/02/2013 8:58:26 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Prayers for The Religion Forum (Ecumenical)
10 posted on 11/02/2013 8:59:05 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

 
Jesus, High Priest
 

We thank you, God our Father, for those who have responded to your call to priestly ministry.

Accept this prayer we offer on their behalf: Fill your priests with the sure knowledge of your love.

Open their hearts to the power and consolation of the Holy Spirit.

Lead them to new depths of union with your Son.

Increase in them profound faith in the Sacraments they celebrate as they nourish, strengthen and heal us.

Lord Jesus Christ, grant that these, your priests, may inspire us to strive for holiness by the power of their example, as men of prayer who ponder your word and follow your will.

O Mary, Mother of Christ and our mother, guard with your maternal care these chosen ones, so dear to the Heart of your Son.

Intercede for our priests, that offering the Sacrifice of your Son, they may be conformed more each day to the image of your Son, our Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ. Amen.

Saint John Vianney, universal patron of priests, pray for us and our priests

This icon shows Jesus Christ, our eternal high priest.

The gold pelican over His heart represents self-sacrifice.

The border contains an altar and grapevines, representing the Mass, and icons of Melchizedek and St. Jean-Baptiste Vianney.

Melchizedek: king of righteousness (left icon) was priest and king of Jerusalem.  He blessed Abraham and has been considered an ideal priest-king.

St. Jean-Baptiste Vianney is the patron saint of parish priests.

11 posted on 11/02/2013 9:00:03 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Pray a Rosary each day for our nation.

Pray the Rosary

1.  Sign of the Cross:  In the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit.  Amen.

2.  The Apostles Creed:  I BELIEVE in God, the Father almighty, Creator of heaven and earth, and in Jesus Christ, His only Son, our Lord, who was conceived by the Holy Spirit, born of the Virgin Mary, suffered under Pontius Pilate, was crucified, died, and was buried. He descended into hell; on the third day he rose again from the dead; he ascended into heaven, and is seated at the right hand of God, the Father Almighty; from there He shall come to judge the living and the dead.

I believe in the Holy Spirit, the holy catholic Church, the communion of saints, the forgiveness of sins, the resurrection of the body, and the life everlasting. Amen.

3.  The Lord's Prayer:  OUR Father, who art in heaven, hallowed be Thy name. Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done on earth as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread and forgive us our trespasses as we forgive those who trespass against us. And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil. Amen.

4. (3) Hail Mary:  HAIL Mary, full of grace, the Lord is with thee. Blessed art thou amongst women and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus. Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners, now, and in the hour of our death. Amen. (Three times)

5. Glory Be:  GLORY be to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit. As it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be, world without end. Amen.

Fatima Prayer: Oh, my Jesus, forgive us our sins, save us from the fires of hell, lead all souls to heaven, especially those in most need of your mercy.

Announce each mystery, then say 1 Our Father, 10 Hail Marys, 1 Glory Be and 1 Fatima prayer.  Repeat the process with each mystery.

End with the Hail Holy Queen:

Hail, Holy Queen, Mother of Mercy, our life, our sweetness and our hope! To thee do we cry, poor banished children of Eve! To thee do we send up our sighs, mourning and weeping in this vale of tears! Turn then, most gracious advocate, thine eyes of mercy towards us; and after this, our exile, show unto us the blessed fruit of thy womb, Jesus!

O clement, O loving, O sweet Virgin Mary! Pray for us, O holy Mother of God, that we may be made worthy of the promises of Christ.

Final step -- The Sign of the Cross

 

The Mysteries of the Rosary

By tradition, Catholics meditate on these Mysteries during prayers of the Rosary.
The biblical references follow each of the Mysteries below.


The Glorious Mysteries
(Wednesdays and Sundays)
1.The Resurrection (Matthew 28:1-8, Mark 16:1-18, Luke 24:1-12, John 20:1-29) [Spiritual fruit - Faith]
2. The Ascension (Mark 16:19-20, Luke 24:50-53, Acts 1:6-11) [Spiritual fruit - Christian Hope]
3. The Descent of the Holy Spirit (Acts 2:1-13) [Spiritual fruit - Gifts of the Holy Spirit]
4. The Assumption [Spiritual fruit - To Jesus through Mary]
5. The Coronation [Spiritual fruit - Grace of Final Perseverance]


12 posted on 11/02/2013 9:01:01 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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~ PRAYER ~

St. Michael, the Archangel, defend us in battle
 Be our protection against the wickedness
and snares of the devil;
May God rebuke him, we  humbly pray,
 and do thou, O Prince of the heavenly host,
 by the power of God,
 Cast into hell Satan and all the evil spirits
who prowl through the world seeking the ruin of souls.
 Amen
+

13 posted on 11/02/2013 9:01:44 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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A Prayer for our Free Nation Under God
God Save Our Country web site (prayer warriors)
Prayer Chain Request for the United States of America
Pray for Nancy Pelosi
Prayer and fasting will help defeat health care reform (Freeper Prayer Thread)
Prayer Campaign Started to Convert Pro-Abortion Catholic Politicians to Pro-Life
[Catholic Caucus] One Million Rosaries
Non-stop Rosary vigil to defeat ObamaCare

From an Obama bumper sticker on a car:

"Pray for Obama.  Psalm 109:8"

   

PLEASE JOIN US -

Evening Prayer
Someone has said that if people really understood the full extent of the power we have available through prayer, we might be speechless.
Did you know that during WWII there was an advisor to Churchill who organized a group of people who dropped what they were doing every day at a prescribed hour for one minute to collectively pray for the safety of England, its people and peace?  


There is now a group of people organizing the same thing here in America. If you would like to participate: Every evening at 9:00 PM Eastern Time (8:00 PM Central) (7:00 PM Mountain) (6:00 PM Pacific), stop whatever you are doing and spend one minute praying for the safety of the United States, our troops, our citizens, and for a return to a Godly nation. If you know anyone else who would like to participate, please pass this along. Our prayers are the most powerful asset we have.    Please forward this to your praying friends.


14 posted on 11/02/2013 9:02:37 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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(For if he had not hoped that they that were slain should rise again, it would have seemed superfluous and vain to pray for the dead,) And because he considered that they who had fallen asleep with godliness, had great grace laid up for them. It is therefore a holy and wholesome thought to pray for the dead, that they may be loosed from sins." II Maccabees 12

 

November Devotion: The Holy Souls in Purgatory

Since the 16th century Catholic piety has assigned entire months to special devotions. As a reminder of our duty to pray for the suffering faithful in Purgatory, the Church has dedicated the month of November to the Holy Souls. The Holy Souls are those who have died in the state of grace but who are not yet free from all punishment due to their unforgiven venial sins and all other sins already forgiven for which satisfaction is still to be made. They are certain of entering Heaven, but first they must suffer in Purgatory. The Holy Souls cannot help themselves because for them the night has come, when no man can work (John 9:4). It is our great privilege of brotherhood that we can shorten their time of separation from God by our prayers, good works, and, especially, the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass.

To Help the Holy Souls in Purgatory:

1. Have the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass offered up for them.

2. Pray the Rosary and or the Chaplet of Divine Marcy for them, or both.

3. Pray the Stations of the Cross.

4. Offer up little sacrifices and fasting.

5. Spread devotion to them, so that others may pray for them.

6. Attend Eucharistic Adoration and pray for them.

7. Gain all the indulgences you can, and apply them to the Holy Souls

8. Visit to a Cemetery

 

Litany for the Holy Souls in Purgatory

The just shall be in everlasting remembrance; 
He shall not fear the evil hearing.
 
V. Absolve, O Lord, the souls of the faithful departed 
from every bond of sin, 
R. And by the help of Thy grace
may they be enabled to escape the avenging judgment, 
and to enjoy the happiness of eternal life. 
Because in Thy mercy are deposited the souls that departed 
in an inferior degree of grace,
Lord, have mercy.
Because their present suffering is greatest 
in the knowledge of the pain that their separation from Thee is causing Thee,
Lord, have mercy. 
Because of their present inability to add to Thy accidental glory, 
Lord, have mercy.
Not for our consolation, O Lord; 
not for their release from purgative pain, O God; 
but for Thy joy 
and the greater accidental honour of Thy throne, O Christ the King,
Lord, have mercy.
For the souls of our departed friends, relations and benefactors, 
grant light and peace, O Lord.  
For those of our family who have fallen asleep in Thy bosom, O Jesus, 
grant light and peace, O Lord.  
For those who have gone to prepare our place,
grant light and peace, O Lord.  
(For those who were our brothers [or sisters] in Religion,)
grant light and peace, O Lord.  
For priests who were our spiritual directors,
grant light and peace, O Lord.  
For men or women who were our teachers in school,
grant light and peace, O Lord.  
For those who were our employers (or employees),
grant light and peace, O Lord.  
For those who were our associates in daily toil,
grant light and peace, O Lord.  
For any soul whom we ever offended,
grant light and peace, O Lord.  
For our enemies now departed,
grant light and peace, O Lord.  
For those souls who have none to pray for them,
grant light and peace, O Lord.  
For those forgotten by their friends and kin,
grant light and peace, O Lord.  
For those now suffering the most,
grant light and peace, O Lord.  
For those who have acquired the most merit,
grant light and peace, O Lord.  
For the souls next to be released from Purgatory,
grant light and peace, O Lord.  
 
For those who, while on earth, 
were most devoted to God the Holy Ghost, 
to Jesus in the Most Blessed Sacrament, 
to the holy Mother of God,
grant light and peace, O Lord.  
For all deceased popes and prelates,
grant light and peace, O Lord.  
For all deceased priests, seminarians and religious, 
grant light and peace, O Lord.  
For all our brethren in the Faith everywhere, 
grant light and peace, O Lord.  
For all our separated brethren who deeply loved Thee, 
and would have come into Thy household had they known the truth,
grant light and peace, O Lord.  
For those souls who need, or in life asked, our prayers,
grant light and peace, O Lord.  
For those, closer to Thee than we are, whose prayers we need,
grant light and peace, O Lord.  
That those may be happy with Thee forever, 
who on earth were true exemplars of the Catholic Faith, 
grant them eternal rest, O Lord.
That those may be admitted to Thine unveiled Presence, 
who as far as we know never committed mortal sin,     
grant them eternal rest, O Lord.  
That those may be housed in glory, 
who lived always in recollection and prayer,
grant them eternal rest, O Lord.  
That those may be given the celestial joy of beholding Thee, 
who lived lives of mortification and self-denial and penance,
grant them eternal rest, O Lord.  
That those may be flooded with Thy love, 
who denied themselves even Thy favours of indulgence 
and who made the heroic act 
for the souls who had gone before them,
grant them eternal rest, O Lord.  
That those may be drawn up to the Beatific Vision, 
who never put obstacles in the way of sanctifying grace 
and who ever drew closer in mystical union with Thee,
grant them eternal rest, O Lord.  
V. Eternal rest give unto them, O Lord, 
R. And let perpetual light shine upon them. 
 
Let Us Pray 
Be mindful, O Lord, 
of Thy servants and handmaids, 
N. and N., 
who are gone before us 
with the sign of faith 
and repose in the sleep of grace.  
To these, O Lord, 
and to all who rest in Christ, 
grant, we beseech Thee, 
a place of refreshment, 
light and peace, 
through the same Christ Our Lord.
 
Amen


All Saints or All Souls? Differences should be black and white
All Souls' Day [Catholic Caucus]
Why I Am Catholic: For Purgatory, Thank Heavens (Ecumenical)
Q and A: Why Pray for the Dead? [Ecumenical]
“….and Death is Gain” – A Meditation on the Christian View of Death [Catholic Caucus]
99 & 1/2 Won’t Do – A Meditation on Purgatory
The Month of November: Thoughts on the "Last Things"
To Trace All Souls Day (Protestants vs Catholics)

November 2 -- All Souls Day
On November: All Souls and the "Permanent Things"
"From the Pastor" ALL SAINTS & ALL SOULS
Praying for the Dead [All Souls Day] (Catholic/Orthodox Caucus)
To Trace All Souls Day [Ecumenical]
All Souls Day [Catholic/Orthodox Caucus]
The Roots of All Souls Day
The Commemoration of all the Faithful Departed (All Souls)
During Month of Souls, Recall Mystic, St. Gertrude the Great
All Saints and All Souls


15 posted on 11/02/2013 9:03:10 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Intentions of the Holy Father for November

November 2013

Suffering Priests. That priests who experience difficulties may find comfort in their suffering, support in their doubts, and confirmation in their fidelity.

Latin American Churches. That as fruit of the continental mission, Latin American Churches may send missionaries to other Churches.

16 posted on 11/02/2013 9:04:43 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Daily Gospel Commentary

Commentary of the day
Paul VI, Pope from 1963-1978
General Audience of 26/08/1970

"Zacchaeus was seeking to see who Jesus was"

People today, generally speaking, are no longer looking for God... They look for everything, except God. God is dead, they say; let's not be bothered about him any more. But God is not dead; for so many people of today he is lost. So then, wouldn't it be worth the trouble to look for him?

People are looking for everything: the new and the old; the difficult and the useless; the good and the bad. One might say that this kind of seeking is characteristic of modern life. But why not look for God? Isn't he a “value” worth our looking for? Isn't he a reality who is in need of a better understanding than the purely nominal one in current use? Better than that of certain superstitious and overdone religious expressions that we ought either to reject because they are false or purify because they are imperfect. Better than one that thinks itself to be already well-informed and forgets that God is an inexpressible mystery, that to know God is a question of life, eternal life, for us? (cf Jn 17,3). Isn't God what we might call a “problem” that touches us nearly, that puts into the court our thoughts, conscience, destiny and, inevitably, our meeting with him personally one day?

As for God, might he not be hidden?


17 posted on 11/02/2013 9:08:53 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Arlington Catholic Herald

GOSPEL COMMENTARY LK 19:1-10

We Zacchaeans

 

Fr. Paul Scalia

 

We all know that we are supposed to find ourselves in certain Gospel scenes. In reading Our Lord’s parables, for example, we understand that we are to identify with certain characters — the prodigal son, the merchant in search of pearls, the importunate widow, etc. But since Our Lord in His providence writes history as well, we should find ourselves also in the characters He encounters in His public ministry. To apply St. Paul’s words from another context: “These things happened as examples for us” (1 Cor 10:6). In the historical figures that appear in the history of Our Lord’s life we find ourselves — what we are, and what we ought to be. Zacchaeus serves as a good case study (cf. Lk 19:1-10). We find in him our faults, our potential and our calling.

Zacchaeus reveals, first of all, something rather unflattering about us. He was a chief tax collector — an unpopular figure in any culture, but even worse in his. The arrangement with Rome was such that the local tax collector had great latitude and would typically collect more than the empire required and keep the surplus for himself. In a word, he was a thief — taking what was not rightly his. And so are we, because our vanity is a form of theft. We take the glory that rightly belongs to God and claim it as our own. The chief tax collector must have put himself forward as a figure of some prominence. So also we push God out of the way and put ourselves forward — robbing Him of the honor that is rightly His.

And as Zacchaeus was “short in stature,” so are we — spiritually. Small in the sense of being peevish and petulant — childish. We insist on our own way from God and sulk when we do not get it. This smallness, however, can be turned to our advantage. In humbly acknowledging it, we can “turn and become like children” (Mt 18:3). We can convert from childish ways and become childlike: simple, trusting, willing to be small.

We have to imagine Zacchaeus’ conversion to get a sense of what ours must be. As chief tax collector he must have carried himself as a man of notoriety and importance. That little man probably looked down on a lot of people. His inability to see Jesus thus would have shocked him and made him painfully aware of his small stature — both physically and spiritually. On the basis of that realization he humbles himself: He climbs the tree. Because what could be more humiliating for a grown man, for the big man around town, than to have to climb a tree?

Like Zacchaeus we carry ourselves with an outward show of importance and greatness, when really we are quite small. Our conversion begins when, like him, we acknowledge our littleness and that we need help seeing Jesus. Because children cannot see in a crowd. So — we need to climb a tree. The tree we must climb is the cross. We do so by humbling ourselves before Our Lord crucified, ascending in affection and adoration from His pierced feet to His sacred head. Or, put another way, as St. Rose of Lima says, “Apart from the cross there is no other ladder by which we may get to heaven.” The cross thus becomes both the tree and the ladder by which we humble ourselves, becoming like children and ascending to see Jesus.

Following Zacchaeus in this repentance and humility, we will then hear with him the words of Our Lord: “Today I must stay at your house.” In our case, however, the “house” is our souls, in which Jesus comes to dwell and to rejoice.

Fr. Scalia is Arlington Bishop Paul S. Loverde’s delegate for clergy.


18 posted on 11/02/2013 9:18:25 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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The Work of God

1 AND entering in, he walked through Jericho.
2 And behold, there was a man named Zacheus, who was the chief of the publicans, and he was rich.
3 And he sought to see who Jesus was, but he could not because of the crowd, since he was low of stature.
4 And running before, he climbed up into a sycamore tree, so that he could see him; for he was to pass that way.
5 And when Jesus came to the place, looking up, he saw him, and said to him: Zacheus, make haste and come down; for this day I must abide in thy house.
6 And he made haste and came down; and received him with joy.
7 And when all saw it, they murmured, saying, that he was gone to be a guest with a man that was a sinner.
8 But Zacheus standing, said to the Lord: Behold, Lord, the half of my goods I give to the poor; and if I have wronged any man of any thing, I restore him fourfold.
9 Jesus said to him: This day is salvation come to this house, because he also is a son of Abraham.
10 For the Son of man is come to seek and to save that which was lost.

Inspiration of the Holy Spirit - From the Sacred Heart of Jesus

31th Sunday in Ordinary time - For the Son of man is come to seek and to save that which was lost. Zacheus was interested in me, he knew that he was a sinful man; he simply wanted to have a look at me out of curiosity, he never expected that I would take notice of him. So he went up on the sycamore tree to make sure that he could see me, and his efforts were rewarded. Not only did he see me, but I saw him as well, it was my delight to see that someone was interested in seeing me, actually I was more interested in him and I asked him to have me over his to his house that night.

Those in the crowd knew that he was a sinful man, and murmured because I was going to his house. But what happened that night was the conversion of a sinner who became interested in me.

I am interested in everyone and I extend my grace to all those who become interested in me. I came to the world to forgive sinners; I did not come to judge nor to condemn, but to save what is lost.

There are many out there like Zacheus, they live a worldly life and are far away from me. They are low in stature when they think of the crowd of the just, therefore it seems impossible for them to come to me. Like Zacheus they must climb out of their pride into the summit of humility, where they can see me, where I see them and call them to organize their lives.

It is not too late for any sinner, I am Mercy itself, I desire to forgive everyone who comes to me with sincere contrition. I don’t condemn, I simply forgive and restore the soul.

The enemy puts fear in the hearts of sinners, so they simply lose hope in me and decide to please themselves putting their salvation at risk. I am daily calling all sinners to turn away from sin and to believe in my word. My spirit will guide them if they listen to me, I will not fail them.

Author: Joseph of Jesus and Mary

19 posted on 11/02/2013 9:24:02 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Archdiocese of Washington

To Make a Long Story Short – A Homily for the 31st Sunday of the Year

By: Msgr. Charles Pope

The Gospel today is of the familiar and endearing story of Zacchaeus, a man too short to see Jesus, who climbs the tree (of the Cross), encounters Jesus, and is changed.

The danger with familiar stories is that they are familiar and we can miss remarkable qualities. Perhaps it is well that we look afresh and search for the symbolic in the ordinary details.

I. Shortsighted Sinner - Zacchaeus was physically short, and so, could not see the Lord. But let me ask you, do you think that Luke has told us this merely to indicate his physical stature? Well, I’m a preacher and I’m counting on the fact that there is more at work here than a physical description.

I suspect it is also a moral description. Zacchaeus cannot see the Lord because of the blindness sin brings. It is his moral stature that is the real cause of his inability to see the Lord. Consider some of the following texts from scripture that link sin to a kind of blindness:

So sin brings blindness, an inability to see the Lord. Now Zacchaeus has fallen short through sin and hence he cannot see Jesus. “How has he sinned?” You might say. Well, he is the chief tax collector of Jericho. Tax collectors were wicked men, I tell you no lie. The Romans recruited the mobsters of that day to collect taxes. These were bad guys. They ruffed people up and extorted money from them. The Romans permitted them to charge beyond the tax as their “cut” of the deal. They were corrupt, they exploited the poor, and schmoozed the powerful. These were men who were both feared and hated, and for good reason. They were, to a man, wicked and unjust.

Zacchaeus was not just any Tax Collector, he was Chief Tax collector. He was a mafia boss, a Don, a “Godfather.” Got the picture? Zacchaeus isn’t just physically short. He’s the lowest of the low, he doesn’t measure up morally, he comes up short in terms of justice, he’s a financial giant, but a moral midget. Zacchaeus is a shrimp, well short of a full moral deck. That he cannot see the Lord is not just a physical problem, it is a moral one.

Now I am not picking on Zacchaeus. For the truth be told we are all Zacchaeus, Zacchaeus is us. You say, “Wait a minute, I’m not that bad.” Maybe, not but you’re not that good either. In fact we’re a lot closer to being like Zacchaeus that to being like Jesus. The fact that we are not yet ready to look on the face of the Lord is demonstrable by the fact that we’re still here. We’re not ready and not righteous enough to look upon the unveiled face of God. How will Zacchaeus ever hope to see the Lord? How will we? Let’s read on.

II. Saving Sycamore- Zacchaeus climbs a tree to see Jesus. So must we. And the only tree that can really help us to see the Lord is the tree of the Cross. Zacchaeus has to cling to the wood of that old sycamore to climb it, and we too must cling to the wood of the old rugged cross.

Only by the wood of cross and power of Jesus’ blood can we ever hope to climb high enough to see the Lord. There is an old Latin chant that says, Dulce lignum, dulce clavos, dulce pondus sustinet (sweet the wood, sweet the nails, sweet the weight (that is) sustained). So Zacchaeus foreshadows for us the righteous that comes from the cross by climbing a tree and being able to get a glimpse of Jesus.

III. Sanctifying Savior- Jesus stops by that tree, for we always meet Jesus at the cross. And there at that tree, that cross, he invites Zacchaeus into a saving and transformative relationship. It is not a surprise that Jesus invites himself for what amounts to dinner at Zacchaeus’ house. Though dinner is not mentioned here, it was just a basic aspect of Jewish hospitality. But remember, it is Jesus who ultimately serves the meal. Consider these texts:

Yes, Zacchaeus has now begun to see the Lord, and the Lord invites him into a Holy Communion, a relationship and a liturgy that will begin to transform him. And Zacchaeus is us. We too have begun to see the Lord through the power of the Cross to cast out our blindness and the Lord draws us to sacred Communion with him. The liturgy and Holy Communion are essential for this, as the Lord invites himself to our house, that is to say, our soul and our parishes.

IV. Started Surrender - Zacchaeus is experiencing the start of a transformative relationship. But this is just the start. Note that Zacchaeus promises to return four-fold the money he has extorted and also to give half his money to the poor. Now there’s an old song that says, “I surrender all….” but Zacchaeus isn’t quite there yet, and, probably most of us aren’t either.

Eventually Zacchaeus will surrender all, and so will we. But in time. For now he needs to stay near the cross to see and continue to allow Jesus to have communion with him. One day all will be surrendered.

So here is the start for Zacchaeus and us. The best is yet to come. You might say, that the Gospel ends here to make a long story short

This sermon is recorded in mp3 here: http://frpope.com/audio/31%20C.mp3

This song says, “I was sinking deep in sin, far from the peaceful shore. Very deeply stained within, sinking to rise no more. But the master of the sea heard my desparing cry and from the waters lifted me, now safe am I. Love lifted me! When nothing else could help, love lifted me!”


20 posted on 11/02/2013 9:32:29 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Sunday Gospel Reflections

31st Sunday in Ordinary Time
Reading I: Wisdom 11:22-12:2 II: 2 Thessalonians 1:11-2:2


Gospel
Luke 19:1-10

1 He entered Jericho and was passing through.
2 And there was a man named Zacchaeus; he was a chief tax collector, and rich.
3 And he sought to see who Jesus was, but could not, on account of the crowd, because he was small of stature.
4 So he ran on ahead and climbed up into a sycamore tree to see him, for he was to pass that way.
5 And when Jesus came to the place, he looked up and said to him, "Zacchaeus, make haste and come down; for I must stay at your house today."
6 So he made haste and came down, and received him joyfully.
7 And when they saw it they all murmured, "He has gone in to be the guest of a man who is a sinner."
8 And Zacchaeus stood and said to the Lord, "Behold, Lord, the half of my goods I give to the poor; and if I have defrauded any one of anything, I restore it fourfold."
9 And Jesus said to him, "Today salvation has come to this house, since he also is a son of Abraham.
10 For the Son of man came to seek and to save the lost."


Interesting Details
One Main Point

Jesus seeks us, sees us, and saves us. In repentance, we give alms and find joy even when the whole world is against us.


Reflections
  1. Jesus sees through me. What does he see?
  2. Have I ever felt that people judge me unfairly? In such cases, does Jesus bring me joy?
  3. Dare I be like Jesus and recognize another person’s goodness even when everyone grumbles against such recognition?

21 posted on 11/02/2013 9:39:24 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Sunday, November 03, 2013
Thirty-First Sunday in Ordinary Time
First Reading:
Psalm:
Second Reading:
Gospel:
Wisdom 11:22 -- 12:2
Psalm 145:1-2, 8-11, 13-14
2 Thessalonians 1:11 -- 2:2
Luke 19:1-10

Attend, O My people, to My law: incline your ears to the words of My mouth.

-- Psalm lxxvii. 1


22 posted on 11/02/2013 9:45:40 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Just A Minute Just A Minute (Listen)
Some of EWTN's most popular hosts and guests in a collection of one minute inspirational messages. A different message each time you click.

24 posted on 11/02/2013 10:04:19 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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The Angelus 

The Angel of the Lord declared to Mary: 
And she conceived of the Holy Spirit. 

Hail Mary, full of grace, the Lord is with thee; blessed art thou among women and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus.
Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners, now and at the hour of our death. Amen. 

Behold the handmaid of the Lord: Be it done unto me according to Thy word. 

Hail Mary . . . 

And the Word was made Flesh: And dwelt among us. 

Hail Mary . . . 


Pray for us, O Holy Mother of God, that we may be made worthy of the promises of Christ. 

Let us pray: 

Pour forth, we beseech Thee, O Lord, Thy grace into our hearts; that we, to whom the incarnation of Christ, Thy Son, was made known by the message of an angel, may by His Passion and Cross be brought to the glory of His Resurrection, through the same Christ Our Lord.

Amen. 


25 posted on 11/02/2013 10:05:07 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Saint Martin de Porres, Religious

Saint Martin de Porres, Religious
Optional Memorial
November 3


Saint Martin de Porres was born on December 9, 1579, in Lima, Peru. He was the illegitimate son of wealthy Spanish knight Juan de Porres and a freed slave woman from Panama, Anna Velasquez, who was of mixed raced. At the age of fifteen, Martin became a "resident oblate" in the Dominican Friary in Lima and was accepted as a lay brother nine years later. He had a desire to be a foreign missionary somewhere to earn martyrdom, but he spent his whole life in Lima working as a barber, farm laborer, almoner (one who collects and distributes alms for the poor), and doctor's assistant, among other things.

Martin was blessed with great graces and miracles such as: curing the sick, aerial flights, and bilocation. He was very humble and called himself "Brother Broom". He treated all with love and did not discriminate against anyone who needed help. Not only did he love all people, but animals as well, even rodents, and he maintained a hospital for cats and dogs in the house of his sister. In his charity, he also started an institution for poor children to educate them and to teach them a trade so that they would have better lives; and he established an open garden planted with fig trees which was accessible to all the poor for food.

Saint Martin died on November 3, 1639 of typhus (a disease that is contracted from lice, mites, or fleas), probably contracted due to his contact with animals. He was carried to his tomb by bishops and noblemen. He was canonized by Pope John XXIII on May 6, 1962. He was also the first Black saint of the Americas and a contemporary of Saint Rose of Lima. Saint Martin is the patron saint of nurses and health care assistants, sick livestock, and is called on against rats and mice.

Sources
Lives . . . of the Saints: For Every Day of the Year, revision of the original edition by Rev. Hugo Hoever, S. O. Cist., Ph. D., 1993-1955 by Catholic Book Publishing Co., N.Y.

Saints for Young Readers: For Everyday, Second Ed., Vol. II, revised and edited by Susan Helen Wallace, fsp, 1995, Pauline Books and Media, Boston

Encyclopedia of the Saints by Clemens Jockle, Alpine Fine Arts Collection (UK) Ltd., London. 1995.)

The Order of Preachers (Dominican) Website http://www.op.org/curia/JPC/booklets/brosistr.htm#DePorres

Collect:
O God, who led Saint Martin de Porres
by the path of humility to heavenly glory,
grant that we may so follow his radiant example in this life
as to merit to be exalted with him in heaven.
Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son,
who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God, for ever and ever. +Amen.

First Reading: Philippians 4:4-9
Rejoice in the Lord always; again I will say, Rejoice. Let all men know your forbearance. The Lord is at hand. Have no anxiety about anything, but in everything by prayer and supplication with thanksgiving let your requests be made known to God. And the peace of God, which passes all understanding, will keep your hearts and your minds in Christ Jesus.

Finally, brethren, whatever is true, whatever is honorable, whatever is just, whatever is pure, whatever is lovely, whatever is gracious, if there is any excellence, if there is anything worthy of praise, think about these things. What you have learned and received and heard and seen in me, do; and the God of peace will be with you.

Gospel Reading: Matthew 22:34-40
But when the Pharisees heard that He had silenced the Sadducees, they came together. And one of them, a lawyer, asked Him a question, to test Him. "Teacher, which is the great commandment in the law?" And he said to Him, "You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart, and with all your soul, and with all your mind. This is the great and first commandment. And a second is like it, You shall love your neighbor as yourself. On these two commandments depend all the law and the prophets."


Excerpt from: LECTURE BY H.E. CARDINAL RATZINGER AT THE BISHOPS' CONFERENCE OF THE REGION OF CAMPANIA IN BENEVENTO (ITALY) ON THE TOPIC: "EUCHARIST, COMMUNION AND SOLIDARITY", Sunday June 2, 2002

For complete text click here (Links to Vatican website)

Martin de Porres, Mother Teresa

The great social saints were in reality always the great Eucharistic saints. I would like to mention just two examples chosen entirely at random.

First of all, the beloved figure of St Martin de Porres, who was born in 1569 in Lima, Peru, the son of an Afro-American mother and a Spanish nobleman. Martin lived from the adoration of the Lord present in the Eucharist, passing entire nights in prayer before the crucified Lord in the tabernacle, while during the day he tirelessly cared for the sick and assisted the socially outcast and despised, with whom he, as a mulatto, identified because of his origins. The encounter with the Lord, who gives himself to us from the cross, makes all of us members of the one body by means of the one bread, which when responded to fully moves us to serve the suffering, to care for the weak and the forgotten.

In our time, we can recall the person of Mother Teresa of Calcutta. Wherever she opened the houses of her sisters to the service of the dying and outcast, the first thing she asked for was a place for the tabernacle, because she knew that only beginning from there, would come the strength for such service.

Whoever recognizes the Lord in the tabernacle, recognizes him in the suffering and the needy; they are among those to whom the world's judge will say: "I was hungry and you gave me food; I was thirsty and you gave me drink; I was naked and you clothed me, I was sick and you visited me, I was in prison and you came to me" (Mt 25,35).

Briefly, I would like to recall a second important New Testament text concerning the word "communion" (koinonia). It is found right at the beginning of the first Letter of John (1,3-7), where he speaks of the encounter granted him with the Word made flesh. John says that he is transmitting what he has seen with his own eyes and touched with his own hands. This encounter has given him the gift of koinonia - communion - with the Father and his Son, Jesus Christ. It has become a true "communion" with the living God. As John expresses it, the communion has opened his eyes and he now lives in the light, that is, in the truth of God, which is expressed in the unique, new commandment, which encompasses everything - the commandment to love. And so the communion with the "Word of life" becomes the just life, becomes love. In this way it also becomes reciprocal communion:  "If we walk in the light, as he is in the light, we are in communion one with another" (I Jn 1,6).

The text shows the same logic of communio that we already found in Paul:  communion with Jesus becomes communion with God himself, communion with the light and with love; it becomes in this way an upright life, and all of this unites us with one another in the truth. Only when we regard communion in this depth and breadth do we have something to say to the world.


26 posted on 11/03/2013 7:44:41 AM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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A saint's day is superseded by the Sunday liturgy.

Martin de Porres, Saint of the “Least” [Catholic Caucus]
Litany of St. Martin de Porres (For an Election Novena - Oct.26 — Nov.3)
Saint Martin's Story [Martin de Porres]

27 posted on 11/03/2013 8:03:28 AM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Information: St. Martin de Porres

Feast Day: November 3

Born: December 9, 1579, Lima, Peru

Died: November 3, 1639, Lima, Peru

Canonized: May 6, 1962 by Pope John XXIII

Major Shrine: Church and Convent of Santo Domingo, Lima, Peru

Patron of: black people, hair stylists, innkeepers, mixed-race people, Peru, poor people, public education, public health, public schools, race relations, social justice, state schools, television, Peruvian Naval Aviators

28 posted on 11/03/2013 8:11:32 AM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Interactive Saints for Kids

St. Martin De Porres


Feast Day: November 3
Born: 1579 :: Died: 1639

Martin was born at Lima in Peru. His father was a Spanish knight and his mother was earlier an Indian slave from Panama who had been set free.

Because of his dark complexion, his father soon became ashamed of Martin and his mother. When Martin was very young, his father went away, leaving the family to look out for themselves.

As they were very poor, his mother could not support Martin or his sister and they were sent to live at a primary school for two years.

When he was just ten years old, Martin was placed with a surgeon to learn about the medical field and earn his living. He felt great joy while helping the sick. He also learned how to cure many diseases according to the practices of those days. Even as a young boy, he spent some time every night in prayer.

Martin grew up good and holy. Martin's father finally decided to take care of his son's education. But Martin wanted to give himself to God and asked for admission to a Dominican Convent.

Brother Martin soon proved to be a wonderful religious. No one was kinder or more obedient or holy. Before long, he began to work miracles, too. He was known to go through locked doors to help the sick. He was even seen in other countries helping the sick although he never left Lima all his life.

He cured so many sick people that everyone in the city of Lima would ask for Brother Martin when there was sickness. He would go to them all, whether they were blacks or whites. He loved all people as his brothers and sisters in Christ.

When he took in an old beggar who was covered with ulcers and laid him on his own bed, one of the other brothers scolded him. Martin told him that it was better to be kind that to be clean because you only needed soap to wash off dirt.

Large amounts of money were given to this good, lovable Brother for his charities. People knew how well he could organize works of charity. His sister offered her house as a hospital for the sick when there was a plague in Lima.

This kind-hearted saint was also very good to animals. He excused the comings and goings of rats and mice by saying, "The poor little things don't have enough to eat." In his sister's house, he kept a home for stray cats and dogs too.

Although he was so famous in Lima, St. Martin always had a very humble opinion of himself. His name for himself was, in fact, "Brother Broom."

When Martin died on November 3, 1639, this beloved saint was carried to his tomb by bishops and noblemen who wanted to honor the humble and holy brother.


29 posted on 11/03/2013 8:17:16 AM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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CATHOLIC ALMANAC

Sunday, November 3

Liturgical Color: Green

The Church dedicates the month of
November to the remembrance of all the
holy souls in purgatory. Our prayers can
help souls in purgatory. "He made atonement
for the dead that they may be freed from this sin."
(2 Maccabees12:46)

30 posted on 11/03/2013 10:37:35 AM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Catholic Culture

 

Daily Readings for:November 03, 2013
(Readings on USCCB website)

Collect: Almighty and merciful God, by whose gift your faithful offer you right and praiseworthy service, grant, we pray, that we may hasten without stumbling to receive the things you have promised. Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son, who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.

RECIPES

o    Pumpkin Stew

ACTIVITIES

o    On Preventing Pride and Vainglory in Children

o    Teaching About Death

PRAYERS

o    Prayer for the Dead

o    Litany of Humility

·         Ordinary Time: November 3rd

·         Thirty-First Sunday of Ordinary Time

Old Calendar: Twenty-Fourth Sunday after Pentecost

Jesus entered Jericho and was going through the town when a man whose name was Zacchaeus made his appearance; he was one of the senior tax collectors and a wealthy man. He was anxious to see what kind of man Jesus was, but he was too short and could not see him for the crowd; so he ran ahead and climbed a sycamore tree to catch a glimpse of Jesus who was to pass that way. When Jesus reached the spot he looked up and spoke to him: "Zacchaeus, come down. Hurry, because I must stay at your house today."

Don't forget to pray for the Poor Souls in Purgatory from November 1 to the 8th.

Click here for commentary on the readings in the Extraordinary Form of the Roman Rite.


Sunday Readings
The first reading is taken from the book of Wisdom 11:22, 12:2. The author of Wisdom says that although the whole universe is like a grain of dust compared with God who created it, yet he loves all the things which he has created. It is he who preserves all creation, he who forgives the sins of men, his spirit is in every creature.

The second reading is from the second letter of Paul to the Thessalonians 1:11, 2:2. Having encouraged the Thessalonians to persevere in their Christian faith, thus giving glory to God and Christ, St. Paul tells them not to consider that the end of the world and the second coming of Christ in glory to judge the world, is near at hand. This idea had in some way become fairly widespread among the converts and some of them just sat idly waiting for Christ's coming, refusing to do any work. Such behavior was condemned by Paul who told the offenders to work and earn their daily bread.

The Gospel is from St. Luke 19: 1-10. Zacchaeus's interest in seeing what Jesus was like was caused by something more than idle curiosity. Unknown to him, the grace of God was working within him. He thought that he just wanted to see what Jesus was like. Jesus knew already what Zacchaeus was like and intended to see him and save him from his downward rush after earthly wealth. He would offer him eternal riches. This is exactly what happened. Jesus entered the home and heart of Zacchaeus that day, and not only the home and heart of Zachaeus, but of his whole household. From that day Jesus had devoted followers in Jericho, and Christianity had a strong foothold in that ancient city.

We cannot have the slightest doubt that God wants us all in heaven. Neither can we doubt that he is sending out calls to us when we wander foolishly off the right road. Unfortunately for ourselves, we can refuse to listen to these calls. We can turn a deaf ear to God's offer of mercy and grace. If we do, one of our greatest sources of sorrow and regret in our future life, will be that, while we still had a chance to repent, our stupid stubbornness made us refuse to listen to our loving Father's calls to repentance.

Zacchaeus was not so stubborn or so foolish. The story of his conversion is put before us today, not as a matter of historical interest, but as a matter of vital spiritual interest. We are all sinners to a greater or lesser degree. Jesus is approaching each one of us today by means of this very lesson which we have read. Let each one of us try to see what Jesus is like. He is a loving brother who died that we might live, a fellowman who suffered tortures that we might have eternal joy. He was also the Son of God, the God of infinite love. At the same time, let Jesus see us as we really are. Let us expose and confess to him all our earthly weaknesses and injustices against God and neighbor. He will find a remedy for us. He will put us back once more on the straight road to heaven. Today, salvation will come to us and to our house. We will become again true sons of Abraham, true heirs to heaven.

— Excerpted from The Sunday Readings Cycle C, Fr. Kevin O' Sullivan, O.F.M.

 

Indulgences for All Souls Week
An indulgence, applicable only to the Souls in Purgatory, is granted to the faithful, who devoutly visit a cemetery and pray, even if only mentally, for the departed. The indulgence is plenary each day from the first to the eighth of November; on other days of the year it is partial.


A plenary indulgence, applicable only to the Souls in Purgatory, is granted to the faithful, who on the day dedicated to the Commemoration of All the Faithful Departed [November 2 {as well as on the Sunday preceding or following, and on All Saints' Day}] piously visit a church. In visiting the church it is required that one Our Father and the Creed be recited.


To acquire a plenary indulgence it is necessary also to fulfill the following three conditions: sacramental Confession, Eucharistic communion, and prayer for the intention of the Holy Father. The three conditions may be fulfilled several days before or after the performance of the visit; it is, however, fitting that communion be received and the prayer for the intention of the Holy Father be said on the same day as the visit.


The condition of praying for the intention of the Holy Father is fully satisfied by reciting one Our Father and one Hail Mary. A plenary indulgence can be acquired only once in the course of the day.


31 posted on 11/03/2013 10:48:08 AM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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The Word Among Us

Meditation: Luke 19:1-10

31st Sunday in Ordinary Time

He has gone to stay at the house of a sinner. (Luke 19:7)

When Jesus told the parable of the Pharisee and the tax collector, he made it clear that it is better to be humble than to consider yourself better than everyone else (Luke 18:9-14). When he forgave the sinful woman at a dinner party, he couldn’t help but teach his host, a Pharisee, how much better it is to be merciful rather than self-righteous (7:36-50). In today’s Gospel reading, Jesus goes so far as to invite himself into the home of a public sinner, a corrupt tax collector named Zacchaeus.

To the crowd surrounding him that day, Zacchaeus was a traitor who served the Roman Empire and made himself rich at the expense of his fellow Jews. But while they were focusing on who Zacchaeus was, Jesus focused on who he could be. That vision for the man’s future moved Jesus to speak kindly to him and lead him to salvation.

There are times when we can be like Zacchaeus as well. We can take advantage of other people and look out only for ourselves. Other times, we can be like the onlookers. We become self-righteous and judge people harshly. We are all capable of holding a double standard—one for ourselves and one for everybody else.

Despite our shortcomings and our double standards, Jesus continues to reach out to us just as he reached out to Zacchaeus. It’s true that Jesus loves us as we are. But it’s also true that he loves us so much that he wants to see us become everything we are meant to be.

In your prayer today, ask the Lord to show you one simple way that you can become more like the person you were meant to be: perhaps more caring or more generous, perhaps more loving toward your family or more prayerful. As he did with Zacchaeus, Jesus is always ready to help you. He is always ready to pour his grace on you whenever you turn to him.

“Lord, fill me with your love. Help me to look at the people around me the way you look at me.”

Wisdom 11:22–12:2; Psalm 145:1-2, 8-11, 13-14; 2 Thessalonians 1:11–2:2

1. In the first reading from the Book of Wisdom, we learn of God's love for all things, his mercy for all people, and his forgiveness for repentant sinners. The psalmist goes on to say that the Lord loathes nothing that he has made: “for what you hated, you would not have fashioned” (Wisdom 11:24). What is your attitude towards people who are different from yourself? How could it be more Christlike?

2. The responsorial psalm also speaks of God's graciousness, mercy, kindness, and compassion. How important is it for our compassion to reach beyond our small circle of family or friends? What more can you do?

3. St. Paul, in the second reading, warns the early Christians to be on their guard against false “prophets” of doom. In what way is your view of the state of the world shaped by alarmists and doomsayers? How would a deeper understanding of the nature and character of God, and faith in his power to transform even the hardest of hearts, help your view to be more hopeful and Christ-centered?

4. In the Gospel, we again see Jesus reaching out to an individual who was hated and disrespected by his contemporaries. Notice that Zacchaeus “received him with joy” and the crowd “began to grumble.” Why did this happen? In what ways can you work "against the grain" to care for others, especially those who are looked down on?

5. Jesus said he came “to seek and save what was lost.” Notice that Jesus did not wait around but actively sought those in need. He also told Zacchaeus that, “Today salvation has come to this house” (Luke 19:9). In what ways can our outreach to others be a source of “salvation” to them? How can you be less passive and more active in sharing the good news of Jesus Christ with others?

6. In the meditation, we hear these words: “Despite our shortcomings and our double standards, Jesus continues to reach out to us just as he reached out to Zacchaeus. It’s true that Jesus loves us as we are. But it’s also true that he loves us so much that he wants to see us become everything we are meant to be.” What steps can you take to open yourself more to the transforming love of Jesus our Lord?

7. Take some time now to pray and ask the Lord for the grace to love others as He has loved you (John 13:34). Use the prayer at the end of the meditation as a starting point.


32 posted on 11/03/2013 12:24:44 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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A Christian Pilgrim

Nov

TODAY SALVATION HAS COME TO THIS HOUSE

 (Biblical reflection on the 31st Ordinary Sunday [Year C] – November 3, 2013) 

Gospel Reading: Luke 19:1-10 

First Reading: Wisdom 11:22-12:2; Psalms: Psalm 145:1-2,8-11,13-14; Second Reading: 2Thessalonians 1:11-2:2 

Zacchaeus006Scripture Text:

He entered Jericho and was passing through. And there was a man name Zacchaeus; he was a chief tax collector, and rich. And He sought to see who Jesus was, but could not, on account of the crowd, because he was small of stature. So he ran on ahead and climbed up into a sycamore tree to see Him, for He was to pass that way. And when Jesus came to the place, He looked up and said to Him, “Zacchaeus, make hast and came down; for I must stay at your house today.” So he made haste and came down and received Him joyfully. And when they saw it they all murmured, “He has gone in to be the guest of a man who is a sinner.” And Zacchaeus stood and said to the Lord, “Behold, Lord, the half of my goods I give to the poor; and if I have defrauded any one of anything, I restore if fourfold.” And Jesus said to him, “Today salvation has come to this house, since he also is a son of Abraham. For the Son of man came to seek and to save the lost.”  (Luke 19:1-10 RSV) 

“Today salvation has come to this house, since he also is a son of Abraham” (Luke 19:9).

What was it that moved Jesus to make this proclamation? Was it because Zacchaeus sought out Jesus so creatively? Or was it his decision to pay back any ill-gotten financial gain? Actually it was both. Jesus was glad that Zacchaeus had sought Him out and welcomed Him into his home, but He did not confirm Zacchaeus’ salvation until Zacchaeus made the commitment to change his ways. Jesus was watching for the moment when Zacchaeus’ faith would express itself in action.

Make no mistake about it: Salvation is a free gift from God. But our response to this free gift is crucial. What good is our faith, after all, if it does not lead us into a life of love in the service of others? It would have done Zacchaeus little good to accept Jesus as the Messiah, and then continue in a life of cheating others out of their tax money. The scene of Zacchaeus walking through the streets giving back handfuls of money undoubtedly said far more than a thousand words he could have uttered about how much he loved Jesus.

Today, take a moment to examine your own walk of faith. Most of us are somewhere between a life of “faith only” on one side, and “works only” on the other. If your prayer life and religious practices are strong, consider whether you could be doing more to show your love for the Lord and for others on a regular basis. Think of a way you can serve your family today, or consider a ministry in your parish that could join. St. Paul  encouraged the Philippians to continue to “work out” their salvation each day (Philippians 2:12). If you are already strong on good deeds, ask if your prayer life could use a lift. Take a few moments right now to tell the Lord how much you love Him. It really is a balancing act, but our goal is always that our real, life-changing faith would express itself through works. 

Prayer: Lord Jesus Christ, I thank you for the great gift of salvation You have given me. May I never take this gift for granted. May I never become complacent in my love for you or in my service for other people. Today I want to make a return to You, dear Lord, for all that You have done for me. Amen.

33 posted on 11/03/2013 12:35:19 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

Marriage=One Man and One Woman 'Til Death Do Us Part

Daily Marriage Tip for November 3, 2013:

34 posted on 11/03/2013 12:59:18 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Salvation
The rest of that message.

Today’s reading from the Book of Wisdom reminds us that God loves all that He has made. Just for today, try to see your spouse as God does—precious and lovable despite his/her faults.

35 posted on 11/03/2013 1:03:21 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Sunday Scripture Study

Thirty-first Sunday in Ordinary Time - Cycle C

November 3, 2013

Click here for USCCB readings

Opening Prayer  

First Reading: Wisdom 11:22—12:2

Psalm: 145:1-2,8-11,13-14

Second Reading: 2 Thessalonians 1:11—2:2

Gospel Reading: Luke 19:1-10

 

QUESTIONS:

Closing Prayer

Catechism of the Catholic Church:  §§ 2559, 2513, 588, 2631, 2667, 2839

 

Before you receive Jesus Christ, you should remove from your heart all worldly attachments which you know to be displeasing to Him. -St. Augustine

36 posted on 11/03/2013 1:07:00 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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The Lord Wants to Come to My House

Pastor’s Column

31st Sunday in Ordinary Time

November 3, 2013

 

“Come down Zacchaeus, for today I must stay in your house.”    Luke 19:1-10

 

 

          Jesus wants to stay with me today. Did I hear him asking? Did I recognize his request to come in? How does he do this?

 

          Zacchaeus was a tax collector. In last week’s gospel, another tax collector considered himself to be such a bad sinner that he beat his breast and couldn't even look up while praying in the temple. Tax collectors worked for the occupying enemy, the Romans, and got their income by overcharging their fellow Jews while tax collecting. When this man would come calling, people knew he was rich, and that he was planning to extort extra money to add to his wealth.  I sure wouldn't ask this man to dinner, but Jesus did!

 

          Notice that Jesus invites himself over before Zacchaeus has repented. This causes the whole town to murmur, and rightly so. Jesus knows that he is going to cause uproar by this choice and he does it anyway! Aside from divine knowledge, how does Jesus know that Zacchaeus might repent? Zacchaeus climbed a tree for a better view, which must have made him look ridiculous. Jesus knew that he was interested; and Jesus zeroes in on him.

 

          Since the Lord also wishes to enter and stay with each one of us, he will want to prepare our house and put things in order. He is not afraid to come right into the house of a sinner to clean it up! He is not afraid to take a whip and chase the evil out if needed (as we see in the cleansing of the temple story), because he loves his house. 

 

          The Lord wants to come and stay in my house today. How might he do this? One way will be the Eucharist, where the Lord will literally come to dwell in the temple of my soul. Of course, he will want to start cleaning house right away. Of course, he will want to clean the room with all the junk in it, and throw out other “guests” we may be entertaining, like sins and disorders, like what we watch in various media and how we treat others.

 

          Jesus will also come and stay in my house today by means of his Word. Do I meditate on the Word of God daily? Just try to keep one passage in mind every day or every week from the Sunday readings and he will be there!

 

          Jesus will come and stay in my house through prayer. Whether I feel him or not, Jesus is always here when I pray or attend Mass! Jesus will come in surprising ways too. We invite him in when we are kind to someone, or are mindful of the poor. Have I tithed here or given to others in need? Then, although I probably didn't notice, the Lord has come in; he has entered my house. Jesus wants to stay with me today. Did I hear him asking? Did I recognize his request to come in? 

                                                                                                Father Gary


37 posted on 11/03/2013 1:18:02 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Reflections from Scott Hahn

Lover of Souls: Scott Hahn Reflects on the 31st Sunday in Ordinary Time

Posted by Dr. Scott Hahn on 10.31.13 |

Wisdom 11:22-12
1 Psalm 145:1-2, 8-11, 13-14
2 Thessalonians 1:11-2:2
Luke 19:1-10

Our Lord is a lover of souls, the Liturgy shows us today. As we sing in today’s Psalm, He is slow to anger and compassionate towards all that He has made.

In His mercy, our First Reading tells us, He overlooks our sins and ignorance, giving us space that we might repent and not perish in our sinfulness (see Wisdom 12:10; 2 Peter 3:9).

In Jesus, He has become the Savior of His children, coming himself to save the lost (see Isaiah 63:8-9; Ezekiel 34:16).

In the figure of Zacchaeus in today’s Gospel, we have a portrait of a lost soul. He is a tax collector, by profession a “sinner” excluded from Israel’s religious life. Not only that, he is a “chief tax collector.” Worse still, he is a rich man who has apparently gained his living by fraud.

But Zacchaeus’ faith brings salvation to his house. He expresses his faith in his fervent desire to “see” Jesus, even humbling himself to climb a tree just to watch Him pass by. While those of loftier religious stature react to Jesus with grumbling, Zacchaeus receives Him with joy.

Zacchaeus is not like the other rich men Jesus meets or tells stories about (see Luke 12:16-21; 16:19-31; 18:18-25). He repents, vowing to pay restitution to those he has cheated and to give half of his money to the poor.

By his humility he is exalted, made worthy to welcome the Lord into his house. By his faith, he is justified, made a descendant of Abraham (see Romans 4:16-17).

As He did last week, Jesus is again using a tax collector to show us the faith and humility we need to obtain salvation.

We are also called to seek Jesus daily with repentant hearts. And we should make our own Paul’s prayer in today’s Epistle: that God might make us worthy of His calling, that by our lives we might give glory to the name of Jesus.


38 posted on 11/03/2013 1:27:33 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

 

31st Sunday: Little man, big heart

 

 

 

 

 

"Zacchaeus, come down quickly,
for today I must stay at your house."

 

Sunday Scriptures: http://usccb.org/bible/readings/110313.cfm

 

Video Reflection: http://www.usccb.org/bible/reflections/


The delightful story of Zacchaeus and Jesus is a lesson in perseverance.  With a smile on his face, Jesus called to Zacchaeus in what he must have found a surprise: a little man, up in a big tree, despised by others but in love with the Lord. 

And so "salvation" came to the house of this little man with a big heart, eager to come to know the Lord.  He was most willing to live righteously: "Behold, half of my possessions, Lord, I shall give to the poor, and if I have extorted anything from anyone I shall repay it four times over."

How far am I willing to go to set things right between myself and the Lord Jesus?  Do I feel the need for some correction, as Zacchaeus was willing to "repay four times over" anyone to whom he may have done wrong.?

When we gather at the Lord's Supper, we receive the One who offers us salvation. Am I just sitting up in my tree observing from a distance or am I eager, hungry for the Lord and to set things right between myself and any to whom I have done harm or have offended me? How about giving someone a second, third, or fourth chance? 

Almighty and merciful God,

by whose gift your faithful offer you

right and praiseworthy service,

grant, we pray,

that we may hasten without stumbling

to receive the things you have promised.

 

(Collect for Sunday)


39 posted on 11/03/2013 1:39:17 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Salvation
Insight Scoop

Zacchaeus, the Silly Tree, and the Meaning of Life


"Zacchaeus in the Sycamore Awaiting the Passage of Jesus" (Zachée sur le sycomore attendant le passage de Jésus) by James Tissot, late 1800s. (Brooklyn Museum/Wikimedia Commons)

A Scriptural Reflection on the Readings for Sunday, November 3, 2013 | Carl E. Olson

Readings:
• Wis 11:22-12:2
• Ps 145:1-2, 8-9, 10-11, 13, 14
• 2 Thes 1:11-2:2
• Lk 19:1-10

“That’s a good question. I’ve never really thought about it.”

The remark was made a number of years ago by a forty-year-old relative who had been asked, “What do you think is the meaning of life? Why are we here?” His honest answer shocked me. After all, he was an intelligent and well-educated man; surely he had pondered the mystery of his existence at some point in his life!

Sadly, some people do not. Or at least try not too. But most people, in some way or another, do ask the big questions of life: Who am I? Why am I here? Why do I exist? The author of the Book of Wisdom certainly pondered these questions. We don’t know his name, but he was apparently a well-educated Jewish author living in or around Alexandria, Egypt, between 50 to 180 years prior to the birth of Jesus. He tackled big issues, including exhorting fellow Jews to live holy lives, defending the existence of a just and all-powerful God, and denouncing the materialism, skepticism, and idolatry so prevalent among the pagans (and some Jews) of his day. He was educated in Greek thought and rhetoric, and he often used Hellenistic terms and ideas of defend his beliefs in a Creator, providence, and divine judgment. 

In today’s reading from the Book of Wisdom, the author emphasizes two seemingly disparate qualities of God: His omnipotence, or all-powerful nature, and His love for His creation. On one hand the Lord is so great that all of creation is but a fleck of dust or drop of water; on the other hand, He loves everything that He has fashioned and He upholds it all by His loving will. He is, the author writes, both Lord and “lover of souls.”

The author then makes a point that appears several times in the Book of Wisdom: man’s disbelief in God is not a matter of intellectual weakness as much as it is a matter of moral failure. Man is a creature with a built-in need to worship someone or something. The rejection of God means the acceptance of false gods. Even those materialists who say there is no God or gods end up worshipping false idols of one sort or another, including power, science, money, or pleasure. Or even themselves.

In the face of a vast universe, what is man’s response to his own existence? The author of the Book of Wisdom says that humility, thanksgiving, and right living are the only reasonable responses to the mystery of life. Likewise, the Psalmist declares, “Let your works give you thanks, O Lord, and let your faithful ones bless you.” The story of the chief tax collector Zacchaeus and his encounter with Jesus, found only in Luke’s Gospel, touches on similar themes.

Like the rich young ruler depicted a chapter prior (Lk 18:18-23), Zacchaeus is rich and powerful. But as a tax collector, who practiced a profession known for corruption and injustice, it would have been difficult for Zacchaeus to claim that he had kept the Law perfectly, as the rich young ruler had. Yet there was something different about Zacchaeus, who “was seeking to see who Jesus was.” The crowds, it seems, were there out of mere curiosity, but Zacchaeus had a deep desire to truly understand and know Jesus. And in seeking Jesus, this wealthy man had no qualms about making a fool of himself in public.

“He ignored the crowd that was getting in his way,” Augustine said in a sermon, “He instead climbed a sycamore tree, a tree of ‘silly fruit’.” After meeting Jesus, the tax collector promises to give generously to the poor and to repay fourfold anyone he may have defrauded.

What is the meaning of life? The answer is found when we acknowledge our Creator and seek the Savior. “Say what you like,” said Augustine, “but for our part, let us climb the sycamore tree and see Jesus.” That is something to really think about.

(This "Opening the Word" column originally appeared in the November 4, 2007, issue of Our Sunday Visitor newspaper.


40 posted on 11/03/2013 1:51:15 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Do What He Tells You

SUNDAY READINGS - 31st Sunday in Ordinary Time

FIRST READING: Wisdom 11: 22-12: 1. Lord, the whole world before thee is like a speck that tips the scales, and like a drop of morning dew that falls upon the ground. But thou art merciful to all, for thou canst do all things, and thou dost overlook men's sins, that they may repent. For thou lovest all things that exist, and hast loathing for none of the things which thou hast made, for thou wouldst not have made anything if thou hadst hated it. How would anything have endured if thou hadst not willed it? Or how would anything not called forth by thee have been preserved? Thou sparest all things, for they are thine, 0 Lord who lovest the living. For thy immortal spirit is in all things. Therefore thou dost correct little by little those who trespass, and dost remind and warn them of the things wherein they sin, that they may be freed from wickedness and put their trust in thee, O Lord.

EXPLANATION: The author of Wisdom says that although the whole universe is like a grain of dust compared with God who created it, yet he loves all the things which he has created. It is he who preserves all creation, he who forgives the sins of men, his spirit is in every creature.
world . . . scales: Like a grain of dust that barely tips the scale or does not even tip the scale because it is so small.
a drop of morning dew: A tiny thing scarcely noticeable. So tiny is the whole universe in relation to the God who created it.
merciful . . . do all things: He is interested and benevolent to all his creatures, because he is all-powerful. Men can be merciful but their mercy is limited because their power is limited, but God is infinite.
overlook . . . repent: God does not punish men immediately for their sins. He wants them to repent and so gives them time to do so.
loathing . . . made: God loves all that he has created. There is goodness in all his creatures, he created nothing that was really bad.
How would . . . endure: God not only created all that exists but he sustains all. Whatever exists is due to God's creation and his providence.
O Lord . . . living: God spares, keeps in existence, all creation. It belongs to him and he loves all that exists. "Lover of life" is the translation in the J.B., R.S.V. and N.E.B.
immortal spirit: The breath of life put into created beings is a gift from God. It is, in a way, a part of his own imperishable life. It was out of his infinite power and Being that he was able to create all that is.

APPLICATION: This lesson which we have just heard read from the book of Wisdom, should pull us up sharply and make us think of what we puny men are, and what God is. He tells us the whole universe, which to us is immense, is only like a grain of dust when compared with God. We know that this little planet of ours called "earth," is only like one grain of sand in the Sahara desert compared with the whole universe. Then on this earth, the whole human race is, in size and bulk, only a tiny fraction of this planet. What are we then, in comparison with God?

Yet, we are something and something important, because the infinite God so willed it. He loves all his creation. It was out of love that he created it. Man, the highest of his earthly creatures, his masterpiece, is loved by God in a special, personal way. He has given us the powers by means of which we can get to know him and love him in our own little limited way. Limited and puny though our love and gratitude are, he willingly accepts all, and has an eternal reward in store for those of us who will show him this limited love and gratitude.

At the same time, he knows and understands how fickle and faltering that love of ours can be. His infinite mercy is ever there at our disposal. When we sin, as unfortunately we can and do, his mercy does not let him send the immediate punishment which we so richly deserve. He "overlooks the sins of men," that is, he restrains his justice "so that they may repent." He gives us time to realize how wrong we were, how ungrateful we were to him who gave us all we have, and that realization of our unworthiness and wickedness would make us turn to him and ask for pardon.

The author of the book of Wisdom, who wrote fifty or so years before Christ was born, shows a deep appreciation of all that God has done and continues to do for all creation, but especially for man, who is less than a speck of dust in comparison with his Creator. What if he had known of the Incarnation, if he knew all we know now of God's infinite love which made him send his Son on earth in order to bring all men to heaven? What, if he knew, as we know, that the Son of God would die an excruciating and shameful death on the cross so that we might live eternally? He did not know all of this proof of God's infinite and almost incredible love of God for us. Yet, he knew enough to try to make some return to God for his love for us, and to urge his fellow-men to do likewise.

How much greater, therefore, should be our efforts to return all the love of which we are capable to our loving Creator and Savior. We know that not only did he create us and give us all the gifts we possess. He has raised us through the Incarnation to divine son-ship and made us heirs to his eternal kingdom. How could any reasonable and decent man refuse to do the little that God asks of him, especially when he thinks of all that God has done for him? It is hard to imagine an intelligent creature, like man, being so ungrateful, so mean, as to offend by sinning, the greatest benefactor that ever was. Furthermore, it is almost incredible that intelligent man could be so foolish as to risk his eternal, unending happiness, for the sake of some passing pleasure or possession.

Yet, this does happen. Man can get so blinded by pride or passion that he forgets God and his own real welfare. He does things that insult and offend God. He shuts the door of eternal happiness in his own face. However, thanks be to his infinite mercy God is ever ready to give sinners a chance of repentance. While we should all strive to avoid every sin and serve God out of gratitude and love, let us not forget that should we, unfortunately, prove at times ungrateful and shamefully forgetful of our greatest Benefactor, his mercy is ever there to forgive us and bring us back once more to his friendship. Let us remember to ask for that mercy.

If any man dies in sin and excludes himself from heaven, the fault will be his, and his alone. He refused to avail himself of the infinite mercy of God.


SECOND READING: 2 Thessalonians 1: 11-2:2. We always pray for you, that our God may make you worthy of his call, and may fulfill every good resolve and work of faith by his power, so that the name of our Lord Jesus may be glorified in you, and you in him, according to the grace of our God and the Lord Jesus Christ.

Now concerning the coming of our Lord Jesus Christ and our assembling to meet him, we beg you, brethren, not to be quickly shaken in mind or excited, either by spirit, or by word, or by letter purporting to be from us, to the effect that the day of the Lord has come.

EXPLANATION: The Apostle Paul, who had founded a flourishing Church in Thessalonica, the capital of Macedonia, in the year 50, wrote two letters to his converts there, from Corinth, during the following year (51 A.D.). These two letters are generally admitted as being the earliest writings of the New Testament. Having encouraged the Thessalonians to persevere in their Christian faith, thus giving glory to God and Christ, he tells them not to consider that the end of the world and the parousia or second coming of Christ in glory to judge the world, is near at hand. This idea had in some way become fairly widespread among the converts and some of them just sat idly waiting for Christ's coming, refusing to do any work. Such behavior was condemned by Paul who told the offenders to work and earn their daily bread.
We . . . pray for you: Paul never forgot his converts. When he could not visit them to exhort them, he wrote to them. He interceded with God for them always.
worthy of his call: The Christian faith which they had, was God's gift to them, God's vocation for them. Its reward is eternal. They must try to be worthy of it.
fulfill . . . by his power: If, aided by God's grace, they live the Christian life as Paul had instructed them to do, they will make themselves worthy of the divine vocation which they had received.
name of our Lord . . . glorified in you: Every loyal Christian who lives according to his Christian faith, shows forth the result of Christ's life, death and resurrection in his own life and thus gives external glory to Christ who is God.
according . . . Christ: The Christian faith, the consequence and fruit of the Incarnation, is the gracious gift of God's infinite love for men. It was brought about by the Blessed Trinity but in a special way by the Son, who humbled himself and took our human nature. He is Lord, that is, God, and he is Jesus Christ, that is, man, because of his Incarnation.
concerning the coming: Paul now refers to the question that was causing disturbance amongst the Thessalonians---the Second coming of Christ and the end of the world.
by word: Some member of the Christian community was wrongly claiming to have special revelation that the end of the world was near.
letter . . . us: Evidently, somebody had pretended that a letter had come from St. Paul in which the proximate advent of the parousia had been affirmed.

APPLICATION: We have the same duty as the Thessalonians, namely, to try to make ourselves worthy of the Christian faith which God has so generously given us. This Christian faith is the one and only true explanation of our existence here on earth. Our reason tells us that we were created (whether directly or by a long evolutionary process, it matters not) by an all-intelligent, all-powerful Being, who must be the uncaused Cause of all that exists. Our reason tells us also that an all-intelligent Being would not have given us the marvellous spiritual faculties which we have, with the innate desire for lasting happiness, unless we could continue to exercise these faculties and enjoy that desired and lasting bliss. To create man with powers that raise him above all other creatures on earth and enable him to be the master of all the other creatures, and yet let him end as a little heap of dust in the grave, could hardly be the act of an intelligent and loving Creator.

Reason then demands a different end for man. Divine revelation has stepped in and informed man that the Creator has an even more sublime end for him, greater even than that which his reason would expect. The Chosen People of Old Testament times had some idea of the sublime purpose which God had for man. It was only when the fullness of revelation was given us through Christ, however, that we could fully realize that our omnipotent Creator and loving Father, had (before creation began) planned that man would come to share in his eternal happiness and become his adopted sons, through his divine Son's becoming man and sharing our lowly human nature with us.

This is what our Christian faith is. It not only gives us a new knowledge of the infinitely loving God; it gives us a new status in relation to God. We are still his creatures. We are special creatures because Baptism has made us potential citizens of heaven. We must strive, therefore, to make ourselves worthy of this sublime vocation. The few years given us in this life are years most valuable, for by the proper use of them we can earn for ourselves an unending life of happiness. Earthly death then has no terror for the sincere Christian. It is not the end but the beginning. It is the door which opens into eternal life.

How many of us are sincere Christians? How many are really trying to make ourselves worthy of that "gracious gift of God and of the Lord Jesus Christ" to us---the cherished, Christian faith? There has been, there are, and there will be, alas, Christians who had a passport to heaven but who through vice and worldliness threw that passport away. Please God, their number is very small, for God's mercy and grace can and does turn the vicious from their vices and the worldly from their worldliness.

Let us all ask God for a lot of mercy and grace. Let us examine our outlook on this life and on the next. Our Christian faith does not forbid us to have and use the gifts God has put on this earth. In fact he wants us to use them and earn our livelihood. St. Paul reprimanded those who spent their days in idleness because they thought the end of the world was imminent. We need not worry about when our end comes. If we are doing our best each day to live our Christian faith, we are insured for a happy death. This is one insurance policy that every true Christian can and should take out.


GOSPEL: Luke 19: 1-10. Jesus entered Jericho and was passing through. And there was a man named Zacchaeus; he was a chief tax collector, and rich. And he sought to see who Jesus was, but could not, on account of the crowd, because he was small of stature. So he ran on ahead and climbed up into a sycamore tree to see him, for he was to pass that way. And when Jesus came to the place, he looked up and said to him, "Zacchaeus, make haste and come down, for I must stay at your house today." So he made haste and came down, and received him joyfully. And when they saw it they all murmured, "He has gone in to be the guest of a man who is a sinner." And Zacchaeus stood and said to the Lord, "Behold, Lord, the half of my goods I give to the poor; and if I have defrauded any one of anything, I restore it fourfold." And Jesus said to him, "Today salvation has come to this house, since he also is a son of Abraham. For the Son of Man came to seek and to save the lost."

EXPLANATION: We have here another example of Jesus' interests in the conversion of sinners. All tax-gatherers were reputed to be extortioners and the Roman system of tax-collecting encouraged injustice. This man, Zacchaeus, was the chief of the tax-collectors in Jericho and probably more unjust than the others. Some special grace of God made him curious to see Jesus. He had heard of him evidently. This curiosity brought salvation not only to himself but to his whole household.
Zacchaeus: His name indicates that he was a Jew, as most of the tax-collectors in Palestine were. There was a large crowd surrounding Jesus as he was passing through the town. As Zacchaeus was a small man he could not see Jesus in the center of the crowd, so he wisely ran on ahead and climbed a tree so that he could get a good view.
make . . . at your house today: Jesus addresses him familiarly by his name although he had not met him before. What is more, it is clear that he read his heart. Zacchaeus was interested in Jesus for he...
received him joyfully: He expected no such privilege. That this pious preacher, and wonderworker, should want to come to his house, of all the houses in Jericho, surely surprised him but he was delighted with the honor.
all murmured: What kind of a holy man was this who chose to be the guest of a known sinner?
half . . . poor: Zacchaeus paid no heed to the murmurings of the crowd. He admitted that he was a sinner and decided there and then to make atonement.
If I have defrauded anyone: When he looks up his books, he will return four-fold whatever he demanded unjustly of any tax-payer, that is, four times the amount he over-taxed anyone. This was more than restitution.
salvation has come to this house: Not only is Zacchaeus himself absolved from his sins but all his family and servants who had probably cooperated with him in his unjust practices.
a son of Abraham: He was a son of Abraham by race but, up until that day, an unworthy son. Now, having repented, he becomes a true son of Abraham. Very probably, many of the murmurers in the crowd were not such true children of Abraham as he was showing himself to be.
The Son of Man . . . lost : Very frequently, Jesus uses this title of himself. It stresses his real humanity as well. He had come on earth to search for and give salvation to sinners. This is his answer to the murmurers.

APPLICATION: Zacchaeus's interest in seeing what Jesus was like was caused by something more than idle curiosity. Unknown to him, the grace of God was working within him. He thought that he just wanted to see what Jesus was like. Jesus knew already what Zacchaeus was like and intended to see him and save him from his downward rush after earthly wealth. He would offer him eternal riches. This is exactly what happened. Jesus entered the home and heart of Zacchaeus that day, and not only the home and heart of Zachaeus, but of his whole household. From that day Jesus had devoted followers in Jericho, and Christianity had a strong foothold in that ancient city.

There were many other sinners in Jericho that day. In fact, it is most likely that the vast majority of the adult population were guilty of violating one or other of God's commandments. Why then did Zacchaeus get this great privilege and not the others? God alone knows the answer to this question. We can assume that the mercy of God and the grace of conversion was available to all of them. However, unlike Zacchaeus, many of them refused to accept God's offer. Christ told them all that he "had come to search out and save what was lost." Many of them, unfortunately, did not realize that they were lost and so did not interpret his words as applying to themselves. Certainly, those who murmured, because he was entering the house of a sinner, must have felt that their own house was a haven of sanctity. But was it? Even if they had no other sins, this lack of charity, of interest, in their fellow-citizen's salvation was a violation of one of the basic commandments.

Not to admit that we are sinners is a fundamental impediment to the working of the mercy and grace of God in our hearts. The second and more common impediment is to refuse to listen to the calls to repentance, which God so frequently sends out to us. God wants all mankind, the whole human race, to enjoy the eternal happiness of heaven. His divine Son became man so that men could share this eternal happiness with the Father, Son and Holy Spirit forever. The door of heaven is open. The road is clearly mapped out. All the necessary means for the journey are at our disposal. The only ones who can fail are those who wander deliberately off the road and refuse to return to it when called.

Those who fail cannot blame God. It was his love for us and his desire that we should be eternally happy with him, that led him to the humiliation of lowering his divine Son to the level of a mere creature in his human nature. He endured the tortures of crucifixion, in order to raise us up to the level of divine sonship. Such love is so infinitely far beyond our limited intelligence that it is almost incredible. When God did this for us, we were his enemies and positive offenders against his law. Some of us, aided by God's grace, can forgive a fellowman who has offended us. Which of us could willingly die for that neighbor while he was still offending us? This is what God the Son did for us.

We cannot have the slightest doubt that he wants us all in heaven. Neither can we doubt that he is sending out calls to us when we wander foolishly off the right road. Unfortunately for ourselves, we can refuse to listen to these calls. We can turn a deaf ear to God's offer of mercy and grace. If we do, one of our greatest sources of sorrow and regret in our future life, will be that, while we still had a chance to repent, our stupid stubbornness made us refuse to listen to our loving Father's calls to repentance.

Zacchaeus was not so stubborn or so foolish. The story of his conversion is put before us today, not as a matter of historical interest, but as a matter of vital spiritual interest. We are all sinners to a greater or lesser degree. Jesus is approaching each one of us today by means of this very lesson which we have read. Let each one of us try to see what Jesus is like. He is a loving brother who died that we might live, a fellowman who suffered tortures that we might have eternal joy. He was also the Son of God, the God of infinite love. At the same time, let Jesus see us as we really are. Let us expose and confess to him all our earthly weaknesses and injustices against God and neighbor. He will find a remedy for us. He will put us back once more on the straight road to heaven. Today, salvation will come to us and to our house. We will become again true sons of Abraham, true heirs to heaven.


41 posted on 11/03/2013 1:58:31 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Salvation
Regnum Christi

The Little Man in a Tree
| SPIRITUAL LIFE | SPIRITUALITY
Thirty-First Sunday in Ordinary Time

Father Steven Reilly, LC

 

Luke 19: 1-10

He entered Jericho and was passing through it. A man was there named Zacchaeus; he was a chief tax collector and was rich. He was trying to see who Jesus was, but on account of the crowd he could not, because he was short in stature. So he ran ahead and climbed a sycamore tree to see him, because he was going to pass that way. When Jesus came to the place, he looked up and said to him, "Zacchaeus, hurry and come down; for I must stay at your house today." So he hurried down and was happy to welcome him. All who saw it began to grumble and said, "He has gone to be the guest of one who is a sinner." Zacchaeus stood there and said to the Lord, "Look, half of my possessions, Lord, I will give to the poor; and if I have defrauded anyone of anything, I will pay back four times as much." Then Jesus said to him, "Today salvation has come to this house, because he too is a son of Abraham. For the Son of Man came to seek out and to save the lost."

Introductory Prayer: Oh God, thank you for allowing me to come into your presence. Your love enlarges my soul. I long to see your face! I come to this prayer with a thirst to just be in your presence, relax under your loving gaze. May my presence here be an expression of my love for you.

Petition: Lord, help me to overcome obstacles in my spiritual life.

1. Climbing Trees: What a sight it must have been — that rotund, little figure scampering up the tree. The astonished onlookers must have guffawed and whistled at the chief tax collector tossing his dignity to the winds as he huffed and puffed getting up that sycamore. Zacchaeus was nothing if not persistent. He was used to overcoming obstacles as he fleeced the tax payers of Jericho. But now his worldly skills were directed in a far different way: He wanted to see Jesus! If only we showed half as much persistence in pursuing our spiritual goals as we do our secular ones. When we really, really want something, we can push, pull and tug to make sure that we get over, around or under the obstacle that impedes our desires. But when it’s a question of our prayer life, something as simple as a change in schedule can seem insurmountable. Let’s yearn to see Christ! If we truly long for his love, we will even climb trees to get it!

2. Called by Name: When the people looked at Zacchaeus in the tree, they saw a hated enemy, to be laughed at with scorn. When Jesus looked at Zacchaeus in the tree, he saw a soul with potential, to be called with love. Jesus’ ability to read hearts enabled him to see the whole picture of Zacchaeus. Yes, money had been his driving motivation, but there was an openness in his heart that would be good soil for the seed. Jesus invited himself over for dinner; Zacchaeus would have never imagined doing it himself. The Lord was not embarrassed by Zacchaeus, and like the privileged souls of his closest disciples, he called him by name. He wants to call us, too!

3. Christ’s Credibility: The people began to grumble about Jesus — how could he spend time with such a sinner? His credibility is put to the test. Zacchaeus’ response is proof to others that the way of righteousness proclaimed by Jesus is true and real. Jesus cured lepers, made the cripple walk and even raised the dead, but the dramatic conversions of great sinners must have been the most astounding of his miracles. It was harder NOT to believe Jesus in the face of such evidence. As Catholics, we have to be proof, too, of the credibility of Christ working through the Church. When our lives shine with charity and self-denial, we are living proof that the graces received through the Eucharist (and all the other sacraments and blessings we have as Catholics) are real.

Conversation with Christ: Lord, what joy you received through Zacchaeus’ conversion. He responded fully to your grace. At times, I can drag my feet even when I feel you calling me to another step forward in my spiritual life. Help me to be generous, so that other souls will see how wonderful it is to follow you!

Resolution: I will strive to overcome all obstacles to my prayer life today.


42 posted on 11/03/2013 2:03:14 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

Scripture Speaks Who Are You Seeking?

by Gayle Somers on November 1, 2013 ·

In Jericho, a man climbs a tree seeking Jesus, but who is seeking whom?

Gospel (Read Lk 19:1-10)

St. Luke tells us that as Jesus was passing through Jericho, He encountered a man, Zaccheus, who was a “chief tax collector and also a wealthy man.”  We know that religious Jews despised tax collectors for their traitorous work on behalf of the Roman government.  Tax collectors often got rich through extortion, piling up dishonest gain for themselves.  No wonder no one was willing to make way for Zaccheus as he eagerly sought “to see who Jesus was.”  What did he know about the Lord to make him so determined not to miss a chance to see Him?  At the very least, he must have heard that Jesus was a remarkable miracle-worker and maybe even more than that.  Recall that when Jesus asked the disciples, “Who do men say that the Son of Man is?” (see Mt 16:13), there were all sorts of answers—Elijah, Jeremiah, or one of the prophets.  Zaccheus wanted to see for himself the One who created all this buzz.

When Jesus passed by, the little man got quite a shock:  “Jesus looked up and said, ‘Zaccheus, come down quickly, for today I must stay at your house.’”  Jesus knew him by name—already—and He wanted a face-to-face visit with him.  Surely Zaccheus never expected this kind of miracle.  Perhaps he hoped to see Jesus heal someone or drive out a demon.  Instead, he discovered that Jesus knew him, saw his determination, and invited Himself for a visit.  It’s a wonder Zaccheus didn’t fall out of that tree.  He “came down quickly and received Him with joy.”  For such an obvious sinner to be singled out for a visit by Jesus was beyond remarkable.  Zaccheus could hardly wait for this encounter.

The crowd outside, however, wasn’t so happy.  They grumbled about Jesus, saying “He has gone to stay at the house of a sinner.”  Zaccheus must have heard their muttering.  Rather than get angry with their judgment of him, he spoke directly to Jesus:  “Behold, half of my possessions, Lord, I shall give to the poor, and if I have extorted anything from anyone, I shall repay it four times over.”  We can see that something profound happened in him between the time he climbed up the tree and the time he came down.  A man seeking merely to see Jesus out of curiosity discovered that Jesus was seeking him.  As a result, he had an instant conversion, the first fruit of which was serious, active repentance for his sin.  He was convicted this way when he perceived Jesus’ willingness to overlook his sin for the sake of a visit.  Zaccheus was exactly the kind of man for whom Jesus searched as He preached about the Kingdom of God:   “For the Son of Man has come to seek and to save the lost.”

This beautiful story reminds us of something religious people often forget.  Jesus came to save sinners, not condemn them.  The Church’s work of evangelism must constantly preserve this reality.  Sinners need to hear something about Jesus that stirs up their curiosity, to hear the Good News of God’s love and desire for them first.  When they understand this and step into its joyous truth,then they are ready to keep the “rules” of sanctity.  They discover, in their conversion, that the “rules” are actually the path to happiness, but they cannot see this while they are still blinded by sin.  They must first see Jesus; when they know He sees and loves them, they are ready for a change.  Zaccheus, after Jesus looked up at him in the tree and spoke his name, was happy to be generous with his wealth and to make amends for all his dishonesty.

Yes, Jesus comes to “stay” with sinners, just as the crowd outside Zaccheus’ house grumbled, but the sinner is never the same.  The lost has been found.

Possible response:  Lord Jesus, when I encounter an obvious sinner, my first reaction is to scold.  Help me instead share Your love with sinners hungry for it.

First Reading (Read Wis 11:22-12:2)

In a deeply moving, poetic passage, the author of the Book of Wisdom explains why Jesus was eager to visit with Zaccheus.  He tells us that God has “mercy on all and … overlook[s] people’s sins that they may repent.”  God doesn’t loathe sinners, for what He “hated” He would not have fashioned.  This is why Jesus was not put off by Zaccheus’ reputation as a sinner.  From a distance, He could see him in the tree, looking for Him, no matter what his past was like.  That was enough for Jesus!  As Wisdom says about God, “You rebuke offenders little by little, warn them and remind them of the sins they are committing, that they may abandon their wickedness and believe in You, O Lord!”  Jesus was, literally, the living Embodiment of God’s great love and compassion for sinners.  The only harsh words He ever spoke were to religious people who thought other people were sinners.  When, in the Sermon on the Mount, Jesus taught us to love even our enemies, He said that loving and praying for those who persecute us would make us “sons of your Father Who is in heaven; for He makes His sun rise on the evil and on the good, and sends rain on the just and the unjust.”

God is kind and gracious to sinners.  Are we?

Possible response:  Heavenly Father, thank You for Your patience and love for us sinners.  Help me be patient with my own weakness for sin and to keep working on repentance and faith.

Psalm (Read Ps 145:1-2, 8-11, 13-14)

The psalm repeats, in the form of prayerful praise, what the Book of Wisdom and the Gospel have already taught us:  “The Lord is gracious and merciful, slow to anger and of great kindness.  The Lord is good to all and compassionate toward all His works.”  This wonderful truth is our only hope!  When we grasp it and receive it, both for ourselves and other sinners, we can happily sing:  “I will praise Your name forever, my king and my God.”

Possible response:  The psalm is, itself, a response to our other readings.  Read it again prayerfully to make it your own.

Second Reading (Read 2 Thess 1:11-2:2)

In this epistle, St. Paul writes to his Christian friends who had been converted through his preaching of the Gospel.  See how he prays for these converts:  “That our God may make you worthy of His calling … that the name of our Lord Jesus may be glorified in you … in accord with the grace of our God and Lord Jesus Christ.”  What does this prayer mean?  It recognizes that no convert is worthy of God’s kind forgiveness of sins.  We are utterly dependent on God’s grace for this.  However, when we do, in faith, respond to the gift of salvation He has made possible in Jesus, then He begins His work in us to make us worthy of such a calling.  God loves us too much to leave us in our sin, because we were designed for goodness, God’s own goodness.  So, conversion begins the work of transformation.  We saw a wonderful example of this in Zaccheus.  When he realized that he, the unworthy and despised sinner, was going to be visited by Jesus, his life was turned inside out.  Jesus’ goodness to him made it possible for him to become good.

This is precisely what St. Paul prayed for his Christian friends.  It is what we still pray in the Rosary:  “Pray for us, O Holy Mother of God, that we may be made worthy of the promises of Christ.”  Our perfection by God, though we are sinners, glorifies the name of Jesus in us.  What a gift!

Possible response:  Heavenly Father, it is a great mystery to me how You will make me worthy of Your calling, but I place my trust in You.


43 posted on 11/03/2013 2:15:12 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
One Bread One Body

One Bread, One Body

Language: English | Español

All Issues > Volume 29, Issue 6

<< Sunday, November 3, 2013 >> 31st Sunday Ordinary Time
 
Wisdom 11:22—12:2
2 Thessalonians 1:11—2:2

View Readings
Psalm 145:1-2, 8-11, 13-14
Luke 19:1-10

Similar Reflections
 

CROWD CONTROL

 
"He was trying to see what Jesus was like, but being small of stature, was unable to do so because of the crowd." —Luke 19:3
 

So many people are trying to see what Jesus is like. Yet they're small and the crowd is large. Sometimes the crowd isn't people around us but things inside us. How many have a crowd of fears, doubts, and selfish desires inside? To see Jesus, we must fight our way through the crowd (see Lk 8:45) or climb above it.

If I told you to go to Confession right now, a crowd would form for some of you. You may feel afraid, and before long you'd have a hundred reasons why you're not going. You have to fight through the crowd to touch Jesus and be washed in His blood.

What if I told you to go to Mass daily, lead someone to Christ, or tithe? For many of us, another crowd of sin, selfishness, doubt, fear, and anxiety would form. We must climb the tree of faith above the crowd and fight by faith through the crowd. Don't be crowded out of eternal life; enter in by faith.

 
Prayer: "We pray for you always that our God may make you worthy of His call, and fulfill by His power every honest intention and work of faith. In this way the name of our Lord Jesus may be glorified in you and you in Him" (2 Thes 1:11-12).
Promise: "You have mercy on all, because You can do all things; and You overlook the sins of men that they may repent." —Wis 11:23
Praise: All praise be to You, glorious, risen Lord Jesus Christ! You reign supreme over the crowd of creation. I worship You, magnificent in glory.

44 posted on 11/03/2013 2:36:13 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Prayer to End Abortions

Lord God, I thank you today for the gift of my life, and for the lives of all my brothers and sisters. I know there is nothing that destroys more life than abortion, yet I rejoice that You have conquered death by the Resurrection of Your Son. I am ready to do my part in ending abortion. Today I commit myself NEVER to be silent, NEVER to be passive, NEVER to be forgetful of the unborn. I commit myself to be active in the pro-life movement, and never to stop defending life until all my brothers and sisters are protected, and our nation once again becomes a nation with liberty and justice not just for some, but for all, through Christ our Lord. Amen!

45 posted on 11/03/2013 2:37:38 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Salvation
Luke
  English: Douay-Rheims Latin: Vulgata Clementina Greek NT: Byzantine/Majority Text (2000)
  Luke 19
1 AND entering in, he walked through Jericho. Et ingressus perambulabat Jericho. και εισελθων διηρχετο την ιεριχω
2 And behold, there was a man named Zacheus, who was the chief of the publicans, and he was rich. Et ecce vir nomine Zachæus : et hic princeps erat publicanorum, et ipse dives : και ιδου ανηρ ονοματι καλουμενος ζακχαιος και αυτος ην αρχιτελωνης και ουτος ην πλουσιος
3 And he sought to see Jesus who he was, and he could not for the crowd, because he was low of stature. et quærebat videre Jesum, quis esset : et non poterat præ turba, quia statura pusillus erat. και εζητει ιδειν τον ιησουν τις εστιν και ουκ ηδυνατο απο του οχλου οτι τη ηλικια μικρος ην
4 And running before, he climbed up into a sycamore tree, that he might see him; for he was to pass that way. Et præcurrens ascendit in arborem sycomorum ut videret eum : quia inde erat transiturus. και προδραμων εμπροσθεν ανεβη επι συκομωραιαν ινα ιδη αυτον οτι [δι] εκεινης εμελλεν διερχεσθαι
5 And when Jesus was come to the place, looking up, he saw him, and said to him: Zacheus, make haste and come down; for this day I must abide in thy house. Et cum venisset ad locum, suspiciens Jesus vidit illum, et dixit ad eum : Zachæe, festinans descende : quia hodie in domo tua oportet me manere. και ως ηλθεν επι τον τοπον αναβλεψας ο ιησους ειδεν αυτον και ειπεν προς αυτον ζακχαιε σπευσας καταβηθι σημερον γαρ εν τω οικω σου δει με μειναι
6 And he made haste and came down; and received him with joy. Et festinans descendit, et excepit illum gaudens. και σπευσας κατεβη και υπεδεξατο αυτον χαιρων
7 And when all saw it, they murmured, saying, that he was gone to be a guest with a man that was a sinner. Et cum viderent omnes, murmurabant, dicentes quod ad hominem peccatorem divertisset. και ιδοντες παντες διεγογγυζον λεγοντες οτι παρα αμαρτωλω ανδρι εισηλθεν καταλυσαι
8 But Zacheus standing, said to the Lord: Behold, Lord, the half of my goods I give to the poor; and if I have wronged any man of any thing, I restore him fourfold. Stans autem Zachæus, dixit ad Dominum : Ecce dimidium bonorum meorum, Domine, do pauperibus : et si quid aliquem defraudavi, reddo quadruplum. σταθεις δε ζακχαιος ειπεν προς τον κυριον ιδου τα ημιση των υπαρχοντων μου κυριε διδωμι τοις πτωχοις και ει τινος τι εσυκοφαντησα αποδιδωμι τετραπλουν
9 Jesus said to him: This day is salvation come to this house, because he also is a son of Abraham. Ait Jesus ad eum : Quia hodie salus domui huic facta est : eo quod et ipse filius sit Abrahæ. ειπεν δε προς αυτον ο ιησους οτι σημερον σωτηρια τω οικω τουτω εγενετο καθοτι και αυτος υιος αβρααμ εστιν
10 For the Son of man is come to seek and to save that which was lost. Venit enim Filius hominis quærere, et salvum facere quod perierat. ηλθεν γαρ ο υιος του ανθρωπου ζητησαι και σωσαι το απολωλος

46 posted on 11/03/2013 6:08:19 PM PST by annalex (fear them not)
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To: annalex
1. And Jesus entered and passed through Jericho.
2. And, behold, there was a man named Zaccheus, which was the chief among the Publicans, and he was rich.
3. And he sought to see Jesus who he was; and could not for the press, because he was little of stature.
4. And he ran before, and climbed up into a sycamore tree to see him: for he was to pass that way.
5. And when Jesus came to the place, he looked up, and saw him, and said to him, Zacchaeus, make haste, and come down; for to day I must abide at your house.
6. And he made haste, and came down, and received him joyfully.
7. And when they saw it, they all murmured, saying, That he was gone to be guest with a man that is a sinner.
8. And Zacchaeus stood, and said to the Lord; Behold, Lord, the half of my goods I give to the poor; and if I have taken any thing from any man by false accusation, I restore him fourfold.
9. And Jesus said to him, This day is salvation come to this house, forsomuch as he also is a son of Abraham.
10. For the Son of man is come to seek and to save that which was lost.

AMBROSE; Zacchaeus in the sycamore, the blind man by the way side: upon the one our Lord waits to show mercy, upon the other He confers the great glory of abiding in his house.

The chief among the Publicans is here fitly introduced. For who will hereafter despair of himself, now that he attains to grace who gained his living by fraud. And he too moreover a rich man, that we may know that not all rich men are covetous.

CYRIL; But Zacchaeus made no delay in what he did, and so was accounted worthy of the favor of God, which gives sight to the blind, and calls them who are afar off.

TIT. BOST. The seed of salvation had begun to spring up in him, for he desired to see Jesus, having never seen Him. For if he had seen Him, he would long since have given up the Publican's wicked life. No one that sees Jesus can remain any longer in wickedness. But there were two obstacles to his seeing Him. The multitude not so much of men as of his sins prevented him, for he was little of stature.

AMBROSE; What means the Evangelist by describing his stature, and that of none other? It is perhaps because he was young in wickedness, or as yet weak in the faith. For he was not yet prostrate in sin who could climb up. He had not yet seen Christ.

TIT. BOST. But he discovered a good device; running before he climbed up into a sycamore, and saw Him whom he had long wished for, i.e. Jesus, passing by. Now Zacchaeus desired no more than to see, but He who is able to do more than v e ask for, granted to Him far above what he expected; as it follows,

And when Jesus came to the place, he looked up, and saw him. He saw the soul of the man striving earnestly to live a holy life, and converts him to godliness.

AMBROSE; Uninvited he invites Himself to his house; as it follows, Zacchaeus, make haste, and come down, &c. for He knew how richly He would reward his hospitality. And though He had not yet heard the word of invitation, He had already seen the will.

BEDE; See here, the camel disencumbered of his hunch passes through the eye of a needle, that is, the rich man and the publican abandoning his love of riches, and loathing his dishonest gains, receives the blessing of his Lord's company. It follows, And he made haste, and came down, and received him joyfully.

AMBROSE; Let the rich learn that guilt attaches not to the goods themselves, but to those who know not how to use them. For riches, as they are hindrances to virtue in the unworthy, so are they means of advancing it in the good.

PSEUDO-CHRYS. Observe the gracious kindness of the Savior. The innocent associates with the guilty, the fountain of justice with covetousness, which is the source of injustice. Having entered the publican's house, He suffers no stain from the mists of avarice, but disperses them by the bright beam of His righteousness. But those who deal with biting words and reproaches, try to cast a slur upon the things which were done by Him; for it follows, And when they saw it, they all murmured, saying, That he was gone to be guest with a man that is a sinner.

But He, though accused of being a wine-bibber and a friend of publicans, regarded it not, so long as He could accomplish His end. As a physician sometimes can not save his patients from their diseases without the defilement of blood. kind so it happened here, for the publican was converted, and lived a better life. Zacchaeus stood, and said to the Lord, Behold, Lord, the half of my goods I give to the poor; and if I have defrauded any man, I restore him fourfold. Behold here is a marvel: without learning he obeys. And as the sun pouring its rays into a house enlightens it not by word, but by work, so the Savior by the rays of righteousness put to flight the darkness of sin; for the light shines in darkness. Now every thing united is strong, but divided, weak, therefore Zacchaeus divides into two parts his substance. But we must be careful to observe, that his wealth was not made up from unjust gains, but from his patrimony, else how could he restore fourfold what he had unjustly extorted. He knew that the law ordered what was wrongly taken away to be restored fourfold, that if the law deterred not, a man's losses might soften him. Zacchaeus waits not for the judgment of the law, but makes himself his own judge.

THEOPHYL. If we examine more closely, we shall see that nothing was left of his own property. For having given half of his goods to the poor, out of the remainder he restored fourfold to those whom he had injured. He not only promised this, but did it. For he says not, "I will give the half, and I will restore fourfold, but, I give, and I restore. To such Christ announces salvation; Jesus said to him, This day is salvation come to this house, signifying that Zacchaeus had attained to salvation, meaning by the house the inhabitant thereof. And it follows, forasmuch as he also is a son of Abraham. For He would not have given the name of a son of Abraham to a lifeless building.

BEDE; Zacchaeus is called the son of Abraham, not because he was born of Abraham's seed, but because he imitates his faith, that as Abraham left his country and his father's house, so he abandoned all his goods in giving them to the poor. And He well says, "He also," to declare that not only those who had lived justly, but those who are raised up from a life of injustice, belong to the sons of promise.

THEOPHYL. He said not that he "was" a son of Abraham, but that he now is. For before when he was the chief among the publicans, and bore no likeness to the righteous Abraham, he was not his son. But because some murmured that he tarried with a man who was a sinner, he adds in order to restrain them, For the Son of man came to seek and to save that which was lost.

PSEUDO-CHRYS. Why do you accuse me if I bring sinners to righteousness? So far am I from hating them, that for their sakes I came. For I came to heal, not to judge, therefore am I the constant guest of those that are sick, and I suffer their noisomeness that I may supply remedies. But some one may ask, how does Paul bid us, If we have a brother that is a fornicator or covetous man, with such not even to take food; whereas Christ was the guest of publicans? They were not as yet so far advanced as to be brethren, and besides, St. Paul bids us avoid our brethren only when they persist in evil, but these were converted.

BEDE; Mystically, Zacchaeus, which is by interpretation "justified," signifies the Gentile believers, who were depressed and brought very low by their worldly occupations, but sanctified by God. And he was desirous to see our Savior entering Jericho, inasmuch as he sought to share in that faith which Christ brought into the world.

CYRIL; The crowd is the tumultuous state of an ignorant multitude, which cannot see the lofty top of wisdom. Zacchaeus therefore, while he was in the crowd, saw not Christ, but having advanced beyond the vulgar ignorance, was thought worthy to entertain Him whom he desired to look upon.

BEDE; Or the crowd that is, the general habit of vice, which rebuked the blind man crying out, lest he should seek the light, also impedes Zacchaeus looking up, that he might not see Jesus; that as by crying out the more the blind man overcame the crowd, so the man weak in the faith by forsaking earthly things, and climbing the tree of the Cross, surmounts the opposing multitude. The sycamore, which is a tree resembling the mulberry in foliage, but exceeding it in height, whence by the Latins it is called "lofty," is called the "foolish fig-tree," and so the Cross of our Lord sustains believers, as the fig-tree figs, and is mocked by unbelievers as foolishness. This tree Zacchaeus, who was little in stature, climbed up, that he might be raised together with Christ; for every one who is humble, and conscious of his own weakness, cries out, God forbid that I should glory, save in the cross of our Lord Jesus Christ.

AMBROSE; He has well added, that our Lord was to pass that way, either where the sycamore-tree was, or where he was who was about to believe, that so He might preserve the mystery, and sow the seeds of grace. For He had so come as that through the Jews He came to the Gentiles. He sees then Zacchaeus above, for already the excellence of his faith shone forth amidst the fruits of good works, and the loftiness of the fruitful tree; but Zacchaeus stands out above the tree, as one who is above the law.

BEDE; The Lord as He journeyed came to the place where Zacchaeus had climbed the sycamore, for having sent His preachers throughout the world in whom He Himself spoke and went, He comes to the Gentile people, who were already raised up on high through faith in His Passion, and whom when He looked up He saw, for He chose them through grace. Now our Lord once abode in the house of the chief of the Pharisees, but when He did works such as none but God could do, they railed at Him Wherefore hating their deeds He departed, saying, Your house shall be left to you desolate; but now He must needs stay at the house of the weak Zacchaeus, that is, by the grace of the new law brightly shining, He must take rest in the hearts of tile lowly nations. But that Zacchaeus is bid to come down from the sycamore tree, and prepare an abode for Christ, this is what the Apostle says, Yea, though we have known Christ after the flesh, yet now henceforth know we Him no more. And again elsewhere, For though he was crucified through weakness, yet he lives by the power of God. It is plain that the Jews always hated the salvation Of the Gentiles; but salvation, which formerly filled the houses of the Jews, has this day shone upon the Gentiles, forasmuch as this people also by believing on God is a son of Abraham.

THEOPHYL. It is easy to turn this to a moral use. For whoever surpasses many in wickedness is small in spiritual growth, and cannot see Jesus for the crowd. For disturbed by passion and worldly things, he beholds not Jesus walking, that is, working in us, not recognizing His operation. But he climbs up to the top of a sycamore-tree, in that he rises above the sweetness of pleasure, which is signified by a fig, and subduing it, and so becoming more exalted, he sees and is seen by Christ.

GREG. Or because the sycamore is from its name called the foolish fig, the little Zacchaeus gets up into the sycamore and sees the Lord, for they who humbly choose the foolish things of this world are those who contemplate most closely the wisdom of God. For what is more foolish in this world than not to seek for what is lost, to give our possessions to robbers, to return not injury for injury? However, by this wise foolishness, the wisdom of God is seen, not yet really as it is, but by the light of contemplation.

THEOPHYL. The Lord said to him, Make haste and come down, that is, "you have ascended by penitence to a place too high for you, come down by humility, lest your exaltation cause you to sky. I must abide in the house of a humble man. We have two kinds of goods in us, bodily, and spiritual; the just man gives up all his bodily goods to the poor, but he forsakes not his spiritual goods, but if he has extorted any thing from any one, he restores to him fourfold; signifying thereby that if a man by repentance walks in the Opposite path to his former perverseness, he by the manifold practice of virtue heals all his old offenses, and so merits salvation, and is called the son of Abraham, because he went out from his own kindred, that is, from his ancient wickedness.

Catena Aurea Luke 19
47 posted on 11/03/2013 6:09:00 PM PST by annalex (fear them not)
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To: annalex


Jesus calling Zacchaeus

No attribution. If you know the age or the place of this fresco, please write to me.

48 posted on 11/03/2013 6:09:37 PM PST by annalex (fear them not)
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To: All

http://resources.sainteds.com/showmedia.asp?media=../sermons/homily/2013-11-03-Homily%20Fr%20Gary.mp3&ExtraInfo=0&BaseDir=../sermons/homily


49 posted on 11/10/2013 6:50:33 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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