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Catholic Caucus: Sunday Mass Readings, 11-17-13, Thirty-third Sunday in Ordinary Time
USCCB.org/RNAB ^ | 11-17-13 | Revised New American Bible

Posted on 11/16/2013 8:18:05 PM PST by Salvation

November 17, 2013

 

Thirty-third Sunday in Ordinary Time

 

 

Reading 1 Mal 3:19-20a

Lo, the day is coming, blazing like an oven,
when all the proud and all evildoers will be stubble,
and the day that is coming will set them on fire,
leaving them neither root nor branch,
says the LORD of hosts.
But for you who fear my name, there will arise
the sun of justice with its healing rays.

Responsorial Psalm Ps 98:5-6, 7-8, 9

R. (cf. 9) The Lord comes to rule the earth with justice.
Sing praise to the LORD with the harp,
with the harp and melodious song.
With trumpets and the sound of the horn
sing joyfully before the King, the LORD.
R. The Lord comes to rule the earth with justice.
Let the sea and what fills it resound,
the world and those who dwell in it;
let the rivers clap their hands,
the mountains shout with them for joy.
R. The Lord comes to rule the earth with justice.
Before the LORD, for he comes,
for he comes to rule the earth,
He will rule the world with justice
and the peoples with equity.
R. The Lord comes to rule the earth with justice.

Reading 2 2 Thes 3:7-12

Brothers and sisters:
You know how one must imitate us.
For we did not act in a disorderly way among you,
nor did we eat food received free from anyone.
On the contrary, in toil and drudgery, night and day
we worked, so as not to burden any of you.
Not that we do not have the right.
Rather, we wanted to present ourselves as a model for you,
so that you might imitate us.
In fact, when we were with you,
we instructed you that if anyone was unwilling to work,
neither should that one eat.
We hear that some are conducting themselves among you in a
disorderly way,
by not keeping busy but minding the business of others.
Such people we instruct and urge in the Lord Jesus Christ to work quietly
and to eat their own food.

Gospel Lk 21:5-19

While some people were speaking about
how the temple was adorned with costly stones and votive offerings,
Jesus said, "All that you see here--
the days will come when there will not be left
a stone upon another stone that will not be thrown down."

Then they asked him,
"Teacher, when will this happen?
And what sign will there be when all these things are about to happen?"
He answered,
"See that you not be deceived,
for many will come in my name, saying,
'I am he,’ and 'The time has come.’
Do not follow them!
When you hear of wars and insurrections,
do not be terrified; for such things must happen first,
but it will not immediately be the end."
Then he said to them,
"Nation will rise against nation, and kingdom against kingdom.
There will be powerful earthquakes, famines, and plagues
from place to place;
and awesome sights and mighty signs will come from the sky.

"Before all this happens, however,
they will seize and persecute you,
they will hand you over to the synagogues and to prisons,
and they will have you led before kings and governors
because of my name.
It will lead to your giving testimony.
Remember, you are not to prepare your defense beforehand,
for I myself shall give you a wisdom in speaking
that all your adversaries will be powerless to resist or refute.
You will even be handed over by parents, brothers, relatives, and friends,
and they will put some of you to death.
You will be hated by all because of my name,
but not a hair on your head will be destroyed.
By your perseverance you will secure your lives."



TOPICS: Catholic; General Discusssion; Prayer; Worship
KEYWORDS: catholic; ordinarytime; prayer
For your reading, reflection, faith-sharing, comments, questions, discussion.

1 posted on 11/16/2013 8:18:06 PM PST by Salvation
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To: nickcarraway; NYer; ELS; Pyro7480; livius; ArrogantBustard; Catholicguy; RobbyS; marshmallow; ...
Alleluia Ping

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2 posted on 11/16/2013 8:20:34 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

From: Malachi 4:1-2 [3:19-20a in NAB]

Sixth Exchange: The Righteous on the Day of the Lord (Continuation)


[1] “For behold, the day comes, burning like an oven, when all the arrogant and
all evildoers will be stubble; the day that comes shall burn them up, says the
Lord of hosts, so that it will leave them neither root nor branch. [2] But for you
who fear my name the sun of righteousness shall rise, with healing in its wings.
You shall go forth leaping like calves from the stall.

*********************************************************************************************
Commentary:

3:13-4:3. The question posed here is similar to that in the fourth “dispute” (2:17
-3:5): if things go well for those who do evil and tempt God (v. 15), why should
one obey the Lord’s commandments (v. 14)? The prophet’s reply is very similar
to his previous one (cf. 3:2, 5): he announces a day of judgment when the wick-
ed will be destroyed (4:1, 3). However, Malachi is more explicit than he was ear-
lier as regards the reward of the righteous. The Lord is not unaware of the trials
and worries of those who fear him; in fact he is like a great king who records in
his annals (cf. Esther 6:1-3) the good deeds of the just (3:16). Therefore, the
day when the Lord reveals himself will be for them a day of splendour and inex-
pressible joy (4:2), for they enjoy God’s special protection (3:17-18).

The expression “sun of righteousness” (4:2), applied to the coming of the Lord,
is echoed in the New Testament Benedictus or canticle of Zechariah (cf. Lk 1:
78). Therefore, it is not surprising that Christian tradition should apply it to Je-
sus Christ: “The Lord came in the evening to a world in decline, when the
course of life was almost run; but when the Sun of justice came, he gave new
life and began a new day for those who believed in him” (Origen, Homiliae in
Exodum, 7, 8).

*******************************************************************************************
Source: “The Navarre Bible: Text and Commentaries”. Biblical text from the
Revised Standard Version and New Vulgate. Commentaries by members of
the Faculty of Theology, University of Navarre, Spain.

Published by Four Courts Press, Kill Lane, Blackrock, Co. Dublin, Ireland, and
by Scepter Publishers in the United States.


3 posted on 11/16/2013 8:36:28 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

From: 2 Thessalonians 3:7-12

Avoiding Idleness. Earning One’s Living


[7] For you yourselves know how you ought to imitate us; we were not idle when
we were with you, [8] we did not eat any one’s bread without paying, but with toil
and labor we worked night and day, that might not burden any of you. [9] It was
not because we have not that right, but to give you in our conduct an example to
imitate. [10] For even when we were with you, we gave you this command: If any
one will not work, let him not eat. [11] For we hear that some of you are living in
idleness, mere busy bodies, not doing any work. [12] Now such persons we com-
mand and exhort in the Lord Jesus Christ to do their work in quietness and to
earn their own living.

*********************************************************************************************
Commentary:

7-12. Some of the Thessalonians, wrongly thinking that the Parousia was about
to happen, had given up working and were living in idleness, minding everyone’s
business but their own. So the Apostle reminds them all that when he was
among them he worked to keep himself and was a burden on no one.

The Second Vatican Council underlines the value of work when it exhorts “Chris-
tians, as citizens of both cities, to perform their duties faithfully in the spirit of the
Gospel.” Far from neglecting earthly responsibilities, they should, as the Council
goes on, realize that by their faith they “are bound all the more to fulfill these res-
ponsibilities according to the vocation of each one (cf. 2 Thess 3:6-13; Eph 4:28)”
(”Gaudium Et Spes”, 43).

“For the love of God, for the love of souls, and to live up to our Christian vocation,
we must give good example. So as not to give scandal, or to provoke even the
faintest suspicion that the children of God are soft and useless, so as not to dis-
edify, you must strive to show an example of balanced justice, to behave proper-
ly as responsible people. The farmer who ploughs his field while constantly raising
his heart to God, just as much as the carpenter, the blacksmith, the office worker,
the academic — all Christians, in fact — have to be an example for their colleagues
at work, and to be humble about it. Therefore, everyone, in his job, in whatever
place he has in society, must feel obliged to make his work God’s work, sowing
everywhere the peace and joy of the Lord” (St. J. Escriva, “Friends of God”, 70).

*********************************************************************************************
Source: “The Navarre Bible: Text and Commentaries”. Biblical text from the
Revised Standard Version and New Vulgate. Commentaries by members of
the Faculty of Theology, University of Navarre, Spain.

Published by Four Courts Press, Kill Lane, Blackrock, Co. Dublin, Ireland, and
by Scepter Publishers in the United States.


4 posted on 11/16/2013 8:38:25 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

From: Luke 21:5-19

Discourse on the Destruction of Jerusalem and the End of the World


[5] And as some spoke of the temple, how it was adorned with noble stones
and offerings, He (Jesus) said, [6] “As for these things which you see, the
days will come when there shall not be left here one stone upon another that
will not be thrown down.” [7] And they asked Him, “Teacher, when will this
be, and what will be the sign when this is about to take place?” [8] And He
said, “Take heed that you are not led astray; for many will come in My name,
saying, ‘I am He!’ and, ‘The time is at hand!’ Do not go after them. [9] And
when you hear of wars and tumults, do not be terrified; for this must first
take place, but the end will not be at once.”

[10] Then He said to them, “Nation will rise against nation, and kingdom against
kingdom; [11] there will be great earthquakes, and in various places famines and
pestilences; and there will be terrors and great signs from heaven. [12] But
before all this they will lay their hands on you and persecute you, delivering you
up to the synagogues and prisons, and you will be brought before kings and
governors for My name’s sake. [13] This will be a time for you to bear testimony.
[14] Settle it therefore in your minds, not to meditate beforehand how to answer;
[15] for I will give you a mouth and wisdom, which none of your adversaries will
be able to withstand or contradict. [16] You will be delivered up even by parents
and brothers and kinsmen and friends, and some of you they will put to death;
[17] you will be hated by all for My name’s sake. [18] But not a hair of your head
will perish. [19] By your endurance you will gain your lives.”

*********************************************************************************************
Commentary:

5-36. The disciples are in awe of the magnificence of the temple, and Jesus uses
the occasion to give a long discourse, known as the “eschatological discourse”
because it has to do with the last days of the world. The account given here is
very similar to those in the other Synoptic Gospels (cf. Mt 24:1-51; Mk 13:1-37).
The discourse deals with three inter-connected subjects—the destruction of
Jerusalem (which took place some forty years later), the end of the world, and
the second coming of Christ in glory and majesty. Jesus, who also predicts
here the persecution of the Church will experience, exhorts His disciples to be
patient, to pray and be watchful.

Our Lord speaks here in the style and language of prophecy, using images taken
from the Old Testament; also, in this discourse prophecies which are going to be
fulfilled very soon are mixed in with others which have to do with the end of the
world. It is not our Lord’s intention to satisfy people’s curiosity about future events,
but to protect them from being discouraged and scandalized about what is going
to happen in the days immediately ahead. This explains why He exhorts them:
“Take heed that you are not led astray” (v. 8); “do not be tempted” (v. 9); “watch
at all times” (v. 34).

8. On hearing that Jerusalem is going to be destroyed, the disciples ask what
sign will be given as a warning of these events (vv. 5-7). Jesus answers by telling
them “not to be led astray,” that is to say, not to expect any warning; not to be
misled by false prophets; to stay faithful to Him. These false prophets will come
along claiming to be the Messiah (”I am He!”). Our Lord’s reply in fact refers to
two events which in the Jewish mind were interrelated—the destruction of the
Holy City and the end of the world. This is why He goes on to speak of both
events and implies that there will be a long gap between the two; the destruction
of the temple and of Jerusalem are a kind of sign or symbol of the catastrophes
which will mark the end of the world.

9-11. Our Lord does not want His disciples to confuse just any catastrophe —
famine, earthquake, war—or even persecution with the signals of the end of the
world. He exhorts them quite clearly: “Do not be tempted,” because although
all these has to happen, “the end will not be at once;” in spite of the difficulties
of all kinds the Gospel will spread to the ends of the earth. Difficulties should
not paralyze the preaching of the faith.

19. Jesus foretells all kinds of persecution. Persecution itself is something
inevitable: “all who desire to live a godly life in Christ Jesus will be persecuted”
(2 Timothy 3:12). His disciples will have need to remember the Lord’s warning
at the Last Supper: “A servant is not greater than his master. If they persecuted
Me, they will persecute you” (John 15:20). However, these persecutions are part
of God’s providence: they happen because He lets them happen, which He does
in order to draw greater good out of them. Persecution provides Christians with
an opportunity to bear witness to Christ; without it the blood of martyrs would
not adorn the Church. Moreover, our Lord promises to give special help to those
who suffer persecution, and He tells them not to be afraid: He will give them of
His own wisdom to enable them to defend themselves; He will not permit a hair
of their heads to perish, that is, even apparent misfortune and loss will be for
them a beginning of Heaven.

From Jesus’ words we can also deduce the obligation of every Christian to be
ready to lose life rather than offend God. Only those will attain salvation who
persevere until the end in faithfulness to the Lord. The three Synoptic Gospels
locate His exhortation to perseverance in this discourse (cf. Matthew 24:13;
Mark 13:13) and St. Matthew gives it elsewhere (Matthew 10:22) as does St.
Peter (1 Peter 5:9)—all of which underlines the importance for every Christian
of this warning from our Lord.

*********************************************************************************************
Source: “The Navarre Bible: Text and Commentaries”. Biblical text from the
Revised Standard Version and New Vulgate. Commentaries by members of
the Faculty of Theology, University of Navarre, Spain.

Published by Four Courts Press, Kill Lane, Blackrock, Co. Dublin, Ireland, and
by Scepter Publishers in the United States.


5 posted on 11/16/2013 8:40:03 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Jerusalem Bible published and copyright © 1966, 1967 and 1968 by Darton, Longman & Todd

Readings at Mass


First reading

Malachi 3:19-20 ©

The day is coming now, burning like a furnace; and all the arrogant and the evil-doers will be like stubble. The day that is coming is going to burn them up, says the Lord of Hosts, leaving them neither root nor stalk. But for you who fear my name, the sun of righteousness will shine out with healing in its rays.


Psalm

Psalm 97:5-9 ©

The Lord comes to rule the peoples with fairness.

Sing psalms to the Lord with the harp

  with the sound of music.

With trumpets and the sound of the horn

  acclaim the King, the Lord.

The Lord comes to rule the peoples with fairness.

Let the sea and all within it, thunder;

  the world, and all its peoples.

Let the rivers clap their hands

  and the hills ring out their joy

The Lord comes to rule the peoples with fairness.

at the presence of the Lord: for he comes,

  he comes to rule the earth.

He will rule the world with justice

  and the peoples with fairness.

The Lord comes to rule the peoples with fairness.


Second reading

2 Thessalonians 3:7-12 ©

You know how you are supposed to imitate us: now we were not idle when we were with you, nor did we ever have our meals at anyone’s table without paying for them; no, we worked night and day, slaving and straining, so as not to be a burden on any of you. This was not because we had no right to be, but in order to make ourselves an example for you to follow.

  We gave you a rule when we were with you: do not let anyone have any food if he refuses to do any work. Now we hear that there are some of you who are living in idleness, doing no work themselves but interfering with everyone else’s. In the Lord Jesus Christ, we order and call on people of this kind to go on quietly working and earning the food that they eat.


Gospel Acclamation

Lk21:36

Alleluia, alleluia!

Stay awake, praying at all times

for the strength to stand with confidence

before the Son of Man.

Alleluia!

Or

Lk21:28

Alleluia, alleluia!

Stand erect, hold your heads high,

because your liberation is near at hand.

Alleluia!


Gospel

Luke 21:5-19 ©

When some were talking about the Temple, remarking how it was adorned with fine stonework and votive offerings, Jesus said, ‘All these things you are staring at now – the time will come when not a single stone will be left on another: everything will be destroyed.’ And they put to him this question: ‘Master,’ they said ‘when will this happen, then, and what sign will there be that this is about to take place?’

  ‘Take care not to be deceived,’ he said ‘because many will come using my name and saying, “I am he” and, “The time is near at hand.” Refuse to join them. And when you hear of wars and revolutions, do not be frightened, for this is something that must happen but the end is not so soon.’ Then he said to them, ‘Nation will fight against nation, and kingdom against kingdom. There will be great earthquakes and plagues and famines here and there; there will be fearful sights and great signs from heaven.

  ‘But before all this happens, men will seize you and persecute you; they will hand you over to the synagogues and to imprisonment, and bring you before kings and governors because of my name – and that will be your opportunity to bear witness. Keep this carefully in mind: you are not to prepare your defence, because I myself shall give you an eloquence and a wisdom that none of your opponents will be able to resist or contradict. You will be betrayed even by parents and brothers, relations and friends; and some of you will be put to death. You will be hated by all men on account of my name, but not a hair of your head will be lost. Your endurance will win you your lives.’


6 posted on 11/16/2013 8:47:10 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Relics of St. Peter to Go On Public Display
Relics of St. Peter to Go On Public Display Relics of St. Peter to Go On Public Display
Pope Francis: The Communion of Saints Is a "Solidarity Between Heaven and Earth" [weekly audience
On Mary, Model of Faith, Charity and Union with Christ [Weekly Audience]
Audience: Pope continues catechesis on Church as our Mother
The Light of Faith (Lumen Fidei)[Catholic Caucus]

Year of Faith: Does God Command Evil Actions in the Bible? Part II (Part I linked
Francis "Lights" Up – Pope's First Encyclical Due Friday
Pope: Homily at Mass for Evangelium Vitae Day [full text]
Adoration with Pope energizing Catholics worldwide
Parishes Worldwide Prepare for Eucharistic Adoration Hour (June 2 at 11 am ET)
Pope [Francis] at Pentecost: Newness, harmony and mission
Audience: Do not be ‘part-time’ Christians
Pope Francis: Regina caeli
Pope to welcome 70,000 youths, confirm 44 (this Sunday) [Catholic Caucus]
Pope Francis’ General Audience focused on women. Feminists aren’t going to be happy

Cardinal Jorge Mario Bergoglio's "Letter On the Year of Faith" (Crossing Threshold of Faith)
Pope Francis – the real deal – has Audience with Cardinals
Benedict XVI's Final General Audience
On Ash Wednesday
On God As Creator of Heaven and Earth
On Abraham's Faith
On Christ As Mediator Between God and Man
On the Incarnation
On God the Almighty Father
Year of Faith: Indulgences and Places of Pilgrimage [Ecumenical]
On the Identity of Jesus

On the Faith of Mary, the Virgin Mother of Christ
Father Cantalamessa's 1st Advent Sermon (Catholic Caucus)
On The Unfolding of God's Self-Revelation
On the Beauty of God's Plan of Salvation
On Bearing Witness to the Christian Faith
On the Splendor of God's Truth
On the Knowledge of God
Archbishop Chaput says Year of Faith holds solution to relativism
Following the Truth: The Year Of Faith – 10 Things You Should Know [Catholic Caucus]
Papal Encyclical on Faith Announced

On the Desire for God
On the Ecclesial Nature of Faith
On the Nature of Faith
Catechism's benefits explained for Year of Faith (Catholic Caucus)
A Life of Faith: Papal Theologian Speaks on the Grace of Faith
ASIA/LAOS - "Year of Faith" amid the persecutions of Christians forced to become "animists"
From no faith to a mountain-top of meaning: Father John Nepil (Catholic Caucus)
Living the Year of Faith: How Pope Benedict Wants You to Begin [Catholic Caucus]
Share Your Faith in This Year of Faith: Two keys to help you do it.
On A New Series of Audiences for The Year of Faith

Pope will deliver year-long teaching series on restoring faith
Pope Benedict XVI Grants Plenary Indulgence to Faithful [Catholic Caucus]
Pope, at Marian shrine, entrusts Year of Faith, synod to Mary (Catholic Caucus)
Catholic Church Calls for Public Prayers in Offices on Fridays
Highlights in the Plan for Year of Faith: Traditional Events Will Take on Special Perspective
Catholic Church calls for public prayers in offices on Fridays
Vatican Unveils Logo for Year of Faith [Catholic Caucus]
Miami Prelate Recalls Pope's Visit to Cuba, Looks to Year of Faith [Catholic Caucus]
The World-Changing Year of Faith [Catholic Caucus]
Vatican to Issue Recommendations for Celebrating Year of Faith

7 posted on 11/16/2013 8:51:50 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Perpetual Novena for the Nation (Ecumenical)
8 posted on 11/16/2013 8:52:30 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Prayers for The Religion Forum (Ecumenical)
9 posted on 11/16/2013 8:53:08 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

 
Jesus, High Priest
 

We thank you, God our Father, for those who have responded to your call to priestly ministry.

Accept this prayer we offer on their behalf: Fill your priests with the sure knowledge of your love.

Open their hearts to the power and consolation of the Holy Spirit.

Lead them to new depths of union with your Son.

Increase in them profound faith in the Sacraments they celebrate as they nourish, strengthen and heal us.

Lord Jesus Christ, grant that these, your priests, may inspire us to strive for holiness by the power of their example, as men of prayer who ponder your word and follow your will.

O Mary, Mother of Christ and our mother, guard with your maternal care these chosen ones, so dear to the Heart of your Son.

Intercede for our priests, that offering the Sacrifice of your Son, they may be conformed more each day to the image of your Son, our Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ. Amen.

Saint John Vianney, universal patron of priests, pray for us and our priests

This icon shows Jesus Christ, our eternal high priest.

The gold pelican over His heart represents self-sacrifice.

The border contains an altar and grapevines, representing the Mass, and icons of Melchizedek and St. Jean-Baptiste Vianney.

Melchizedek: king of righteousness (left icon) was priest and king of Jerusalem.  He blessed Abraham and has been considered an ideal priest-king.

St. Jean-Baptiste Vianney is the patron saint of parish priests.

10 posted on 11/16/2013 8:54:05 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Pray a Rosary each day for our nation.

Pray the Rosary

1.  Sign of the Cross:  In the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit.  Amen.

2.  The Apostles Creed:  I BELIEVE in God, the Father almighty, Creator of heaven and earth, and in Jesus Christ, His only Son, our Lord, who was conceived by the Holy Spirit, born of the Virgin Mary, suffered under Pontius Pilate, was crucified, died, and was buried. He descended into hell; on the third day he rose again from the dead; he ascended into heaven, and is seated at the right hand of God, the Father Almighty; from there He shall come to judge the living and the dead.

I believe in the Holy Spirit, the holy catholic Church, the communion of saints, the forgiveness of sins, the resurrection of the body, and the life everlasting. Amen.

3.  The Lord's Prayer:  OUR Father, who art in heaven, hallowed be Thy name. Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done on earth as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread and forgive us our trespasses as we forgive those who trespass against us. And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil. Amen.

4. (3) Hail Mary:  HAIL Mary, full of grace, the Lord is with thee. Blessed art thou amongst women and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus. Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners, now, and in the hour of our death. Amen. (Three times)

5. Glory Be:  GLORY be to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit. As it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be, world without end. Amen.

Fatima Prayer: Oh, my Jesus, forgive us our sins, save us from the fires of hell, lead all souls to heaven, especially those in most need of your mercy.

Announce each mystery, then say 1 Our Father, 10 Hail Marys, 1 Glory Be and 1 Fatima prayer.  Repeat the process with each mystery.

End with the Hail Holy Queen:

Hail, Holy Queen, Mother of Mercy, our life, our sweetness and our hope! To thee do we cry, poor banished children of Eve! To thee do we send up our sighs, mourning and weeping in this vale of tears! Turn then, most gracious advocate, thine eyes of mercy towards us; and after this, our exile, show unto us the blessed fruit of thy womb, Jesus!

O clement, O loving, O sweet Virgin Mary! Pray for us, O holy Mother of God, that we may be made worthy of the promises of Christ.

Final step -- The Sign of the Cross

 

The Mysteries of the Rosary

By tradition, Catholics meditate on these Mysteries during prayers of the Rosary.
The biblical references follow each of the Mysteries below.


The Glorious Mysteries
(Wednesdays and Sundays)
1.The Resurrection (Matthew 28:1-8, Mark 16:1-18, Luke 24:1-12, John 20:1-29) [Spiritual fruit - Faith]
2. The Ascension (Mark 16:19-20, Luke 24:50-53, Acts 1:6-11) [Spiritual fruit - Christian Hope]
3. The Descent of the Holy Spirit (Acts 2:1-13) [Spiritual fruit - Gifts of the Holy Spirit]
4. The Assumption [Spiritual fruit - To Jesus through Mary]
5. The Coronation [Spiritual fruit - Grace of Final Perseverance]


11 posted on 11/16/2013 8:54:39 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Salvation; TNMountainMan; alphadog; infool7; Heart-Rest; HoosierDammit; red irish; fastrock; ...
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12 posted on 11/16/2013 8:54:49 PM PST by narses (... unless you eat the flesh of the Son of Man and drink his blood, you do not have life within you.)
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To: All



~ PRAYER ~

St. Michael, the Archangel, defend us in battle
 Be our protection against the wickedness
and snares of the devil;
May God rebuke him, we  humbly pray,
 and do thou, O Prince of the heavenly host,
 by the power of God,
 Cast into hell Satan and all the evil spirits
who prowl through the world seeking the ruin of souls.
 Amen
+

13 posted on 11/16/2013 8:55:41 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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A Prayer for our Free Nation Under God
God Save Our Country web site (prayer warriors)
Prayer Chain Request for the United States of America
Pray for Nancy Pelosi
Prayer and fasting will help defeat health care reform (Freeper Prayer Thread)
Prayer Campaign Started to Convert Pro-Abortion Catholic Politicians to Pro-Life
[Catholic Caucus] One Million Rosaries
Non-stop Rosary vigil to defeat ObamaCare

From an Obama bumper sticker on a car:

"Pray for Obama.  Psalm 109:8"

   

PLEASE JOIN US -

Evening Prayer
Someone has said that if people really understood the full extent of the power we have available through prayer, we might be speechless.
Did you know that during WWII there was an advisor to Churchill who organized a group of people who dropped what they were doing every day at a prescribed hour for one minute to collectively pray for the safety of England, its people and peace?  


There is now a group of people organizing the same thing here in America. If you would like to participate: Every evening at 9:00 PM Eastern Time (8:00 PM Central) (7:00 PM Mountain) (6:00 PM Pacific), stop whatever you are doing and spend one minute praying for the safety of the United States, our troops, our citizens, and for a return to a Godly nation. If you know anyone else who would like to participate, please pass this along. Our prayers are the most powerful asset we have.    Please forward this to your praying friends.


14 posted on 11/16/2013 8:56:40 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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(For if he had not hoped that they that were slain should rise again, it would have seemed superfluous and vain to pray for the dead,) And because he considered that they who had fallen asleep with godliness, had great grace laid up for them. It is therefore a holy and wholesome thought to pray for the dead, that they may be loosed from sins." II Maccabees 12

 

November Devotion: The Holy Souls in Purgatory

Since the 16th century Catholic piety has assigned entire months to special devotions. As a reminder of our duty to pray for the suffering faithful in Purgatory, the Church has dedicated the month of November to the Holy Souls. The Holy Souls are those who have died in the state of grace but who are not yet free from all punishment due to their unforgiven venial sins and all other sins already forgiven for which satisfaction is still to be made. They are certain of entering Heaven, but first they must suffer in Purgatory. The Holy Souls cannot help themselves because for them the night has come, when no man can work (John 9:4). It is our great privilege of brotherhood that we can shorten their time of separation from God by our prayers, good works, and, especially, the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass.

To Help the Holy Souls in Purgatory:

1. Have the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass offered up for them.

2. Pray the Rosary and or the Chaplet of Divine Marcy for them, or both.

3. Pray the Stations of the Cross.

4. Offer up little sacrifices and fasting.

5. Spread devotion to them, so that others may pray for them.

6. Attend Eucharistic Adoration and pray for them.

7. Gain all the indulgences you can, and apply them to the Holy Souls

8. Visit to a Cemetery

 

Litany for the Holy Souls in Purgatory

The just shall be in everlasting remembrance; 
He shall not fear the evil hearing.
 
V. Absolve, O Lord, the souls of the faithful departed 
from every bond of sin, 
R. And by the help of Thy grace
may they be enabled to escape the avenging judgment, 
and to enjoy the happiness of eternal life. 
Because in Thy mercy are deposited the souls that departed 
in an inferior degree of grace,
Lord, have mercy.
Because their present suffering is greatest 
in the knowledge of the pain that their separation from Thee is causing Thee,
Lord, have mercy. 
Because of their present inability to add to Thy accidental glory, 
Lord, have mercy.
Not for our consolation, O Lord; 
not for their release from purgative pain, O God; 
but for Thy joy 
and the greater accidental honour of Thy throne, O Christ the King,
Lord, have mercy.
For the souls of our departed friends, relations and benefactors, 
grant light and peace, O Lord.  
For those of our family who have fallen asleep in Thy bosom, O Jesus, 
grant light and peace, O Lord.  
For those who have gone to prepare our place,
grant light and peace, O Lord.  
(For those who were our brothers [or sisters] in Religion,)
grant light and peace, O Lord.  
For priests who were our spiritual directors,
grant light and peace, O Lord.  
For men or women who were our teachers in school,
grant light and peace, O Lord.  
For those who were our employers (or employees),
grant light and peace, O Lord.  
For those who were our associates in daily toil,
grant light and peace, O Lord.  
For any soul whom we ever offended,
grant light and peace, O Lord.  
For our enemies now departed,
grant light and peace, O Lord.  
For those souls who have none to pray for them,
grant light and peace, O Lord.  
For those forgotten by their friends and kin,
grant light and peace, O Lord.  
For those now suffering the most,
grant light and peace, O Lord.  
For those who have acquired the most merit,
grant light and peace, O Lord.  
For the souls next to be released from Purgatory,
grant light and peace, O Lord.  
 
For those who, while on earth, 
were most devoted to God the Holy Ghost, 
to Jesus in the Most Blessed Sacrament, 
to the holy Mother of God,
grant light and peace, O Lord.  
For all deceased popes and prelates,
grant light and peace, O Lord.  
For all deceased priests, seminarians and religious, 
grant light and peace, O Lord.  
For all our brethren in the Faith everywhere, 
grant light and peace, O Lord.  
For all our separated brethren who deeply loved Thee, 
and would have come into Thy household had they known the truth,
grant light and peace, O Lord.  
For those souls who need, or in life asked, our prayers,
grant light and peace, O Lord.  
For those, closer to Thee than we are, whose prayers we need,
grant light and peace, O Lord.  
That those may be happy with Thee forever, 
who on earth were true exemplars of the Catholic Faith, 
grant them eternal rest, O Lord.
That those may be admitted to Thine unveiled Presence, 
who as far as we know never committed mortal sin,     
grant them eternal rest, O Lord.  
That those may be housed in glory, 
who lived always in recollection and prayer,
grant them eternal rest, O Lord.  
That those may be given the celestial joy of beholding Thee, 
who lived lives of mortification and self-denial and penance,
grant them eternal rest, O Lord.  
That those may be flooded with Thy love, 
who denied themselves even Thy favours of indulgence 
and who made the heroic act 
for the souls who had gone before them,
grant them eternal rest, O Lord.  
That those may be drawn up to the Beatific Vision, 
who never put obstacles in the way of sanctifying grace 
and who ever drew closer in mystical union with Thee,
grant them eternal rest, O Lord.  
V. Eternal rest give unto them, O Lord, 
R. And let perpetual light shine upon them. 
 
Let Us Pray 
Be mindful, O Lord, 
of Thy servants and handmaids, 
N. and N., 
who are gone before us 
with the sign of faith 
and repose in the sleep of grace.  
To these, O Lord, 
and to all who rest in Christ, 
grant, we beseech Thee, 
a place of refreshment, 
light and peace, 
through the same Christ Our Lord.
 
Amen


All Saints or All Souls? Differences should be black and white
All Souls' Day [Catholic Caucus]
Why I Am Catholic: For Purgatory, Thank Heavens (Ecumenical)
Q and A: Why Pray for the Dead? [Ecumenical]
“….and Death is Gain” – A Meditation on the Christian View of Death [Catholic Caucus]
99 & 1/2 Won’t Do – A Meditation on Purgatory
The Month of November: Thoughts on the "Last Things"
To Trace All Souls Day (Protestants vs Catholics)

November 2 -- All Souls Day
On November: All Souls and the "Permanent Things"
"From the Pastor" ALL SAINTS & ALL SOULS
Praying for the Dead [All Souls Day] (Catholic/Orthodox Caucus)
To Trace All Souls Day [Ecumenical]
All Souls Day [Catholic/Orthodox Caucus]
The Roots of All Souls Day
The Commemoration of all the Faithful Departed (All Souls)
During Month of Souls, Recall Mystic, St. Gertrude the Great
All Saints and All Souls

 Repeat these prayers every seven days during the month of November for the Poor Souls in Purgatory

 

SUNDAY

O Lord God omnipotent, I beseech You by the Precious Blood, which Your divine Son Jesus shed in the Garden, deliver the souls in purgatory, and especially that one which is the most forsaken of all, and bring it into Your glory, where it may praise and bless You for ever.    Amen.

 

Say here:  one Our Father and one Hail Mary

CONCLUDING PRAYERS

Eternal rest grant unto them, O Lord; and let perpetual light shine upon them.  May they rest in peace.    Amen.

Merciful Father, hear our prayers and console us.   As we renew our faith in Your Son, whom You raised from the dead, strengthen our hope that all our departed brothers and sisters will share in His resurrection, who lives and reigns with You and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.    Amen.



 

MONDAY

O Lord God omnipotent, I beseech You by the Precious Blood, which Your divine Son Jesus shed in His cruel scourging, deliver the souls in purgatory, and among them all, especially that soul which is nearest to its entrance into Your glory, that it may soon begin to praise You and bless You for ever.    Amen.

 

Say here:  one Our Father and one Hail Mary

CONCLUDING PRAYERS

Eternal rest grant unto them, O Lord; and let perpetual light shine upon them.  May they rest in peace.    Amen.

Merciful Father, hear our prayers and console us.   As we renew our faith in Your Son, whom You raised from the dead, strengthen our hope that all our departed brothers and sisters will share in His resurrection, who lives and reigns with You and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.    Amen.

 

TUESDAY

O Lord God omnipotent, I beseech You by the Precious Blood of Your divine Son Jesus that was shed in His bitter crowning with thorns, deliver the souls in purgatory, and among them all, particularly that soul which is in the greatest need of our prayers, in order that it may not long be delayed in praising You in Your glory and blessing You for ever.    Amen.

 

Say here:  one Our Father and one Hail Mary

CONCLUDING PRAYERS

Eternal rest grant unto them, O Lord; and let perpetual light shine upon them.  May they rest in peace.    Amen.

Merciful Father, hear our prayers and console us.   As we renew our faith in Your Son, whom You raised from the dead, strengthen our hope that all our departed brothers and sisters will share in His resurrection, who lives and reigns with You and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.    Amen.


 

WEDNESDAY

O Lord God omnipotent, I beseech You by the Precious Blood of Your divine Son Jesus that was shed in the streets of Jerusalem while He carried on His sacred shoulders the heavy burden of the Cross, deliver the souls in purgatory and especially that one which is richest in merits in Your sight, so that, having soon attained the high place in glory to which it is destined, it may praise You triumphantly and bless You for ever.    Amen

 

Say here:  one Our Father and one Hail Mary

CONCLUDING PRAYERS

Eternal rest grant unto them, O Lord; and let perpetual light shine upon them.  May they rest in peace.    Amen.

Merciful Father, hear our prayers and console us.   As we renew our faith in Your Son, whom You raised from the dead, strengthen our hope that all our departed brothers and sisters will share in His resurrection, who lives and reigns with You and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.    Amen.

 

THURSDAY

O Lord God omnipotent, I beseech You by the Precious Body and Blood of Your divine Son Jesus, which He Himself on the night before His Passion gave as meat and drink to His beloved Apostles and bequeathed to His Holy Church to be the perpetual Sacrifice and life-giving nourishment of His faithful people, deliver the souls in purgatory, but most of all, that soul which was most devoted to this Mystery of infinite love, in order that it may praise You therefore, together with Your divine Son and the Holy Spirit in Your glory for ever.    Amen.

 

Say here:  one Our Father and one Hail Mary

CONCLUDING PRAYERS

Eternal rest grant unto them, O Lord; and let perpetual light shine upon them.  May they rest in peace.    Amen.

Merciful Father, hear our prayers and console us.   As we renew our faith in Your Son, whom You raised from the dead, strengthen our hope that all our departed brothers and sisters will share in His resurrection, who lives and reigns with You and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.    Amen.

 

FRIDAY

 

O Lord God omnipotent,
I beseech You by the Precious Blood which Jesus Your divine Son did shed this day upon the tree of the Cross, especially from His sacred Hands and Feet, deliver the souls in purgatory, and particularly that soul for whom I am most bound to pray, in order that I may not be the cause which hinders You from admitting it quickly to the possession of Your glory where it may praise You and bless You for evermore.    Amen

 

Say here:  one Our Father and one Hail Mary

CONCLUDING PRAYERS

Eternal rest grant unto them, O Lord; and let perpetual light shine upon them.  May they rest in peace.    Amen.

Merciful Father, hear our prayers and console us.   As we renew our faith in Your Son, whom You raised from the dead, strengthen our hope that all our departed brothers and sisters will share in His resurrection, who lives and reigns with You and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.    Amen.

 

 

Say here:  one Our Father and one Hail Mary

 

 

SATURDAY

O Lord God omnipotent, I beseech You by the Precious Blood which gushed forth from the sacred Side of Your divine Son Jesus in the presence and to the great sorrow of His most holy Mother, deliver the souls in purgatory and among them all especially that soul which has been most devout to this noble Lady, that it may come quickly into Your glory, there to praise You in her, and her in You through all the ages.    Amen.

 

Say here:  one Our Father and one Hail Mary

CONCLUDING PRAYERS

Eternal rest grant unto them, O Lord; and let perpetual light shine upon them.  May they rest in peace.    Amen.

Merciful Father, hear our prayers and console us.   As we renew our faith in Your Son, whom You raised from the dead, strengthen our hope that all our departed brothers and sisters will share in His resurrection, who lives and reigns with You and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.    Amen.


15 posted on 11/16/2013 8:57:52 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Intentions of the Holy Father for November

November 2013

Suffering Priests. That priests who experience difficulties may find comfort in their suffering, support in their doubts, and confirmation in their fidelity.

Latin American Churches. That as fruit of the continental mission, Latin American Churches may send missionaries to other Churches.

16 posted on 11/16/2013 8:59:43 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Daily Gospel Commentary

Thirty-third Sunday in Ordinary Time - Year C

Commentary of the day
Saint Patrick (c.385-c.461), missionary monk, Bishop
Confession, 34-38 ; SC 249

"It will lead to your giving testimony"

I must give thanks to my God continuously. He has helped me to keep my faith through difficult times, so that I can fearlessly offer myself as a kind of living sacrifice to Christ. The Lord has rescued me from so many dangers that sometimes I just have to ask: "God, who am I?... “From where did I get such wisdom?” It certainly wasn't from inside myself. “I didn't know my future,” and I had no great knowledge of God. And later on, who was it who gave me such a wonderful and life-giving gift, the gift to know and love God? But to receive such things, I had to leave behind my home and family... I came to Ireland to preach the good news and to suffer abuse from unbelievers and... to have my mission shamefully criticized. I have had many hard times, even to the point of being enslaved again, but I traded in my free birth for the good of others.


If I am worthy, I am even ready to lay down my life willingly and without hesitation for
his name. Here, in Ireland, is where I wish to live out my final days, if God will permit me. I owe so much to God, who allowed so many people to find a new life in him through me. I confirmed them in our faith and ordained clergy for them everywhere, for a people just coming to a belief in God. The master chose them from the ends of the earth, just as he said he would through the prophets: “The gentiles will come to you from the ends of the earth” and...: "I will place you like a lamp among the nations so that you may bring salvation to the ends of the earth.”

(
Biblical references : Ps 94[93],9; Rm 12,1; 2S 7,18; Mt 13,54; Ps 38[35],5; 2Tm 2,9; Lk 1,70; Jr 16,19; Is 49,6; Acts 13,47)


17 posted on 11/16/2013 9:05:29 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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From Zenit.org

Searching for the Kingdom of God in the Humility of the Wait

Lectio Divina: 33rd Sunday in Ordinary Time, Year C

Paris, November 15, 2013 (Zenit.org) Monsignor Francesco Follo | 326 hits

1)     The question is to understand what to do now, not to know what will happen at the end

 

      Reading the text of today’s Gospel (Luke 21:5-19) it is easy to think almost exclusively at the events of the end of the world that will also be the end of human history: the end of the world, the victory of the Lord and the last judgment. However the aim of Jesus’ speech is not to satisfy the curiosity of the ones who want to know how the “otherworld” will be, but to enlighten the present one. Listening to these words allows the disciple to “see” the ephemeral worldas a “sign” of a reality that lasts forever. Jesus, his person and his word, are the key to interpret this reality and history. He is the Son of God who became man, He is the incarnate Word, he is the passing fragility and the everlasting life, “He is the new Temple[2], in a new place where we encounter God” (Benedict XVI), and He is the Love that on the Cross is revealed as passion and compassion.

    Thanks to Christ the Cross is no longer a sad instrument of death but a splendid throne irradiating Love. The Cross of Jesus is the most intense moment of the revelation of the meaning of all that exists. It is the most dramatic point of obscurity, of fragility and of nonsense, but it is also the moment of the most intense light and fulfillment of the life that is resurrected and that wins over death. The cross of Jesus is the revelation that the final meaning of everything is Love, the love that humiliates himself, that dies to become true love and that empties himself to become the greatest gift.

    Love is the truest meaning of this world that passes and dies to be able to enter into the infinity of the Love that never ends. We don’t know how the “otherworld” will be, but we know that it will be the fullness of love that is already the life in the “earthly” world.

     Jesus invites his disciples (that is us) not to be attached to what passes , not to have illusions, not to have idols, but to live intensely the “daily life” by beginning to taste the love that will never end and that will become always bigger. To live love, to free and to expand the field of love, is the message of Jesus through his eschatological[3] speech: only Love lasts forever.

      This is the reason for which the Redeemer invites to “walk in charity” (expression used to indicate the Spiritual Exercises written by Saint Ignatius of Loyola and recalled by Pope Francis).

      Let’s not forget that charity is not just  being charitable to the poor by giving them money or other material help. Charity is also to grow in the Christian hope, in the link of fraternal love and in steady faith. (1 John 2:14). The via amoris dolorosa (the path of love in the complete donation of oneself) that is the Via Crucis, is for the Christian the way that takes him to the complete identification with Christ. To this regard Saint Clare of Assisi said of Saint Francis who was in love with Christ: “He loves him to the point of resembling even physically to Him” and asked to herself “Will I be able to do the same?”

The life of this Saint Nun shows that it is possible to reassemble to Christ if one puts himself at His school of charity and walks always behind the for-so-long-waited Loved One. Here, I mean to use the “to wait” in the original meaning of “to reach to”, “to search for.”

      In conclusion we “wait for” the Lord:

-        Looking for him. Regarding the search for God it is clear an apothegm [4] of the Fathers of the desert that says: “A man in search of God asked a Christian “How can I find God?” The Christian replied “I’ll show you”. He took him on the sea shore and plunged his face three times in the water. Then he asked him “What did you wanted most when your face was in the water?” “Air” “When you’ll desire God as much as you have desired air, you’ll find Him” said the Christian.

-        Persevering in His love.  “As love is strong in the great difficulties so it is perseverant in the dull daily life. One thing is necessary to please God: to do even the small things for love” ( Mother Faustina Kowalska)

-        Testifying His truth and not fantasizing about the end of the world

    We found an example of this testimony in the Consecrated Virgins. The virginal consecration grows in them an attitude of trust in the world and in humanity and a way of listening to history and to the human problems uniting them, through their way of working and living, to every man and woman.  These Virgins become companions in the journey, instruments of communion and witnesses of love.

      These consecrated women participate to the creative doing of God through their work that allows them to provide for their living and to be open to sharing.

       With their life they give voice to the invocation of the Spirit and of the Church, “‘Maranatha’, come Lord Jesus” ( Wis 22:20) keeping alive a vigilant and prophetic waiting.[5]

       The consecrated Virgins recall the desire of God to the men and the women of their time and show how God today is present and redeems history.

--

Roman Rite

XXXIII Sunday in Ordinary Time - Year C – November 17, 2013

Mal 3:19-20; Ps 98; 2The 3:7-12; Lk21:5-19


18 posted on 11/16/2013 9:14:57 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Arlington Catholic Herald

GOSPEL COMMENTARY LK 21:5-19

All worldly things will pass, God’s love endures

Fr. Robert Wagner

This Sunday’s Gospel account is situated a few days after Jesus comes to Jerusalem for the celebration of the Passover feast. As we recall each Palm Sunday, He entered the city to cries of joyful praise as His fellow disciples and pilgrims proclaimed, “Blessed is the king who comes in the name of the Lord” (Lk 19:38). Now Jesus is amid the crowds again, listening to them speak of the splendor of the temple that rises above them.

Without question, the temple was an impressive site. Its exterior was made from gleaming white marble and covered with large plates of gold and expensive ornaments. To the pilgrim approaching Jerusalem, the temple towered above the city, brilliant in the sunlight, displaying all the glory one could expect of the house of God. Admiring its beauty and gathered around their prophet and king, we cannot help but sense the joy and pride of the disciples of Jesus.

 

Their contentment, however, likely was shattered by a sobering prediction from Jesus. Referring to the temple, He said, “All that you see here — the days will come when there will not be left a stone upon another stone” (Lk 21:6). Considering the temple was constructed of marble blocks as large as 40 feet in length and weighing more than 500 tons, likely this seemed startling in its impossibility. In another sense, however, it was more shocking, for how could the Lord allow His house to be destroyed? Without the temple, where would Israel offer sacrifices for their sins or offerings of thanksgiving?

Next, Jesus tells of further turmoil, including natural disasters and wars, the coming of false prophets bent on deceiving the faithful, and even the persecution and martyrdom of His disciples at the hands of those they trust. Along with the foretelling of the temple destruction, these troubling predictions had to bring discouragement into the hearts of His disciples that day. If we were to hear the same prediction for our own future, we, too, might begin to doubt the plan that God has for our salvation.

The disciples of Jesus did not yet know and understand what would take place in the coming days, when through His death and resurrection, Jesus would forgive the sins of the world and destroy the power of death. In Him, the Old Covenant of the people of Israel would come to pass as the New Covenant embraced all people; the temple of Jerusalem — destroyed by the Roman army in A.D. 70 — also would come to pass and find its fulfillment in the universal church.

The eyes of faith are needed to see the glorious victory of the cross, because to the world, it seems as a defeat. History shows us, however, that God often allows suffering and destruction to bring about His glory and draw us to His loving embrace.

As Christians, we know the full story. We know the victory is ours. Jesus assures His disciples that “not a hair on your head will be destroyed” (Lk 21:18). Since He speaks of coming persecution and martyrdom, we know that Jesus does not mean that His disciples will be free from suffering. Instead, He guarantees that with faith in Him and trust in His love, even in death, we will not experience defeat. Nothing can separate us from the love of God (cf. Rom 8:35-39).

God created all the things of this world. In them we see His power, goodness, beauty and order. But while we may find the splendor of God in the world, we know that we do not place our faith in such things. Magnificent — even sacred — structures, material possessions, political leaders and systems of government, the people who surround us — even the world itself — all of these will pass. The day will come when not one stone will be left upon another, and there will be just one thing that remains: our God, Whose love is everlasting.

Jesus offers us this promise: “By your perseverance you will secure your lives” (Lk 21:19). Let us pray for the faith that sees past the glory, the suffering and all the passing things of this world, and clings to the everlasting love of our triune God. In this is our salvation and joy.

Fr. Wagner is Arlington Bishop Paul S. Loverde’s secretary.

Their contentment, however, likely was shattered by a sobering prediction from Jesus. Referring to the temple, He said, “All that you see here — the days will come when there will not be left a stone upon another stone” (Lk 21:6). Considering the temple was constructed of marble blocks as large as 40 feet in length and weighing more than 500 tons, likely this seemed startling in its impossibility. In another sense, however, it was more shocking, for how could the Lord allow His house to be destroyed? Without the temple, where would Israel offer sacrifices for their sins or offerings of thanksgiving?

Next, Jesus tells of further turmoil, including natural disasters and wars, the coming of false prophets bent on deceiving the faithful, and even the persecution and martyrdom of His disciples at the hands of those they trust. Along with the foretelling of the temple destruction, these troubling predictions had to bring discouragement into the hearts of His disciples that day. If we were to hear the same prediction for our own future, we, too, might begin to doubt the plan that God has for our salvation.

The disciples of Jesus did not yet know and understand what would take place in the coming days, when through His death and resurrection, Jesus would forgive the sins of the world and destroy the power of death. In Him, the Old Covenant of the people of Israel would come to pass as the New Covenant embraced all people; the temple of Jerusalem — destroyed by the Roman army in A.D. 70 — also would come to pass and find its fulfillment in the universal church.

The eyes of faith are needed to see the glorious victory of the cross, because to the world, it seems as a defeat. History shows us, however, that God often allows suffering and destruction to bring about His glory and draw us to His loving embrace.

As Christians, we know the full story. We know the victory is ours. Jesus assures His disciples that “not a hair on your head will be destroyed” (Lk 21:18). Since He speaks of coming persecution and martyrdom, we know that Jesus does not mean that His disciples will be free from suffering. Instead, He guarantees that with faith in Him and trust in His love, even in death, we will not experience defeat. Nothing can separate us from the love of God (cf. Rom 8:35-39).

God created all the things of this world. In them we see His power, goodness, beauty and order. But while we may find the splendor of God in the world, we know that we do not place our faith in such things. Magnificent — even sacred — structures, material possessions, political leaders and systems of government, the people who surround us — even the world itself — all of these will pass. The day will come when not one stone will be left upon another, and there will be just one thing that remains: our God, Whose love is everlasting.

Jesus offers us this promise: “By your perseverance you will secure your lives” (Lk 21:19). Let us pray for the faith that sees past the glory, the suffering and all the passing things of this world, and clings to the everlasting love of our triune God. In this is our salvation and joy.

Fr. Wagner is Arlington Bishop Paul S. Loverde’s secretary.


19 posted on 11/16/2013 9:35:43 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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The Work of God

Year C  -  33rd Sunday in Ordinary Time

The days will come in which there shall not be left a stone upon a stone that shall not be thrown down.

Luke 21:5-19

5 And some saying of the temple, that it was adorned with goodly stones and gifts, he said:
6 These things which you see, the days will come in which there shall not be left a stone upon a stone that shall not be thrown down.
7 And they asked him, saying: Master, when shall these things be? and what shall be the sign when they shall begin to come to pass?
8 Who said: Take heed you be not seduced; for many will come in my name, saying, I am he; and the time is at hand: go ye not therefore after them.
9 And when you shall hear of wars and seditions, be not terrified: these things must first come to pass; but the end is not yet presently.
10 Then he said to them: Nation shall rise against nation, and kingdom against kingdom.
11 And there shall be great earthquakes in divers places, and pestilences, and famines, and terrors from heaven; and there shall be great signs.
12 But before all these things, they will lay their hands upon you, and persecute you, delivering you up to the synagogues and into prisons, dragging you before kings and governors, for my name's sake.
13 And it shall happen unto you for a testimony.
14 Lay it up therefore into your hearts, not to meditate before how you shall answer:
15 For I will give you a mouth and wisdom, which all your adversaries shall not be able to resist and gainsay.
16 And you shall be betrayed by your parents and brethren, and kinsmen and friends; and some of you they will put to death.
17 And you shall be hated by all men for my name's sake.
18 But a hair of your head shall not perish.
19 In your patience you shall possess your souls.

Inspiration of the Holy Spirit - From the Sacred Heart of Jesus

You are the temples of the spirit of God. The spirit gives you life and sustains you in your earthly journey. But it will come to pass when your soul will have to leave the body and you will be turned into dust. The temple of Jerusalem was admired for its beauty and riches, but it was turned into ruins as a witness of material vanity.

Nothing of this world is eternal, therefore beauty comes and beauty goes, what is strong today will be weak tomorrow; the beauty and the light of day must give way to the darkness of the night.

Generations have come and generations have gone, men have been on this earth for thousands of years, but the day will come when things as they are will be no more, the old will be replaced with the new, there will be a new heavens and a new earth.

And while you have your senses, cling to me and learn from my wisdom, have fear of God who has the power to give life and to take it away. Whoever is not with me is against me, and whoever does not gather with me scatters.

Life is full of struggles; therefore unless you work hard you will not obtain what you want. I am inviting you to open your hearts to the Kingdom of Heaven for your own good, but I must warn you that if you take the easy road you will not succeed. I offer you hope in your faith and guarantee the reward of your efforts, but you must persevere to overcome all your obstacles.

Author: Joseph of Jesus and Mary


20 posted on 11/16/2013 9:42:48 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Archdiocese of Washington

The Passage through a Passing World. A homily for the 33rd Sunday of the year

By: Msgr. Charles Pope

In the month of November the Church has us ponder the Four Last Things: death judgment, heaven and hell. As the golden gown of autumn gives way to the lifeless look of winter we too are encouraged to see that our own lives are on a trajectory that leads ultimately to autumn and then the winter of death. But for those who have faith this passage to death leads ultimately to glory.  Scripture says, And the world passes away, and the lust of it; but he who does the will of God abides for ever (1 John 2:17).

In today’s gospel the Lord Jesus gives us a kind of road map of life and calls us to have a sobriety as to the passing and perilous nature of this world in which we live.

There is an historical context in which our Lord speaks. There were political rumblings in Israel in the early 30s AD that would eventually lead to war. Hatred of the Romans is growing among the Jews. The Zealot party and other factions are building power. Jesus, in this passage, prophesies that war will come and lead to Jerusalem’s ultimate destruction. Everything that they knew was going to pass away. By the Summer of 66 AD a three and half year war ensued that resulted in the complete destruction of Jerusalem and the death of 1.2 million Jews. Josephus records the war in great detail in his work The Jewish War.

That is what this text we read today meant historically. But we also need to know what it means for us today. So let’s look at the text from that perspective. The Gospel can be seen in three major sections.

I. PORTRAIT OF PASSING THINGS – The text says, While some people were speaking about how the temple was adorned with costly stones and votive offerings, Jesus said, “All that you see here( the days will come when there will not be left  a stone upon another stone that will not be thrown down.” Then they asked him,  “Teacher, when will this happen? And what sign will there be when all these things are about to happen?” – Notice how they admire the temple and its beauty. But the Lord reminds them that, glorious though it now is, it is all going to be thrown down. We too must hear that whatever glory we see or experience in this world will not ultimately last. It is all going to pass away.

The Temple is a portrait of passing things. Just as it was in splendor and now is gone, so too everything we see now and admire will pass. This is a sober truth we must come to accept, even if it is difficult. Other scriptures remind us of this truth. For example, The world as we know it is passing away (1 Cor 7:29). And again,  And the world passes away, and the lust of it; but he who does the will of God abides for ever (1 John 2:17). Hence this world is passing and we too are passing from it one day soon.

Note however, for them as well as for us, one world was ending, but another was beginning. The Old Testament, Old Covenant and ritual order of the Temple was ending, but the New Testament age of the Church was beginning. It was already breaking forth, even as the old was coming to an end.

And so for us, we should not lament the end of this current world or even our death, for a newer great world of heaven awaits if we are faithful. In fact, through the liturgy and sacraments that new world is already breaking forth if we partake of it.

II. POINTS OF PASSAGE TO PROMISED THINGS – Having been informed at the passing of all things,  the apostles ask for signs that will precede the coming end to the temple and all things they know. We too can learn from what Jesus teaches them and apply it to our lives.

Jesus warns them of four perils on the passage to the promised land of the New Testament of the age of the Church. We too will experience perils in our journey to the Promised Land of Heaven.

A. FALSE MESSIAHS – The text says,  ”See that you not be deceived, for many will come in my name, saying,  ‘I am he,’ and ‘The time has come.’ Do not follow them!- Do you want Jesus Christ to be the Lord of your life? Then you’ve got to get rid of false messiahs.

There are just too many people giving worldly  things and people greater authority in their life than Jesus Christ and what he teaches. Fads, fashions, philosophies, all those people, things and philosophies we  submit our lives to in hope that we be happy.

The danger is that something or someone is reigning in your life other than Jesus Christ. Perhaps it is someone in power we admire, or someone in the media whom we give authority and allow to influence us inordinately. Perhaps it is political positions that we allow to trump the scriptures and the teachings of the Church. Perhaps it is just our own convictions or ideas that over-rule God’s teachings.

A false messiah is any one or any thing that is telling you how to organize your life other than Jesus Christ. Before Christ can reign unambiguously in your life false powers and influences have to go.

Too many people look only to science, popular culture, economics, medicine, education, politics and the like. They have been deceived.

It is not that we can’t use these things at all, but they are not the Messiah. None of these things or people every died for you. Only Jesus did that.

The power to save you is not in the statehouse, courthouse, or White-house – it’s in the blood, the saving blood of the Lamb, Our Lord Jesus Christ.

B. FIERCE MILITARISM – The text says: When you hear of wars and insurrections,  do not be terrified; for such things must happen first,  but it will not immediately be the end.”  Then he said to them,  “Nation will rise against nation, and kingdom against kingdom. A war was looming for those ancient people.

And we too are in a war, a battle. Before Christ can reign unambiguously in you the false powers in you have to be defeated. They will not go without a fight. The world, the flesh, and the devil can be expected to wage a fierce battle to keep their power.

Are you in a battle?  You should be! Too many Christians have lost the sense of battle. Scripture says, Resist the devil and he will flee from you(James 4:7). And yet  too many not only do not resist him, they welcome him. Scripture also says, Stand therefore, having girded your loins with truth, and having put on the breastplate of righteousness, and having shod your feet with the equipment of the gospel of peace;  besides all these, taking the shield of faith, with which you can quench all the flaming darts of the evil one.  And take the helmet of salvation, and the sword of the Spirit, which is the word of God (Eph 6:14).

An old hymn says, I’ve seen lightning flashing, and hear the thunder roll, I’ve felt sin-breakers dashing, which tried to conquer my soul; I’ve heard the voice of my savior, he bid me still to fight on. He promised never to leave me never to leave me alone.

On our way to the promised land of heaven we will encounter necessary battles. Battles for what is right, battles against sin, battles for proper priorities.

C. FAR-FLUNG MARVELS – the Text says: There will be powerful earthquakes, famines, and plagues  from place to place; and awesome sights and mighty signs will come from the sky. In the time of Jesus and the era just preceding the war there were in fact many earthquakes, droughts and even heavenly signs. Historians of the time speak of a comet and strange views of what we know today as the Aurora Borealis.

But what of us? For us What are earthquakes of life? Earthquakes involve the shaking of the ground! The shaking of that which is most stable and basic to us. What are you basing your life on? What is the foundation of your life?

For most of us the foundations of this world are things like, Money, Politics, Friends, Family, our own skills. All of these things are shaken in life and all of them will eventually fail. Our talents and personal powers fade as we age, family members and friends die, move or fail us. Political power and worldly access fails. Haven’t we all experienced our world shaken, our soul famished, the plagues of sin that infect our world and ourselves?

Further, haven’t the stars, all the things that orient us, fallen from the sky from time to time and the sun, the light we see by darkened. Has not the world turned upside down? Maybe it was the sudden death of a loved one, the loss of a job, trials, tragedies, testings, and tumult, a diagnosis of cancer or Alzheimer disease.

This is why God has to be our ultimate foundation, and our ultimate navigation point. Either Jesus is our foundation, or something else is. Without God as our foundation we cannot stand. The foundations of this world will cave, Christ must be our sure foundation.

D. FEARFUL MALICE - The text says, Before all this happens, however,  they will seize and persecute you, they will hand you over to the synagogues and to prisons, and they will have you led before kings and governors  because of my name…..You will even be handed over by parents, brothers, relatives, and friends It will lead to your giving testimony.  Remember, you are not to prepare your defense beforehand, for I myself shall give you a wisdom in speaking  that all your adversaries will be powerless to resist or refute. and they will put some of you to death.  You will be hated by all because of my name, but not a hair on your head will be destroyed. The early Christians had much to suffer through persecutions. Most of us in the Christian West have had less to suffer but more difficult days may well be ahead as the secular West grows increasingly hostile to the traditional Christian Faith.

Persecution however is an expected part of the Christian journey to the promised land of heaven. Even if we’re not handed over it is a truth of our time that many of us are not taken seriously, are written off or called names even by our closest family and friends?

Christ tells us not to worry of such things. They are part of the normal Christian life. And even if some of us eventually lose our life for the faith, the Lord promises that not a hair of our head will be harmed. That is, our souls will be saved. The world can only harm our body but not our soul, unless we allow it.

So these are the perils that we must soberly accept on our journey home to the promised land of heaven. This leads to the final exhortation of Christ.

3. PRESCRIPTION for the PASSAGE to PROMISED THINGS - The text says, By your perseverance you will secure your lives. Despite these perils we can only journey on and not lose faith or lose heart. There is glory waiting for us if we persevere.

Scripture says elsewhere: But he who endures to the end will be saved (Mat 10:22) and again, For yet a little while, and the coming one shall come and shall not tarry;  but my righteous one shall live by faith, and if he shrinks back, my soul has no pleasure in him.”  But we are not of those who shrink back and are destroyed, but of those who have faith and keep their souls (Heb 10:37).

An old Spiritual says, Hold on just a little while longer, everything’s gonna be alright.

In this regard the end of the Book of Daniel also seems pertinent: So [Daniel asked the Archangel Gabriel],  My lord, what will the outcome of all this be?He replied, “Go your way, Daniel, because the words are rolled up and sealed until the time of the end. Many will be purified, made spotless and refined, but the wicked will continue to be wicked. None of the wicked will understand, but those who are wise will understand….“As for you, go your way till the end. You will die,  yet at the end of the days you will rise to receive your reward.” (Daniel 12:8-10, 13)

Yes, on our passage through this passing world it is necessary to persevere unto the end. If we do, there is glory on the other side. If we do not, there will be only worse woes that will usher in.


21 posted on 11/16/2013 9:51:30 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Sunday Gospel Reflections

33rd Sunday in Ordinary Time
Reading I: Malachi 3:19-20 II: 2 Thessalonians 3:7-12


Gospel
Luke 21:5-19

5 And as some spoke of the temple, how it was adorned with noble stones and offerings, he said,
6 "As for these things which you see, the days will come when there shall not be left here one stone upon another that will not be thrown down."
7 And they asked him, "Teacher, when will this be, and what will be the sign when this is about to take place?"
8 And he said, "Take heed that you are not led astray; for many will come in my name, saying, 'I am he!' and, 'The time is at hand!' Do not go after them.
9 And when you hear of wars and tumults, do not be terrified; for this must first take place, but the end will not be at once."
10 Then he said to them, "Nation will rise against nation, and kingdom against kingdom;
11 there will be great earthquakes, and in various places famines and pestilences; and there will be terrors and great signs from heaven.
12 But before all this they will lay their hands on you and persecute you, delivering you up to the synagogues and prisons, and you will be brought before kings and governors for my name's sake.
13 This will be a time for you to bear testimony.
14 Settle it therefore in your minds, not to meditate beforehand how to answer;
15 for I will give you a mouth and wisdom, which none of your adversaries will be able to withstand or contradict.
16 You will be delivered up even by parents and brothers and kinsmen and friends, and some of you they will put to death;
17 you will be hated by all for my name's sake.
18 But not a hair of your head will perish.
19 By your endurance you will gain your lives.


Interesting Details
One Main Point

Persevering in a state of grace to the end in spite of difficulties and persecution leads to eternal salvation.


Reflections
  1. Most of us are very scared when talking of the end of the world. Have you ever thought "the end is indeed ended when you turn you back to God?" Go back to your own world and reflect this question.
  2. Compare the phrase "...they will seize and persecute you, they will hand you over to the synagogues and to prisons, and they will have you led before kings and governors because of my name"
    with the phrase "It will lead to your giving testimony."
    Have you experienced these challenges? Ask yourself a question on how you can bear witness to God in your daily life.
  3. Jesus was completely honest when revealing what we must expect if we choose to follow Him. However, He had promised that his followers never meet their tribulations alone. Remember our Saints or our martyrs, specifically our Vietnamese martyrs, to ascertain that God was always with them. When they were tortured and when they were awaiting death, they had experienced sweet times with God. A prison can be like a palace, a scaffold like a throne, the storms of life like summer weather, when God is with them. Meditate the joy of those who bear witness to God.

22 posted on 11/16/2013 9:55:50 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Sunday, November 17, 2013
Thirty-Third Sunday in Ordinary Time
First Reading:
Psalm:
Second Reading:
Gospel:
Malachi 3:19-20
Psalm 98:5-9
2 Thessalonians 3:7-12
Luke 21:5-19

Let us sing to the Lord: for he is gloriously magnified, the horse and the rider he hath thrown into the sea. The Lord is my strength and my praise, and he is become salvation to me: he is my God, and I will glorify him: the God of my father, and I will exalt him.

-- Exodus xv. 1,2


23 posted on 11/16/2013 9:59:39 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Just A Minute Just A Minute (Listen)
Some of EWTN's most popular hosts and guests in a collection of one minute inspirational messages. A different message each time you click.

24 posted on 11/16/2013 10:00:52 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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The Angelus 

The Angel of the Lord declared to Mary: 
And she conceived of the Holy Spirit. 

Hail Mary, full of grace, the Lord is with thee; blessed art thou among women and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus.
Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners, now and at the hour of our death. Amen. 

Behold the handmaid of the Lord: Be it done unto me according to Thy word. 

Hail Mary . . . 

And the Word was made Flesh: And dwelt among us. 

Hail Mary . . . 


Pray for us, O Holy Mother of God, that we may be made worthy of the promises of Christ. 

Let us pray: 

Pour forth, we beseech Thee, O Lord, Thy grace into our hearts; that we, to whom the incarnation of Christ, Thy Son, was made known by the message of an angel, may by His Passion and Cross be brought to the glory of His Resurrection, through the same Christ Our Lord.

Amen. 


25 posted on 11/16/2013 10:01:30 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Salvation

According to my missal this Sunday is Pentecost XXVI.


26 posted on 11/17/2013 3:11:09 AM PST by IbJensen (Liberals are like Slinkies, good for nothing, but you smile as you push them down the stairs.)
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To: IbJensen

I’ll get to that post later.


27 posted on 11/17/2013 10:28:07 AM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Saint Elizabeth of Hungary, Religious

Saint Elizabeth of Hungary, religious
Memorial
November 17th


Sándor Liezen-Mayer
Saint Elisabeth of Hungary
1882 -- Oil on canvas, 262 x 186 cm
Hungarian National Gallery, Budapest

(1207-1231) She was the daughter of the King of Hungary and in 1221 married Ludwig, the Landgrave of Thuringia. With Ludwig she had four children. After her husband's death in 1227, she became a Franciscan tertiary, devoting herself to caring for the poor, the sick, and the aged. She died in exceptional poverty and was canonized in 1235.

Source: Daily Roman Missal, Edited by Rev. James Socías, Midwest Theological Forum, Chicago, Illinois ©2003

Collect:
O God, by whose gift Saint Elizabeth of Hungary
recognized and revered Christ in the poor,
grant, through her intercession,
that we may serve with unfailing charity
the needy and those afflicted.
Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son,
who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God, for ever and ever. +Amen.

First Reading: 1 John 3:14-18
We know that we have passed out of death into life, because we love the brethren. He who does not love abides in death. Any one who hates his brother is a murderer, and you know that no murderer has eternal life abiding in him. By this we know love, that He laid down His life for us; and we ought to lay down our lives for the brethren. But if any one has the world's goods and sees his brother in need, yet closes his heart against him, how does God's love abide in him? Little children, let us not love in word or speech but in deed and in truth.


Gospel Reading: Luke 6:27-38
"But I say to you that hear, Love your enemies, do good to those who hate you, bless those who curse you, pray for those who abuse you. To him who strikes you on the cheek, offer the other also; and from him who takes away your coat do not withhold even your shirt. Give to every one who begs from you; and of him who takes away your goods do not ask them again. And as you wish that men would do to you, do so to them.

"If you love those who love you, what credit is that to you? For even sinners love those who love them. And if you do good to those who do good to you, what credit is that to you? For even sinners do the same. And if you lend to those from whom you hope to receive, what credit is that to you? Even sinners lend to sinners, to receive as much again. But love your enemies, and do good, and lend, expecting nothing in return; and your reward will be great, and you will be sons of the Most High; for he is kind to the ungrateful and the selfish. Be merciful, even as your Father is merciful.

"Judge not, and you will not be judged; condemn not, and you will not be condemned; forgive, and you will be forgiven; give, and it will be given to you; good measure, pressed down, shaken together, running over, will be put into your lap. For the measure you give will be the measure you get back."


BENEDICT XVI, GENERAL AUDIENCE, Wednesday, October 20, 2010

Saint Elizabeth of Hungary

Dear Brothers and Sisters,

In our catechesis today I wish to speak about Saint Elizabeth of Hungary, also known as Saint Elizabeth of Thuringia. She was born in the early thirteenth century. Her father was the King of Hungary, and Elizabeth was known from an early age for her fidelity to prayer and her attention to the poor. Though she was married to Ludwig, a nobleman, for political reasons, she and her husband developed a sincere love for each other, one deepened by faith and the desire to do the Lord’s will.

In her married life, Elizabeth did not compromise her faith in spite of the requirements of life at court. She preferred to feed the poor than to dine at banquets, and to clothe the naked than to dress in costly garments. Because of their deep faith in God, Elizabeth and Ludwig supported each other in their religious duties. After his early death, she dedicated herself to the service of the poor, always performing the humblest and most difficult works. She founded a religious community, and lived her vows until her death at an early age. She was canonized four years later, and is a patroness of the Third Order of Saint Francis. May her dedication to the poor and needy inspire in us the same love for Christ in our neighbour. 

© Copyright 2010 - Libreria Editrice Vaticana


28 posted on 11/17/2013 10:34:43 AM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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A Saint's Day is superseded by the Sunday liturgy.

On St. Elizabeth of Hungary
SAINT ELIZABETH of HUNGARY Widow (1207-1231)
Traditional Feast Day of St. Elizabeth of Hungary
The Legend of Saint Elizabeth [of Hungary]

29 posted on 11/17/2013 10:49:48 AM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Information: Saint Elizabeth of Hungary

Feast Day: November 17

Born: 1207 at Presburg, Hungary

Died: 17 November 1231, Marburg, Germany

Canonized: 1235, Perugia, Italy

Major Shrine: Elisabeth Church (Marburg)

Patron of: hospitals, nurses, bakers, brides, countesses, dying children, exiles, homeless people, lacemakers, tertiaries and widows

30 posted on 11/17/2013 10:54:01 AM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Interactive Saints for Kids

St. Elizabeth of Hungary


Feast Day: November 17
Born: 1207 :: Died: 1231

Elizabeth, the daughter of King Andrew of Hungary was born in Presburg. When she was only thirteen years old, she married Louis, the ruler of Thuringia. Elizabeth was a beautiful bride who dearly loved her handsome husband. Louis returned her affection with all his heart. God gave them three children and they were very happy for six years.

She build a hospital at the foot of the mountain where the castle stood and looked after the sick herself. Once when she was taking food to the poor and sick in secret, Prince Louis stopped her and looked under her cloak. The food she was carrying miraculously changed to roses.

Then St. Elizabeth's sorrows began. Louis died of the plague. She was so heart-broken that she cried: "The world is dead to me and all that is joyous in the world." Louis' relatives had never liked Elizabeth because she had given so much food to the poor.

While Louis was alive, they had not been able to do anything but now they began to trouble her. Within a short time, this beautiful, gentle princess and her three children were sent away from the castle. They suffered hunger and cold.

Yet Elizabeth did not complain about her terrible sufferings. Instead she blessed God and prayed with great fervor. She accepted the sorrows just as she had accepted the joys.

Elizabeth's relatives came to her rescue. She and her children had a home once more. Her uncle wanted her to marry again, for she was still very young and attractive. But the saint had decided to give herself to God.

She wanted to imitate the poverty of St. Francis. She went to live in a poor cottage and spent the last few years of her life serving the sick and the poor. She even went fishing to try to earn more money for her beloved poor.

St. Elizabeth was only twenty-four when she died in 1231. On her death bed, she was heard to sing softly. She had great confidence that Jesus would take her to himself.


31 posted on 11/17/2013 11:00:26 AM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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CATHOLIC ALMANAC

Sunday, November 17M

Liturgical Color: White

Today is the Memorial of St. Elizabeth of
Hungary, religious. Against the advice of her
family, she built a hospital near her home
where she tended the sick. She said she
could only follow the teaching of Christ, not
the opinion of her family.

32 posted on 11/17/2013 12:10:10 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Catholic Culture

 

Daily Readings for:November 17, 2013
(Readings on USCCB website)

Collect: Grant us, we pray, O Lord our God, the constant gladness of being devoted to you, for it is full and lasting happiness to serve with constancy the author of all that is good. Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son, who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.

RECIPES

o    Brandy Apple Cake with Grand-Marnier Sauce

o    'Braveheart' Cock-A-Leekie Soup

o    Fall or Winter Sunday Dinner Menu

ACTIVITIES

o    Bible Stories for Children

o    Scripture in the Home

o    Thanksgiving Placemat

PRAYERS

o    Ordinary Time, After Pentecost: Table Blessing 1

LIBRARY

o    The Belief of Catholics | Ronald Knox

o    The Church and the Catholic | Romano Guardini

o    What the 'Grain of Wheat' Teaches Us Today | Pope Benedict XVI

·         Ordinary Time: November 17th

·         Thirty-Third Sunday of Ordinary Time

Old Calendar: Twenty-Sixth Sunday after Pentecost

"Nation will rise against nation and kingdom against kingdom. There will be great earthquakes, plagues and famines in various places — and in the sky fearful omens and great signs. But before any of this, they will manhandle and persecute you, summoning you to synagogues and prisons, bringing you to trial before kings and governors, all because of my name. You will be brought to give witness on account of it. I bid you resolve not to worry about your defense beforehand, for I will give you words and a wisdom which none of your adversaries can take exception to or contradict. You will be delivered up even by your parents, brothers, relatives and friends, and some of you will be put to death. All will hate you because of me, yet not a hair of your head will be harmed. By patient endurance you will save your lives."

Click here for commentary on the readings in the Extraordinary Form of the Roman Rite.


Sunday Readings
The first reading is taken from the Prophecy of Malachi 3:19-20 and concerns the day of retribution, of judgment when the Lord will punish the wicked and reward His faithful ones.

The second reading is from the the second letter of Paul to the Thessalonians 3:7-12, in which he addresses those few in the community who were unwilling to earn their daily bread and were abusing the charity of their fellow Christians.

The Gospel is from St. Luke, 21:5-19. The reason why these verses of St. Luke's gospel were chosen for today's Mass is that the Church wants us all to do a bit of spiritual stock-taking this morning. As next Sunday will be the special feastday of the Kingship of Christ, today's Mass is really the last of our liturgical year. Next Sunday, we begin our new liturgical year, the First Sunday of Advent. To help us to be honest with ourselves in our stock-taking we are reminded today that this world will come to an end one day. We do not know when or how, but that end will come. It will be followed immediately by the general judgment. Christ will come in power and glory to judge the whole human race. Each one will receive the sentence he merited while on earth. The just will enter with Him into eternal glory. The wicked will go to their place of suffering, sorrow and remorse.

Long before that day comes, each of us here present today will already have faced his or her own particular judgment. It is this judgment which will seal our eternal fate. It it on this judgment that we should try to concentrate this morning. It is to help and encourage us to do just this that the church brings the thought of the end of the world before our minds. The end of this world will come for each one of us when we draw our last breath. How will we stand in God's sight when that moment comes? An eternity of happiness or grief will depend on our spiritual state at that moment.

The thought of death is a frightening thought for most of us. We would rather put it far from our minds, but of all the other things that can possibly happen to us on this earth, death is the one and only certainty. It would be utter folly then to try to ignore it or forget it. It is not the moment or the circumstances or the fact itself of death that matters. The vast majority, even of those dying of a slow illness, do not know that they are on the point of death. What matters is the judgment which follows death. How will we fare in that?

Each one of us can put the following simple question to ourselves this very moment. How would I fare if I were called before the judgment seat of God today? The best of us would certainly prefer to be better prepared. There is so much good I have left undone, so many faults for which I have not atoned properly, so many uncharitable thoughts about my friends and neighbors in my mind, so many acts of charity I kept postponing, so many acts of thanksgiving and praise I have not made to my loving God.

What of those who have even more serious sins on their consciences? Over two hundred thousand people will leave this world between now and midnight. If we were called, and we have no guarantee that we will not be called today, could we dare to face our judgment in our present state? "Today if you hear God's voice harden not your heart" the scripture warns us. Today you have heard Him speak to you. He has reminded you that your end is coming, that you should put your spiritual accounts in order. This is an act of God's mercy. He does not need you, It is you who need Him. Your eternal future will depend on whether you listen to His call today, as tomorrow may be too late. You can put your accounts straight this very day. Why take a risk with your own eternal welfare?

The Christian who wants to die in the state of grace, that is, in the friendship of God (and can there be any real Christian who would not want to?) has but one way of making sure of this. He is to try to live always in God's friendship. The man who does this by living his Christian life daily need not fear death. It may be a sudden death, but it will never be an unprovided-for death.

— Excerpted from The Sunday Readings Cycle C, Fr. Kevin O' Sullivan, O.F.M.


33 posted on 11/17/2013 12:18:34 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
The Word Among Us

Meditation: Psalm 98

33rd Sunday in Ordinary Time

Shout with joy to the Lord, all the earth. (Psalm 98:4)

Rivers “clapping their hands.” Mountains “shouting for joy.” What extraordinary images these poetic descriptions of nature evoke for us! These have got to be some of the most beautiful verses in the entire psalter!

The Bible resounds with the worship of God. From its pages echo the voices of countless men and women, as well as angels, who offer cries and prayers of homage to the Lord. And as today’s psalm shows us, even nature adds its voice to the chorus.

Many Church Fathers have seen this psalm as a joyous celebration of the coming of Christ in his incarnation. When the Son of God entered into his world, the whole of creation sang and rejoiced. The Fathers also saw this psalm as pointing to Jesus’ final coming. That’s why we pray this psalm so frequently during the liturgical year.

According to Scripture scholar Jean-Pierre Prévost, Psalm 98 is “an ‘unfinished symphony’ meant to encourage among the faithful the joyful awaiting of God’s coming.” But we are not just to wait passively for his coming, Prévost says. We should “join the chorus and the orchestra in such an uplifting symphony in honor of our God.”

All creation—every human being as well as all of nature—has a part to play in this great unfinished symphony. Each one of us has countless reasons to join the rivers and mountains in their song of praise. So go ahead and sing to the Lord! Tell him how much you love him. Let him know how eager you are to see him face-to-face. Tell him how deeply you long for him to come with saving justice and deliver you from all temptation. And while you’re at it, invite the created world to join you as you “sing a new song to the Lord” (Psalm 98:1)!

“Lord, open my eyes to see the wonders of your creation and your incarnation. I want to join my voice with nature’s great symphony of praise to you.”

Malachi 3:19-20; 2 Thessalonians 3:7-12; Luke 21:5-19

Questions for Reflection or Group Discussion

(Malachi 3:19-20; Psalm 98:5-9; 2 Thessalonians 3:7-12; Luke 21:5-19)

1. In the first reading, the prophet Malachi warns of the end times, and promises that the Lord will bring healing to those who “fear” his name, but to those who are proud and evildoers, they will become “stubble.” This “fear,” of course, means honor, reverence, respect, and love for the Lord. It also reflects a desire to please him in all things. How would you rate your fear of the Lord? What steps can you take to allow this kind of “fear of the Lord” to affect more of your speech and actions?

2. The responsorial psalm also speaks of the Lord’s coming and of the joy of all creation in expectation of that event. What are your feelings and reactions when considering the end of time and Jesus’ second coming? Are you filled with a certain excitement and anticipation or with some trepidation and concern? Why?

3. In the second reading, St. Paul describes how hard he worked to be a model of a Christian man of God to the Thessalonians. How important is it to you to be the model of a Christian man of God to your family, and to others? What are some ways you can better model Jesus Christ to them?

4. In the Gospel, Jesus also speaks of the destruction of the temple and the end times, but tells us that our perseverance will save us from danger. This requires a relationship with the Lord that is steady, on going, and constant? What are the circumstances that cause your relationship with the Lord to waiver?

5. Jesus also tells us not to fear, even in the midst of persecution, because: “It will lead to your giving testimony” to him and he will be with you. Is this your thinking in the midst of a trial? Do you usually turn first to the Lord? Why or why not? If this is an area that you struggle with, what can you do about it?

6. The meditation ends with these words, “Each one of us has countless reasons to join the rivers and mountains in their song of praise. So go ahead and sing to the Lord! Tell him how much you love him. Let him know how eager you are to see him face-to-face. Tell him how deeply you long for him to come with saving justice and deliver you from all temptation. And while you’re at it, invite the created world to join you as you “sing a new song to the Lord” (Psalm 98:1)!” What are some reasons why you too want to “join the rivers and mountains in their song of praise”?

7. Take some time now to pray and ask the Lord for the grace to always “Sing praise to the Lord” and “sing joyfully before the King, the Lord.” Use the prayer at the end of the meditation as a starting point.


34 posted on 11/17/2013 1:30:55 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Salvation
Luke
  English: Douay-Rheims Latin: Vulgata Clementina Greek NT: Byzantine/Majority Text (2000)
  Luke 21
5 And some saying of the temple, that it was adorned with goodly stones and gifts, he said: Et quibusdam dicentibus de templo quod bonis lapidibus et donis ornatum esset, dixit : και τινων λεγοντων περι του ιερου οτι λιθοις καλοις και αναθημασιν κεκοσμηται ειπεν
6 These things which you see, the days will come in which there shall not be left a stone upon a stone that shall not be thrown down. Hæc quæ videtis, venient dies in quibus non relinquetur lapis super lapidem, qui non destruatur. ταυτα α θεωρειτε ελευσονται ημεραι εν αις ουκ αφεθησεται λιθος επι λιθω ος ου καταλυθησεται
7 And they asked him, saying: Master, when shall these things be? and what shall be the sign when they shall begin to come to pass? Interrogaverunt autem illum, dicentes : Præceptor, quando hæc erunt, et quod signum cum fieri incipient ? επηρωτησαν δε αυτον λεγοντες διδασκαλε ποτε ουν ταυτα εσται και τι το σημειον οταν μελλη ταυτα γινεσθαι
8 Who said: Take heed you be not seduced; for many will come in my name, saying, I am he; and the time is at hand: go ye not therefore after them. Qui dixit : Videte ne seducamini : multi enim venient in nomine meo, dicentes quia ego sum : et tempus appropinquavit : nolite ergo ire post eos. ο δε ειπεν βλεπετε μη πλανηθητε πολλοι γαρ ελευσονται επι τω ονοματι μου λεγοντες οτι εγω ειμι και ο καιρος ηγγικεν μη ουν πορευθητε οπισω αυτων
9 And when you shall hear of wars and seditions, be not terrified: these things must first come to pass; but the end is not yet presently. Cum autem audieritis prælia et seditiones, nolite terreri : oportet primum hæc fieri, sed nondum statim finis. οταν δε ακουσητε πολεμους και ακαταστασιας μη πτοηθητε δει γαρ ταυτα γενεσθαι πρωτον αλλ ουκ ευθεως το τελος
10 Then he said to them: Nation shall rise against nation, and kingdom against kingdom. Tunc dicebat illis : Surget gens contra gentem, et regnum adversus regnum. τοτε ελεγεν αυτοις εγερθησεται εθνος επι εθνος και βασιλεια επι βασιλειαν
11 And there shall be great earthquakes in divers places, and pestilences, and famines, and terrors from heaven; and there shall be great signs. Et terræmotus magni erunt per loca, et pestilentiæ, et fames, terroresque de cælo, et signa magna erunt. σεισμοι τε μεγαλοι κατα τοπους και λιμοι και λοιμοι εσονται φοβητρα τε και σημεια απ ουρανου μεγαλα εσται
12 But before all these things, they will lay their hands upon you, and persecute you, delivering you up to the synagogues and into prisons, dragging you before kings and governors, for my name's sake. Sed ante hæc omnia injicient vobis manus suas, et persequentur tradentes in synagogas et custodias, trahentes ad reges et præsides propter nomen meum : προ δε τουτων παντων επιβαλουσιν εφ υμας τας χειρας αυτων και διωξουσιν παραδιδοντες εις συναγωγας και φυλακας αγομενους επι βασιλεις και ηγεμονας ενεκεν του ονοματος μου
13 And it shall happen unto you for a testimony. continget autem vobis in testimonium. αποβησεται δε υμιν εις μαρτυριον
14 Lay it up therefore into your hearts, not to meditate before how you shall answer: Ponite ergo in cordibus vestris non præmeditari quemadmodum respondeatis : θεσθε ουν εις τας καρδιας υμων μη προμελεταν απολογηθηναι
15 For I will give you a mouth and wisdom, which all your adversaries shall not be able to resist and gainsay. ego enim dabo vobis os et sapientiam, cui non poterunt resistere et contradicere omnes adversarii vestri. εγω γαρ δωσω υμιν στομα και σοφιαν η ου δυνησονται αντειπειν ουδε αντιστηναι παντες οι αντικειμενοι υμιν
16 And you shall be betrayed by your parents and brethren, and kinsmen and friends; and some of you they will put to death. Trademini autem a parentibus, et fratribus, et cognatis, et amicis, et morte afficient ex vobis : παραδοθησεσθε δε και υπο γονεων και συγγενων και φιλων και αδελφων και θανατωσουσιν εξ υμων
17 And you shall be hated by all men for my name's sake. et eritis odio omnibus propter nomen meum : και εσεσθε μισουμενοι υπο παντων δια το ονομα μου
18 But a hair of your head shall not perish. et capillus de capite vestro non peribit. και θριξ εκ της κεφαλης υμων ου μη αποληται
19 In your patience you shall possess your souls. In patientia vestra possidebitis animas vestras. εν τη υπομονη υμων κτησασθε τας ψυχας υμων

35 posted on 11/17/2013 1:33:57 PM PST by annalex (fear them not)
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To: annalex
5. And as some spoke of the temple, how it was adorned with goodly stones and gifts, he said,
6. As for these things which you behold, the days will come, in the which there shall not be left one stone upon another, that shall not be thrown down.
7. And they asked him, saying, Master, but when shall these things be? and what sign will there be when these things shall come to pass?
8. And he said, Take heed that you be not deceived: for many shall come in my name, saying, I am Christ; and the time draws near: go you not therefore after them.

EUSEB. How beautiful was every thing relating to the structure of the temple, history informs us, and there are yet preserved remains of it, enough to instruct us in what was once the character of the buildings. But our Lord proclaimed to those that were wondering at the building of the temple, that there should not be left in it one stone upon another. For it was meet that that place, because of the presumption of its worshippers, should suffer every kind of desolation.

BEDE; For it was ordained by the dispensation of God that the city itself and the temple should be overthrown, lest perhaps some one yet a child in the faith, while rapt in astonishment at the rites of the sacrifices, should be carried away by the mere sight of the various beauties.

AMBROSE; It was spoken then of the temple made with hands, that it should be overthrown. For there is nothing made with hands which age does not impair, or violence throw down, or fire burn. Yet there is also another temple, that is, the synagogue, whose ancient building falls to pieces as the Church rises. There is also a temple in every one, which falls when faith is lacking, and above all when any one falsely shields himself under the name of Christ, that so he may rebel against his inward inclinations.

CYRIL; Now His disciples did not at all perceive the force of His words, but supposed they were spoken of the end of the world. Therefore asked they Him, saying, Master, but when shall these things be? and what sign, &c.

AMBROSE; Matthew adds a third question, that both the time of the destruction of the temple, and the sign of His coming, and the end of the world, might be inquired into by the disciples. But our Lord being asked when the destruction of the temple should be, and what the sign of His coming, instructs them as to the signs, but does not mind to inform them as to the time. It follows, Take heed that you be not deceived.

ATHAN. For since we have received, delivered to us by God, graces and doctrines which ere above man, (as, for example, the rule of a heavenly life, power against evil spirits, the adoption and the knowledge of the Father and the Word, the gift of the Holy Spirit,) our adversary the devil goes about seeking to steal from us the seed of the word which has been sown. But the Lord, shutting up in us His teaching as His own precious gift, warns us, lest we be deceived. And one very great gift He gives us, the word of God, that not only we be not led away by what appears, but even if there is ought lying concealed, by the grace of God we may discern it. For seeing that the devil is the hateful inventor of evil, what he himself is he conceals, but craftily assumes a name desirable to all; just as if a man wishing to get into his power some children not His own, should in the absence of the parents counterfeit their looks, and lead away the children who were longing for them. In every heresy then the devil says in disguise, "I am Christ, and with me there is truth." And so it follows, For many shall come in my name, saying, I am Christ; and the time draws near.

CYRIL; For before His descent from heaven, there shall come some to whom we must not give place. For the Only-begotten Son of God, when He came to save the world, wished to be in secret, that He might bear the cross for us. But His second coming shall not be in secret, but terrible and open. For He shall descend in the glory of God the Father, with the Angels attending Him, to judge the world in righteousness. Therefore He concludes, Go you not therefore after them.

TIT BOST. Or perhaps He does not speak of false Christs coming before the end of the world, but of those who existed in the Apostles' time.

BEDE; For there were many leaders when the destruction of Jerusalem was at hand, who declared themselves to be Christ, and that the time of deliverance was drawing nigh. Many heresiarchs also in the Church have preached that the day of the Lord is at hand, whom the Apostles condemn. Many Antichrists also came in Christ's name, of whom the first was Simon Magus, who said, This man is the great power of God.

9. But when you shall hear of wars and commotions, be not terrified: for these things must first come to pass, but the end is not by and by.
10. Then said he to them, Nation shall rise against nation, and kingdom against kingdom:
11. And great earthquakes shall be in diverse places, and famines, and pestilences; and fearful sights and great signs shall there be from heaven.

GREG. God denounces the woes that shall forerun the destruction of the world, that so they may the less disturb when they come, as having been foreknown. For darts strike the less which are foreseen. And so He says, But when you shall hear of wars and commotions, &c. Wars refer to the enemy, commotions to citizens. To show us then that we shall be troubled from within and without, He asserts that the one we suffer from the enemy, the other from our own brethren.

AMBROSE; But of the heavenly words none are greater witnesses than we, upon whom the ends of the world have come. What wars and what rumors of wars have we received!

GREG. But that the end will not immediately follow these evils which come first, it is added, These things must first come to pass; but the end is not yet, &c. For the last tribulation is preceded by many tribulations, because many evils must come first, that they may await that evil which has no end.

It follows, Then said he to them, Nation shall rise against nation, &c. For it must needs be that we should suffer some things from heaven, some from earth, some from the elements, and some from men. Here then are signified the confusions of men.

It follows, And great earthquakes shall be in diverse places. This relates to the wrath from above.

CHRYS. For an earthquake is at one time a sign of wrath, as when our Lord was crucified the earth shook; but at another time it is a token of God's providence, as when the Apostles were praying, the place was moved where they were assembled. It follows, and pestilence.

GREG. Look at the vicissitudes of bodies. And famine. Observe the barrenness of the ground. And fearful sights and great signs there shall be from heaven. Behold the variableness of the climate, which must be ascribed to those storms which by no means regard the order of the seasons. For the things which come in fixed order are not signs. For every thing that we receive for the use of life we pervert to the service of sin, but all those things which we have bent to a wicked use, are turned to the instruments of our punishment.

AMBROSE; The ruin of the world then is preceded by certain of the world's calamities, such as famine, pestilence, and persecution.

THEOPHYL. Now some have wished to place the fulfillment of these things not only at the future consummation of all things, but at the time also of the taking of Jerusalem. For when the Author of peace was killed, then justly arose among the Jews wars and sedition. But from wars proceed pestilence and famine, the former indeed produced by the air infected with dead bodies, the latter through the lands remaining uncultivated. Josephus also relates the most intolerable distresses to have occurred from famine; and at the time of Claudius Caesar there was a severe famine, as we read in the Acts, and many terrible events happened, A forboding, as Josephus says, the destruction of Jerusalem.

CHRYS. But He says, that the end of the city shall not come immediately, that is, the taking of Jerusalem, but there shall be many battles first.

BEDE; The Apostles are also exhorted not to be alarmed by these forerunners, nor to desert Jerusalem and Judea. But the kingdom against kingdom, and the pestilence of those whose word creeps as a cancer, and the famine of hearing the word of God, and the shaking of the whole earth, and the separation from the true faith, may be explained also in the heretics, who contending one with another bring victory to the Church.

AMBROSE; There are also other wars which the Christian wages, the struggles of different lusts, and the conflicts of the will; and domestic foes are far more dangerous than all foreign.

12. But before all these, they shall lay their hands on you, and persecute you, delivering you up to the synagogues, and into prisons, being brought before kings and rulers for my name's sake.
13. And it shall turn to you for a testimony.
14. Settle it therefore in your hearts, not to meditate before what you shall answer:
15. For I will give you a mouth and wisdom which all your adversaries shall not be able to gainsay nor resist.
16. And you shall be betrayed both by parents and brethren, and kinsfolks, and friends; and some of you shall they cause to be put to death.
17. And you shall be hated of all men for my name's sake.
18. But there shall not an hair of your head perish.
19. In your patience you will possess your souls.

GREG. Because the things which have been prophesied of arise not from the injustice of the inflictor of them, but from the deserts of the world which suffers them, the deeds of wicked men are foretold; as it is said, But before all these things, they shall lay their hands upon you: as if He says First the hearts of men, afterwards the elements, shall be disturbed, that when the order of things is thrown into confusion, it may be plain from what retribution it arises. For although the end of the world depends upon its own appointed course, yet finding some more corrupt than others who shall rightly be overwhelmed in its fall, our Lord makes them known.

CYRIL; Or He says this, because before that Jerusalem should be taken by the Romans, the disciples, having suffered persecution from the Jews, were imprisoned and brought before rulers; Paul was sent to Rome to Caesar, and stood before Festus and Agrippa.

It follows, And it shall turn to you for a testimony. In the Greek it is, for the glory of martyrdom.

GREG. Or, for a testimony, that is, against those who by persecuting you bring death upon themselves, or living do not imitate you, or themselves becoming hardened perish without excuse from whom the elect take example that they may live. But as hearing so many terrible things the hearts of men may be troubled He therefore adds for their consolation, Settle it therefore in your hearts, &c.

THEOPHYL. For because they were foolish and inexperienced, the Lord tells them this, that they might not be confounded when about to give account to the wise. And He adds the cause, For I will give you a mouth and wisdom, which all your adversaries shall not be able to gainsay or resist. As if He said, you shall forthwith receive of me eloquence and wisdom, so that all your adversaries, were they gathered together in one, shall not be able to resist you, neither in wisdom, that is, the power of the understanding, nor in eloquence, that is, excellence of speech, for many men have often wisdom in their mind, but being easily provoked to their great disturbance, mar the whole when their time of speaking comes. But not such were the Apostles, for in both these gifts they were highly favored.

GREG. As if the Lord said to His disciples, "Be not afraid, go forward to the battle, it is I that fight; you utter the words, I am He that speaks."

AMBROSE; Now in one place Christ speaks in His disciples, as here; in another, the Father; in another the Spirit of the Father speaks. These do not differ but agree together. In that one speaks, three speak, for the voice of the Trinity is one.

THEOPHYL. Having in what has gone before dispelled the fear of inexperience, He goes on to warn them of another very certain event, which might agitate their minds, lest falling suddenly upon them, it should dismay them; for it follows, And you shall be betrayed both by parents, and brethren, and kinsfolk, and some of you shall they cause to be put to death.

GREG We are the more galled by the persecutions we suffer from those of whose dispositions we made sure, because together with the bodily pain, we are tormented by the bitter pangs of lost affection.

GREG. NYSS. But let us consider the state of things at that time. While all men were suspected, kinsfolk were divided against one another, each differing from the other in religion; the gentile son stood up the betrayer of his believing parents, and of his believing son the unbelieving father became the determined accuser; no age was spared in the persecution of the faith; women were unprotected even by the natural weakness of their sex.

THEOPHYL. To all this He adds the hatred which they shall met with from men.

GREG. But because of the hard things foretold concerning the affliction of death, there immediately follows a consolation, concerning the joy of the resurrection, when it is said, But there shall not an hair of your head perish. As though He said to the martyrs Why fear you for the perishing of that which when cut, pains when that can not perish in you, which when cut gives no pain?

BEDE; Or else, There shall not perish a hair of the head of our Lord's Apostles, because not only the noble deeds and words of the Saints, but e en the slightest thought shall meet with its deserving reward.

GREG. He who preserves patience in adversity, is thereby rendered proof against all affliction, and so by conquering himself, he gains the government of himself; as it follows, In your patience shall you possess your souls. For what is it to possess your souls, but to live perfectly in all things, and sitting it upon the citadel of virtue to hold in subjection every motion of the mind?

GREG. By patience then we possess our souls, because when we are said to govern; ourselves, we begin to possess you very thing which we are. But for this reason, the possession of the soul is laid in the virtue of patience, because patience is the root and guardian which are inflicted by others, and also to have no feeling of indignation against him who inflicts them.

Catena Aurea Luke 21
36 posted on 11/17/2013 1:35:02 PM PST by annalex (fear them not)
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To: annalex


Holy Martyr St. Panteleimon with insets

Iconographic studio Divo (miracle)
The Descent of the Holy Ghost Temple
Lazarevsky cemetery, Moscow

37 posted on 11/17/2013 1:36:24 PM PST by annalex (fear them not)
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To: All
A Christian Pilgrim

JESUS WANTS TO BUILD EACH OF US INTO A GLORIOUS TEMPLE

 (Biblical reflection on the 33rd Ordinary Sunday [Year C] – November 17, 2013) 

Gospel Reading: Luke 21:5-19 

First Reading: Malachi 3:19-20; Psalms: Psalm 98:5-9; Second Reading: 2Thessalonians 3:7-12 

Brooklyn_Museum_-_Reconstruction_of_Jerusalem_and_the_Temple_of_Herod_(Réconstitution_de_Jérusalem_et_du_temple_d'Hérode)_-_James_Tissot

Scripture Text:

Tissot_Solomon_Dedicates_the_Temple_at_Jerusalem

And as some spoke of the temple, how it was adorned with noble stones and offerings, He said, “As for these things which you see, the days will come when there shall not be left here one stone upon another that will not be thrown down.” And they asked Him, “Teacher, when will this be, and what will be the sign when this is about to take place?” And He said, “Take heed that you are not led astray; for many will come in My name, saying, ‘I am He!’ and, ‘The time is at hand1’ Do not go after them. And when you hear of wars and tumults, do not be terrified, for this must first take place, but the end will not be at once.” 

Then He said to them, “Nation will rise against nation, and kingdom against kingdom; there will be great earthquakes, and in various places famines and pestilences; and there will be terrors and great signs from heaven. But before all this they will lay their hands on you and persecute you, delivering you up to the synagogues and prisons, and you will be brought before kings and governors for My name’s sake. This will be a time for you to bear testimony. Settle it therefore in your minds, not to meditate beforehand how to answer; for I will give you a mouth and wisdom, which none of your adversaries will be able to withstand or contradict. You will be delivered up even by parents and brothers and kinsmen and friends, and some of you they will put death; you will be hated by all for My name’s sake. But not a hair of your head will perish. By your endurance you will gain your lives. (Luke 21:5-19 RSV) 

God is the great master builder. He created the universe and formed each of us according to a perfect plan – to fill us with divine life and bring us into His presence. Isn’t it incredible that God loves us so much?

Jesus wanted to build His disciples into women and men of faith who would hunger for God’s ways above their own. But He knew that in order for this to happen, some things in them would have to be stripped away. Many of their ways of thinking were not in harmony with the wisdom of God. We see an example of Jesus trying to influence their thinking in the way He responded to their fascination with the Temple (Luke 21:5). While they were caught up in the Temple’s splendor, Jesus told them that a time would come when it would be utterly destroyed. What a difference! Jesus was concerned about the worship that went on inside the Temple, and they could not get past us size and majesty.

ROH KUDUS MELAYANG-LAYANG - 2

Every time we celebrate Mass, Jesus wants to build us into a glorious temple. And that means He must strip away worldly thinking in us. Some things may be so obvious that a heartfelt prayer during the Penitential Rite (Latin: Confiteor) may be all we need. But in other areas, our worldly values may be too subtle to recognize. That’s why we need the Holy Spirit. So can we give Him the freedom to do whatever it takes to set us free?

At Mass today, let us ask Jesus to come and strip away areas of resistance to His ways. Let us ask Him to remove everything that distracts us from His love. Then, as we become more and more free, we will also become more and more satisfied by the Bread of Life we receive!

Prayer: Heavenly Father, You said that unless You build the house, those who labor do so in vain (Psalm 127:1). Dear Father, I want You to build me into the person You created me to be. Strip away all that is not of You so that I may become a place where Your glory dwells! Amen.

38 posted on 11/17/2013 2:04:35 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Marriage=One Man and One Woman 'Til Death Do Us Part

Daily Marriage Tip for November 17, 2013:

Are you a skunk, a turtle, or an owl? In terms of conflict resolution, skunks just make a stink about it, often with a lot of noise. Turtles ignore or hide from the problem. Owls look the problem over, think about it, then suggest a solution. Be wise or be road kill.

39 posted on 11/17/2013 2:08:21 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Sunday Scripture Study

Thirty-third Sunday in Ordinary Time - Cycle C

November 17, 2013

here for USCCB readings

Opening Prayer  

First Reading: Malachi 3:19-20a (or 4:1-2a)

Psalm: 98:5-9

Second Reading: 2 Thessalonians 3:7-12

Gospel Reading: Luke 21:5-19

 

QUESTIONS:

Closing Prayer

Catechism of the Catholic Church:  §§ 675, 585-86, 161, 2612, 2849

 

When we find ourselves in some grave danger we must not lose courage but firmly trust in God, for where there is the greatest danger, there is also the greatest help from Him who wants to be called our 'Help' in times of peace and in times of tribulation.   --St. Ambrose

40 posted on 11/17/2013 3:44:19 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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"Not One Stone Left on Another"

Pastor’s Column

33rd Sunday in Ordinary Time

November 17, 2013

 

 

“All that you see here—the days will come when there will not be left a stone upon another stone that will not be thrown down.”

                                                          Luke 21:5-6

 

 

The Wailing Wall in Jerusalem--stones that Jesus would have seen as well.

 

          The story of the destruction of Jerusalem and the end of the world are woven inextricably together in the gospels of Matthew and Luke. Each year at this time the liturgy invites us to reflect on this great reality in the world and in our lives. Certainly no one living at the time of Christ could have imagined that these incredible stones and the beauty of the temple mount, at that time still under construction, could be so utterly destroyed less than 40 years later.

 

          Anyone who has ever been to the temple mount in Jerusalem or seen the “wailing wall”, where one can still see the great stonework of Herod the Great,  marvels at these great stones and wonders. The only stones one finds today that are still in place are those around the great retaining wall, as seen in the picture (which I took) above on the right. As you can see in this picture, every stone above the level of the platform has been destroyed and replaced with lesser quality stones many centuries later. What ever became of Herod’s great stone work? These stones are scattered throughout Jerusalem, having been used and re-used over the last 2000 years.

 

          Even today, the story of the destruction of Jerusalem in 70 AD is considered to be the archetype of horrible and pitiless destruction, a terrible example of man’s inhumanity to man. It was truly one of the worst disasters in history, a standard by which all subsequent tragedies have been measured.

 

          What then can we learn from this? What lessons might we draw from our Lord’s observations? There will come a time when the things we have counted on and relied upon may not remain standing. Often there are signs in the world of just this kind of thing, such as the terrible devastation brought on the Philippines by a typhoon. And which of us will ever forget September 11 in New York City, the American version of an event that left not “one stone upon another”?

 

          The Holy Spirit will give us the grace to handle each of these events as we need it but not usually in advance. Far from promising us an easy life, our Lord warns us that he may even require us to go through things in which everyone seems to be against us for the sake of Christ, or wars and every manner of difficulty. Yet, he also notes that our faith will save us! Everything that happens in this world is meant to help us grow and be ready for the coming age! God has everything ultimately under control. He will make it right in the end.

                  

          We have been enduring a version of this here as well, with virtually every mature tree uprooted and not a single paved place to park anywhere! When I first came to this parish (as a visitor) in 1992, I would never have believed we would see such an upheaval here but it all has a purpose! By keeping our eyes on the finish, by having faith in the good things to come, we are happy to go through all of this. It is much the same in all the predictable and surprising upheavals we must endure in life. Our faith will save us, because with it we know we are loved by God, and if we are loved, we can get through anything.

 

                                                                                                Father Gary

 


41 posted on 11/17/2013 4:06:12 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Reflections from Scott Hahn

‘Today’ is the Day: Scott Hahn Reflects on the 33rd Sunday in Ordinary Time

Posted by Dr. Scott Hahn on 11.15.13 |

 

Malachi 3:19-20
Psalm 98:5-9
2 Thessalonians 3:7-12
Luke 21:5-19

It is the age between our Lord’s first coming and His last. We live in the new world begun by His life, death, Resurrection and Ascension, by the sending of His Spirit upon the Church. But we await the day when He will come again in glory.

“Lo, the day is coming,” Malachi warns in today’s First Reading. The prophets taught Israel to look for the Day of the Lord, when He would gather the nations for judgment (see Zephaniah 3:8; Isaiah 3:9; 2 Peter 3:7).

Jesus anticipates this day in today’s Gospel. He cautions us not to be deceived by those claiming “the time has come.” Such deception is the background also for today’s Epistle (see 2 Thessalonians 2:1-3).

The signs Jesus gives His Apostles seem to already have come to pass in the New Testament. In Acts, the Epistles and Revelation, we read of famines and earthquakes, the Temple’s desolation. We read of persecutions - believers imprisoned and put to death, testifying to their faith with wisdom in the Spirit.

These “signs” then, show us the pattern for the Church’s life - both in the New Testament and today.

We too live in a world of nations and kingdoms at war. And we should take the Apostles as our “models,” as today’s Epistle counsels. Like them we must persevere in the face of unbelieving relatives and friends, and forces and authorities hostile to God.

As we do in today’s Psalm, we should sing His praises, joyfully proclaim His coming as Lord and King. The Day of the Lord is always a day that has already come and a day still yet to come. It is the “today” of our Liturgy.

The Apostles prayed marana tha - “O Lord come!” (see 1 Corinthians 16:22; Revelation 22:20). In the Eucharist He answers, coming again as the Lord of hosts and the Sun of Justice with its healing rays. It is a mighty sign - and a pledge of that Day to come.


42 posted on 11/17/2013 4:20:10 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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33 rd Sunday: Mind to your own business.

 

 

"Not a hair on your head will be destroyed.
By your perseverance you will secure your lives." (Lk 21: 19)

 

The Word for Sunday: http://usccb.org/bible/readings/111713.cfm

 

Mal 3: 19 - 20a

Thes 3: 7-12

Lk 21: 5-19



Our common human experience, if we take our lives seriously before God, is the tension between the present and the future; between what we are now and what we know we should be. Many of us don’t give much daily thought to the life beyond this one.  For most of us our lives are filled with enough need for problem solving or doing the right thing and hoping that in the end all will be well. Welcome to the human condition!

 

Yet, this time of our liturgical year and the Gospel this Sunday (Lk 21: 5-19) reminds us that indeed in the end, “. . . not a hair on your head will be destroyed. By your perseverance you will secure your lives."

 

They are words of comfort from Jesus but we have to place them in their full context. That is, getting from point A to point B will not always be easy or pleasant. If we remove the significance of the cross from our Christian life, then we are nothing more than an ancient philosophy from some well-intentioned but tragic figure who went about doing good and preaching inspiring words but in the end died a pitiful death.

 

When Jesus spoke an ominous warning as we hear in the Gospel that, “. . . Nation will rise against nation, and kingdom against kingdom. There will be powerful earthquakes, famines, and plagues from place to place; . . .” Our first reading from the prophet Malachi has no less of a warning: “Lo, the day is coming, blazing like an oven, when all the proud and all evildoers will be stubble, and the day that is coming will set them on fire, leaving them neither root nor branch . . . “ In the face of such dire predictions, we could either cry “the sky is falling” like chicken little or we can understand that nothing is new under the sun. What age has not seen such portends of disaster? Such apocalyptic scenarios are the stuff of symbol and sign.

 

Still, rather than frighten us the words of this Sunday are to bring us comfort: that all will be well because God is on our side.  In fact, he is on everyone’s side since no one has a monopoly on divine protection.  This is the guarantee of salvation. So what are we to do in the face of such “signs?” Maybe it could be said: “mind to your own business.”

 

Our “business,” is the stuff of our daily walk with the Lord in the here and the now. Maybe our fascination with the signs of power and destruction (the stuff of Hollywood) is more of a distraction than an aid to understanding.  While reading the signs of the time is an important exercise in holy discernment, what signs do we see in our daily lives where the Lord is present to us? Are we unaware of the living Christ who stands with us now in our daily walk?

 

No doubt, life can be tough at times; there’s no denying that.  While end times images can disturb us our real attention should be to mind our own business in the present moment we live.  The call to daily trust, works of charity, a forgiving heart, a humble spirit of service, participation in our sacramental life of faith, a healthy prayer life, and our loyalty to Christ and his Church is certainly enough to handle for any of us.

 

Our faith is often tested in the face of present day disasters such as the recent tragedy in the Philippines. Scandals in the Church and the sometimes disappointing behavior of those in public office or Church leadership all bring us to question at times.  Yet, if we live as faithful disciples, all will be well in the end.  

 

As Christians we really should not fear, though we still do at times.  As Christians, God gives us hope and takes away fear, but we still doubt. As Christians, we hear in our first reading: “But for you who fear my name, there will arise the sun of justice with its healing rays” but we often lose hope or feel unbalanced.  

 

Maybe in minding to our own business we need to seek a conversion and live in goodness and justice for others.  As God is with us are we truly with him? Our Eucharist is Christ alive and present to us not in some future moment but in the present. Let us receive this food for the journey with humility.

Grant us, we pray, O Lord our God,
the constant gladness of being devoted to you;
for it is full and lasting happiness
to serve with constancy
the author of all that is good.

(Roman Missal: Collect for Sunday)

 

Fr. Tim


43 posted on 11/17/2013 4:36:12 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Insight Scoop

The Day, the End, and a New Beginning

"The Destruction of the Temple of Jerusalem" by Francesco Hayez (1867)

A Scriptural Reflection on the Readings for Sunday, November 17, 2013 | Carl E. Olson

Readings:
• Mal 3:19-20a
• Ps 98:5-6, 7-8, 9
• 2 Thes 3:7-12
• Lk. 21:5-9

By my highly unscientific estimation, the world has ended several hundred times in my lifetime, courtesy of nuclear war, overpopulation, famine, disease, global cooling, global warming, and so forth. This is not to make light of those serious realities, to the extent that they are realities. But we can be tempted to interpret every sort of current event as a sign of world’s imminent demise. And, unfortunately, this can lead to all sorts of problems, including a misreading of certain passages of the Bible.

Today’s Gospel reading from Luke 21 is one such passage. This passage, along with Mark 13 and Matthew 24, are sometimes called “little apocalypses,” and have been subject to just about every sort of interpretation imaginable. C. S. Lewis was so distressed by the contents of these passages that he wrote, in the essay “The World’s Last Night,” that Jesus’ statement, “Truly, I say to you, this generation will not pass away till all has taken place” (Lk 21:32) is “certainly the most embarrassing verse in the Bible.” Lewis then argued (not very convincingly) that Jesus had indeed been ignorant in saying that world would end within forty years of His utterance.

Lewis’s perplexity is understandable, even if his attempt to solve the difficulty is not. A challenging feature of Luke 21 is that it records Jesus talking about three different events or realities: the persecution of Christians prior to the fall of the Temple in A.D. 70, the time of the fall of the Temple and the city of Jerusalem at the hands of the Roman army, and the time of the Son of Man. Although Jesus distinguished between these three events, He also presented them as being closely related to one another.

Jesus had, throughout His ministry, proclaimed that He was the true Prophet, the fulfillment of previous prophets’ statements and desires, and the savior of Israel. In today’s reading from the prophet Malachi, we are presented with a prophecy about “the day”—the day of liberation from the oppression and bondage endured at the hands of “the proud” and “the evildoers.” Many first-century Jews believed this liberation involved political and military revolution and would result in the overthrow of Roman rule. But Jesus went to great lengths to teach—often with parables—and to show—by signs and miracles—that His kingdom was being established to liberate the people from far worse sources of oppression: sin and death.

In Luke 21, Jesus prophesied that the Temple, one of the most impressive structures of the ancient world, would be torn down, stone by stone. Asked for a sign indicating the timing of this stunning event, Jesus exhorted His listeners to be both vigilant and wary against false preachers. He used the language of the Old Testament prophets to describe the sort of political and social upheaval that the early Christians would hear about and experience. These included persecution, for just as Jesus would be persecuted and killed (Lk 9:44; 18:32), many of his followers would undergo the same, described often by Luke in the Acts of the Apostles (cf., Acts 4:3; 5:18; 8:3; 9:4).

The destruction of the Temple one generation from the death and Resurrection of Christ was a sign that the beginning of a new era in God’s work of salvation had begun. As the Catechism points out, Jesus “even identified himself with the Temple by presenting himself as God's definitive dwelling-place among men. Therefore his being put to bodily death presaged the destruction of the Temple, which would manifest the dawning of a new age in the history of salvation…” (par 586). That age, of course, is the age of the Church, which is the seed of the Kingdom.

The fulfillment of Jesus’ words demonstrated that He is a true prophet and that there is nothing to be embarrassed about. On the contrary, Luke 21—as challenging and complex as it is—proves once again the truthfulness of the promises of the Son of God.

(This "Opening the Word" column originally appeared in the November 18, 2007, issue of Our Sunday Visitor newspaper.)


44 posted on 11/17/2013 4:46:57 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Do What He Tells You

SUNDAY READINGS - 33rd Sunday in Ordinary Time

FIRST READING: Malachi 3:19-20. Behold, the day comes, burning like an oven, when all the arrogant and all evildoers will be stubble; the day that comes shall burn them up, says the Lord of hosts, so that it will leave them neither root nor branch. But for you who fear my name the sun of righteousness shall rise, with healing in its wings.

EXPLANATION: The prophet Malachi, whose name means my messenger or Yahweh's messenger, preached to the returned exiles about the year 450 B.C. Forcibly and bluntly he speaks against the sins of his fellow Jews. Many of them were not proving themselves worthy of the mercy that God had shown them when he released them from their Babylonian exile. In the two verses chosen for today's first reading the prophet has dire threats for the confirmed sinners and words of hope for the just when the day of judgment, which is surely coming, arrives.
Behold . . . comes: That is, the day of retribution, of judgment. The day of the Lord when he will punish the wicked and reward his faithful ones, is here referred to. Almost all the prophets of the Old Testament had a reference to this day. Here Malachi says it is coming, it is near at hand.
burning like an oven: For the wicked this day, or event, will be like a highly heated smelting furnace, into which they will be cast like useless stubble to be burned into ashes.
neither root nor branch: Nothing will be left of them.
says the Lord of hosts: This threat is attributed to God. Malachi is only his mouth-piece.
But for you: On the other hand, for those who have served God faithfully, this day of judgment will be a day of joy, a day of sunshine and consolation, a day when all their wounds will be healed by the gentle rays of the sun.

APPLICATION: This reminder of the day of the Lord, of the day of judgment, was chosen for this Sunday's reading because it is, in a sense, the last Sunday of the liturgical year. Next Sunday is dedicated to the Feast of Christ the King, so it is only right and fitting that we should be reminded of our last end on the last Sunday of our liturgical year. The second reading and the Gospel have a somewhat similar theme.

It is true that many of the prophets of the Old Testament stressed the justice of God very much and seldom referred to his mercy. Malachi belongs to this group. We must not forget that they were dealing with a stubborn, selfish people, who served God more out of fear than out of love. When their earthly affairs prospered they forgot him and all his kindness to them. The vast majority of them thought of him only when some personal or national disaster threatened. Therefore, the prophets, the preachers whom God sent to them, spoke in the language they could understand.

However, we must not forget that they had not witnessed the infinite mercy of God, as shown in the Incarnation, which we Christians have witnessed. Neither had they heard of that divine mercy which our loving Father has for every human being whom he has put on earth. We have this knowledge from the lips of God's divine Son, Christ our Lord, who tells us that God wants the eternal death of no sinner, no matter how wicked he be, but rather that that sinner be converted and live eternally.

Furthermore, the Jews had only a very limited revelation as regards the future life. They had some vague idea that those who had died in the Lord, at peace with God, would sometime in the remote future live again with God. For the time being, they were vague shadows living some form of inactive, attenuated life in the underworld, a place which they called Sheol. They expected their rewards and punishments in this life.

The prophet's words, therefore, stressed the frightening aspect of God's justice, without any hint at possible mercy. He knew the religious, or rather irreligious, outlook of his contemporaries. For the great majority of them, relations with God were governed by fear rather than by love. Thanks to the deeper knowledge of God which his Incarnate Son has given to us, we now know God as a loving Father who wants us all to be his loving, obedient and grateful children. He has made known to us what St. Paul calls: "the mystery hidden for generations and centuries and which has now been revealed to his saints. This mystery is Christ among you, your hope of glory" (Col. 1: 26-27). To his Ephesian converts Paul says : "Before the world was made he (God) chose us in Christ, to be holy and spotless and to live through love in his presence determining that we should become his adopted sons through Jesus Christ" (Eph. 1: 4-5). With this knowledge of the God of love we can put fear aside. We can strive instead to render all the thanks of which we are capable, for the wonderful, infinite love and mercy he has shown to us through sending his divine Son to us and making us his adopted children.

Children can of course sometimes be ungrateful to the kindest and most generous of parents. Let us look back today over the past year and see if we were always grateful, obedient children of the kindest and most generous of Fathers. If we failed now and then we can make up for that forgetfulness. We can ask him for forgiveness, and it will be gladly granted. We all are another year nearer to our eternal home. Please God we have made great strides on our journey to heaven already. With the help of God's grace we will make even greater progress in the year or years that God may still give us.

"The sun of justice with its healing rays," that is, the blessed vision of God in his and our eternal home, will rise for us some-day soon when the darkness of earthly death will close our bodily eyes. So may it be for each and every one of us.


SECOND READING: 2 Thessalonians 3: 7-12. You yourselves know how you ought to imitate us; we were not idle when we were with you, we did not eat any one's bread without paying, but with toil and labor we worked night and day, that we might not burden any of you. It was not because we have not that right, but to give you in our conduct an example to imitate. For even when we were with you, we gave you this command: If any one will not work, let him not eat. For we hear that some of you are living in idleness, mere busybodies; not doing any work. Now such persons we command and exhort in the Lord Jesus Christ to do their work in quietness and to earn their own living.

EXPLANATION: In his two letters to the Thessalonians, Paul praises their faith and good works. They are an example to the other Christian communities. However, as in the best of communities, there were a few amongst them who were unwilling to earn their daily bread and were abusing the charity of their fellow Christians. Their excuse for this kind of conduct was that the parousia, or General Judgment, was imminent. Paul had not told them that it was imminent, but that it would come "like a thief in the night." These idlers were only looking for an excuse for their laziness. Paul condemns this dishonesty and in the sixth verse, which immediately precedes today's reading, he tells the brethren to "keep away from any of the brothers who refuses to work." As he did while he was amongst them he then goes on to encourage the whole Christian community to avoid idleness and to earn their daily bread honestly.
You . . . know how you ought to imitate us: By imitating Paul they would be imitating Christ whom Paul always tried to imitate (see 1 Cor. 11: 1, etc.).
we . . . bread: While Paul was preaching the gospel in Thessalonica he earned his daily bread by practicing his trade of tent-making.
worked . . . day: Whenever he was free from preaching he worked with his hands to earn his livelihood.
not . . . right: As he was their teacher they were bound to support him. But he wanted to be for them
an example . . . imitate: He wanted to encourage them all to engage in honest labor and so support themselves.
anyone . . . work: Even while he was present amongst them there were some who evidently were inclined to idle and let others provide for them. So he laid down a rule that no idler should be given free meals. This would not be true charity but would rather encourage the sin of idleness.
We hear . . . busybodies: Instead of doing their own work idlers were interfering with the others who were working.
We . . . exhort: With all his authority as their Apostle in Christ he now appeals to them to change their lives and earn their livelihood by working peacefully and quietly, that is, not disturbing the others who worked.

APPLICATION: Around the turn of the last century, and the first decade of this, it was customary for able-bodied male emigrants, going from Europe to America, to "work their passage." This meant that they traveled free of charge provided they worked as crew members on the sailing ships which were then the means of transport across the Atlantic. For the vast majority of them, who had not the wherewithal to pay for their transport, this was not a hardship but a favor. The three to four weeks' strenuous and tiring labor seemed as nothing when they thought of the land of freedom and plenty which it enabled them to reach.

We are on a voyage, the voyage of life, which will end on the shores of eternity. It is God's plan for us that during our voyage we should earn entry into that land of freedom and plenty by "working our passage." For our period of preparation, he created this earth for us to live on. For our needs he gave it the power to produce the fruits and vegetables, as well as the animals of the fields, the birds of the air and the fishes in the sea. He handed over to man all these gifts for his use and sustenance. Man was to use his gifts of mind and muscle to master the lower creatures and put them to his service. In other words, God provided the raw material. By his labor man had to produce the finished article.

From the beginning this was the law of God for man. Christianity did not change his obligation of labor in any way, except that it exalted man's labor and gave him a more noble motive for his daily toil. The Christian labors not only to provide the necessities of life for himself but thereby to honor God and, where possible, help his needy neighbor.

There were some among the Thessalonian converts who thought that they were freed from this obligation of daily labor, because they should concentrate all their thoughts and time on the eternal life which was around the corner. St. Paul corrects this erroneous, view. He tells them that they must earn their living by honest labor, for the vice of idleness was no preparation for meeting their Judge.

The great Apostle has the same message for all of us too. It is for all, for the millionaire as well as for the penniless person, for the managing director as well as for the office-cleaner. We must all use the gifts of mind and body which God gave us. We are to do so not only to provide for our own temporal necessities but, where possible, to produce a surplus that is so badly needed by our fellowman in less developed parts of our world today. Laziness is still a vice and an evil inclination which can worm its way into any man no matter what his social status in life may be. Perhaps we are inclined to notice it more in the lower social grades, because the number of such workers is greater. Of course, there is no denying that far too many of these workers are not always honest in their dealings with their employers. Too often their ideal is to get the greatest amount of pay for the least amount of labor. Generally the result is that they do an injustice to their employers, to their fellow workers and to the consumers of the goods which they produce.

However, the employers and business managers can also do an injustice to their employees and to the general public. They do so if, through idleness, they waste the time which they should spend in planning and directing and working for the progress of the business concern which they own or manage. Their sin of laziness seldom gets the publicity it deserves, nor does it often register in their own consciences. Yet as far as the progress of his business and the general prosperity of his city or country is concerned, one negligent and idling director can do more harm than a hundred slacking factory-hands.

We all need to examine our consciences and see if we are honestly "working our passage" to heaven. Do we rest on our oars when we feel that we have enough for ourselves? Do we think of our neighbors at home and abroad who could be helped by a little extra labor on our part? Does the father of the family provide for his household or does he waste his working days because of drinking bouts or other sinful habits? Does the mother of the house work honestly and through her thrift and economy provide for her husband and children? Do the teenagers waste their earnings, or their parents' earnings, on unnecessary amusements and luxuries while neighbors are short of bread?

As Christians, we should set the example to all others. We know that God gave us the mental and physical gifts we possess. We know too that we must one day render an account of the use we have made of the talents he gave us. If we use them honestly they will pay our passage to our heavenly home. If we abuse them and waste them we shall never see that promised land.


GOSPEL: Luke 21:5-19. As some spoke of the temple, how it was adorned with noble stones and offerings, Jesus said, "As for these things which you see, the days will come when there shall not be left here one stone upon another that will not be thrown down." And they asked him, "Teacher, when will this be, and what will be the sign when this is about to take place?" And he said, "Take heed that you are not led astray; for many will come in my name, saying, 'I am he!' and, 'The time is at hand!' Do not go after them. And when you hear of wars and tumults, do not be terrified; for this must first take place, but the end will not be at once."

Then he said to them, "Nation will rise against nation, and kingdom against kingdom, there will be great earthquakes, and in various places famines and pestilence; and there will be terrors and great signs from heaven. But before all this they will lay their hands on you and persecute you, delivering you up to the synagogues and prisons, and you will be brought before kings and governors for my name's sake. This will be a time for you to bear testimony. Settle it therefore in your minds, not to meditate beforehand how to answer; for I will give you a mouth and wisdom, which none of your adversaries will be able to withstand or contradict. You will be delivered up even by parents and brothers and kinsmen and friends, and some of you they will put to death; you will be hated by all for my name's sake. But not a hair of your head will perish. By your endurance you will gain your lives."

EXPLANATION: Standing in the Temple square in Jerusalem, surrounded by the crowd, Jesus foretells the destruction of this Temple and of Jerusalem. He also refers to the end of the world but implies that it is a long way off. He foretells persecution and torture for his followers but they will triumph in the end. They will earn eternal life.
temple . . . adorned . . . stones: Some of the crowd were admiring the beauty of the Temple when Jesus said to them
not . . . one stone . . . another: The Romans leveled the Temple to the ground in the year 70 A.D. fulfilling his prophecy to the letter.
when will this be?: This question concerns not the destruction of the Temple but the end of the world, as our Lord's answer indicates.
many will come in my name: False Messiahs will appear before the end of the world trying to mislead Christians.
Nation . . . earthquakes . . . famines: Many troubles and misfortunes will occur. Before the end of the world nation will fight nation, kingdom will be against kingdom.
great signs: Christ uses the eschatological language of the prophets and of the apocalyptic writers which are to be understood symbolically. Nothing definite can be deduced from these words as to what these signs will be which will precede the end. That it is in the distant future seems clear from the fact that many other events must take place first.
before all this: He is now telling his disciples and followers that they will have their own personal tribulations to face in the near future because of their faith in him.
parents . . . brothers . . . friends: The first generation of Jewish converts to Christianity were betrayed and even persecuted by their own relatives and families.
endurance: If they bear their sufferings for Christ's name they will earn the true life, the eternal life of heaven.

APPLICATION: The reason why these verses of St. Luke's gospel were chosen for today's Mass is that the Church wants us all to do a bit of spiritual stock-taking this morning. As next Sunday will be the special feastday of the Kingship of Christ, today's Mass is really the last of our liturgical year. We begin our new liturgical year, the First Sunday of Advent, on next Sunday week.

To help us to be honest with ourselves in our stock-taking we are reminded today that this world will come to an end one day. We do not know when or how but that end will come. It will be followed immediately by the general judgment. Christ will come in power and glory to judge the whole human race. Each one will receive the sentence he merited while on earth. The just will enter with him into eternal glory. The wicked will go to their place of suffering, sorrow and remorse.

Long before that day comes everyone of us here present today, will already have faced his or her own particular judgment. It is this judgment which will seal our eternal fate. It is on this judgment that we should try to concentrate this morning. It is to help and encourage us to do just this, that the church brings the thought of the end of the world before our minds. The end of this world will come for each one of us when we draw our last breath. How will we stand in God's sight when that moment comes? An eternity of happiness or grief will depend on our spiritual state at that moment.

The thought of death is a frightening thought for most people. They would rather put it far from their minds, but of all the other things that can possibly happen to them on this earth death is the one and only certainty. It would be utter folly then to try to ignore it or forget it. It is not the moment or the circumstances or the fact itself of death that matters. The vast majority, even of those dying of a slow illness, do not know that they are on the point of death. What matters is the judgment which follows death. How will we fare in that?

Each one of us can put the following simple question to himself this very moment. How would I fare if I were called before the judgment seat of God today? The best of us would certainly prefer to be better prepared. There is so much good I have left undone, so many faults for which I have not atoned properly, so many uncharitable thoughts about my friends and neighbors in my mind, so many acts of charity I kept postponing, so many acts of thanksgiving and praise I have not made to my loving God.

What of those who have even more serious sins on their consciences? Over two hundred thousand people will leave this world between now and midnight. If we were called, and we have no guarantee that we will not be called today, could we dare to face our judgment in our present state? "Today if you hear God's voice harden not your heart" the scripture warns us. Today you have heard him speak to you. He has reminded you that your end is coming, that you should put your spiritual accounts in order. This is an act of God's mercy. He does not need you, It is you who need him. Your eternal future will depend on whether you listen to his call today, as tomorrow may be too late. You can put your accounts straight this very day. Why take a risk with your own eternal welfare?

The Christian who wants to die in the state of grace, that is, in the friendship of God (and can there be any real Christian who would not want to?) has but one way of making sure of this. He is to try to live always in God's friendship. The man who does this by living his Christian life daily need not fear death. It may be a sudden death, but it will never be an unprovided-for death.


45 posted on 11/17/2013 4:59:59 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Regnum Christi

Things Change, God Does Not
| SPIRITUAL LIFE | SPIRITUALITY
Thirty-Third Sunday in Ordinary Time

Luke 21: 5-19

While some people were speaking about how the temple was adorned with costly stones and votive offerings, Jesus said, "All that you see here-- the days will come when there will not be left a stone upon another stone that will not be thrown down." Then they asked him, "Teacher, when will this happen? And what sign will there be when all these things are about to happen?" He answered, "See that you not be deceived, for many will come in my name, saying, ´I am he,’ and ´The time has come.’ Do not follow them!

When you hear of wars and insurrections, do not be terrified; for such things must happen first, but it will not immediately be the end." Then he said to them, "Nation will rise against nation, and kingdom against kingdom. There will be powerful earthquakes, famines, and plagues from place to place; and awesome sights and mighty signs will come from the sky. Before all this happens, however, they will seize and persecute you,
they will hand you over to the synagogues and to prisons, and they will have you led before kings and governors because of my name. It will lead to your giving testimony. Remember, you are not to prepare your defense beforehand, for I myself shall give you a wisdom in speaking that all your adversaries will be powerless to resist or refute. You will even be handed over by parents, brothers, relatives, and friends, and they will put some of you to death. You will be hated by all because of my name, but not a hair on your head will be destroyed. By your perseverance you will secure your lives."

Introductory Prayer: Lord, I turn to you today with faith, knowing that you are the Lord of life and history. Aware of my weaknesses and failures, I set my hopes in you, for you always fulfill your promises. As I contemplate your love that becomes fidelity, I, too, desire to repay you with my fidelity. I am here before you to listen and, in listening, discover your will for me today.

Petition: Lord, grant me the grace to set my heart on what is eternal and everlasting.

1. Things Change: Like the people gazing at the physical beauty of the Temple, we, too, can be mesmerized by the fleeting glitter of the treasures of this world. Time, experience and our faith teach us that things change, including relationships. Our relationships with one another are never static; they are either being weaved more intimately, or they are fraying or coming apart at the seams. This also holds true for our relationship with Christ. All we do moves us deeper into his Sacred Heart or moves us away from him.

2. Christ Is Always the Same: Christ is the most sacred of temples; he is the Temple. Yet he changed. His body suffered the wounds that man inflicted upon his body. Christ changed interiorly, too. He suffered loneliness of the worst kind, when he experienced the effects of sin in the depths of his soul – separation from the Father and separation from his closest friends, his apostles. Yet in essence, Christ always remained the same, for he is love itself, and love is everlasting. Christ suffered physical and interior changes in his human nature so that we might partake of his divine nature, which is the same yesterday, today and forever.

3. The Gift of Perseverance: In order for us to enjoy eternal life, we must persevere. St. Paul talks about running the race, and moreover, about winning the race. Christ teaches us about the final victory and that to achieve this we must never deny him. Yet we are weak, and there are many ways that we deny our Lord. How can we who are so weak run the race and win the gift that lasts forever? Christ gives us the answer: Trust in him, not in ourselves or in the things or ways of this world. We will persevere through the grace he won for us on Calvary.

Conversation with Christ: Lord Jesus, your beauty transcends all creation, even my holiest of thoughts. Please bless me with the gift to appreciate more perfectly the limited beauty of created things and the infinite and everlasting beauty of you, my Lord and my God.

Resolution: Today I will reflect on the beauty of God’s creation and on the reality that all creation changes. As well, I will see and respect the everlasting beauty that resides, or should reside, in the hearts of all men, so that I will treat all people with the highest degree of respect.


46 posted on 11/17/2013 5:04:52 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

Scripture Speaks: Time to Be Bold

by Gayle Somers on November 15, 2013

 

Jesus once overheard a conversation about the glory of the Temple in Jerusalem.  He then made a startling prediction.  What was it?

Gospel (Read Lk 21:5-19)

St. Luke tells us Jesus had a conversation with His disciples about the Temple in Jerusalem.  It began when “some people were speaking about how the Temple was adorned with costly stones and votive offerings.”  To the Jews of Jesus’ day, the Temple was the signature symbol of their long covenant with God as His people.  It was the place on earth where God and man literally met, an encounter that took place once a year in its inner chamber, the Holy of Holies.  On the Day of Atonement, the high priest would enter and make a sacrifice for the sins of the people, and God’s glory would come down and overshadow the “mercy seat” on the Ark of the Covenant as He accepted the offering and granted forgiveness (see Lev 16).  Over Israel’s long history, the Temple began to be revered as a sign that nothing would ever change God’s relationship with His people.  If God dwelt in their midst, how could they be anything but safe?

If we know this, we will understand how disturbing it must have been for anyone to hear Jesus’ startling prophecy:  “The days will come when there will not be a stone left upon another stone that will not be thrown down.”  Naturally, this provoked questions:  “When will this happen?  And what sign will there be when all these things are about to happen?”  We might have our own question:  Why would God allow the sacred symbol of the Temple to be destroyed?

In Jesus’ day, the Temple had actually become an empty symbol.  There was little rigor in the religion of the Jews; it had become largely externalized (remember Jesus’ cleansing of the Temple because it was meant to be a “house of prayer”).  In addition, the Temple sacrifices were never meant to be ends in themselves.  How could animal blood ultimately atone for human sin?  The Temple, with its beauty and sacred action, pointed toward something beyond itself.  When Jesus came in to the world, He came to be the human fulfillment of the animal sacrifices.  Innocent human blood would atone for human sin in the New Covenant He made with us.  By His Death and Resurrection, He became the new Living Temple of God, where God and man—all people, not just the Jewish high priest—meet.  Believers, as St. Peter tells us, are now being built as living stones in this spiritual Temple, the Mystical Body of Christ (see 1 Pet 2:5).  The Temple in Jerusalem was no longer necessary; it had served its purpose.

Yet why did the Temple have to be “thrown down”?  Why not just keep it as a relic of sacred architectural history for the Jews and the whole world?  To answer this question, Jesus describes a time of terrible turmoil.  We know that He was predicting a coming judgment on Jerusalem—God’s just judgment on its rejection of Jesus as their Messiah.  Within just one generation of this statement, about forty years, the Romans entered the city and sacked it (70 A.D.).  Nothing was left of the Temple except a portion of one wall (the Wailing Wall, still standing today).  Jesus’ words were literally fulfilled.  The sack of the city was preceded by three years of terrible mayhem within its walls.  Many insurrectionists claimed to be the Messiah sent from God to deliver Judah militarily from Rome.  Factions forms and warred against each other.  A devastating famine grew so severe that animal sacrifices in the Temple came to an end because there were no more animals.  When the Romans finally did enter the city, there was a blood bath.  It was horrific.  The Temple had to come down not because it was outdated but because it had become a symbol of the disobedience of God’s people.

However, we see Jesus told His disciples that “before all this happens” they would undergo their own upheaval because of persecution:  “They will hand you over to the synagogues and to prisons, and they will have you led before kings and governors because of My Name.”  He also warned them that their fidelity to Him could cost them relationships with family and friends.  Some would know betrayal and even death.  Remarkably, Jesus told the disciples not to prepare their defense beforehand, because “I Myself shall give you a wisdom in speaking that all your adversaries will be powerless to resist or refute” (see Acts 6:9-10, the martyrdom of St. Stephen, as an example of this promise’s fulfillment).  In the coming time of trial for the disciples, perseverance would be necessary:  “By your perseverance you will secure your lives.”

We know whenever Jesus spoke in the Gospels about the destruction of the Temple and the coming judgment on Judah’s covenant unfaithfulness, He was also foreshadowing God’s Final Judgment on the whole world at the end of time.  The Jews believed the Temple to be an architectural microcosm of the universe—a kind of replica of heaven meeting earth, of God and man together.  If the Temple was destined to come to an end because of disobedience, so is this world.   So, although most of what Jesus said about the Temple and the fate of Jerusalem was meant for people living in His day, the words and images reach far into the future, too.

What did Jesus want His disciples to be doing before Judah’s judgment arrived?  The persecution they were sure to face would do something wonderful:  “It will lead to your giving testimony.”  What should we be doing in this long stretch of time as we wait for the Final Judgment?  Exactly the same thing.

Possible response:  Lord Jesus, help me do all I can to spread the Good News of salvation.  Now is the time to be bold.

First Reading (Read Mal 3:19-20a)

Malachi’s prophecy of God’s judgment came at the time of the Jews’ return to the Promised Land after their exile in Babylon, about the first half of the 5th century B.C.  It shows us two elements of God’s justice:  punishment on evil, reward for goodness.  When the Jews returned from exile, they began rebuilding the Temple that had been destroyed.  However, they were half-hearted in both their building efforts and in their covenant fidelity.  Through Malachi, God warns them “the day is coming, blazing like an oven, when all the proud and all evil doers will be stubble.”  Yet, there is also a promise of blessing for those who fear His Name:  “There will arise the sun of justice with its healing rays.”  We understand this to be a Messianic prophecy of the coming of Jesus.  He came in “the fullness of time,” as St. Paul once wrote, as Israel’s Messiah.  Although He was rejected by the religious elites in Jerusalem, the Gospel was preached in His Name by the apostles for forty more years—a generation.  Resistance against Jesus actually hardened in Judah during that time, although the Gentiles enthusiastically received the Gospel.  Ultimately, Israel’s long history of faithlessness had to meet with judgment; this is the event of which Jesus spoke in our Gospel.  Ultimately, this world’s rebellion against God will also be judged.  Until then, the Church calls everyone to find healing in the rays of the Sun of Justice–Jesus.

Possible response:  Heavenly Father, thank You for being both just and merciful.  Jesus is proof of that.

Psalm (Read Ps 98:5-9)

When we are confident in God’s justice—that evildoing will not go on forever unpunished nor goodness forever forgotten—we will want to sing a psalm like this one out of joy:  “The Lord comes to rule the earth with justice.”  So much of what makes life a struggle for us is that we are grieved by the evil that goes on all around us.  It never stops; it is always breaking out in one form or another.  However, Jesus is going to return to this fallen world someday and bring evil to a complete, powerless end.  Because of this hope, we can sing:  “Let the sea and what fills it resound, the world and those who dwell in it; let the rivers clap their hands, the mountains shout with them for joy.”

Possible response:  The psalm is, itself, a response to our other readings.  Read it again prayerfully to make it your own.

Second Reading (Read 2 Thess 3:7-12)

This is a very interesting epistle reading for us as we think about the Second Coming and Final Judgment.  St. Paul and all the apostles preached the reality of this great doctrine of our faith.  However, some of the early converts misinterpreted Jesus’ Return as an excuse not to work.  If Jesus is coming back, why get involved in working?  Unfortunately, with time on their hands, these Christians were conducting themselves in “a disorderly way, by not keeping busy but minding the business of others.”  St. Paul reminds them of the example he and his co-workers set for them while they were in Thessalonica.  They worked hard to support themselves (St. Paul was a tentmaker) and did not accept any free food or support.  Even when he was still among the Thessalonians, he instructed them “if anyone was unwilling to work, neither should that one eat.”

Waiting for Jesus, then and now, doesn’t mean waiting in idleness (which usually leads to trouble).  Waiting for Jesus means living for Him and with Him in the work He has given us to do.  Knowing that someday He will come back and ask us for an accounting of our time on earth should make us more engaged with life in this world as His followers, not less.  How foolish it would be for us to be indifferent to the world for which Jesus left heaven and gave His life.  Very foolish indeed.

Possible response:  Lord Jesus, sometimes I long for Your return so that I don’t have to live through any more messes.  Help me embrace those messes as my preparation to see You whenever You return.


47 posted on 11/17/2013 5:23:47 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
One Bread One Body

One Bread, One Body

Language: English | Español

All Issues > Volume 29, Issue 6

<< Sunday, November 17, 2013 >> 33rd Sunday Ordinary Time
 
Malachi 3:19-20
2 Thessalonians 3:7-12

View Readings
Psalm 98:5-9
Luke 21:5-19

Similar Reflections
 

THE DAYLIGHT SAVINGS TIME

 
"Lo, the day is coming." —Malachi 3:19
 

Malachi prophesied about "the day." This is the last day of all, the day the world ends, the day of fire, the day of Jesus' final coming, Judgment Day. "The day is coming, blazing like an oven, when all the proud and all evildoers will be stubble" (Mal 3:19). However, for those who fear God's name, on the last day "there will arise the sun of justice with its healing rays" (Mal 3:20). These Christians will definitely need these healing rays because prior to the final day they will be manhandled, persecuted, arrested, betrayed, hated, and some will even be martyred (Lk 21:12-17). "By patient endurance" they will save their lives and receive the healing rays of Jesus' final coming (Lk 21:19).

If Jesus returned today and the world ended or if you died today, would you be among the proud and the evildoers or among those who respect, love, obey, and fear the Lord? Are you the persecuted or the persecutor? Are you living for Jesus or for yourself? Are you going to be thrown into the fire or healed by the "Son-shine"? Repent, go to Confession, love Jesus, suffer for Him, rejoice in the present, look forward to the future. "The day is coming" (Mal 3:19). Come, Lord Jesus!

 
Prayer: Father, by repentance, intercession, and evangelization may I hasten "the day" (2 Pt 3:12).
Promise: "We enjoin all such, and we urge them strongly in the Lord Jesus Christ, to earn the food they eat by working quietly." —2 Thes 3:12
Praise: Alleluia! Praise Jesus risen from the dead! Alleluia!

48 posted on 11/17/2013 5:32:07 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

49 posted on 11/17/2013 5:37:27 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

http://resources.sainteds.com/showmedia.asp?media=../sermons/homily/2013-11-17-Homily%20Fr%20Gary.mp3&ExtraInfo=0&BaseDir=../sermons/homily


50 posted on 11/24/2013 3:27:37 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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