Free Republic
Browse · Search
Religion
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

Catholic Caucus: Daily Mass Readings, 02-24-14
USCCB.org/RNAB ^ | 02-24-14 | Revised New American Bible

Posted on 02/23/2014 11:42:19 PM PST by Salvation

February 24, 2014

Monday of the Seventh Week in Ordinary Time

 

 

Reading 1 Jas 3:13-18

Beloved:
Who among you is wise and understanding?
Let him show his works by a good life
in the humility that comes from wisdom.
But if you have bitter jealousy and selfish ambition in your hearts,
do not boast and be false to the truth.
Wisdom of this kind does not come down from above
but is earthly, unspiritual, demonic.
For where jealousy and selfish ambition exist,
there is disorder and every foul practice.
But the wisdom from above is first of all pure,
then peaceable, gentle, compliant,
full of mercy and good fruits,
without inconstancy or insincerity.
And the fruit of righteousness is sown in peace
for those who cultivate peace.

Responsorial Psalm Ps 19:8, 9, 10, 15

R. (9a) The precepts of the Lord give joy to the heart.
The law of the LORD is perfect,
refreshing the soul;
The decree of the LORD is trustworthy,
giving wisdom to the simple.
R. The precepts of the Lord give joy to the heart.
The precepts of the LORD are right,
rejoicing the heart;
The command of the LORD is clear,
enlightening the eye.
R. The precepts of the Lord give joy to the heart.
The fear of the LORD is pure,
enduring forever;
The ordinances of the LORD are true,
all of them just.
R. The precepts of the Lord give joy to the heart.
Let the words of my mouth and the thought of my heart
find favor before you,
O LORD, my rock and my redeemer.
R. The precepts of the Lord give joy to the heart.

Gospel Mk 9:14-29

As Jesus came down from the mountain with Peter, James, John
and approached the other disciples,
they saw a large crowd around them and scribes arguing with them.
Immediately on seeing him,
the whole crowd was utterly amazed.
They ran up to him and greeted him.
He asked them, “What are you arguing about with them?”
Someone from the crowd answered him,
“Teacher, I have brought to you my son possessed by a mute spirit.
Wherever it seizes him, it throws him down;
he foams at the mouth, grinds his teeth, and becomes rigid.
I asked your disciples to drive it out, but they were unable to do so.”
He said to them in reply,
“O faithless generation, how long will I be with you?
How long will I endure you? Bring him to me.”
They brought the boy to him.
And when he saw him,
the spirit immediately threw the boy into convulsions.
As he fell to the ground, he began to roll around
and foam at the mouth.
Then he questioned his father,
“How long has this been happening to him?”
He replied, “Since childhood.
It has often thrown him into fire and into water to kill him.
But if you can do anything, have compassion on us and help us.”
Jesus said to him,
“‘If you can!’ Everything is possible to one who has faith.”
Then the boy’s father cried out, “I do believe, help my unbelief!”
Jesus, on seeing a crowd rapidly gathering,
rebuked the unclean spirit and said to it,
“Mute and deaf spirit, I command you:
come out of him and never enter him again!”
Shouting and throwing the boy into convulsions, it came out.
He became like a corpse, which caused many to say, “He is dead!”
But Jesus took him by the hand, raised him, and he stood up.
When he entered the house, his disciples asked him in private,
“Why could we not drive the spirit out?”
He said to them, “This kind can only come out through prayer.”



TOPICS: Catholic; General Discusssion; Prayer; Worship
KEYWORDS: catholic; ordinarytime; prayer
For your reading, reflection, faith-sharing, comments, questions, discussion.

1 posted on 02/23/2014 11:42:20 PM PST by Salvation
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: nickcarraway; NYer; ELS; Pyro7480; livius; ArrogantBustard; Catholicguy; RobbyS; marshmallow; ...
Alleluia Ping

Please FReepmail me to get on/off the Alleluia Ping List.


2 posted on 02/23/2014 11:43:51 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: All

From: James 3:13-18

True and False Wisdom


[13] Who is wise and understanding among you? By his good life let him show
works in the meekness of wisdom. [14] But if you have bitter jealousy and selfish
ambition in your hearts, do not boast and be false to the truth. [15] This wisdom
is not such as comes down from above, but is earthly, unspiritual, devilish. [16]
For where jealousy and selfish ambition exist, there will be disorder and every vile
practice. [17] But the wisdom from above is first pure, then peaceable, gentle,
open to reason, full of mercy and good fruits, without uncertainty or insincerity.

[18] And the harvest of righteousness is sown in peace by those who make
peace.

*********************************************************************************************
Commentary:

13-18. These verses point out the qualities of Christian wisdom (cf. 1:5). After ex-
horting his readers to manifest their wisdom by their actions (verse 13), he at-
tacks the signs of false wisdom (verses 14-16) and explains the qualities of the
true (verses 17-18).

St. Paul also makes a distinction between worldly wisdom — the wisdom of man
when he veers away from his correct goal — and the wisdom of God, which rea-
ches its highest expression on the Cross (cf. 1 Corinthians 1:18-3:3). St. James
pays particular attention to the practical effects of godly wisdom—meekness, mer-
cy and peace.

False wisdom, on the contrary, leads to bitter zeal, rivalry and resentment: it is
“earthly” because it rejects things transcendental and supernatural; “unspiritual”
(merely natural, “psychi” in the original Greek), as befits people who follow their
nature as wounded by Original Sin, deprived of the help of the Spirit (cf. notes on
1 Corinthians 2:14-16; Jude 19-20); “devilish”, in the sense that such people are
inspired by the devil, who is envious (cf. Wisdom 2:24), “a liar and the father of
lies” (John 8:44).

18. What this verse means is that the “peacemakers” of the Beatitudes (cf. Mat-
thew 5:6 and note) create around themselves an environment making for righ-
teousness (holiness), and they themselves benefit from the peace they sow.
“There can be no peace,” Bl. John XXIII says, “between men unless there is
peace within each of them: unless, that is, each one builds up within himself
the order wished by God” (”Pacem In Terris”, 165).

The “harvest of righteousness” is the equivalent of righteousness itself: it is kee-
ping the law of the Gospel, doing good works, which show true wisdom. The pas-
sage is reminiscent of Isaiah 32:17-18: “and the effects of righteousness will be
peace, and the result of righteousness, quietness and trust for ever. My people
will abide in a peaceful habitation, in secure dwellings and in quiet resting pla-
ces.”

Every Christian who strives to live in accordance with his vocation is a sower of
holiness and justice-with-peace: “Through your work, through the whole network
of human relations,” St. Escriva says, “you ought to show the charity of Christ
and its concrete expression in friendship, understanding, human affection and
peace. Just as Christ ‘went about doing good’ (Acts 10:38) throughout Palestine,
so much you also spread peace in your family circle, in civil society, at work,
and in your cultural and leisure activities” (”Christ Is Passing By”, 166).

*********************************************************************************************
Source: “The Navarre Bible: Text and Commentaries”. Biblical text from the
Revised Standard Version and New Vulgate. Commentaries by members of
the Faculty of Theology, University of Navarre, Spain.

Published by Four Courts Press, Kill Lane, Blackrock, Co. Dublin, Ireland, and
by Scepter Publishers in the United States.


3 posted on 02/23/2014 11:45:29 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: All

From: Mark 9:14-29

The Curing of an Epileptic Boy


[14] And when they came to the disciples, they saw a great crowd about them,
and scribes arguing with them. [15] And immediately all the crowd when they
saw Him (Jesus), were greatly amazed, and ran up to Him and greeting Him. [16]
And He asked them, “What are you discussing with them?” [17] And one of the
crowd answered Him, “Teacher, I brought my son to you, for he has a dumb spi-
rit; [18] and wherever it seizes him, it dashes him down; and he foams and grinds
his teeth and becomes rigid; and I asked Your disciples to cast it out, and they
were not able.” [19] And He answered them, “Oh faithless generation, how long
am I to be with you? How long am I to bear with you? Bring him to Me.”

[20] And they brought the boy to Him; and when the spirit saw Him, immediately
it convulsed the body, and he fell on the ground and rolled about, foaming at the
mouth. [21] And Jesus asked his father, “How long has he had this?” And he
said, “From childhood. [22] And it has often cast him into the fire and into the
water, to destroy him; but if You can do anything, have pity on us and help us.”
[23] And Jesus said to him, “If you can! All things are possible to him who be-
lieves.” [24] Immediately the father of the child cried out and said, “I believe; help
my unbelief!” [25] And when Jesus saw that a crowd came running together, He
rebuked the unclean spirit, saying to it, “You dumb and deaf spirit, I command
you, come out of him, and never enter him again.” [26] After crying out and con-
vulsing him terribly, it came out, and the boy was like a corpse; so that most of
them said, “He is dead.” [27] But Jesus took him by the hand and lifted him up,
and he arose. [28] And when He had entered the house, His disciples asked Him
privately, “Why could we not cast it out?” [29] And He said to them, “This kind
cannot be driven out by anything but prayer and fasting.”

*********************************************************************************************
Commentary:

17. The demon who possessed this boy is described as a “dumb spirit” because
dumbness was the main feature of the possession. On diabolic possession cf.
note on Matthew 12:22-24.

19-24. As on other occasions, Jesus requires submission of faith before He works
the miracle. The exclamation of Jesus refers to the request of the boy’s father
(verse 22), which seemed to suggest some doubt about God’s omnipotence. The
Lord corrects this way of asking and requires him to have firm faith. In verse 24
we can see that the father has quite changed; then Jesus does the miracle. The
man’s strengthened faith made him all-powerful, for someone with faith relies not
on himself but on Jesus Christ. Through faith, then, we become sharers in God’s
omnipotence. But faith is a gift of God, which man, especially at times when he is
wavering, should ask humbly and tenaciously, like the father of this boy: “I believe,
help my unbelief,” and like the Apostles: “Increase our faith!” (Luke 17: 5).

28-29. “In teaching the Apostles how to expel a spirit as evil as this He is teaching
all of us how we should live, and telling us that prayer is the resource we should
use to overcome even the severest temptations, whether they come from unclean
spirits or from men. Prayer does not consist only in the words we use to invoke
God’s clemency but also in everything we do, out of faith, as homage to God.
The Apostle bears witness to this when he says: `Pray constantly’ (1 Thessalo-
nians 5:7)” (St. Bede, “In Marci Evangelium Expositio, in loc.”).

*********************************************************************************************
Source: “The Navarre Bible: Text and Commentaries”. Biblical text from the
Revised Standard Version and New Vulgate. Commentaries by members of
the Faculty of Theology, University of Navarre, Spain.

Published by Four Courts Press, Kill Lane, Blackrock, Co. Dublin, Ireland, and
by Scepter Publishers in the United States.


4 posted on 02/23/2014 11:46:52 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: All
Scripture readings taken from the Jerusalem Bible, published and copyright © 1966, 1967 and 1968 by Darton, Longman & Todd

Readings at Mass


First reading

James 3:13-18 ©

If there are any wise or learned men among you, let them show it by their good lives, with humility and wisdom in their actions. But if at heart you have the bitterness of jealousy, or a self-seeking ambition, never make any claims for yourself or cover up the truth with lies – principles of this kind are not the wisdom that comes down from above: they are only earthly, animal and devilish. Wherever you find jealousy and ambition, you find disharmony, and wicked things of every kind being done; whereas the wisdom that comes down from above is essentially something pure; it also makes for peace, and is kindly and considerate; it is full of compassion and shows itself by doing good; nor is there any trace of partiality or hypocrisy in it. Peacemakers, when they work for peace, sow the seeds which will bear fruit in holiness.


Psalm

Psalm 18:8-10,15 ©

The precepts of the Lord gladden the heart.

The law of the Lord is perfect,

  it revives the soul.

The rule of the Lord is to be trusted,

  it gives wisdom to the simple.

The precepts of the Lord gladden the heart.

The precepts of the Lord are right,

  they gladden the heart.

The command of the Lord is clear,

  it gives light to the eyes.

The precepts of the Lord gladden the heart.

The fear of the Lord is holy,

  abiding for ever.

The decrees of the Lord are truth

  and all of them just.

The precepts of the Lord gladden the heart.

May the spoken words of my mouth,

  the thoughts of my heart,

win favour in your sight, O Lord,

  my rescuer, my rock!

The precepts of the Lord gladden the heart.


Gospel Acclamation

1P1:25

Alleluia, alleluia!

The word of the Lord remains for ever:

What is this word?

It is the Good News that has been brought to you.

Alleluia!

Or

cf.2Tim1:10

Alleluia, alleluia!

Our Saviour Jesus Christ abolished death

and he has proclaimed life through the Good News.

Alleluia!


Gospel

Mark 9:14-29 ©

When Jesus, with Peter, James and John came down from the mountain and rejoined the disciples, they saw a large crowd round them and some scribes arguing with them. The moment they saw him the whole crowd were struck with amazement and ran to greet him. ‘What are you arguing about with them?’ he asked. A man answered him from the crowd, ‘Master, I have brought my son to you; there is a spirit of dumbness in him, and when it takes hold of him it throws him to the ground, and he foams at the mouth and grinds his teeth and goes rigid. And I asked your disciples to cast it out and they were unable to.’ ‘You faithless generation’ he said to them in reply. ‘How much longer must I be with you? How much longer must I put up with you? Bring him to me.’ They brought the boy to him, and as soon as the spirit saw Jesus it threw the boy into convulsions, and he fell to the ground and lay writhing there, foaming at the mouth. Jesus asked the father, ‘How long has this been happening to him?’ ‘From childhood,’ he replied ‘and it has often thrown him into the fire and into the water, in order to destroy him. But if you can do anything, have pity on us and help us.’ ‘If you can?’ retorted Jesus. ‘Everything is possible for anyone who has faith.’ Immediately the father of the boy cried out, ‘I do have faith. Help the little faith I have!’ And when Jesus saw how many people were pressing round him, he rebuked the unclean spirit. ‘Deaf and dumb spirit,’ he said ‘I command you: come out of him and never enter him again.’ Then throwing the boy into violent convulsions it came out shouting, and the boy lay there so like a corpse that most of them said, ‘He is dead.’ But Jesus took him by the hand and helped him up, and he was able to stand. When he had gone indoors his disciples asked him privately, ‘Why were we unable to cast it out?’ ‘This is the kind’ he answered ‘that can only be driven out by prayer.’


5 posted on 02/24/2014 12:01:43 AM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: All
Perpetual Novena for the Nation (Ecumenical)
6 posted on 02/24/2014 12:02:23 AM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: All
Prayers for The Religion Forum (Ecumenical)
7 posted on 02/24/2014 12:02:48 AM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: All

 
Jesus, High Priest
 

We thank you, God our Father, for those who have responded to your call to priestly ministry.

Accept this prayer we offer on their behalf: Fill your priests with the sure knowledge of your love.

Open their hearts to the power and consolation of the Holy Spirit.

Lead them to new depths of union with your Son.

Increase in them profound faith in the Sacraments they celebrate as they nourish, strengthen and heal us.

Lord Jesus Christ, grant that these, your priests, may inspire us to strive for holiness by the power of their example, as men of prayer who ponder your word and follow your will.

O Mary, Mother of Christ and our mother, guard with your maternal care these chosen ones, so dear to the Heart of your Son.

Intercede for our priests, that offering the Sacrifice of your Son, they may be conformed more each day to the image of your Son, our Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ. Amen.

Saint John Vianney, universal patron of priests, pray for us and our priests

This icon shows Jesus Christ, our eternal high priest.

The gold pelican over His heart represents self-sacrifice.

The border contains an altar and grapevines, representing the Mass, and icons of Melchizedek and St. Jean-Baptiste Vianney.

Melchizedek: king of righteousness (left icon) was priest and king of Jerusalem.  He blessed Abraham and has been considered an ideal priest-king.

St. Jean-Baptiste Vianney is the patron saint of parish priests.

8 posted on 02/24/2014 12:04:22 AM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

To: All
Pray a Rosary each day for our nation.

Pray the Rosary

1.  Sign of the Cross:  In the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit.  Amen.

2.  The Apostles Creed:  I BELIEVE in God, the Father almighty, Creator of heaven and earth, and in Jesus Christ, His only Son, our Lord, who was conceived by the Holy Spirit, born of the Virgin Mary, suffered under Pontius Pilate, was crucified, died, and was buried. He descended into hell; on the third day he rose again from the dead; he ascended into heaven, and is seated at the right hand of God, the Father Almighty; from there He shall come to judge the living and the dead.

I believe in the Holy Spirit, the holy catholic Church, the communion of saints, the forgiveness of sins, the resurrection of the body, and the life everlasting. Amen.

3.  The Lord's Prayer:  OUR Father, who art in heaven, hallowed be Thy name. Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done on earth as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread and forgive us our trespasses as we forgive those who trespass against us. And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil. Amen.

4. (3) Hail Mary:  HAIL Mary, full of grace, the Lord is with thee. Blessed art thou amongst women and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus. Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners, now, and in the hour of our death. Amen. (Three times)

5. Glory Be:  GLORY be to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit. As it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be, world without end. Amen.

Fatima Prayer: Oh, my Jesus, forgive us our sins, save us from the fires of hell, lead all souls to heaven, especially those in most need of your mercy.

Announce each mystery, then say 1 Our Father, 10 Hail Marys, 1 Glory Be and 1 Fatima prayer.  Repeat the process with each mystery.

End with the Hail Holy Queen:

Hail, Holy Queen, Mother of Mercy, our life, our sweetness and our hope! To thee do we cry, poor banished children of Eve! To thee do we send up our sighs, mourning and weeping in this vale of tears! Turn then, most gracious advocate, thine eyes of mercy towards us; and after this, our exile, show unto us the blessed fruit of thy womb, Jesus!

O clement, O loving, O sweet Virgin Mary! Pray for us, O holy Mother of God, that we may be made worthy of the promises of Christ.

Final step -- The Sign of the Cross

 

The Mysteries of the Rosary

By tradition, Catholics meditate on these Mysteries during prayers of the Rosary.
The biblical references follow each of the Mysteries below.


The Joyful Mysteries
(Mondays and Saturdays)

1. The Annunciation (Luke 1:26-38) [Spiritual fruit - Humility]
2. The Visitation (Luke 1: 39-56) [Spiritual fruit - Love of Neighbor]
3. The Nativity (Luke 2:1-20) [Spiritual fruit - Poverty of Spirit]
4. The Presentation (Luke 2:21-38) [Spiritual fruit - Purity of mind & body]
5. The Finding of Jesus in the Temple (Luke 2:41-52) [Spiritual fruit - Obedience ]

9 posted on 02/24/2014 12:04:48 AM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: All



~ PRAYER ~

St. Michael, the Archangel, defend us in battle
 Be our protection against the wickedness
and snares of the devil;
May God rebuke him, we  humbly pray,
 and do thou, O Prince of the heavenly host,
 by the power of God,
 Cast into hell Satan and all the evil spirits
who prowl through the world seeking the ruin of souls.
 Amen
+

10 posted on 02/24/2014 12:05:16 AM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: All

A Prayer for our Free Nation Under God
God Save Our Country web site (prayer warriors)
Prayer Chain Request for the United States of America
Pray for Nancy Pelosi
Prayer and fasting will help defeat health care reform (Freeper Prayer Thread)
Prayer Campaign Started to Convert Pro-Abortion Catholic Politicians to Pro-Life
[Catholic Caucus] One Million Rosaries
Non-stop Rosary vigil to defeat ObamaCare

From an Obama bumper sticker on a car:

"Pray for Obama.  Psalm 109:8"

   

PLEASE JOIN US -

Evening Prayer
Someone has said that if people really understood the full extent of the power we have available through prayer, we might be speechless.
Did you know that during WWII there was an advisor to Churchill who organized a group of people who dropped what they were doing every day at a prescribed hour for one minute to collectively pray for the safety of England, its people and peace?  


There is now a group of people organizing the same thing here in America. If you would like to participate: Every evening at 9:00 PM Eastern Time (8:00 PM Central) (7:00 PM Mountain) (6:00 PM Pacific), stop whatever you are doing and spend one minute praying for the safety of the United States, our troops, our citizens, and for a return to a Godly nation. If you know anyone else who would like to participate, please pass this along. Our prayers are the most powerful asset we have.    Please forward this to your praying friends.


11 posted on 02/24/2014 12:05:55 AM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: All

February Devotion: The Holy Family

Since the 16th century Catholic piety has assigned entire months to special devotions. The month of February has been primarily asociated with the Holy Family, probably due to the feast of Our Lord's presentation at the temple, celebrated on February 2. At the very outset of Christ's work on earth, God showed the world a family in which, as Pope Leo XIII teaches, "all men might behold a perfect model of domestic life, and of all virtue and holiness." The harmony, unity, and holiness which characterized this holy Family make it the model for all Christian families.

INVOCATION
Jesus, Mary, and Joseph most kind, Bless us now and in death's agony.

FOR THE PROTECTION OF THE HOLY FAMILY
Grant unto us, Lord Jesus, ever to follow the example of Thy holy Family, that in the hour of our death Thy glorious Virgin Mother together with blessed Joseph may come to meet us and we may be worthily received by Thee into everlasting dwellings: who livest and reignest world without end. Amen.
Roman Missal

CONSECRATION TO THE HOLY FAMILY
O Jesus, our most loving Redeemer, who having come to enlighten the world with Thy teaching and example, didst will to pass the greater part of Thy life in humility and subjection to Mary and Joseph in the poor home of Nazareth, thus sanctifying the Family that was to be an example for all Christian families, graciously receive our family as it dedicates and consecrates itself to Thee this day. Do Thou defend us, guard us and establish amongst us Thy holy fear, true peace, and concord in Christian love: in order that, by conforming ourselves to the divine pattern of Thy family, we may be able, all of us without exception, to attain to eternal happiness.

Mary, dear Mother of Jesus and Mother of us, by thy kindly intercession make this our humble offering acceptable in the sight of Jesus, and obtain for us His graces and blessings.

O Saint Joseph, most holy guardian of Jesus and Mary, assist us by thy prayers in all our spiritual and temporal necessities; that so we may be enabled to praise our divine Savior Jesus, together with Mary and thee, for all eternity.

Our Father, Hail Mary and Glory be, three times.

IN HONOR OF THE HOLY FAMILY
O God, heavenly Father, it was part of Thine eternal decree that Thine only-begotten Son, Jesus Christ, the Savior of the human race, should form a holy family with Mary, His blessed mother, and His foster father, Saint Joseph. In Nazareth home life was sanctified, and a perfect example was given to every Christian family. Grant, we beseech Thee, that we may fully comprehend and faithfully imitate the virtues of the Holy Family so that we may be united with them one day in their heavenly glory. Through the same Christ our Lord. Amen.

Prayer Source: Prayer Book, The by Reverend John P. O'Connell, M.A., S.T.D. and Jex Martin, M.A., The Catholic Press, Inc., Chicago, Illinois, 1954

Holy Family Chaplet

Jesus, Mary, and Joseph, I give you my heart.
Jesus, Mary, and Joseph, be with me in my last hour.
Jesus, Mary, and Joseph, may I breathe forth my soul
in peace with you.

Blessed be Jesus Christ, true God and true man.
Blessed be the great Mother of God, Mary most holy.
Blessed be St. Joseph, her most chaste spouse. Amen.

Say 3 Our Father's, 3 Hail Mary's, and 3 Glory be's.

The Holy Family Icon by Nicholas Markell

PRAYER TO
THE HOLY FAMILY
=====================================================================================

GOD our Heavenly Father, You call all peoples to be united as one family in worshipping You as the one and true God. You willed that Your Son become man, giving Him a virgin mother and a foster father to form the Holy Family of Nazareth.

WE pray: may the Holy Family of Jesus, Mary and Joseph, image and model of every human family unit walk in the spirit of Nazareth and grow in the understanding of its particular mission in society and the Church. May our families be living cells of love, faithfulness and unity, thus reflecting God's covenant with humanity and Christ's redeeming love for His Church.

JESUS, Mary and Joseph protect our families from all evil; keep us, who are away from home, one in love with our dear ones.

The Holy Family


 
"The Holy Family with the infant St. John the Baptist ( the Doni tondo )" by Michelangelo c.1506, Galleria degli Uffizi, Florence
Parent's Prayer

Jesus, Son of God, Son of Man, and Son of Mary, I thank you for the gift of life you have entrusted to my care. Help me be a parent both tender and wise, both loving and forgiving.

Mary, Holy Mother of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ, and our Motherly Queen of Heaven, nourish our family with your heavenly grace. Help us to remain faithful to The Most Holy Trinity, in all our sorrows and joys.

Joseph, Earthly father to our Lord God, guardian and spouse of Mary, keep our family safe from harm. Help us in all times of discouragement or anxiety.

Holy Family of Nazareth, help our family to walk in your footsteps. May we be peace-loving and peace-giving.
Amen.
 

Imitating the Holy Family: Four Traits that Make It Possible
[Catholic Caucus] On the Holy Family [Angelus]
Biblical Teachings on Marriage and Family. A Homily for the Feast of the Holy Family
Feast of the Holy Family of Jesus, Mary, and Joseph
Recovering God’s Plan for Marriage and Family: A Sermon on the Feast of the Holy Family

“Why were you looking for me?" (On the Feast of The Holy Family)
U.S. Postal Service Issues Holy Family Forever Stamp
On Prayer in the Life of the Holy Family
The Holy Family - held together by Love through all their problems [Ecumenical]
Feast of the Holy Family: The Christian Family is a Domestic Church
Chesterton on "The Human Family and the Holy Family"
Joseph, Mary and Jesus: A Model Family
ADVICE TO PARENTS by Saint Alphonsus Liguori (1696-1787)
The Holy Family
St. Joseph as Head of the Holy Family (Catholic/Orthodox Caucus)

Feast of the Holy Family
Feast of the Holy Family (Dom Guéranger OSB)
The Feast of the Holy Family
The Holy Family vs. The Holy Innocents: A Christmas season reflection [Catholic Caucus]
Vatican creche to place Holy Family in Joseph's carpentry workshop
The Redemption and Protection of the Family [Feast of the Holy Family]
Study Backs Tradition of Loreto House - Stones in Altar Match Those in Nazareth, It Says
Unraveling Jesus' mystery years in Egypt
Gaudi’s Church of the Holy Family to be ready for worship in 2008
Imitating the Holy Family; Four Traits that Make It Possible
Lots of Graphics: Post your favorite image of the St. Mary and Child, the Holy Family...

12 posted on 02/24/2014 12:06:22 AM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: All
February 2014 Year A

Pope's Intentions:

Universal: That the Church and society may respect the wisdom and experience of older people.

For Evangelization: That priests, religious, and lay people may work together with generosity for evangelization.

13 posted on 02/24/2014 12:06:49 AM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 12 | View Replies]

To: All
Daily Gospel Commentary

Monday of the Seventh week in Ordinary Time

Commentary of the day
Julian of Norwich (1342-after 1416), recluse
Revelations of divine love, ch. 11 (trans. ©Classics of Western spirituality)

"Help my unbelief!"

For I saw truly that God does thing, however small it may be, and that nothing is done by chance, but all by God's prescient wisdom. If it seem chance in man's sight, our blindness and lack of prescience is the reason. For those things which are in God's prescient wisdom since before time, which duly and to his glory he always guides to their best conclusion, as things come about, come suddenly upon us when we are ignorant; and so through our blindness and our lack of prescience we say that these things are by chance. But it is not so in our Lord's sight. And therefore I was compelled to admit that everything which is done is well done, for our Lord God does everything... And on another occasion he did show sin, undisguised, and the way in which he performs works of mercy and of grace...

I saw most truly that he never changed his purpose in any kind of thing, nor ever will eternally. For there was nothing unknown to him in his just ordinance before time began...  And no kind of thing will fail in that respect, for he has made everything totally good. And therefore the blessed Trinity is always wholly pleased with all its works; and God revealed all this most blessedly, as though to say: “See, I am God. See, I am in all things. See, I do all things. See, I never remove my hands from my works, nor ever shall without end. See, I guide all things to the end that I ordain them for, before time began, with the same power and wisdom and love with which I made them; how should anything be amiss?”


14 posted on 02/24/2014 12:09:00 AM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 13 | View Replies]

To: All
Monday, February 24, 2014
Weekday
First Reading:
Psalm:
Gospel:
James 3:13-18
Psalm 19:8-10, 15
Mark 9:14-29

Read some chapter of a devout book....It is very easy and most necessary, for just as you speak to God when at prayer, God speaks to you when you read.

-- St. Vincent de Paul


15 posted on 02/24/2014 12:10:26 AM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 14 | View Replies]

To: All
Just A Minute Just A Minute (Listen)
Some of EWTN's most popular hosts and guests in a collection of one minute inspirational messages. A different message each time you click.

16 posted on 02/24/2014 12:11:09 AM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 15 | View Replies]

To: All



The Angelus 

The Angel of the Lord declared to Mary: 
And she conceived of the Holy Spirit. 

Hail Mary, full of grace, the Lord is with thee; blessed art thou among women and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus.
Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners, now and at the hour of our death. Amen. 

Behold the handmaid of the Lord: Be it done unto me according to Thy word. 

Hail Mary . . . 

And the Word was made Flesh: And dwelt among us. 

Hail Mary . . . 


Pray for us, O Holy Mother of God, that we may be made worthy of the promises of Christ. 

Let us pray: 

Pour forth, we beseech Thee, O Lord, Thy grace into our hearts; that we, to whom the incarnation of Christ, Thy Son, was made known by the message of an angel, may by His Passion and Cross be brought to the glory of His Resurrection, through the same Christ Our Lord.

Amen. 


17 posted on 02/24/2014 12:11:42 AM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 16 | View Replies]

To: All
Information: St. Ethelbert

Feast Day: February 24

Born: 552

Died: 24 February 616

18 posted on 02/24/2014 7:11:08 AM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 17 | View Replies]

To: All
Interactive Saints for Kids

St. Montanus, St. Lucius and Companions

Feast Day: February 24
Born/Died: in the third century


Emperor Valerian tortured and punished the Christians during the days of the early Church. He had allowed a Roman officer to put St. Cyprian to death in September 258.

The Roman officer himself died soon after and the new official, Solon, was nearly killed by some rebels. He suspected that they tried to kill him in revenge for the death of St. Cyprian and arrested eight innocent people.

They were all Christians; mostly deacons, priests and bishops. Each of them had been a devoted follower of St. Cyprian. These Christians were taken down into dark dungeons where they found others whom they knew.

These deep dungeons were dirty and damp and the high walls surrounded the group. They realized that they would soon be put to death. The Christians were kept many months in the prison.

They were made to work during the day and were often kept without food and water for no reason. The cruel treatment, made these Christians grow close together and they helped one another bear their sufferings. The ordinary people protected the bishops, priests and deacons at whom the emperor's cruelty was specially aimed at.

When the Christians were finally called to the place of execution, each was allowed to speak. Montanus, who was tall and strong, spoke bravely to the entire Christian crowd. He told them to be true to Jesus and to die rather than give up the faith.

Lucius, who was small and in poor health, walked quietly to the place where he was to die. He was weak from the hard months in prison. In fact, he had to lean on two friends who helped him to the place where the executioner waited. The people who watched asked him to remember them when he went to heaven.

As each of the Christians were beheaded one after another, the Christians who watched became braver and stronger. They wept for those who suffered such injustice. But they were also filled with joy when they realized that these martyrs would bless them from heaven.

Montanus, Lucius and their companions willingly died for their faith in Jesus in 259.


19 posted on 02/24/2014 7:24:59 AM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 18 | View Replies]

To: All

Day 78 - Did Jesus really experience fear of death?

 

On the Mount of Olives on the night before his death, did Jesus really experience fear of death?

Since Jesus was true man, he truly experienced fear of death on the Mount of Olives.

With the same human strength that we all possess, Jesus had to fight in order to consent interiorly to the Father's will that he give his life for the life of the world. Abandoned in his darkest hour by everyone, even his friends, Jesus managed after a struggle to say Yes. "My Father, if this [cup] cannot pass unless I drink it, your will be done." (YOUCAT question 100)

 


Dig Deeper: CCC section (612) and other references here.


20 posted on 02/24/2014 4:52:56 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 19 | View Replies]

To: All

Part 1: The Profession of Faith (26 - 1065)

Section 2: The Profession of the Christian Faith (185 - 1065)

Chapter 2: I Believe in Jesus Christ, the Only Son of God (422 - 682)

Article 4: "Jesus Christ suffered under Pontius Pilate, was crucified, died and was buried" (571 - 630)

Paragraph 2: Jesus Died Crucified (595 - 623)

III. CHRIST OFFERED HIMSELF TO HIS FATHER FOR OUR SINS

The agony at Gethsemani

1009
2600
532
(all)

612

The cup of the New Covenant, which Jesus anticipated when he offered himself at the Last Supper, is afterwards accepted by him from his Father's hands in his agony in the garden at Gethsemani,434 making himself "obedient unto death". Jesus prays: "My Father, if it be possible, let this cup pass from me..."435 Thus he expresses the horror that death represented for his human nature. Like ours, his human nature is destined for eternal life; but unlike ours, it is perfectly exempt from sin, the cause of death.436 Above all, his human nature has been assumed by the divine person of the "Author of life", the "Living One".437 By accepting in his human will that the Father's will be done, he accepts his death as redemptive, for "he himself bore our sins in his body on the tree."438

434.

Cf. Mt 26:42; Lk 22:20.

435.

Phil 2:8; Mt 26:39; cf. Heb 5:7-8.

436.

Cf. Rom 5:12; Heb 4:15.

437.

Cf. Acts 3:15; Rev 1:17; Jn 1:4; 5:26.

438.

1 Pet 2:24; cf. Mt 26:42.


21 posted on 02/24/2014 5:07:45 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 20 | View Replies]

To: Salvation
Mark
  English: Douay-Rheims Latin: Vulgata Clementina Greek NT: Byzantine/Majority Text (2000)
  Mark 9
14 9:13 And coming to his disciples, he saw a great multitude about them, and the scribes disputing with them. 9:13 Et veniens ad discipulos suos, vidit turbam magnam circa eos, et scribas conquirentes cum illis. και ελθων προς τους μαθητας ειδεν οχλον πολυν περι αυτους και γραμματεις συζητουντας αυτοις
15 9:14 And presently all the people seeing Jesus, were astonished and struck with fear; and running to him, they saluted him. 9:14 Et confestim omnis populus videns Jesum, stupefactus est, et expaverunt, et accurrentes salutabant eum. και ευθεως πας ο οχλος ιδων αυτον εξεθαμβηθη και προστρεχοντες ησπαζοντο αυτον
16 9:15 And he asked them: What do you question about among you? 9:15 Et interrogavit eos : Quid inter vos conquiritis ? και επηρωτησεν τους γραμματεις τι συζητειτε προς αυτους
17 9:16 And one of the multitude, answering, said: Master, I have brought my son to thee, having a dumb spirit. 9:16 Et respondens unus de turba, dixit : Magister, attuli filium meum ad te habentem spiritum mutum : και αποκριθεις εις εκ του οχλου ειπεν διδασκαλε ηνεγκα τον υιον μου προς σε εχοντα πνευμα αλαλον
18 9:17 Who, wheresoever he taketh him, dasheth him, and he foameth, and gnasheth with the teeth, and pineth away; and I spoke to thy disciples to cast him out, and they could not. 9:17 qui ubicumque eum apprehenderit, allidit illum, et spumat, et stridet dentibus, et arescit : et dixi discipulis tuis ut ejicerent illum, et non potuerunt. και οπου αν αυτον καταλαβη ρησσει αυτον και αφριζει και τριζει τους οδοντας αυτου και ξηραινεται και ειπον τοις μαθηταις σου ινα αυτο εκβαλωσιν και ουκ ισχυσαν
19 9:18 Who answering them, said: O incredulous generation, how long shall I be with you? how long shall I suffer you? bring him unto me. 9:18 Qui respondens eis, dixit : O generatio incredula, quamdiu apud vos ero ? quamdiu vos patiar ? afferte illum ad me. ο δε αποκριθεις αυτω λεγει ω γενεα απιστος εως ποτε προς υμας εσομαι εως ποτε ανεξομαι υμων φερετε αυτον προς με
20 9:19 And they brought him. And when he had seen him, immediately the spirit troubled him; and being thrown down upon the ground, he rolled about foaming. 9:19 Et attulerunt eum. Et cum vidisset eum, statim spiritus conturbavit illum : et elisus in terram, volutabatur spumans. και ηνεγκαν αυτον προς αυτον και ιδων αυτον ευθεως το πνευμα εσπαραξεν αυτον και πεσων επι της γης εκυλιετο αφριζων
21 9:20 And he asked his father: How long time is it since this hath happened unto him? But he said: From his infancy: 9:20 Et interrogavit patrem ejus : Quantum temporis est ex quo ei hoc accidit ? At ille ait : Ab infantia : και επηρωτησεν τον πατερα αυτου ποσος χρονος εστιν ως τουτο γεγονεν αυτω ο δε ειπεν παιδιοθεν
22 9:21 And oftentimes hath he cast him into the fire and into waters to destroy him. But if thou canst do any thing, help us, having compassion on us. 9:21 et frequenter eum in ignem, et in aquas misit ut eum perderet : sed si quid potes, adjuva nos, misertus nostri. και πολλακις αυτον και εις το πυρ εβαλεν και εις υδατα ινα απολεση αυτον αλλ ει τι δυνασαι βοηθησον ημιν σπλαγχνισθεις εφ ημας
23 9:22 And Jesus saith to him: If thou canst believe, all things are possible to him that believeth. 9:22 Jesus autem ait illi : Si potes credere, omnia possibilia sunt credenti. ο δε ιησους ειπεν αυτω το ει δυνασαι πιστευσαι παντα δυνατα τω πιστευοντι
24 9:23 And immediately the father of the boy crying out, with tears said: I do believe, Lord: help my unbelief. 9:23 Et continuo exclamans pater pueri, cum lacrimis aiebat : Credo, Domine ; adjuva incredulitatem meam. και ευθεως κραξας ο πατηρ του παιδιου μετα δακρυων ελεγεν πιστευω κυριε βοηθει μου τη απιστια
25 9:24 And when Jesus saw the multitude running together, he threatened the unclean spirit, saying to him: Deaf and dumb spirit, I command thee, go out of him; and enter not any more into him. 9:24 Et cum videret Jesus concurrentem turbam, comminatus est spiritui immundo, dicens illi : Surde et mute spiritus, ego præcipio tibi, exi ab eo : et amplius ne introëas in eum. ιδων δε ο ιησους οτι επισυντρεχει οχλος επετιμησεν τω πνευματι τω ακαθαρτω λεγων αυτω το πνευμα το αλαλον και κωφον εγω σοι επιτασσω εξελθε εξ αυτου και μηκετι εισελθης εις αυτον
26 9:25 And crying out, and greatly tearing him, he went out of him, and he became as dead, so that many said: He is dead. 9:25 Et exclamans, et multum discerpens eum, exiit ab eo, et factus est sicut mortuus, ita ut multi dicerent : Quia mortuus est. και κραξαν και πολλα σπαραξαν αυτον εξηλθεν και εγενετο ωσει νεκρος ωστε πολλους λεγειν οτι απεθανεν
27 9:26 But Jesus taking him by the hand, lifted him up; and he arose. 9:26 Jesus autem tenens manum ejus elevavit eum, et surrexit. ο δε ιησους κρατησας αυτον της χειρος ηγειρεν αυτον και ανεστη
28 9:27 And when he was come into the house, his disciples secretly asked him: Why could not we cast him out? 9:27 Et cum introisset in domum, discipuli ejus secreto interrogabant eum : Quare nos non potuimus ejicere eum ? και εισελθοντα αυτον εις οικον οι μαθηται αυτου επηρωτων αυτον κατ ιδιαν οτι ημεις ουκ ηδυνηθημεν εκβαλειν αυτο
29 9:28 And he said to them: This kind can go out by nothing, but by prayer and fasting. 9:28 Et dixit illis : Hoc genus in nullo potest exire, nisi in oratione et jejunio. και ειπεν αυτοις τουτο το γενος εν ουδενι δυναται εξελθειν ει μη εν προσευχη και νηστεια

22 posted on 02/24/2014 5:21:25 PM PST by annalex (fear them not)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: annalex
14. And when he came to his disciples, he saw a great multitude about them, and the Scribes questioning with them.
15. And straightway all the people, when they beheld him, were greatly amazed, and running to him saluted him.
16. And he asked the Scribes, What question you with them?
17. And one of the multitude answered and said, Master, I have brought to you my son, which has a dumb spirit;
18. And wherever he takes him, he tears him: and he foams, and gnashes with his teeth, and pines away: and I spoke to your disciples that they should cast him out; and they could not.
19. He answers him, and said, O faithless generation, how long shall I be with you? how long shall I suffer you? bring him to me.
20. And they brought him to him: and when he saw him, straightway the spirit tore him; and he fell on the ground, and wallowed foaming.
21. And he asked his father, how long is it ago since this came to him? And he said, Of a child.
22. And oft times it has cast him into the fire, and into the waters, to destroy him: but if you can do any thing, have compassion on us, and help us.
23. Jesus said to him, If you can believe, all things are possible to him that believes.
24. And straightway the father of the child cried out, and said with tears, Lord, I believe; help you mine unbelief.
25. When Jesus saw that the people came running together, he rebuked the foul spirit, saying to him, You dumb and deaf spirit, I charge you, come out of him, and enter no more into him.
26. And the spirit cried, and rent him sore, and came out of him: and he was as one dead; insomuch that many said, He is dead.
27. But Jesus took him by the hand, and lifted him up; and he arose.
28. And when he was come into the house, his disciples asked him privately, Why could not we cast him out?
29. And he said to them, This kind can come forth by nothing, but by prayer and fasting.

THEOPHYL. After He had shown His glory in the mount to the three disciples, He returns to the other disciples, who had not come up with Him into the mount; wherefore it is said, And when he came to his disciples, he saw a great multitude about them, and the Scribes questioning with them. For the Pharisees, catching the opportunity of the hour when Christ was not present, came up to them, to try to draw them over to themselves.

PSEUDO-JEROME; But there is no peace for man under the sun; envy is ever slaying the little ones, and lightning strike the tops of the great mountains. Of all those who run to the Church, some as the multitudes come in faith to learn, others, as the Scribes, with envy and pride. It goes on, And straightway all the people, when they beheld Jesus, were greatly amazed, and feared.

BEDE; In all cases, the difference between the mind of the Scribes and of the people ought to be observed; for the Scribes are never said to have shown any devotion, faith, humility, and reverence, but as soon as the Lord was come, the whole multitude was greatly amazed and feared, and ran up to Him, and saluted Him; wherefore there follows, And running to him, saluted him.

THEOPHYL. For the multitude was glad to see Him, so that they saluted Him from afar, as He was coming to them; but some suppose that His countenance had become more beautiful from His transfiguration, and that this induced the crowd to salute Him.

PSEUDO-JEROME; Now it was the people, and not the disciples, who on seeing Him were amazed and feared, for there is no fear in love; fear belongs to servants, amazement to fools. It goes on: And he asked them, What question you with them. Why does the Lord put this question? That confession may produce salvation, and the murmuring of our hearts may be appeased by religious words.

BEDE; The question, indeed, which was raised may, if I am not deceived, have been this, wherefore they, who were the disciples of the Savior, were unable to heal the demoniac, who was placed in the midst, which may be gathered from the following words; And one of the multitude answered and said, Master, I have brought to you my son, which has a dumb spirit;

and wherever he takes him, he tears him: and he foams, and gnashes with his teeth, and pines away.

CHRYS. The Scriptures declare that this man was weak in faith, for Christ says, O faithless generation: and He adds, If you can believe. But although his want of faith was the cause of their not casting out the devil, he nevertheless accuses the disciples; wherefore it is added, And I spoke to your disciples that they should cast him out; but they could not. Now observe his folly; in praying to Jesus in the midst of the crowd, he accuses the disciples, wherefore the Lord before the multitude so much the more accuses him, and not only aims the accusation at himself, but also extends it to all the Jews; for it is probable that many of those present had been offended, and had held wrong thoughts concerning His disciples.

Wherefore there follows, He answers them and says, O faithless generation, how long shall I be with you? how long shall I suffer you? By which He showed both that He desired death, and that it was a burden to Him to converse with them.

BEDE; So far, however, is He from being angry with the person, though He reproved the sin, that He immediately added, Bring him to me; and they brought him to him. And when He saw him, straightway the spirit tore him , and he fell on the ground and, wallowed foaming.

CHRYS. But this the Lord permitted for the sake of the father of the boy, that when he saw the devil vexing his child, he might be brought on to believe that the miracle was to be wrought.

THEOPHYL. He also permits the child to be vexed, that in this way we might know the devil's wickedness, who we would have killed him, he had not been assisted by the Lord. It goes on: And he asked his father, How long is it ago since this came to him? And he said, Of a child;

and oft times it has cast him into the fire and into to the waters to destroy him.

BEDE; Let Julian blush, who dares to say that all men are born in the flesh, without the infection of sin, as though they were innocent in all respects, just as Adam was when he was created. For what was there in the boy, that he should be troubled from infancy with a cruel devil, if he were not held at all by the chain of original sin? since it is evident that he could not yet have had any sin of his own.

GLOSS. Now he expresses in the words of his petition his want of faith; for that is the reason why he adds, But if you can do anything, have compassion on us, and help us. For in this he says , If you can do anything, he shows that he doubts His power, because he had seen that the disciples of Christ had failed in curing him; but he says, have compassion on us, to show the misery of the son, who suffered, and the father, who suffered with him.

It goes on: Jesus said to him, If you can believe, all things are possible to him that believes.

PSEUDO-JEROME; This saying, you can, is a proof of the freedom of the will. Again, all things are possible to him that believes, which evidently means all those things which are prayed for with tears in the name of Jesus, that is, of salvation.

BEDE. The answer of the Lord was suited to the petition, for the man said, If you can do anything, help us; and to this the Lord answered, If you can believe on the other hand the leper whom cried out, with faith, Lord, if you will, you can make me clean, received an answer according to his faith, I will, be you clean.

CHRYS. His meaning is; such a plenitude of virtue is there in Me, that not only can I do this, but I will make others to have that power; wherefore if you can believe as you ought to do, you shall be able to cure not only him, but many more. In this way then, He endeavored to bring back to the faith, the man who as yet Speaks unfaithfully. There follows, And straightway the father of the child cried out, and said with tears, Lord, I believe; help you mine unbelief. But if he had already believed, saying, I believe, how is it that he adds, help you mine unbelief? We must say then that faith is manifold, that one sort of faith is elementary, another perfect; but this man, being but a beginner in believing, prayed the Savior to add to his virtue what was wanting.

BEDE; For no man at once reaches to the highest point, but in holy living a man begins with the least things that house may reach the great; for the beginning of virtue is different, from the progress and the perfection of it. Because then faith mounts up through the secret inspiration of grace, by the steps of its own merits, he who has not yet believed perfectly was at once a believer and an unbeliever.

PSEUDO-JEROME; By this also we are taught that our faith is tottering, if it lean not on the stay of the help of God. But faith by its tears receives the accomplishment of its wishes;

Wherefore it continues, When Jesus saw that the multitude came running together, he rebuked the foul spirit, saying to him, You dumb and deaf spirit, I charge you come out of him, and enter no more into him.

THEOPHYL. The reason that He rebuked the foul spirit, when He saw the crowd running together, was that he did not wish to cure him before the multitude, that He might give us a lesson to avoid ostentation.

PSEUDO-CHRYS. And His rebuking him, and saying, I charge thee, is a proof of Divine power. Again, in that He says not only, come out of him, but also enter no more into him, He shows that the evil spirit was ready to enter again, because the man was weak in faith, but was prevented by the command of the Lord.

It goes on, And the spirit cried, and rent him sore, and came out of him; and he was as one dead, inasmuch that many said, He is dead. For the devil was not able to inflict death upon him, because the true Life was come.

BEDE; But him, whom the unholy spirit made like to death, the holy Savior. Saved by the touch of His holy hand; wherefore it goes on, But Jesus took him by the hand, and lifted him up, and he arose. Thus as the Lord had shown Himself to be every God by the power of healing, so He showed that He had the very nature of our flesh, by the manner of His human touch. The Manichaean indeed madly denies that He was truly clothed in flesh; lie Himself; however, by raising, cleansing, enlightening so many afflicted persons by His touch, condemned his heresy before its birth.

It goes on: And when he was come into the house, his disciples asked him privately, Why could not we cast him out?

CHRYS. They feared that perchance they had lost the grace conferred upon them; for they had already received power over unclean spirits. It goes on: And he said to them, This kind can come forth by nothing but by prayer and fasting.

THEOPHYL. That is, the whole class of lunatics, or simply, of all persons possessed with devils. Both the man to be cured, and he who cures him, should fast; for a real prayer is offered up, when, fasting is joined with prayer, when he who prays is sober and not heavy with food.

BEDE; Again, in a mystical sense, on high the Lord. Bede unfolds the mysteries of the kingdom to His disciples, but below He rebukes the multitude for their Sins of unfaithfulness, and expels devils from those, who are vexed by then, Those who are still carnal and foolish, He strengthens, teaches, punishes, whilst He more freely instructs the perfect concerning the things of eternity.

THEOPHYL. Again, this devil is deaf and dumb; deaf; because he does not choose to hear the words of God; dumb, because he is unable to teach others their duty.

PSEUDO-JEROME; Again, a Sinner foams forth folly, gnashes with anger, pines away in sloth. But the evil spirit tears him, when coming to salvation, and in like manner those whom he would drag into his maw he tears asunder by terrors and losses, as he did Job.

BEDE, For often times when we try to turn to God after sin, our old enemy attacks us with new and greater snares, which he does, either to instill into us a hatred of virtue, or to avenge the injury of his expulsion.

GREG. But he who is freed from the power of the evil spirit is thought to be dead; for whoever has already subdued earthly desires, puts to death within himself his carnal mode of life, and appears to the world as a dead man, and many look upon him as dead; for they who know not how to live after the Spirit, think that he who does not follow after carnal pleasures is altogether dead.

PSEUDO-JEROME; Further, in his being vexed from his infancy, the Gentile people is signified, from the very birth of whom the vain worship of idols arose, so that they in their folly sacrificed their children to devils. And for this reason it is said that it cast him into the fire and into the water; for some of the Gentiles worshipped fire, others water.

BEDE; Or by this demoniac are signified those, who are bound by the guilt of original sin, and coming into the world as criminals, are to be saved by grace; and by fire is meant the heat of anger, by water, the pleasures of the flesh, which melt the soul by their sweetness. But He did not rebuke the boy, who suffered violence, but the devil, who inflicted it, because he who desires to amend a sinner, ought, whilst He exterminates his vice by rebuking and cursing it, to love and cherish the man.

PSEUDO-JEROME; Again, the Lord applies to the evil spirit what he had inflicted on the man, calling him deaf and dumb spirit, because he never will hear and speak what the penitent sinner can speak and hear. But the devil, quitting a man, never returns, if the man keep his heart with the keys of humility and charity, and hold possession of the gate of freedom. The man who was healed became as one dead, for it is said to those who are healed, You are dead, and your life is hid with Christ in God.

THEOPHYL. Again, when Jesus, that is, the word of the Gospel, takes hold of the hand, that is, of our powers of action, then shall we be freed from the devil. And observe that God first helps us, then it is required of us that we do good; for which reason it is said that Jesus raised him, in which is shown the aid of God, and that he arose, in which is declared the zeal of man.

BEDE; Further, our Lord, while teaching the Apostles how the worst devil is to be expelled, gives all of us rules for our life; that is, He would have us know that all the more grievous attacks of evil spirits or of men are to be overcome by fastings and prayers; and again, that the anger of the Lord, when it is kindled for vengeance on our crimes, can be appeased by this remedy alone. But fasting in general is not only abstinence from food, but also from all carnal delights, yes, from all vicious passions. In like manner prayer taken generally, consists not only in the words by which we call upon the Divine mercy, but also in all those things which we do with the devotedness of faith in obedience to our Maker, as the Apostle testifies, when he says, Pray without ceasing.

PSEUDO-JEROME; Or else, the folly which is connected with the softness of the flesh, is healed by fasting; anger and laziness are healed by prayer. Each wound has its own medicine, which must be applied to it; that which is used for the heel will not cure the eye; by fasting, the passions of the body, by prayer, the plagues of the soul, are healed.

Catena Aurea Mark 9
23 posted on 02/24/2014 5:21:52 PM PST by annalex (fear them not)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 22 | View Replies]

To: annalex


Jesus heals a demon-possessed boy

Ilyas Basim Khuri Bazzi Rahib, scribe

1684
Egypt, presently at Walters Art Museum, Baltimore

24 posted on 02/24/2014 5:22:16 PM PST by annalex (fear them not)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 23 | View Replies]

To: All
CATHOLIC ALMANAC

Monday, February 24

Liturgical Color: Violet

Pope John XXIII approved the Litany of
the Most Precious Blood of Our Lord
Jesus Christ on this day in 1960. St.
Gaspar Bufalo began devotion to Jesus
in His Most Precious Blood in 1808,
when he co-founded the Confraternity of
the Precious Blood.

25 posted on 02/24/2014 6:00:15 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 24 | View Replies]

To: All
Catholic Culture

>

 

Daily Readings for:February 24, 2014
(Readings on USCCB website)

Collect: Grant, we pray, almighty God, that, always pondering spiritual things, we may carry out in both word and deed that which is pleasing to you. Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son, who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.

RECIPES

o    Pretzels

ACTIVITIES

o    Fish Mobile

PRAYERS

o    Ordinary Time, Pre-Lent: Table Blessing 3

·         Ordinary Time: February 24th

·         Monday of the Seventh Week of Ordinary Time

Old Calendar: St. Matthias, apostle

But Jesus told them, "Because of the hardness of your hearts he wrote you this commandment. But from the beginning of creation, 'God made them male and female. For this reason a man shall leave his father and mother (and be joined to his wife), and the two shall become one flesh.' So they are no longer two but one flesh. Therefore what God has joined together, no human being must separate" (Mark 10:5-9).

According to the 1962 Missal of Bl. John XXIII the Extraordinary Form of the Roman Rite, today is the feast of St. Matthias, apostle. His feast in the Ordinary Form of the Roman Rite is celebrated on May 14.


From the Beginning of Creation Marriage Was Sacred
The link between secularization and the crisis of marriage and of the family is only too clear. The crisis concerning the meaning of God and that concerning moral good and evil has succeeded in diminishing an acquaintance with the fundamentals of marriage and of the family which is rooted in marriage. For an effective recovery of the truth in this field, it is necessary to rediscover the transcendent dimension that is intrinsic to the full truth of marriage and the family, overcoming every dichotomy that tends to separate the profane aspects from the religious as if there were two marriages: one profane and another sacred.

"God created man in his own image; in the image of God he created him; male and female he created them" (Gn 1,27). The image of God is found in the duality of man and woman and in their interpersonal communion. For this reason, transcendence is inherent in the existence of marriage, right from the start, because it belongs to the natural distinction between man and woman in the order of creation. In their being "one flesh" (Gn 2,24), the man and the woman, in their mutual assistance and fruitfulness, participate in something sacred and religious, as the Encyclical Arcanum divinae sapientiae of my Predecessor Leo XIII emphasized, pointing to the understanding of marriage held in ancient civilizations (10 Feb. 1880, Leonis XIII P.M. Acta, vol. II, p. 22). In this regard, he observed that marriage "from the very beginning was a figure (adumbratio) of the Incarnation of the Word of God" (ibid.). In the state of original innocence, Adam and Eve already had the supernatural gift of grace. In this way, before the Incarnation of the Word took place historically, its effective holiness was already being bestowed on humanity.

Excerpted from Natural Marriage Already Has Sacred Dimension, John Paul II, February 5, 2003


26 posted on 02/24/2014 6:19:09 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 25 | View Replies]

To: All
The Word Among Us

Meditation: Mark 9:14-29

7th Week in Ordinary Time

This kind can only come out through prayer. (Mark 9:29)

Like noisy gulls screeching and squawking over picnic remains, the disciples and the scribes argued. Possibly the contention centered on the disciples’ inability to drive out demons or whether they even had the right to try. Either way, the scene was messy. Try to picture grown men disputing with one another, while a crowd forms and a father pleads frantically for help as an evil spirit tosses his son about. It’s ugly and noisy—definitely not peaceable or inspiring!

Then Jesus wades in. The mess doesn’t get in his way. He remains focused on the one who is suffering, not the diversion caused by crowds and controversies.

And that, in part, is why Jesus said prayer is necessary. Through prayer, we put aside the noise of the world so that we can see more clearly what needs to be done. When we come into contact with the Lord, we allow him to influence us and guide us. We don’t get bogged down in distractions or needless controversies.

Do you believe that this is possible for you? It is! You have the Spirit in you, ready to give you his wisdom. You even have Jesus’ promise that everyone who comes to him finds rest (Matthew 11:28). God has poured his love into your heart through the Spirit, and he longs for you to encounter that love in prayer.

It all begins in prayer, but it certainly doesn’t end there! Prayer is not a moment of time with Jesus, followed by many more moments of thinking and acting the same old way. Prayer is meant to change us so that we think and act like Jesus. Prayer opens our eyes and makes us aware of things that we used to overlook, like the suffering of the poor or the marginalizing of those who don’t measure up to society’s standards. Prayer makes us more loving and considerate.

In prayer, the Lord shows us how to live and how to love. So let him quiet the noise around you. Come away with him, and listen. He has something he wants to say to you today.

“Holy Spirit, fill me with your peace and gentleness. Help me bear good fruit wherever I go today.”

James 3:13-18; Psalm 19:8-10, 15


27 posted on 02/24/2014 6:21:46 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 26 | View Replies]

To: All

Marriage=One Man and One Woman 'Til Death Do Us Part

Daily Marriage Tip for February 24, 2014:

Lent is approaching. Is there a bad habit that you would like to eliminate? Anything you wouldn’t want to teach your children to do? Lent and your children can give you the motivation to let go of it. Ask your spouse for help.

28 posted on 02/24/2014 6:26:45 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 27 | View Replies]

To: All
Vultus Christi

The Propers of the Mass, Then and Now

Monday, 24 February 2014 16:28

2 Comments

I wrote this essay in 2011 and delivered it at a symposium on the s0–called interim Missals held in Phoenix, Arizona. At that time, I concluded that, “that a wider use of the Missal of 1962, and a retrieval of the so–called interim Missals published prior to 1969, in whole or in part, would be among the most effective means to the rehabilitation and reappropriation of the Proper Chants as indispensable theological and structural elements of the Mass of the Roman Rite.”

I would argue today that the 1962 and 1965 Missals, being structurally sound, and maintaining the Propers of the Mass as integral supporting elements — rather than as mere decorative bits to be moved about or even cast aside — constitute the correct point of departure for the organic development of what the Fathers of the Second Vatican Council really envisaged in Sacrosanctum Concilium.

The Propers of the Mass, Then and Now

 Introduction

Until the approval of The New Roman Missal by Pope Paul VI on 3 April 1969, there existed a substantial unity between the texts of the Proper of the Mass contained in the Graduale Romanum and those contained in the Roman Missal.  The Missal, in effect, provided the complete texts of those sung parts of the Mass that in the Graduale Romanum are fully notated.

The Missal takes the text of the Chants of the Proper of the Mass from the Graduale Romanum, and not the Graduale Romanum from the Missal.  The Missal, in fact, contains the very same texts found in the Graduale, but in the Missal they are shorn of the musical notation that allows them to be brought to life in song and, in a certain sense, interprets them in the context of the liturgy.

Originally Mass was always sung.  Not until the eighth or ninth century did the so called Low Mass or missa privata come to be celebrated at the lateral altars and private chapels of abbatial and collegiate churches. The Chants of the Proper of the Mass were not omitted at these Low Masses; they were recited by the priest alone.  This fact, of itself, suggests that well before the eighth century, the Proper Chants were, in effect, considered to be constitutive elements of the Mass, deemed indispensable to the very shape of the liturgy.

What are the Propers?

Let us, then, review what the Proper Chants of the Mass are:

Introit

Were one to open the Roman Missal at the first page, finding there the Mass of the First Sunday of Advent, the very first element proper to that Mass, and to all others, is the Introit.

The Introit is composed of an antiphon, a verse taken from the psalm corresponding to the antiphon or, occasionally, from another, the Gloria Patri, and the repetition of the antiphon.

The Introit as presented in the Roman Missal appears in a somewhat truncated form, though all the essential elements — antiphon, psalmody, and doxology — are present.  Until about the eighth century the entire psalm would have been chanted, or at least the greater part of it, with the antiphon repeated after every verse, and this until the celebrant reached the altar, at which point the cantors would intone the Gloria Patri, and after the final repetition of the antiphon, end the Introit.

The purpose of the Introit in the tradition of the Roman Rite is not didactic; it is contemplative.  The Introit ushers the soul into the mystery of the day not by explaining it, but by opening the Mass with a word uttered from above.  The text of the Introit signifies that, in every celebration, the initiative is divine, not human; it is a word received that quickens the Church–at–Prayer, and awakens a response within her.

Concerning the Introit, Maurice Zundel writes:

 [The soul] has but to listen, her sole preparation an eager desire for light, to catch the interior music of the words, and understand that Someone is speaking to her who was waiting for her.

He calls the Introit,

. . . a triumphal arch at the head of a Roman road, a porch through which we approach the Mystery, a hand outstretched to a crying child, a beloved companion in the sorrow of exile.  The Liturgy is not a formula. It is One who comes to meet us.[1]

Gradual

The Gradual received its name from the Latin word gradus, meaning a step, because a cantor would sing it, standing on a step leading up to ambo.  The structure of the Gradual is an initial text, nearly always from the Psalter, followed by a verse entrusted to one or several cantors.  The first part may be repeated.

The musical treatment of the Gradual is melismatic, that is to say, lavish and characterized by great flights and cascades of notes that stretch and embellish the sacred text.

Maurice Zundel writes:

What really matters about words is not their strictly defined meanings which we find in the dictionary, but the imponderable aura wherein the unutterable Presence in which all things are steeped, is faintly perceptible. It is in the silent spaces which poetry and music open within us that the doctrinal formulae can be heard with their amplest resonance. It was therefore natural to invoke their aid after the reading of the Epistle.  For its message must be allowed to bear fruit in our personal meditation until we make contact with the Presence with which the texts are filled.  We must hear this single Word which is their true meaning and which no human word can express. The chanting of the Gradual provides this interval of silence and this time of rest in which the teaching just received can unfold in prayer, in the sweet movement of the Cantilena distilling in neums of light a divine dew.[2]

Alleluia

The Alleluia, a cry of jubilation at the approach of the Bridegroom King who will arrive in the proclamation of the Holy Gospel, is a chant full of mystery, in that it quits the zone of mere concepts and words, and takes flight to soar into the ecstatic vocalisations of one seized by an ineffable mystery.

Saint John relates that the Alleluia is a heavenly hymn.  It is the song of the saints in praise of God and of the Lamb.  The Alleluia is universal; it is found in all the liturgies of East and West.  This universal presence of the Alleluia in Christian worship attests to its great antiquity.

A verse or phrase, generally, but not always, from the Psalter, follows the Alleluia.  After the verse, the Alleluia is repeated.

Sequence

The sequence prolongs the jubilation of the Alleluia, by gathering up the neums that cascade from it to organize them into a syllabic melody, and by giving free reign to a poetic expression of the mystery being celebrated.

Five sequences remain in the Roman Missal: the Victimae Paschali Laudes of Easter; the Veni Sancte Spiritus of Pentecost, the Lauda Sion Salvatorem of Corpus Domini; the Stabat Mater of September 15th; and the Dies Irae of the Requiem Mass.[3]

Tract

Whereas the Alleluia is the expression of a joy defying all expression, the Tract is characteristic of a liturgy marked by godly sorrow and compunction.  It is found in the Mass, notably, from Septuagesima until Easter. Originally the Tract was sung by the deacon from the ambo, in the manner of a lesson.  It was rendered from beginning to end without the interjection of a refrain by the choir; it is from this mode of execution that its name appears to be derived.

The Tract prepares the congregation for the hearing of the Gospel, not by inviting it to stand on tip–toe, as it were, at the arrival of the Bridegroom, but by inviting to a profound recollection.  The Tract, more than any other Chant of the Proper of the Mass, illustrates that the Roman Rite is a school of audientes, a school forming listeners to the Word.

Offertory

The Offertory Antiphon, already at the time of Saint Augustine, was sung to accompany the offering of bread and wine by the faithful and clergy.  Pope Saint Gregory the Great gave to the chant at the Offertory a form not unlike that of the Introit: an antiphon and several verses from the Psalter.  The antiphon was repeated before each verse; the singing lasted until the priest signaled to the cantors that they should stop, after which he would turn to the faithful for the Orate Fratres.

Even after the Offertory procession, as such, fell into disuse, the Offertory Antiphon continued to be sung, shorn of its verses.  The Offertory Antiphon is, as a rule, taken from the Psalter, although occasionally it is taken from other Books of Sacred Scripture.  In a few cases as, for instance, in the Requiem Mass, it is an ecclesiastical composition.

As for its musical characteristics, the Offertory is one of the richest and most expressive pieces in the Gregorian repetoire.  Dom Eugène Vandeur, a Benedictine monk of the first half of the last century writes:

More mystical and profound than either the Introit or the Gradual, it disposes our souls to recollection that thus they may fittingly assist at the Adorable Sacrifice about to be renewed.  The Offertory [Antiphon], then, more than any other part of the Mass, is a sublime and inspired prayer rising to the throne of God.[4]

Communion

The Communion Antiphon with its psalm, structured like the Introit, accompanies the distribution of Holy Communion.  The communion of the faithful ended, the Gloria Patri is sung, after which the antiphon is repeated.

While the greater part of Communion Antiphons are drawn from the Psalter, a certain number are taken from the Gospel of the day.  These particular Communion Antiphons, sung especially during Lent and Paschaltide, signify that the same Lord Jesus Christ who speaks and acts in the power of the Holy Ghost in the Gospel of the Mass, gives Himself to the communicants to fulfill in them what the Gospel proclaimed and announced.

The 1965 Missale Romanum

The 1965 revision of the Roman Missal maintained the Chants of the Proper in their integrity as found in the Graduale Romanum.  Even as The Constitution on the Sacred Liturgy of the Second Vatican Council, Sacrosanctum Concilium, was being implemented, the place of the Propers was not called into question.  They remained constitutive elements of the Mass, having a structural and theological rather than a merely decorative or didactic function within the overall architecture of the Mass.

The Missal of 1969

Four years later however, the fate of the Chants of the Proper of the Mass appears signed and sealed.  Concerning the Proper Chants, the Apostolic Constitution of Pope Paul VI, Missale Romanum (3 April 1969) is curiously misleading.  It says;

The text of the Graduale Romanum has not been changed as far as the music is concerned.  In the interest of their being more readily understood, however, the responsorial psalm (which St Augustine and St Leo the Great often mention) as well as the entrance and communion antiphons have been revised for use in Masses that are not sung.[5]

What the Apostolic Constitution neglects to say is:

1.  that the very form of the Introit has been changed to correspond to the Opening Sentence common in Protestant orders of worship;

2.  that the text itself of the revised Entrance Antiphon will no longer correspond to the text of the Graduale Romanum and, in some instances, will be an entirely new text susceptible of being integrated into the didactic opening remarks that, in the new Ordo Missae, may follow the salutation.

3.  That even the vestigial psalmody of the traditional Introit will disappear entirely from the reformed Missale Romanum;

3.  that the traditional texts of the Gradual, Tract, and Alleluiatic verses will be found henceforth only in the Graduale Romanum and will disappear completely from the reformed Lectionary;

4.  that the Offertory Antiphon will disappear entirely from the new Roman Missal entirely, and will be found henceforth only in the Graduale Romanum;

5.  that the Communion Antiphon will, like the Entrance Antiphon, become something akin to a Communion Sentence, and often will no longer correspond to the text of the Graduale Romanum.

Thus began the radical deconstruction of the Mass of the Roman Rite.  If one posits that the Chants of the Proper of the Mass are not merely decorative, but constitutive of its architecture, then one must admit that by tinkering with them, or removing them altogether, one is weakening or removing supporting beams of the entire edifice, and risking its collapse.

The General Instruction on the Roman Missal, also promulgated in April 1969, in a single phrase —sive alius cantus— effectively invited the termites to come in and finish the job.  Jesting aside, the Latin text of the General Instruction provided three options for the Chants of the Proper of the Mass.[6] These are:

1.  The antiphon with its psalm as given in the Graduale Romanum.

2.  The antiphon with its psalm as given in the Graduale Simplex.

3.  Another chant (alius cantus) suited to the sacred action and to the character of the day or season, the text of which is approved by the Conference of Bishops.

The 2002 American Adaptation of the GIRM

The 2002 American adaptation of the same General Instruction on the Roman Missal broadened the options and, in so doing, caused the text of the Proper Chants of the Roman Mass to appear as remote accessories that are, in any case, not indispensable to the architecture of the celebration.

In the dioceses of the United States of America there are four options for the Entrance Chant: (1) the antiphon from the Roman Missal or the Psalm from the Roman Gradual as set to music there or in another musical setting; (2) the seasonal antiphon and Psalm of the Simple Gradual; (3) a song from another collection of psalms and antiphons, approved by the Conference of Bishops or the Diocesan Bishop, including psalms arranged in responsorial or metrical forms; (4) a suitable liturgical song similarly approved by the Conference of Bishops or the Diocesan Bishop.

The choices are given in order of preference.  The Roman Gradual, which hitherto was the primary reference, falls into second place. The first choice is the text of the antiphon given in the revised Roman Missal; the American “adaptors” were assuming that these texts will have been put to music.

The second choice is the antiphon and psalm in the Roman Gradual; the American adaptation adds, rather tellingly, either in the chant setting or in another musical setting.[7]

The third choice is the Simple Gradual.  The Council Fathers had, in fact, in Sacrosanctum Concilium, article 117,[8] mandated the preparation of a Simple Gradual, better suited to use in smaller churches.

The fourth choice, a collection of psalms and antiphons approved by the Conference of Bishops or by the Diocesan Bishop, does not, to my knowledge, exist anywhere in the U.S. or elsewhere in the English–speaking world.

The fifth choice — clearly the last resort — is a suitable liturgical song (here, there is a departure from the psalms and antiphons found in choices 1 through 4) similarly approved by the Conference of Bishops or by the Diocesan Bishop.

The General Instruction on the Roman Missal continues:

48. If there is no singing at the entrance, the antiphon in the Missal is recited either by the faithful, or by some of them, or by a lector; otherwise, it is recited by the priest himself, who may even adapt it as an introductory explanation (cf. above, no. 31).

Article 48, by suggesting five different ways of reciting the antiphon in the Missal, including its mutation by the priest into an introductory explanation — note here the primacy of the didactic — puts the final touches on a insidious operation by which the Proper Chants of the Mass, even in the minimalistic form of texts recited by the celebrant, routinely came to be omitted altogether.  The Proper Chants, that in 1964 were still considered to be constitutive elements of the Mass, deemed indispensable to the very shape of the liturgy, were, by 1969, well on their way to being replaced by other compositions alien to the Roman Rite, and erased from the collective liturgical memory.

Conclusion

Allow me to formulate a principle, perhaps even a law of liturgical evolution.  It is this: elements of the rite tend to be neglected and, in the end, disappear altogether, in direct proportion to the number of options by virtue of which they may be replaced or modified.

To my mind, one of the most urgent tasks of what has been called The Reform of the Reform is the suppression of the provision for an alius cantus aptus, and the restoration of the traditional texts of the Proper of the Mass, taking care, at the same time, that the texts given in the Missale Romanum correspond to those in the Graduale Romanum. (I would also argue for the restoration of the text of the Offertorium [Offertory Antiphon] to the editio typica of the reformed Missale Romanum.)  The replacement, in the current Missale Romanum of the venerable sung texts of the Graduale Romanum with texts destined to be read, was an innovation without precedent, and a mistake with far reaching and deleterious consequences for the Roman Rite.

In conclusion, I would further argue that a wider use of the Missal of 1962, and a retrieval of the so–called interim Missals published prior to 1969, in whole or in part, would be among the most effective means to the rehabilitation and reappropriation of the Proper Chants as indispensable theological and structural elements of the Mass of the Roman Rite.

 


[1] Maurice Zundel, The Splendour of the Liturgy, New York: Sheed and Ward, 1939, pp. 43–44.

[2] Maurice Zundel, ibid. pp. 77–78.

[3] The Roman Missal of 1969 retains only four of these; the Dies Irae having been removed to the Liturgy of the Hours where it serves as a hymn for the last two weeks per annum.

[4] Eugène Vandeur, The Holy Mass, London: Burnes, Oates & Washbourne, 1923, p. 74.

[5] Documents on the Liturgy, 1963–1979, Collegeville: The Liturgical Press, 1982, p.460.

[6] 48. Peragitur autem a schola et populo alternatim, vel simili modo a cantore et populo, vel totus a populo vel a schola sola. Adhiberi potest (1) sive antiphona cum suo psalmo in Graduali romano (2) vel in Graduali simplici exstans, (3) sive alius cantus, actioni sacræ, diei vel temporis indoli congruus,cuius textus a Conferentia Episcoporum sit approbatus.

Si ad introitum non habetur cantus, antiphona in Missali proposita recitatur sive a fidelibus, sive ab aliquibus ex ipsis, sive a lectore, sin aliter ab ipso sacerdote, qui potest etiam in modum monitionis initialis (cf. n. 31) eam aptare.  (Institutio Generalis Missalis Romani 2002, art. 47–48)

[7] To my mind this option within an option only serves to weaken the rightful primacy of Gregorian Chant as the musical expression proper to the Roman Rite.

[8] “The typical edition of the books of Gregorian chant is to be completed; and a more critical edition is to be prepared of those books already published since the restoration by St. Pius X.  It is desirable also that an edition be prepared containing simpler melodies, for use in small churches.”


29 posted on 02/24/2014 7:43:12 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 28 | View Replies]

To: All

Renounce, adore, and submit to my designs

Monday, 24 February 2014 20:34

Life in an Unsuitable House

On Friday, 24 March 1651, Mother Mectilde de Bar, having returned to Paris, is reunited with her daughters (nuns of Ramerbervillers) in a modest house designated le Bon Amy. Life at le Bon Amy is austere. The menu — mostly peas cooked in water — rarely varies; bread is rationed. There is no convenient place in the house to chant the Divine Office or even to assemble for community reading and conferences. Le Bon Amy has a solitary feeling to it; each of the nuns is obliged to spend long hours alone in her cell for the simple reason that there is nowhere else to go. God makes use of these deprivations and limitations to grace the little community with a greater fidelity to silence and to personal interior prayer.

Solitude: Vocation or Temptation

Entering deeply into the silence, Mother Mectilde begins, from time to time,  to experience certain spiritual consolations. She wonders if, after all, she is called to be an anchoress. She thinks of Jean de Bernières in his hermitage in Caen, and wonders if she too may not be called by God to end her life in total solitude. Mother Mectilde is only 37 years old but, weakened by a series of pulmonary infections, she feels much older. She begins to think that her life is drawing to close.

La Sainte Baume, the grotto of Saint Mary Magdalene

God Has Disposed of Her

Mother Mectilde further reflects that she is no longer fit to govern a monastery. It is time, she reasons, to leave her charge to one younger and more capable than she. Meditation on the life of Saint Mary Magdalene — by tradition, a hermit in the Sainte–Baume in southern France — inspires her to yearn for a similar way of life. Mother Mectilde begins, in her mind, to plan for life as an anchoress, in imitation of Saint Mary Magdalene.  She will flee to the Sainte–Baume and there finish out her days as a victim of love, making reparation for the outrages and sacrileges committed against the Most Holy Sacrament of the Altar. She will subsist on nothing other than wild herbs, following the diet attributed to Saint John the Baptist. Mother Mectilde elaborates a secret plan: she will quit le Bon Amy silently and without ceremony. She will go from Paris to Lyon, and from Lyons to Marseille. She will arrange to send an anonymous note to her community in Rambervillers: “A religious named Sister Catherine–Mectilde of the Holy Sacrament passed by this way: God has disposed of her. Pray God for the repose of her soul”.

Abandonment to the Will of God

Mother Mectilde goes so far as to seek permission of her canonical superiors in Toul to carry out her plan. God, however, has another plan. He will not dispose of Mectilde as she wishes but, rather, according to His own plan for her life. In the luminous darkness of Holy Saturday night and the early hours of Easter 1651, while praying over the mystery of Christ’s death, entombment, and resurrection, God shows Mother Mectilde that abandonment to His Will is worth more than the most heroic aspirations for a life hidden in the solitude of a tomb. She sees that Jesus is not at all pleased with her plan to run away to the Sainte—Baume. He speaks to her, saying: Renounce, adore, and submit to my designs.

These words signal the end of her cherished project to live as an anchoress. Mectilde de Bar’s life will be poured out in the service of the souls entrusted to her by Christ: victim–adorers, configured to Him in the mystery of His Eucharistic presence.


30 posted on 02/24/2014 7:46:00 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 29 | View Replies]

To: All
Regnum Christi

Help My Unbelief!
| SPIRITUAL LIFE | SPIRITUALITY
Monday of the Seventh Week in Ordinary Time



Father Edward Hopkins, LC

Mark 9:14-29

As Jesus came down the mountain with Peter, James, and John and approaching the other disciples, they saw a large crowd around them and scribes arguing with them. Immediately on seeing him, the whole crowd was utterly amazed. They ran up to him and greeted him. He asked them, "What are you arguing about with them?" Someone from the crowd answered him, "Teacher, I have brought to you my son possessed by a mute spirit. Wherever it seizes him, it throws him down; he foams at the mouth, grinds his teeth, and becomes rigid. I asked your disciples to drive it out, but they were unable to do so." He said to them in reply, "O faithless generation, how long will I be with you? How long will I endure you? Bring him to me." They brought the boy to him. And when he saw him, the spirit immediately threw the boy into convulsions. As he fell to the ground, he began to roll around and foam at the mouth. Then he questioned his father, "How long has this been happening to him?" He replied, "Since childhood. It has often thrown him into fire and into water to kill him. But if you can do anything, have compassion on us and help us." Jesus said to him, “‘If you can!’ Everything is possible to one who has faith." Then the boy´s father cried out, "I do believe, help my unbelief!" Jesus, on seeing a crowd rapidly gathering, rebuked the unclean spirit and said to it, "Mute and deaf spirit, I command you: come out of him and never enter him again!" Shouting and throwing the boy into convulsions, it came out. He became like a corpse, which caused many to say, "He is dead!" But Jesus took him by the hand, raised him, and he stood up. When he entered the house, his disciples asked him in private, "Why could we not drive it out?” He said to them, "This kind can only come out through prayer."

Introductory Prayer:Lord Jesus, I believe in your presence in my life, family and work. I believe that you ask nothing of me that you do not give me the strength to do. I trust in the power of your grace and the care of your love. I love you, Lord, and I wish to love you with this prayer so that I may work according to your will and in your love.

Petition: I believe you can change me, Lord.

1. Working Without Faith: The artist Raphael depicts the poor apostles who, awaiting Our Lord’s return from Mount Tabor and the Transfiguration, are waving their arms in frustration and excusing themselves before the desperate father and his family. How often we try to do what clearly seems to be our work, but without including God in any real way. Our work seems “dead” until we let Jesus work with us to “raise it up.” Often we fail even to ask whether what we do is God’s will or not. When we exclude God from our work or family life, we lack faith. He is there—but we just don’t allow him room to work. The apostles exercise little faith, thinking this cure beyond their ability. The father and his family may as well have lacked faith in what these “apostles” could do. To them, and to us, Christ says, “O faithless generation!” When do I show a lack of faith in my work or family life?

2. Jesus’ Ultimate Intention: Instill Faith: When Jesus is out of sight, the people could only argue. Yet when he comes into view, the people are “utterly amazed.” Jesus immediately sees their lack of faith, so he uses every circumstance to inspire faith. What he did for the chosen three apostles through the Transfiguration, he does now for the nine at the foot of the mountain. He allows them to fail so as to teach them faith. He tests the poor father, too: “If you can!” And he instructs all the apostles on the need for prayer. What is Christ doing in my life to invite me to greater faith? Do I respond with that faith or do I simply argue, since Jesus does not appear present?

3. Our Struggle to Believe: The father’s heartfelt cry is all Jesus needs to drive out the unclean spirit. The man reaffirms his faith while admitting his weakness. How often do we assume that our faith is sufficient, all the while blaming God for what happens in our life? Believing is not easy. It requires a constant recognition of our limitations, our inability to understand the “why’s” of so many occurrences, the “how’s” of so many challenges. Jesus does not rebuke the struggle to believe but rather the lack of effort when we stop believing. What the apostles failed to do was done by the father with one intense but short prayer: “Help my unbelief!” This humble confession always comes to rest on the greatness of God’s power and the comprehensiveness of his love. Do I believe that everything is possible if I only believe?

Conversation with Christ: Lord, grant me an increase of faith! Help me to see you present and active in my everyday life. May I never undertake any work or responsibility without first determining your will and counting on your assistance. I believe that you can do all things in me, according to your own will. I believe your will is committed to what is best for me. Teach me to pray and work with great faith and trust in you.

Resolution: I will reject all worries that I can do nothing about, confidently acting upon those concerns of mine which I can change


31 posted on 02/24/2014 7:49:25 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 30 | View Replies]

To: All

Homily of the Day

When we have a major problem or a lingering illness, we sometimes ask God why. Despite our being faithful followers of Christ, we cannot seem to find a solution. Jesus tells us the same thing that he told the disciples: “Only prayer can drive out this kind, nothing else.” Jesus said it so simply that we may be tempted to think that it is such an easy thing to do. In fact, we do pray every night. But perhaps given the problem in the Gospel – a boy possessed by an evil spirit since childhood– what Jesus meant is a real, honest-to-goodness intimacy with God. This is the kind of prayer that is not just said every night but rather lived every day! The disciples have not reached that level of oneness with God that they do not have the power to drive out the evil spirit.  In the same way, while our relationship with God remains shallow, we will not be able to drive out the spirits that hinder us from having peace and joy.

So, let us continue to strive to reach the level of prayer where we no longer just talk to God but rather listen, speak, and act WITH God.


32 posted on 02/24/2014 7:57:15 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 31 | View Replies]

To: All
One Bread One Body

One Bread, One Body

Language: English | Español

All Issues > Volume 30, Issue 2

<< Monday, February 24, 2014 >>
 
James 3:13-18
View Readings
Psalm 19:8-10, 15 Mark 9:14-29
Similar Reflections
 

TRIPLE FAITH

 
"I do believe! Help my lack of faith!" —Mark 9:24, our translation
 

The father of a demon-possessed son told Jesus that His disciples were not able to free his son. Jesus "replied by saying to the crowd, 'What an unbelieving lot you are! How long must I remain with you? How long can I endure you? Bring him to Me' " (Mk 9:19). Jesus indicated that the lack of faith of the crowd and His disciples prevented the boy from being freed. In other words, our faith, or lack of it, sometimes makes a big difference for other people. Look at how Jesus healed the paralytic after He saw the faith of the stretcher-bearers of the paralyzed man (Mk 2:5).

Jesus remarked not only about the lack of faith among His disciples and the assembled crowd. He also challenged the father of the demon-possessed boy to exercise his faith. Jesus said: "All things are possible to one who believes" (Mk 9:23, our transl). The father accepted Jesus' challenge and cried out: "I do believe! Help my lack of faith!" (Mk 9:24, our transl.) Thus, the faith of parents often makes a critical difference for their children.

Finally, we are all expected not only to depend on others' faith but to have faith ourselves. Jesus repeatedly says in the Gospels: "Your faith has saved you" (e.g. Mk 5:34). We are saved by grace through faith (see Eph 2:8). Unlike the faith that accepts God's healing, the faith accepting salvation can never be someone's else faith, but only our own faith.

In summary, we are responsible to have faith for ourselves, and often responsible to have faith for our families (especially our children) and faith for others. Be men and women of faith.

 
Prayer: Father, give me faith to move mountains (Mt 17:20), drive out demons, and conquer kingdoms (Heb 11:33).
Promise: "If one of you is wise and understanding, let him show this in practice through a humility filled with good sense." —Jas 3:13
Praise: When Mary went to a Bible study, her heart began to burn with a love of God's Word.

33 posted on 02/24/2014 8:14:25 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 32 | View Replies]

To: All

34 posted on 02/24/2014 8:33:55 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 33 | View Replies]

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
Religion
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson