Free Republic
Browse · Search
Religion
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

Catholic Caucus: Daily Mass Readings, 03-03-14, OM, St. Katherine Drexel, Virgin
USCCB.org/RNAB ^ | 03-03-14 | Revised New American Bible

Posted on 03/02/2014 10:49:18 PM PST by Salvation

March 3, 2014

Monday of the Eighth Week in Ordinary Time

 

 

Reading 1 1 Pt 1:3-9

Blessed be the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ,
who in his great mercy gave us a new birth to a living hope
through the resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead,
to an inheritance that is imperishable, undefiled, and unfading,
kept in heaven for you
who by the power of God are safeguarded through faith,
to a salvation that is ready to be revealed in the final time.
In this you rejoice, although now for a little while
you may have to suffer through various trials,
so that the genuineness of your faith,
more precious than gold that is perishable even though tested by fire,
may prove to be for praise, glory, and honor
at the revelation of Jesus Christ.
Although you have not seen him you love him;
even though you do not see him now yet you believe in him,
you rejoice with an indescribable and glorious joy,
as you attain the goal of faith, the salvation of your souls.

Responsorial Psalm Ps 111:1-2, 5-6, 9 and 10c

R. (5) The Lord will remember his covenant for ever.
or:
R. Alleluia.
I will give thanks to the LORD with all my heart
in the company and assembly of the just.
Great are the works of the LORD,
exquisite in all their delights.
R. The Lord will remember his covenant for ever.
or:
R. Alleluia.
He has given food to those who fear him;
he will forever be mindful of his covenant.
He has made known to his people the power of his works,
giving them the inheritance of the nations.
R. The Lord will remember his covenant for ever.
or:
R. Alleluia.
He has sent deliverance to his people;
he has ratified his covenant forever;
holy and awesome is his name.
His praise endures forever.
R. The Lord will remember his covenant for ever.
or:
R. Alleluia.

Gospel Mk 10:17-27

As Jesus was setting out on a journey, a man ran up,
knelt down before him, and asked him,
“Good teacher, what must I do to inherit eternal life?”
Jesus answered him, “Why do you call me good?
No one is good but God alone.
You know the commandments: You shall not kill;
you shall not commit adultery;
you shall not steal;
you shall not bear false witness;
you shall not defraud;
honor your father and your mother
.”
He replied and said to him,
“Teacher, all of these I have observed from my youth.”
Jesus, looking at him, loved him and said to him,
“You are lacking in one thing.
Go, sell what you have, and give to the poor
and you will have treasure in heaven; then come, follow me.”
At that statement, his face fell,
and he went away sad, for he had many possessions.

Jesus looked around and said to his disciples,
“How hard it is for those who have wealth
to enter the Kingdom of God!”
The disciples were amazed at his words.
So Jesus again said to them in reply,
“Children, how hard it is to enter the Kingdom of God!
It is easier for a camel to pass through the eye of a needle
than for one who is rich to enter the Kingdom of God.”
They were exceedingly astonished and said among themselves,
“Then who can be saved?”
Jesus looked at them and said,
“For men it is impossible, but not for God.
All things are possible for God.”



TOPICS: Catholic; General Discusssion; Prayer; Worship
KEYWORDS: catholic; ordinarytime; prayer
For your reading, reflection, faith-sharing, comments, questions, discussion.

1 posted on 03/02/2014 10:49:19 PM PST by Salvation
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: All

From: 1 Peter 1:3-9

Praise and Thanksgiving to God


[3] Blessed be the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ! By his great mercy
we have been born anew to a living hope through the resurrection of Jesus Christ
from the dead, [4] and to an inheritance which is imperishable, undefiled, and un-
fading, kept in heaven for you, [5] who by God’s power are guarded through faith
for a salvation ready to be revealed in the last time. [6] In this you rejoice, though
now for a little while you may have to suffer various trials, [7] so that the genuine-
ness of your faith, more precious than gold which though perishable is tested by
fire, may redound to praise and glory and honor at the revelation of Jesus Christ.
[8] Without having seen him you love him; though you do not now see him you
believe in him and rejoice with unutterable and exalted joy. [9] As the outcome
of your faith you obtain the salvation of your souls.

*********************************************************************************************
Commentary:

3-12. This passage, a hymn of praise and gratitude to God, developing what is
proclaimed in v. 2, is more explicit about the action of each Person of the Bles-
sed Trinity: by making his choice of Christians, God the Father has destined
us to a marvellous heritage in heaven (vv. 3-5); to attain this we need to love and
believe in Jesus Christ our Lord (vv. 6-9); the Holy Spirit, who earlier proclaimed
salvation by the mouth of the Old Testament prophets, is now, through those
who preach the Gospel, announcing that salvation has arrived (vv. 10-12).

3-5. When the fruits of the Redemption are applied to us, a kind of rebirth takes
place. St Peter is the only New Testament writer to use the Greek term transla-
ted here “we have been born anew” (cf. also 1:23). However, the same idea oc-
curs elsewhere: St John speaks of the action of the Holy Spirit at Baptism as
causing one to be born again (cf. Jn 3:1ff; also, e.g., 1:12-13; 1 Jn 2:29; 3:9); St
Paul refers to “a new creation” to describe the effects of Redemption (cf., e.g.,
Gal 6:15; 2 Cor 5:17); and St James calls Christians the “first fruits of his crea-
tures”(Jas 1:16-18).

Through this being born again, God destines us “to a living hope”, which centers
on the inheritance of heaven, here described as “imperishable” (it is eternal), “un-
defiled” (it contains no evil) and “unfading” (it will never grow oId). The sacred wri-
ter uses these adjectives of negation to show that heavenly things are not subject
to any of the imperfections and defects of earthly things.

For those Christians who stay true to their calling, their inheritance is “kept in
heaven”. This key theme will be addressed in various parts of the letter (cf. 2:18-
25; 3:13-17; 4:12-19; 5:5-11); the letter is very much aimed at encouraging the
faithful to bear sufferings with joy, knowing that they are a means to and a gua-
rantee of heaven.

3. God brought about the work of Redemption “by his great mercy”. For God,
who is rich in mercy, out of the great love with which he loved us, even when we
were dead through our trespasses, made us alive together with Christ” (Eph 2:
4-5). And just as the work of Creation is a manifestation of God’s omnipotence,
so his new Creation is an expression of his mercy (cf. “Summa Theologiae”, II-II,
q. 30, a. 4; cf. note on 2 Cor 5:17).

“Through the resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead”: the resurrection of our
Lord marks the climax of his salvific work, for it assures men of their redemption
and their own resurrection. In its Easter liturgy the Church joyfully reminds of this:
“He is the true Lamb who took away the sins of the world. By dying he destroyed
our death; by rising he restored our life” (”Easter Preface”, I).

6-9. Hope of obtaining the inheritance of heaven gives Christians joy in the midst
of trials which test their faith. At the center of that faith is Jesus, whom they strive
to love above all, thereby attaining “unutterable and exalted joy”, a foretaste of
the joy of heaven itself.

Exhortations to be joyful in the midst of affliction occur often in the New Testa-
ment (cf., e.g., Mt 5:11-12; 2 Cor 1:3-7; Jas 1:2) and reflect a deep Christian con-
viction, which St. Bede refers to in his commentary: “St Peter says that it is good
to suffer trials because eternal joys cannot be obtained except through the afflic-
tions and sorrows of this passing world. ‘For a little while’, he says, however, be-
cause when one receives an eternal reward, the afflictions of this world — which
appeared so heavy and bitter—seem then to have been very short-lived and slight”
(”Super 1 Pet. Expositio, ad loc.”).

Christian joy is the fruit of faith, hope and love. “You should realize that God
wants us to be happy and that, if you do all you can, you will be happy, very, very
happy, although you will never be a moment without the Cross. But that Cross is
no longer a gallows. It is the throne from which Christ reigns” (St. J. Escriva,
“Friends of God”, 141).

7. The refining of gold by fire is often referred to in Scripture (cf., e.g., Ps 66:10;
Prov 17:3; 1 Cor 3:12-13; Rev 3:18) to explain that the sufferings of this life help
to improve the quality of one’s faith. “If I experience pain,” St Augustine teaches,
“relief will come in due course. If I am offered tribulation, it will serve for my puri-
fication. Does gold shine in the craftsman’s furnace? It will shine later, when it
forms part of the collar, when it is part of the jewelry. But, for the time being, it
puts up with being in the fire because when it sheds its impurities it will acquire
its brilliant shine” (”Enarrationes in Psalmos”, 61, 11).

The thought of Christ coming in glory (cf. 1:5-13; 4:13) should greatly encourage
the Christian to bear trials cheerfully.

*********************************************************************************************
Source: “The Navarre Bible: Text and Commentaries”. Biblical text from the
Revised Standard Version and New Vulgate. Commentaries by members of
the Faculty of Theology, University of Navarre, Spain.

Published by Four Courts Press, Kill Lane, Blackrock, Co. Dublin, Ireland, and
by Scepter Publishers in the United States.


2 posted on 03/02/2014 10:50:45 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: All

From: Mark 10:17-27

The Rich Young Man


[17] And as He (Jesus) was setting out on His journey, a man ran up and knelt
before Him, and asked Him, “Good Teacher, what must I do to inherit eternal life?”
[18] And Jesus said to him, “Why do you call Me good? No one is good but God
alone. [19] You know the commandments: ‘Do not kill, Do not commit adultery,
Do not steal, Do not bear false witness, Do not defraud, Honor your father and
mother.’” [20] And he said to Him, “Teacher, all these I have observed from my
youth.” [21] And Jesus looking upon him loved him, and said to him, “You lack
one thing; go, sell what you have, and give to the poor, and you will have treasure
in Heaven; and come, follow Me.” [22] At that saying his countenance fell, and
he went away sorrowful; for he had great possessions.

Poverty and Renunciation


[23] And Jesus looked around and said to His disciples, “How hard it will be for
those who have riches to enter the Kingdom of God!” [24] And the disciples were
amazed at His words. But Jesus said to them again, “Children, how hard it is for
those who trust in riches to enter the Kingdom of God!” [25] It is easier for a ca-
mel to go through the eye of a needle than for a rich man to enter the Kingdom
of God.” [26] And they were exceedingly astonished, and said to Him, “Then who
can be saved?” [27] Jesus looked at them and said, “With men it is impossible,
but not with God; for all things are possible with God.”

*********************************************************************************************
Commentary:

17-18. As Matthew 19:16 makes clear, the young man approaches Jesus as an
acknowledged teacher of the spiritual life, in the hope that He will guide him to-
wards eternal life. It is not that Christ rejects the praise He is offered: He wants
to show the depth of the young man’s words: He is good, not because He is a
good man but because He is God, who is Goodness Itself. So, the young man
has spoken the truth, but he has not gone far enough. Hence the enigmatic na-
ture of Jesus’ reply and its profundity. The young man’s approach is upright but
too human; Jesus tries to get him to see things from an entirely supernatural
point of view. If this man is to really attain eternal life he must see in Christ not
just a good master but the divine Savior, the only Master, the only one who, be-
cause He is God, is Goodness Itself. Cf. note on Mt. 19:16-22.

19. Our Lord has not come to abolish the Law but to fulfill it (Matthew 5:17). The
commandments are the very core of the Law and keeping them is necessary for
attaining eternal life. Christ brings these commandments to fulfillment in a dou-
ble sense. First, because He helps us discover their full implications for our lives.
The light of Revelation makes it easy for us to grasp the correct meaning of the
precepts of the Decalogue—something that human reason, on its own, can only
achieve with difficulty. Second, His grace gives us strength to counter our evil in-
clinations, which stem from Original Sin. The commandments, therefore, still ap-
ply in the Christian life: they are like signposts indicating the way that leads to
Heaven.

21-22. Our Lord knows that this young man has a generous heart. This is why
He treats him so affectionately and invites him to greater intimacy with God. But
He explains that this means renunciation—leaving his wealth behind so as to give
his heart whole and entire to Jesus. God calls everyone to holiness, but holiness
is reached by many different routes. It is up to every individual to take the neces-
sary steps to discover which route God wants him to follow. The Lord sows the
seed of vocation in everyone’s soul, to show him the way to go to reach the goal
of holiness, which is common to all.

In other words, if a person does not put obstacles in the way, if he responds ge-
nerously to God, he feels a desire to be better, to give himself more generously.
As fruit of this desire he seeks to know God’s will; he prays to God to help him,
and asks people to advise him. In responding to this sincere search, God uses
a great variety of instruments. Later, when a person thinks he sees the way God
wants him to follow, he may still not take the decision to go that way: he is afraid
of the renunciation it involves: at this point he should pray and deny himself if the
light—God’s invitation—is to win out against human calculation. For, although God
is calling, man is always free, and therefore, he can respond generously or be a
coward, like the young man we are told about in this passage. Failure to respond
generously to one’s vocation always produces sadness.

21. “In its precise eloquence”, Bl. John Paul II points out, commenting on this
passage, “this deeply penetrating event expresses a great lesson in a few words:
it touches upon substantial problems and basic questions that have in no way
lost their relevance. Everywhere young people are asking important questions —
questions on the meaning of life, on the right way to live, on the scale of values:
‘What must I do...?’ ‘What must I do to share in everlasting life?’...To each of you
I say therefore: heed the call of Christ when you hear him saying to you: ‘Follow
Me!’ Walk in My path! Stand by My side! Remain in My love! There is a choice to
be made: a choice for Christ and His way of life, and His commandment of love.

“The message of love that Christ brought is always important, always relevant. It
is not difficult to see how today’s world, despite its beauty and grandeur, despite
the conquests of science and technology, despite the refined and abundant ma-
terial goods that it offers, is yearning for more truth, for more love, for more joy.
And all of this is found in Christ and in His way of life.... Faced with problems and
disappointments, many people will try to escape from their responsibility: escape
in selfishness, escape in sexual pleasure, escape in drugs, escape in violence,
escape in indifference and cynical attitudes. But today, I propose to you the op-
tion of love, which is the opposite of escape. If you really accept that love from
Christ, it will lead you to God. Perhaps in the priesthood or religious life; perhaps
in some special service to your brothers and sisters: especially to the needy, the
poor, the lonely, the abandoned, those whose rights have been trampled upon, or
those whose basic needs have not been provided for. Whatever you make of
your life, let it be something that reflects the love of Christ” (”Homily on Boston
Common”).

22. “The sadness of the young man makes us reflect. We could be tempted to
think that many possessions, many of the goods of this world, can bring happi-
ness. We see instead in the case of the young man in the Gospel that his many
possessions had become an obstacle to accepting the call of Jesus to follow
Him. He was not ready to say “yes” to Jesus and “no” to self, to say “yes” to
love and “no” to escape. Real love is demanding. I would fail in my mission if I
did not clearly tell you so. For it was Jesus—Jesus Himself—who said: ‘You are
My friends if you do what I command you’ (John 15:14). Love demands effort and
a personal commitment to the will of God. It means discipline and sacrifice, but
it also means joy and human fulfillment.

“Dear young people: do not be afraid of honest effort and work; do not be afraid
of the truth. With Christ’s help, and through prayer, you can answer His call, re-
sisting temptations and fads, and every form of mass manipulation. Open your
hearts to the Christ of the Gospels—to His love and His truth and His joy. Do not
go away sad!...

“Follow Christ! You who are single or who are preparing for marriage. Follow
Christ! You who are young or old. Follow Christ! You who are sick or aging; who
are suffering or in pain. You who feel the need for healing, the need for love, the
need for a friend—follow Christ!

“To all of you I extend—in the name of Christ—the call, the invitation, the plea:
‘Come and follow Me’” (Bl. John Paul II, “Homily on Boston Common”).

23-27. The reaction of the rich young man gives our Lord another opportunity to
say something about the way to use material things. In themselves they are good:
they are resources God has made available to people for their development in so-
ciety. But excessive attachment to things is what makes them an occasion of sin.
The sin lies in “trusting” in them, as if they solve all life’s problems, and turning
one’s back on God. St. Paul calls covetousness idolatry (Colossians 3:5). Christ
excludes from the Kingdom of God anyone who becomes so attached to riches
that his life is centered around them. Or, more accurately, that person excludes
himself.

Possessions can seduce both those who already have them and those who are
bent on acquiring them. Therefore, there are—paradoxically—poor people who are
really rich, and rich people who are really poor. Since absolutely everyone has
an inclination to be attached to material things, the disciples see salvation as
an impossible goal: “Then who can be saved?” No one, if we rely on human re-
sources. But God’s grace makes everything possible. Cf. note on Matthew 6:11.

Also, not putting our trust in riches means that everyone who does have wealth
should use it to help the needy. This “demands great generosity, much sacrifice
and unceasing effort on the part of the rich man. Let each one examine his con-
science, a conscience that conveys a new message for our times. Is he prepared
to support out of his own pocket works and undertakings organized in favor of the
most destitute? Is he ready to pay higher taxes so that the public authorities can
intensify their efforts in favor of development?” (Paul VI, “Populorum Progressio”,
47).

*********************************************************************************************
Source: “The Navarre Bible: Text and Commentaries”. Biblical text from the
Revised Standard Version and New Vulgate. Commentaries by members of
the Faculty of Theology, University of Navarre, Spain.

Published by Four Courts Press, Kill Lane, Blackrock, Co. Dublin, Ireland, and
by Scepter Publishers in the United States.


3 posted on 03/02/2014 10:51:32 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: All
Scripture readings taken from the Jerusalem Bible, published and copyright © 1966, 1967 and 1968 by Darton, Longman & Todd

Readings at Mass


First reading

1 Peter 1:3-9 ©

Blessed be God the Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, who in his great mercy has given us a new birth as his sons, by raising Jesus Christ from the dead, so that we have a sure hope and the promise of an inheritance that can never be spoilt or soiled and never fade away, because it is being kept for you in the heavens. Through your faith, God’s power will guard you until the salvation which has been prepared is revealed at the end of time. This is a cause of great joy for you, even though you may for a short time have to bear being plagued by all sorts of trials; so that, when Jesus Christ is revealed, your faith will have been tested and proved like gold – only it is more precious than gold, which is corruptible even though it bears testing by fire – and then you will have praise and glory and honour. You did not see him, yet you love him; and still without seeing him, you are already filled with a joy so glorious that it cannot be described, because you believe; and you are sure of the end to which your faith looks forward, that is, the salvation of your souls.


Psalm

Psalm 110:1-2,5-6,9-10 ©

The Lord keeps his covenant in mind.

or

Alleluia!

I will thank the Lord with all my heart

  in the meeting of the just and their assembly.

Great are the works of the Lord,

  to be pondered by all who love them.

The Lord keeps his covenant in mind.

or

Alleluia!

He gives food to those who fear him;

  keeps his covenant ever in mind.

He has shown his might to his people

  by giving them the lands of the nations.

The Lord keeps his covenant in mind.

or

Alleluia!

He has sent deliverance to his people

  and established his covenant for ever.

  Holy his name, to be feared.

The Lord keeps his covenant in mind.

or

Alleluia!

To fear the Lord is the first stage of wisdom;

  all who do so prove themselves wise.

His praise shall last for ever!

The Lord keeps his covenant in mind.

or

Alleluia!


Gospel Acclamation

cf.1Th2:13

Alleluia, alleluia!

Accept God’s message for what it really is:

God’s message, and not some human thinking.

Alleluia!

Or

2Co8:9

Alleluia, alleluia!

Jesus Christ was rich,

but he became poor for your sake,

to make you rich out of his poverty.

Alleluia!


Gospel

Mark 10:17-27 ©

Jesus was setting out on a journey when a man ran up, knelt before him and put this question to him, ‘Good master, what must I do to inherit eternal life?’ Jesus said to him, ‘Why do you call me good? No one is good but God alone. You know the commandments: You must not kill; You must not commit adultery; You must not steal; You must not bring false witness; You must not defraud; Honour your father and mother.’ And he said to him, ‘Master, I have kept all these from my earliest days.’ Jesus looked steadily at him and loved him, and he said, ‘There is one thing you lack. Go and sell everything you own and give the money to the poor, and you will have treasure in heaven; then come, follow me.’ But his face fell at these words and he went away sad, for he was a man of great wealth.

  Jesus looked round and said to his disciples, ‘How hard it is for those who have riches to enter the kingdom of God!’ The disciples were astounded by these words, but Jesus insisted, ‘My children,’ he said to them ‘how hard it is to enter the kingdom of God! It is easier for a camel to pass through the eye of a needle than for a rich man to enter the kingdom of God.’ They were more astonished than ever. ‘In that case’ they said to one another ‘who can be saved?’ Jesus gazed at them. ‘For men’ he said ‘it is impossible, but not for God: because everything is possible for God.’


4 posted on 03/02/2014 10:56:10 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: All
Perpetual Novena for the Nation (Ecumenical)
5 posted on 03/02/2014 10:57:08 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: All
Prayers for The Religion Forum (Ecumenical)
6 posted on 03/02/2014 10:57:43 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: All

 
Jesus, High Priest
 

We thank you, God our Father, for those who have responded to your call to priestly ministry.

Accept this prayer we offer on their behalf: Fill your priests with the sure knowledge of your love.

Open their hearts to the power and consolation of the Holy Spirit.

Lead them to new depths of union with your Son.

Increase in them profound faith in the Sacraments they celebrate as they nourish, strengthen and heal us.

Lord Jesus Christ, grant that these, your priests, may inspire us to strive for holiness by the power of their example, as men of prayer who ponder your word and follow your will.

O Mary, Mother of Christ and our mother, guard with your maternal care these chosen ones, so dear to the Heart of your Son.

Intercede for our priests, that offering the Sacrifice of your Son, they may be conformed more each day to the image of your Son, our Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ. Amen.

Saint John Vianney, universal patron of priests, pray for us and our priests

This icon shows Jesus Christ, our eternal high priest.

The gold pelican over His heart represents self-sacrifice.

The border contains an altar and grapevines, representing the Mass, and icons of Melchizedek and St. Jean-Baptiste Vianney.

Melchizedek: king of righteousness (left icon) was priest and king of Jerusalem.  He blessed Abraham and has been considered an ideal priest-king.

St. Jean-Baptiste Vianney is the patron saint of parish priests.

7 posted on 03/02/2014 10:58:35 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: All
Pray a Rosary each day for our nation.

Pray the Rosary

1.  Sign of the Cross:  In the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit.  Amen.

2.  The Apostles Creed:  I BELIEVE in God, the Father almighty, Creator of heaven and earth, and in Jesus Christ, His only Son, our Lord, who was conceived by the Holy Spirit, born of the Virgin Mary, suffered under Pontius Pilate, was crucified, died, and was buried. He descended into hell; on the third day he rose again from the dead; he ascended into heaven, and is seated at the right hand of God, the Father Almighty; from there He shall come to judge the living and the dead.

I believe in the Holy Spirit, the holy catholic Church, the communion of saints, the forgiveness of sins, the resurrection of the body, and the life everlasting. Amen.

3.  The Lord's Prayer:  OUR Father, who art in heaven, hallowed be Thy name. Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done on earth as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread and forgive us our trespasses as we forgive those who trespass against us. And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil. Amen.

4. (3) Hail Mary:  HAIL Mary, full of grace, the Lord is with thee. Blessed art thou amongst women and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus. Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners, now, and in the hour of our death. Amen. (Three times)

5. Glory Be:  GLORY be to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit. As it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be, world without end. Amen.

Fatima Prayer: Oh, my Jesus, forgive us our sins, save us from the fires of hell, lead all souls to heaven, especially those in most need of your mercy.

Announce each mystery, then say 1 Our Father, 10 Hail Marys, 1 Glory Be and 1 Fatima prayer.  Repeat the process with each mystery.

End with the Hail Holy Queen:

Hail, Holy Queen, Mother of Mercy, our life, our sweetness and our hope! To thee do we cry, poor banished children of Eve! To thee do we send up our sighs, mourning and weeping in this vale of tears! Turn then, most gracious advocate, thine eyes of mercy towards us; and after this, our exile, show unto us the blessed fruit of thy womb, Jesus!

O clement, O loving, O sweet Virgin Mary! Pray for us, O holy Mother of God, that we may be made worthy of the promises of Christ.

Final step -- The Sign of the Cross

 

The Mysteries of the Rosary

By tradition, Catholics meditate on these Mysteries during prayers of the Rosary.
The biblical references follow each of the Mysteries below.


The Joyful Mysteries
(Mondays and Saturdays)

1. The Annunciation (Luke 1:26-38) [Spiritual fruit - Humility]
2. The Visitation (Luke 1: 39-56) [Spiritual fruit - Love of Neighbor]
3. The Nativity (Luke 2:1-20) [Spiritual fruit - Poverty of Spirit]
4. The Presentation (Luke 2:21-38) [Spiritual fruit - Purity of mind & body]
5. The Finding of Jesus in the Temple (Luke 2:41-52) [Spiritual fruit - Obedience ]

8 posted on 03/02/2014 10:59:24 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

To: All



~ PRAYER ~

St. Michael, the Archangel, defend us in battle
 Be our protection against the wickedness
and snares of the devil;
May God rebuke him, we  humbly pray,
 and do thou, O Prince of the heavenly host,
 by the power of God,
 Cast into hell Satan and all the evil spirits
who prowl through the world seeking the ruin of souls.
 Amen
+

9 posted on 03/02/2014 11:00:31 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: All

A Prayer for our Free Nation Under God
God Save Our Country web site (prayer warriors)
Prayer Chain Request for the United States of America
Pray for Nancy Pelosi
Prayer and fasting will help defeat health care reform (Freeper Prayer Thread)
Prayer Campaign Started to Convert Pro-Abortion Catholic Politicians to Pro-Life
[Catholic Caucus] One Million Rosaries
Non-stop Rosary vigil to defeat ObamaCare

From an Obama bumper sticker on a car:

"Pray for Obama.  Psalm 109:8"

   

PLEASE JOIN US -

Evening Prayer
Someone has said that if people really understood the full extent of the power we have available through prayer, we might be speechless.
Did you know that during WWII there was an advisor to Churchill who organized a group of people who dropped what they were doing every day at a prescribed hour for one minute to collectively pray for the safety of England, its people and peace?  


There is now a group of people organizing the same thing here in America. If you would like to participate: Every evening at 9:00 PM Eastern Time (8:00 PM Central) (7:00 PM Mountain) (6:00 PM Pacific), stop whatever you are doing and spend one minute praying for the safety of the United States, our troops, our citizens, and for a return to a Godly nation. If you know anyone else who would like to participate, please pass this along. Our prayers are the most powerful asset we have.    Please forward this to your praying friends.


10 posted on 03/02/2014 11:01:52 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: All
 
March Devotion: Saint Joseph

Since the 16th century Catholic piety has assigned entire months to special devotions. Due to the solemnity of Saint Joseph on March 19, this month is devoted to this great saint, the foster father of Christ. "It greatly behooves Christians, while honoring the Virgin Mother of God, constantly to invoke with deep piety and confidence her most chaste spouse, Saint Joseph. We have a well grounded conviction that such is the special desire of the Blessed Virgin herself." --Pope Leo XIII

FOR OUR WORK
Glorious Saint Joseph, pattern of all who are devoted to toil, obtain for me the grace to toil in the spirit of penance, in order thereby to atone for my many sins; to toil conscientiously, putting devotion to duty before my own inclinations; to labor with thankfulness and joy, deeming it an honor to employ and to develop, by my labor, the gifts I have received from Almighty God; to work with order, peace, moderation, and patience, without ever shrinking from weariness and difficulties; to work above all with a pure intention and with detachment from self, having always before my eyes the hour of death and the accounting which I must then render of time ill-spent, of talents unemployed, of good undone, and of my empty pride in success, which is so fatal to the work of God. All for Jesus, all through Mary, all in imitation of thee, 0 Patriarch Joseph! This shall be my motto in life and in death. Amen.

FOR THE INTERCESSION OF SAINT JOSEPH
O Joseph, virgin-father of Jesus, most pure spouse of the Virgin Mary, pray every day for us to the same Jesus, the Son of God, that we, being defended by the power of His grace and striving dutifully in life, may be crowned by Him at the hour of death.

Prayer Source: Prayer Book, The by Reverend John P. O'Connell, M.A., S.T.D. and Jex Martin, M.A., The Catholic Press, Inc., Chicago, Illinois, 1954

St. Joseph
St. Joseph was an ordinary manual laborer although descended from the royal house of David. In the designs of Providence he was destined to become the spouse of the Mother of God. His high privilege is expressed in a single phrase, "Foster-father of Jesus." About him Sacred Scripture has little more to say than that he was a just man-an expression which indicates how faithfully he fulfilled his high trust of protecting and guarding God's greatest treasures upon earth, Jesus and Mary.

The darkest hours of his life may well have been those when he first learned of Mary's pregnancy; but precisely in this time of trial Joseph showed himself great. His suffering, which likewise formed a part of the work of the redemption, was not without great providential import: Joseph was to be, for all times, the trustworthy witness of the Messiah's virgin birth. After this, he modestly retires into the background of holy Scripture.

Of St. Joseph's death the Bible tells us nothing. There are indications, however, that he died before the beginning of Christ's public life. His was the most beautiful death that one could have, in the arms of Jesus and Mary. Humbly and unknown, he passed his years at Nazareth, silent and almost forgotten he remained in the background through centuries of Church history. Only in more recent times has he been accorded greater honor. Liturgical veneration of St. Joseph began in the fifteenth century, fostered by Sts. Brigid of Sweden and Bernadine of Siena. St. Teresa, too, did much to further his cult.

At present there are two major feasts in his honor. On March 19 our veneration is directed to him personally and to his part in the work of redemption, while on May 1 we honor him as the patron of workmen throughout the world and as our guide in the difficult matter of establishing equitable norms regarding obligations and rights in the social order.

Excerpted from The Church's Year of Grace, Pius Parsch.

St. Joseph is invoked as patron for many causes. He is the patron of the Universal Church. He is the patron of the dying because Jesus and Mary were at his death-bed. He is also the patron of fathers, of carpenters, and of social justice. Many religious orders and communities are placed under his patronage.

Patron: Against doubt; against hesitation; Americas; Austria; Diocese of Baton Rouge, Louisiana; California; Belgium; Bohemia; bursars; cabinetmakers; Canada; Carinthia; carpenters; China; Church; confectioners; craftsmen; Croatian people (in 1687 by decree of the Croatian parliament) dying people; emigrants; engineers; expectant mothers; families; fathers; Florence, Italy; happy death; holy death; house hunters; immigrants; interior souls; Korea; laborers; Diocese of La Crosse, Wisconsin; Archdiocese of Louisville, Kentucky; Diocese of Manchester, New Hampshire; Mexico; Diocese of Nashville, Tennessee; New France; New World; Oblates of Saint Joseph; people in doubt; people who fight Communism; Peru; pioneers; pregnant women; protection of the Church; Diocese of San Jose, California; diocese of Sioux Falls, South Dakota; social justice; Styria, Austria; travelers; Turin Italy; Tyrol Austria; unborn children Universal Church; Vatican II; Viet Nam; Diocese of Wheeling-Charleston West Virginia; wheelwrights; workers; working people.

Symbols: Bible; branch; capenter's square; carpenter's tools; chalice; cross; hand tools; infant Jesus; ladder; lamb; lily; monstrance; old man holding a lily and a carpenter's tool such as a square; old man holding the infant Jesus; plane; rod.

 

 
Prayer to St. Joseph

Pope Pius X composed this prayer to St. Joseph, patron of working people, that expresses concisely the Christian attitude toward labor. It summarizes also for us the lessons of the Holy Family's work at Nazareth.

Glorious St. Joseph, model of all who devote their lives to labor, obtain for me the grace to work in the spirit of penance in order thereby to atone for my many sins; to work conscientiously, setting devotion to duty in preference to my own whims; to work with thankfulness and joy, deeming it an honor to employ and to develop by my labor the gifts I have received from God; to work with order, peace, moderation, and patience, without ever shrinking from weariness and difficulties; to work above all with a pure intention and with detachment from self, having always before my eyes the hour of death and the accounting which I must then render of time ill spent, of talents wasted, of good omitted, and of vain complacency in success, which is so fatal to the work of God.

All for Jesus, all through Mary, all in imitation of you, O Patriarch Joseph! This shall be my motto in life and in death, Amen.

Litany of Saint Joseph
Lord, have mercy on us.
Christ, have mercy on us.
Lord, have mercy on us.
Christ, hear us.
Christ, graciously hear us.
God, the Father of Heaven, have mercy on us.
God, the Son, Redeemer of the world, have mercy on us.
God, the Holy Ghost, have mercy on us.
Holy Trinity, One God, have mercy on us.
Holy Mary, pray for us.
Holy Joseph,
pray for us.
Illustrious Son of David, pray for us.
Light of the Patriarchs, pray for us.
Spouse of the Mother of God, pray for us.
Chaste Guardian of the Virgin, pray for us.
Foster-Father of the Son of God, pray for us.
Faithful Protector of Christ, pray for us.
Head of the Holy Family, pray for us.
Joseph most just, pray for us.
Joseph most chaste, pray for us.
Joseph most prudent, pray for us.
Joseph most courageous, pray for us.
Joseph most obedient, pray for us.
Joseph most faithful, pray for us.
Mirror of patience, pray for us.
Lover of poverty, pray for us.
Model of working men, pray for us.
Ornament of the domestic life, pray for us.
Guardian of virgins, pray for us.
Pillar of the family, pray for us.
Consoler of the miserable, pray for us.
Hope of the sick, pray for us.
Patron of the dying, pray for us.
Terror of demons, pray for us.
Protector of the Holy Church,
pray for us.
Lamb of God, who takest away the sins of the world, Spare us, O Lord.
Lamb of God, who takest away the sins of the world,
Graciously hear us, O Lord.
Lamb of God, who takest away the sins of the world,
Have mercy on us.
V. He hath made him master of His house.
R. And ruler of all His possessions.

Let us pray.
O God, who in Thy ineffable providence didst vouchsafe to choose blessed Joseph to be the Spouse of Thy most holy Mother: grant, we beseech Thee, that we may have him for our intercessor in Heaven, whom on earth we venerate as out most holy Protector. Who livest and reignest world without end. Amen.

Was St. Joseph a tzadik?
St. Joseph: Patron saint of three Popes [Catholic Caucus]
St. Joseph and the Staircase
St. Joseph, Foster Father, Novena [Catholic/Orthodox Caucus]
Patron of a “Happy Death” A Special Role for St. Joseph [Catholic/Orhtodox Caucus]
Lists Every Catholic Should be Familiar With: The 7 Sorrows and 7 Joys of St. Joseph
Catholic Group Blasts Pelosi For Invoking St. Joseph on Pro-Abortion Health Care Bill
THE SEVEN SORROWS AND SEVEN JOYS OF ST. JOSEPH
Joseph, Mary and Jesus: A Model Family
Season of Announcement - Revelation to Joseph

In hard times, don't forget about the humble carpenter Joseph
Saint Joseph: Complete submission to the will of God (Pope Benedict XVI) (Catholic/Orthodox Caucus)
St. Joseph as Head of the Holy Family (Catholic/Orthodox Caucus)
St. Joseph, Patron of a Peaceful Death [Catholic Caucus]
Octave: St. Joseph, A 'Man’s Man', Calling Men to Jesus
St. Teresa de Avila's Devotion to St. Joseph (Catholic Caucus)
Catholic Men's National Day of Prayer, MARCH 15, 2008, The Solemnity of St. Joseph (Catholic Caucus)
The Role and Responsibility of Fatherhood - St. Joseph as Model
St. Joseph - Foster Father of Jesus
Some divine intervention in real estate-[Bury St. Joseph Statues in Ground]

Many Turn To Higher Power For Home Sales
St. Joseph the Worker, Memorial, May 1
Catholic Devotions: St. Joseph the Worker
Nothing Will Be Denied Him (St. Joseph)
The Heart of a Father [St. Joseph]
St. Joseph's DAY
Quemadmodum Deus - Decree Under Blessed Pius IX, Making St. Joseph Patron of the Church
Father & Child (Preaching on St. Joseph)
March 19 - Feast of St. Joseph - Husband of Mary - Intercessor of civil leaders
St. Joseph's Spirit of Silence

St. Joseph's Humility (By St. Francis de Sales)
St. Joseph [Husband of the Blessed Virgin Mary], Solemnity, March 19
St Joseph’s Paternal Love
The Heart of St. Joseph
MORE THAN PATRON OF HOMES, IT'S TIME FOR ST. JOSEPH TO GAIN HIGHEST OF RECOGNITION [Fatherhood]
The Importance of Devotion to St. Joseph
St. Francis de Sales on St. Joseph (Some Excerpts for St. Joseph's Day 2004)
St. Joseph: REDEMPTORIS CUSTOS (Guardian Of The Redeemer)
(Saint) Joseph the Patriarch: A Reflection on the Solemnity of St. Joseph
How I Rediscovered a "Neglected" Saint: Work of Art Inspires Young Man to Rediscover St. Joseph


Novena to Saint Joseph

O Saint Joseph, whose protection is so great, so strong, so prompt before the throne of God, I place in you all my interests and desires.

O Saint Joseph, assist me by your powerful intercession and obtain for me from your Divine Son all spiritual blessings through Jesus Christ, Our Lord; so that having engaged here below your heavenly power, I may offer my thanksgiving and homage to the most loving of Fathers.

O Saint Joseph, I never weary contemplating you and Jesus asleep in your arms; I dare not approach while He reposes near your heart. Press Him in my name and kiss His fine head for me, and ask Him to return the Kiss when I draw my dying breath, Amen.

O Saint Joseph, hear my prayers and obtain my petitions. O Saint Joseph, pray for me. (mention your intention)

St. Joseph Novena

O good father Joseph! I beg you,  by all your sufferings, sorrows and joys, to obtain for me what I ask.

(Here name your petition).

Obtain for all those who have asked my prayers, everything that is useful to them in the plan of God. Be near to me in my last moments, that I may eternally sing the praises of Jesus, Mary and Joseph. Amen.

(Our Father, Hail Mary, Glory Be)


11 posted on 03/02/2014 11:03:19 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: All
Pope's Intentions

March 2014

Universal: That all cultures may respect the rights and dignity of women.

For Evangelization: That many young people may accept the Lord’s invitation to consecrate their lives to proclaiming the Gospel.

12 posted on 03/02/2014 11:04:11 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: All
Daily Gospel Commentary

Monday of the Eighth week in Ordinary Time

Commentary of the day
Blessed Teresa of Calcutta (1910-1997), founder of the Missionary Sisters of Charity
No Greater Love, p. 97-98

"He went away sad, for he had many possessions"

We have no right to judge the rich. For our part, what we desire is not a class struggle but a class encounter, in which the rich save the poor and the poor save the rich.

With regard to God, our poverty is our humble recognition and acceptance of our sinfulness, helplessness, and utter nothingness, and the acknowledgment of our neediness before Him, which expresses itself as hope in Him, as an openness to receive all things from Him as from our Father. Our poverty should be true gospel poverty: gentle, tender, glad, and open-hearted, always ready to give an expression of love. Poverty is love before it is renunciation. To love, it is necessary to give. To give, it is necessary to be free from selfishness.


13 posted on 03/02/2014 11:08:01 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 12 | View Replies]

To: All
Monday, March 03, 2014
St. Katharine Drexel, Virgin (Optional Memorial)
First Reading:
Psalm:
Gospel:
1 Peter 1:3-9
Psalm 111:1-2, 5-6, 9-10
Mark 10:17-27

You should never praise anyone until you see how how it turns out in the end.

-- St. Francis of Assisi


14 posted on 03/02/2014 11:09:34 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 13 | View Replies]

To: All
Just A Minute Just A Minute (Listen)
Some of EWTN's most popular hosts and guests in a collection of one minute inspirational messages. A different message each time you click.

15 posted on 03/02/2014 11:10:22 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 14 | View Replies]

To: All



The Angelus 

The Angel of the Lord declared to Mary: 
And she conceived of the Holy Spirit. 

Hail Mary, full of grace, the Lord is with thee; blessed art thou among women and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus.
Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners, now and at the hour of our death. Amen. 

Behold the handmaid of the Lord: Be it done unto me according to Thy word. 

Hail Mary . . . 

And the Word was made Flesh: And dwelt among us. 

Hail Mary . . . 


Pray for us, O Holy Mother of God, that we may be made worthy of the promises of Christ. 

Let us pray: 

Pour forth, we beseech Thee, O Lord, Thy grace into our hearts; that we, to whom the incarnation of Christ, Thy Son, was made known by the message of an angel, may by His Passion and Cross be brought to the glory of His Resurrection, through the same Christ Our Lord.

Amen. 


16 posted on 03/02/2014 11:10:58 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 15 | View Replies]

Comment #17 Removed by Moderator

To: All
Saint Katharine Drexel, virgin

Saint Katharine Drexel, virgin
Optional Memorial
March 3rd



Saint Katharine Drexel
Photographer unknown

Collect:

God of love,
you called Saint Katharine Drexel
to teach the message of the Gospel
and to bring the life of the Eucharist
to the Native American and African American peoples;
by her prayers and example, enable us to work for justice
among the poor and the oppressed,
and keep us undivided in love
in the eucharistic community of your Church.
Through our Lord Jesus Christ, Your Son,
who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God, for ever and ever. +Amen.

(Readings are from the Common of Virgins or of Holy Women.)

On October 1, 2000, Pope John Paul II canonized Katharine Drexel, an American heiress who devoted her life (and her considerable fortune) to establishing missions, schools and homes for African-American and Native American children in this country. She was beatified November 20, 1988

Katharine was born in Philadelphia November 26, l858, barely three years before the outbreak of the Civil War. So deeply divided was the country over the issue of slavery, with all its heavy moral, ethical, cultural, economic and emotional considerations (not unlike those which attend the abortion issue today), that the young nation was forced to undergo this terrible war to determine whether any nation "conceived in liberty and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal" could "long endure", as President Lincoln so concisely expressed it at Gettysburg.

Katharine Drexel grew to maturity in the shadow of the agony of that great war and its aftermath of bitterness and confusion. Although the war to abolish slavery was won and the union of the States preserved, deep and lasting damage had been done. Not only were many thousands of lives destroyed, not only was a culture virtually demolished, but even those who had been "liberated" -- the emancipated slaves -- were subject to continued humiliation and brutal poverty.

Katharine's wealthy and socially prominent family were deeply religious Catholics who conducted a Sunday school for black children in their home. Her parents' example of devotion to their faith and to the needs of others had an indelible formative effect on Katharine. At the age of thirty-three, she founded a separate order of the Sisters of the Blessed Sacrament which was entirely devoted to the active care of African-Americans and Native Americans. She spent the rest of her long life tirelessly and courageously evangelizing and educating these "poorest of the poor". She died Marcn 3, 1955.

Like Saint Philippine Duchesne, who preceded her in work with the Indians of America (and who was canonized in 1988), and like Mother Teresa of Calcutta, Saint Katharine's example shows us that the path to holiness can be found in our willing response to Christ's voice heard in the cries of the most lowly and needy of His people.

Through the strength of their faith and their valiant perseverence in spite of conflict and hardships; through their vigorous and unselfish consecration of all their womanly energies and talents and gifts to serving others; through their whole-hearted obedience to God's will for them, all these women have carried the Light of Christ into the darkest corners of the Earth. They have given strength to the weak with the love and the prayers of their "maternal hearts"; they have sheltered and comforted the forsaken in the warm embrace of their "maternal arms."

Excerpt from Valiant Women, Vigorous Faith, by Helen Hull Hitchcock


KATHARINE DREXEL (1858-1955)

Born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in the United States of America, on November 26, 1858, Katharine Drexel was the second daughter of Francis Anthony Drexel and Hannah Langstroth. Her father was a well known banker and philanthropist. Both parents instilled in their daughters the idea that their wealth was simply loaned to them and was to be shared with others.

When the family took a trip to the Western part of the United States, Katharine, as a young woman, saw the plight and destitution of the native Indian-Americans. This experience aroused her desire to do something specific to help alleviate their condition. This was the beginning of her lifelong personal and financial support of numerous missions and missionaries in the United States. The first school she established was St. Catherine Indian School in Santa Fe, New Mexico (1887).

Later, when visiting Pope Leo XIII in Rome, and asking him for missionaries to staff some of the Indian missions that she as a lay person was financing, she was surprised to hear the Pope suggest that she become a missionary herself. After consultation with her spiritual director, Bishop James O'Connor, she made the decision to give herself totally to God, along with her inheritance, through service to American Indians and African-Americans.

Her wealth was now transformed into a poverty of spirit that became a daily constant in a life supported only by the bare necessities. On February 12, 1891, she professed her first vows as a religious, founding the Sisters of the Blessed Sacrament whose dedication would be to share the message of the Gospel and the life of the Eucharist among American Indians and African-Americans.

Always a woman of intense prayer, Katharine found in the Eucharist the source of her love for the poor and oppressed and of her concern to reach out to combat the effects of racism. Knowing that many African-Americans were far from free, still living in substandard conditions as sharecroppers or underpaid menials, denied education and constitutional rights enjoyed by others, she felt a compassionate urgency to help change racial attitudes in the United States.

The plantation at that time was an entrenched social institutionin which the coloured people continued to be victims of oppression. This was a deep affront to Katharine's sense of justice. The need for quality education loomed before her, and she discussed this need with some who shared her concern about the inequality of education for African-Americans in the cities. Restrictions of the law also prevented them in the rural South from obtaining a basic education.

Founding and staffing schools for both Native Americans and African-Americans throughout the country became a priority for Katharine and her congregation. During her lifetime, she opened, staffed and directly supported nearly 60 schools and missions, especially in the West and Southwest United States. Her crowning educational focus was the establishment in 1925 of Xavier University of Louisiana, the only predominantly African-American Catholic institution of higher learning in the United States. Religious education, social service, visiting in homes, in hospitals and in prisons were also included in the ministries of Katharine and the Sisters.

In her quiet way, Katharine combined prayerful and total dependence on Divine Providence with determined activism. Her joyous incisiveness, attuned to the Holy Spirit, penetrated obstacles and facilitated her advances for social justice. Through the prophetic witness of Katharine Drexel's initiative, the Church in the United States was enabled to become aware of the grave domestic need for an apostolate among Native Americans and African-Americans. She did not hesitate to speak out against injustice, taking a public stance when racial discrimination was in evidence.

For the last 18 years of her life she was rendered almost completely immobile because of a serious illness. During these years she gave herself to a life of adoration and contemplation as she had desired from early childhood. She died on March 3, 1955.

Katharine left a four-fold dynamic legacy to her Sisters of the Blessed Sacrament, who continue her apostolate today, and indeed to all peoples:

– her love for the Eucharist, her spirit of prayer, and her Eucharistic perspective on the unity of all peoples;
– her undaunted spirit of courageous initiative in addressing social iniquities among minorities — one hundred years before such concern aroused public interest in the United States;
– her belief in the importance of quality education for all, and her efforts to achieve it;
– her total giving of self, of her inheritance and all material goods in selfless service of the victims of injustice.

Katharine Drexel was  beatified by Pope John Paul II on November 20, 1980.


18 posted on 03/03/2014 6:52:07 AM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 16 | View Replies]

To: Salvation
Calling. The Story of Saint Katharine Drexel
Drexel - St. Katharine's 2 living miracles pay tribute
Blessed to have met St. Katharine Drexel
Saint Katharine Drexel-A Woman Of The 19th And 20th Century
19 posted on 03/03/2014 6:54:19 AM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 18 | View Replies]

To: All
Information: St. Katharine Drexel

Feast Day: March 3

Born: November 26, 1858, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Died: March 3, 1955, Bensalem Township, Pennsylvania

Canonized: 2000 by Pope John Paul II

Major Shrine: Bensalem Township, Pennsylvania

Patron of: philanthropists, racial justice

20 posted on 03/03/2014 6:58:21 AM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 19 | View Replies]

To: akk
Interactive Saints for Kids

St. Katharine Drexel

Feast Day: March 03
Born: 1858 : : Died: 1955


Katharine was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, to Francis Anthony and Hanna Langstroth Drexel. Katharine's mother Hanna died when she was just a month old. Two years later, her father who was a rich industrialist and patron of railroads married a wonderful woman named Emma.

Emma was a loving mother to Elizabeth and Katharine. She then had another daughter Louise and the girls had a happy childhood together. Although their family was wealthy, they were taught to love their neighbors and be especially concerned about the poor.

Their wealth was used for the benefit of others to show their love for God. Her parents even opened their home to the poor several days a week. Elizabeth and Katharine taught at the Sunday School that Emma began for the children of employees and their neighbors.

Later Elizabeth started a Pennsylvania trade school for orphans and her younger sister Louise started a liberal arts and vocational school for poor blacks in Virginia.

Katharine nursed her mother who suffered from cancer for three years before she died in 1883. After her mother’s death, Katharine set out and looked for ways to make herself useful. She was a very active Catholic and generous with her time and her money. She realized that the Church had many needs.

She turned her energies and her fortune to the poor and the forgotten. Her work for Jesus was among the African American and Native American people. She visited the Dakotas, met the Sioux chief and began her systematic aid to the Indian (Red Indian) missions, spending millions of the family fortunes. She began to build schools, supply food and clothing, furnishings and salaries for teachers. She was also able to find priests to serve the spiritual needs of the people

In 1891, Katharine became a nun and took the name of Sister Mary Katharine, she then began a new religious community of missionaries in Santa Fe, New Mexico. They were called the Sisters of the Blessed Sacrament for Indians and Colored (now known simply as the Sisters of the Blessed Sacrament).

She was later known as Mother Katharine. The sisters of her order center their life around Jesus in the Eucharist. She and her sisters started schools, convents and missionary churches. In 1925, they established Xavier University in New Orleans. During her long, fruitful lifetime, Mother Katharine she and her sisters accomplished many wonderful works for the poor.

She believed that she found Jesus truly present in the Eucharist. So, too, she found him in the African and Native Americans whom she lovingly served. Mother Katharine died on March 3, 1955, at the age of ninety-seven.


21 posted on 03/03/2014 7:12:56 AM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 20 | View Replies]

To: Salvation
Mark
  English: Douay-Rheims Latin: Vulgata Clementina Greek NT: Byzantine/Majority Text (2000)
  Mark 10
17 And when he was gone forth into the way, a certain man running up and kneeling before him, asked him, Good Master, what shall I do that I may receive life everlasting? Et cum egressus esset in viam, procurrens quidam genu flexo ante eum, rogabat eum : Magister bone, quid faciam ut vitam æternam percipiam ? και εκπορευομενου αυτου εις οδον προσδραμων εις και γονυπετησας αυτον επηρωτα αυτον διδασκαλε αγαθε τι ποιησω ινα ζωην αιωνιον κληρονομησω
18 And Jesus said to him, Why callest thou me good? None is good but one, that is God. Jesus autem dixit ei : Quid me dicis bonum ? nemo bonus, nisi unus Deus. ο δε ιησους ειπεν αυτω τι με λεγεις αγαθον ουδεις αγαθος ει μη εις ο θεος
19 Thou knowest the commandments: Do not commit adultery, do not kill, do not steal, bear not false witness, do no fraud, honour thy father and mother. Præcepta nosti : ne adulteres, ne occidas, ne fureris, ne falsum testimonium dixeris, ne fraudum feceris, honora patrem tuum et matrem. τας εντολας οιδας μη μοιχευσης μη φονευσης μη κλεψης μη ψευδομαρτυρησης μη αποστερησης τιμα τον πατερα σου και την μητερα
20 But he answering, said to him: Master, all these things I have observed from my youth. At ille respondens, ait illi : Magister, hæc omnia observavi a juventute mea. ο δε αποκριθεις ειπεν αυτω διδασκαλε ταυτα παντα εφυλαξαμην εκ νεοτητος μου
21 And Jesus looking on him, loved him, and said to him: One thing is wanting unto thee: go, sell whatsoever thou hast, and give to the poor, and thou shalt have treasure in heaven; and come, follow me. Jesus autem intuitus eum, dilexit eum, et dixit ei : Unum tibi deest : vade, quæcumque habes vende, et da pauperibus, et habebis thesaurum in cælo : et veni, sequere me. ο δε ιησους εμβλεψας αυτω ηγαπησεν αυτον και ειπεν αυτω εν σοι υστερει υπαγε οσα εχεις πωλησον και δος πτωχοις και εξεις θησαυρον εν ουρανω και δευρο ακολουθει μοι αρας τον σταυρον
22 Who being struck sad at that saying, went away sorrowful: for he had great possessions. Qui contristatus in verbo, abiit mœrens : erat enim habens multas possessiones. ο δε στυγνασας επι τω λογω απηλθεν λυπουμενος ην γαρ εχων κτηματα πολλα
23 And Jesus looking round about, saith to his disciples: How hardly shall they that have riches, enter into the kingdom of God! Et circumspiciens Jesus, ait discipulis suis : Quam difficile qui pecunias habent, in regnum Dei introibunt ! και περιβλεψαμενος ο ιησους λεγει τοις μαθηταις αυτου πως δυσκολως οι τα χρηματα εχοντες εις την βασιλειαν του θεου εισελευσονται
24 And the disciples were astonished at his words. But Jesus again answering, saith to them: Children, how hard is it for them that trust in riches, to enter into the kingdom of God? Discipuli autem obstupescebant in verbis ejus. At Jesus rursus respondens ait illis : Filioli, quam difficile est, confidentes in pecuniis, in regnum Dei introire ! οι δε μαθηται εθαμβουντο επι τοις λογοις αυτου ο δε ιησους παλιν αποκριθεις λεγει αυτοις τεκνα πως δυσκολον εστιν τους πεποιθοτας επι χρημασιν εις την βασιλειαν του θεου εισελθειν
25 It is easier for a camel to pass through the eye of a needle, than for a rich man to enter into the kingdom of God. Facilius est camelum per foramen acus transire, quam divitem intrare in regnum Dei. ευκοπωτερον εστιν καμηλον δια της τρυμαλιας της ραφιδος εισελθειν η πλουσιον εις την βασιλειαν του θεου εισελθειν
26 Who wondered the more, saying among themselves: Who then can be saved? Qui magis admirabantur, dicentes ad semetipsos : Et quis potest salvus fieri ? οι δε περισσως εξεπλησσοντο λεγοντες προς εαυτους και τις δυναται σωθηναι
27 And Jesus looking on them, saith: With men it is impossible; but not with God: for all things are possible with God. Et intuens illos Jesus, ait : Apud homines impossibile est, sed non apud Deum : omnia enim possibilia sunt apud Deum. εμβλεψας δε αυτοις ο ιησους λεγει παρα ανθρωποις αδυνατον αλλ ου παρα θεω παντα γαρ δυνατα εστιν παρα τω θεω

22 posted on 03/03/2014 7:03:23 PM PST by annalex (fear them not)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: annalex
17. And when he was gone forth into the way, there came one running, and kneeled to him, and asked him, Good Master, what shall I do that I may inherit eternal life?
18. And Jesus said to him, Why call you me good? there is none good but one, that is, God.
19. You know the commandments, Do not commit adultery, Do not kill, Do not steal, Do not bear false witness, Defraud not, Honor your father and mother.
20. And he answered and said to him, Master, all these have I observed from my youth.
21. Then Jesus beholding him loved him, and said to him, One thing you lack: go your way, Sell whatsoever you have, and give to the poor, and you shall have treasure in heaven: and come, take up the cross, and follow me.
22. And he was sad at that saying, and went away grieved: for he had great possessions.
23. And Jesus looked round about, and said to his disciples, How hardly shall they that have riches enter into the kingdom of God!
24. And the disciples were astonished at his words. But Jesus answered again, and said to them, Children, how hard is it for them that trust in riches to enter into the kingdom of God!
25. It is easier for a camel to go through the eye of a needle, than for a rich man to enter into the kingdom of God.
26. And they were astonished out of measure, saying among themselves, Who then can be saved?
27. And Jesus looking upon them said, With men it is impossible, but not with God: for with God all things are possible.

BEDE; A certain man had heard from the Lord that only they who are willing to be like little children are worthy to enter into the kingdom of heaven, and therefore he desires to have explained to him, not in parables, but openly, by the merits of what works a man may attain everlasting life. Wherefore it is said: And when he was gone forth into the way, there came one running, and kneeled to him, and asked him, Good Master, what shall I do that I may inherit eternal life?

THEOPHYL. I wonder at this young man, who when all others come to Christ to be healed of their infirmities, begs of Him the possession of everlasting life, notwithstanding his love of money, the malignant passion which afterwards caused his sorrow.

CHRYS. Because however he had come to Christ as he would to a man, and to one of the Jewish doctors, Christ answered him as Man. Wherefore it goes on: And Jesus said to him, Why call you me good? there is none good but the One God. In saying which He does not exclude men from goodness, but from a comparison with the goodness of God.

BEDE; But by this one God, who is good, we must not only understand the Father, but also the Son, whom says, I am the good Shepherd; and also the Holy Ghost, because it is said, The Father which is in heaven will give the good Spirit to them that ask him. For the One and Undivided Trinity itself, Father, Son amid Holy Ghost, is the Only and One good God. The Lord therefore does not deny Himself to be good, but implies that He is God; He does not deny that He is good Master, but He declares that no master is good but God.

THEOPHYL; Therefore the Lord intended by these words to raise the mind of the young man, so that he might know Him to be God. But He also implies another thing by these words, that when you have to converse with a man, you should not flatter him in your conversation, but look back upon God, the root and fount of goodness, and do honor to Him.

BEDE; But observe that the righteousness of the law, when kept in its own time, conferred not only earthly goods, but also eternal life on those who chose it. Wherefore the Lord's answer to one who inquires concerning everlasting life is, You know the commandments, Do not commit adultery, Do not kill; for this is the childlike blamelessness which is proposed to us, if we would enter the kingdom of heaven.

On which there follows, And he answered and said to him, Master, all these have I observed from my youth. We must not suppose that this man either asked the Lord, with a wish to tempt him, as some have fancied, or lied in his account of his life; but we must believe that he confessed with simplicity how he had lived; which is evident, from what is subjoined,

Then Jesus beholding him loved him, and said to him. If however he had been guilty of lying or of dissimulation, by no means would Jesus, after, looking on the secrets of his heart, have been said to love him.

ORIGEN; For in that He loved, or kissed him, He appears to affirm the truth of his profession, in saying that he had fulfilled all those things; for on applying His mind to him, He saw that the man answered with a good conscience.

PSEUDO-CHRYS. It is worthy of inquiry, however, how He loved a man, who, He knew, would not follow Him? But this is so much as to say, that since he was worthy of love in the first instance, because he observed the things of the law from his youth, so in the end, though he did not take upon himself perfection, he did not suffer a lessening of his former love. For although he did not pass the bounds of humanity, nor follow the perfection of Christ, still he was not guilty of any sin, since he kept the law according to the capability of a man, and in this mode of keeping it, Christ loved him.

BEDE; For God loves those who keep the commandments of the law, though they be inferior; nevertheless, He shows to those who would be perfect the deficiency of the law, for He came not to destroy the law, but to fulfill it. Wherefore there follows: And said to him, One thing you lacks: go your way, sell whatever you have, and give to the poor, and you shall have treasure in heaven: and come, follow me; for whoever would be perfect ought to sell all that he has, not a part, like Ananias and Sapphira, but the whole.

THEOPHYL. And when he has sold it, to give it to the poor, not to stage-players and luxurious persons.

CHRYS. Well too did He say, not eternal life, but treasure, saying, And you shall have treasure in heaven; for since the question was concerning wealth, and the renouncing of all things, He shows that He returns more things than He has bidden us leave, in proportion as heaven is greater than earth.

THEOPHYL. But because there are many poor who are not humble, but are drunkards or have some other vice, for this reason He says, And come, follow me.

BEDE; For he follows the Lord, who imitates Him, and walks in His footsteps. It goes on: And he was sad at that saying, and went away grieved.

CHRYS. And the Evangelist adds the cause of his grief, saying, For he had great possessions. The feelings of those who have little and those who have much are not the same, for the increase of acquired wealth lights up a greater flame of covetousness.

There follows: And Jesus looked round about, and said to his disciples, How hardly shall they that have riches enter into the kingdom of God.

THEOPHYL. He says not here, that riches are bad, but that those are bad who only have them to watch them carefully; for He teaches us not to have them, that is, not to keep or preserve them, but to use them in necessary things.

CHRYS. But the Lord said this to His disciples, who were poor and possessed nothing, in order to teach them not to blush at their poverty, and as it were to make an excuse to them, and give them a reason, why He had not allowed them to possess any thing. It goes on: And the disciples were astonished at his words; for it is plain, since they themselves were poor, that they were anxious for the salvation of others.

BEDE; But there is a great difference between having riches, and loving them; wherefore also Solomon says not, He that has silver, but, He that loves silver shall not be satisfied with silver. Therefore the Lord unfolds the words of His former saying to His astonished disciples, as follows: But Jesus answered again, and said to them, Children, how hard it is for them that trust in their riches to enter the kingdom of God. Where we must observe that He says not, how impossible, but how hard; for what is impossible cannot in any way come to pass, what is difficult can be compassed, though with labor.

CHRYS. Or else, after saying difficult, He then shows that it is impossible, and that not simply, but with a certain vehemence; and he shows this by an example, saying, It is easier for a camel to pass through the eye of a needle, than for a rich man to enter the kingdom of heaven.

THEOPHYL. It may be that by camel, we should understand the animal itself, or else that thick cable, which is used for large vessels.

BEDE; How then could either in the Gospel, Matthew and Joseph, or in the Old Testament, very many rich persons, enter into the kingdom of God, unless it be that they learned through the inspiration of God either to count their riches as nothing, or to quit them altogether. Or in a higher sense, it is easier for Christ to suffer for those who love Him, than for, the lovers of this world to turn to Christ; for under the name of camel, He wished Himself to he understood, because He bore the burden of our weakness; and by the needle, He understands the prickings, that is, the pains of His Passion. By the eye of a needle, therefore, He means the straits of His Passion, by which He, as it were, deigned to mend the torn garments of our nature. it goes on;

And they were astonished above measure, saying among themselves, Who then can be saved? Since the number of poor people is immeasurably the greater, and these might be saved, though tine rich perished, they must have understood Him to mean that all who love riches, although they cannot obtain them, are reckoned in the number of the rich. It goes on; And Jesus looking upon them said, With men it is impossible, but not with God; which we must not take to mean, that covetous and proud persons can enter into the kingdom of Heaven with their covetousness and pride, but that it is possible with God that they should be converted from covetousness arid pride to charity and lowliness.

CHRYS. And the reason why He says that this is the work of God is, that He may show that he who is put into this path by God, has much need of grace; from which it is proved, that great is the reward of those rich men, who are willing to follow the r discipline of Christ.

THEOPHYL. Or we must understand that by, with man it is impossible, but not with God, He means, that when we listen to God, it becomes possible, but as long as we keep our human notions, it is impossible. There follows, For all things are possible with God; when He says all things, you must understand, that have a being; which sin has not, for it is a thing without being and substance , Or else: sin does not come under the notion of strength, but of weakness, therefore sin, like weakness, is impossible with God But can God cause that not to have been done which has been done? To which we answer, that God is Truth, but to cause that which has been done should not have been done is falsehood. How then can truth do what is false? He must first therfore quit His own nature, so that they who speak thus really say, Can God cease to be God? which is absurd.

Catena Aurea Mark 10
23 posted on 03/03/2014 7:03:51 PM PST by annalex (fear them not)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 22 | View Replies]

To: annalex


Jesus and the rich young ruler
(Attribution unknown)

24 posted on 03/03/2014 7:04:10 PM PST by annalex (fear them not)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 23 | View Replies]

To: All

Day 85 - Why is Jesus Christ the Lord of the whole world?

 

Why is Jesus Christ the Lord of the whole world?

Jesus Christ is Lord of the world and Lord of history because everything was made for his sake. All men were redeemed by him and will be judged by him.

He is over us, and the only One to whom we bend the knee in worship; he is with us as Head of his Church, in which the kingdom of God begins even now; he is ahead of us as Lord of history, in whom the powers of darkness are definitively overcome and the destinies of the world are brought to perfection according to God's plan; he comes to meet us in glory, on a day we do not know, to renew and perfect the world. We can experience his nearness especially in God's Word, in the reception of the sacraments, in caring for the poor, and wherever "two or three are gathered in my name" (see Mt 18:20). (YOUCAT question 110)


Dig Deeper: CCC section (668-674) and other references here.


25 posted on 03/03/2014 9:51:22 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 24 | View Replies]

To: All

Part 1: The Profession of Faith (26 - 1065)

Section 2: The Profession of the Christian Faith (185 - 1065)

Chapter 2: I Believe in Jesus Christ, the Only Son of God (422 - 682)

Article 7: "From thence He will come again to judge the living and the dead" (668 - 682)

I. HE WILL COME AGAIN IN GLORY

Christ already reigns through the Church...

450
518
(all)

668

"Christ died and lived again, that he might be Lord both of the dead and of the living."549 Christ's Ascension into heaven signifies his participation, in his humanity, in God's power and authority. Jesus Christ is Lord: he possesses all power in heaven and on earth. He is "far above all rule and authority and power and dominion", for the Father "has put all things under his feet."550 Christ is Lord of the cosmos and of history. In him human history and indeed all creation are "set forth" and transcendently fulfilled.551

549.

Rom 14:9.

550.

Eph 1:20-22.

551.

Eph 1:10; cf. 4:10; 1 Cor 15:24,27-28.

1088
541
792
(all)

669

As Lord, Christ is also head of the Church, which is his Body.552 Taken up to heaven and glorified after he had thus fully accomplished his mission, Christ dwells on earth in his Church. The redemption is the source of the authority that Christ, by virtue of the Holy Spirit, exercises over the Church. "The kingdom of Christ [is] already present in mystery", "on earth, the seed and the beginning of the kingdom".553

552.

Cf. Eph 1:22.

553.

LG 3; 5; cf. Eph 4:11-13.

1042
547
825
(all)

670

Since the Ascension God's plan has entered into its fulfillment. We are already at "the last hour".554 "Already the final age of the world is with us, and the renewal of the world is irrevocably under way; it is even now anticipated in a certain real way, for the Church on earth is endowed already with a sanctity that is real but imperfect."555 Christ's kingdom already manifests its presence through the miraculous signs that attend its proclamation by the Church.556

554.

1 Jn 2:18; cf. 1 Pet 4:7.

555.

LG 48 § 3; cf. 1 Cor 10:11.

556.

Cf. Mk 16:17-18,20.

... until all things are subjected to him

1043
1043
2046
2817
769
773
(all)

1

 

671

Though already present in his Church, Christ's reign is nevertheless yet to be fulfilled "with power and great glory" by the King's return to earth.557 This reign is still under attack by the evil powers, even though they have been defeated definitively by Christ's Passover.558 Until everything is subject to him, "until there be realized new heavens and a new earth in which justice dwells, the pilgrim Church, in her sacraments and institutions, which belong to this present age, carries the mark of this world which will pass, and she herself takes her place among the creatures which groan and travail yet and await the revelation of the sons of God."559 That is why Christians pray, above all in the Eucharist, to hasten Christ's return by saying to him:560 Marana tha! "Our Lord, come!"561

557.

Lk 21:27; cf. Mt 25:31.

558.

Cf. 2 Thes 2:7.

559.

LG 48 § 3; cf. 2 Pet 3:13; Rom 8:19-22; 1 Cor 15:28.

560.

Cf. 1 Cor 11:26; 2 Pet 3:11-12.

561.

1 Cor 16:22; Rev 22:17,20.

2612
732
(all)

672

Before his Ascension Christ affirmed that the hour had not yet come for the glorious establishment of the messianic kingdom awaited by Israel562 which, according to the prophets, was to bring all men the definitive order of justice, love and peace.563 According to the Lord, the present time is the time of the Spirit and of witness, but also a time still marked by "distress" and the trial of evil which does not spare the Church564 and ushers in the struggles of the last days. It is a time of waiting and watching.565

562.

Cf. Acts 1:6-7.

563.

Cf. Isa 11:1-9.

564.

Cf. Acts 1:8; 1 Cor 7:26; Eph 5:16; 1 Pet 4:17.

565.

Cf. Mt 25:1, 13; Mk 13:33-37; 1 Jn 2:18; 4:3; 1 Tim 4:1.

The glorious advent of Christ, the hope of Israel

1040
1048
(all)

673

Since the Ascension Christ's coming in glory has been imminent,566 even though "it is not for you to know times or seasons which the Father has fixed by his own authority."567. This eschatological coming could be accomplished at any moment, even if both it and the final trial that will precede it are "delayed".568

566.

Cf. Rev 22:20.

567.

Acts 1:7; Cf. Mk 13:32.

568.

Cf. Mt 24:44; 1 Thes 5:2; 2 Thes 2:3-12.

58
840
(all)

674

The glorious Messiah's coming is suspended at every moment of history until his recognition by "all Israel", for "a hardening has come upon part of Israel" in their "unbelief" toward Jesus.569 St. Peter says to the Jews of Jerusalem after Pentecost: "Repent therefore, and turn again, that your sins may be blotted out, that times of refreshing may come from the presence of the Lord, and that he may send the Christ appointed for you, Jesus, whom heaven must receive until the time for establishing all that God spoke by the mouth of his holy prophets from of old."570 St. Paul echoes him: "For if their rejection means the reconciliation of the world, what will their acceptance mean but life from the dead?"571 The "full inclusion" of the Jews in the Messiah's salvation, in the wake of "the full number of the Gentiles",572 will enable the People of God to achieve "the measure of the stature of the fullness of Christ", in which "God may be all in all".573

569.

Rom 11:20-26; cf. Mt 23:39.

570.

Acts 3:19-21.

571.

Rom 11:15.

572.

Rom 11:12, 25; cf. Lk 21:24.

573.

Eph 4:13; 1 Cor 15:28.


26 posted on 03/03/2014 9:51:52 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 25 | View Replies]

To: All
CATHOLIC ALMANAC

Monday, March 3

Liturgical Color: Violet

Today is the optional memorial of St.
Katherine Drexel, virgin. In 1891, she
founded an order ministering to poor
Native and African Americans. She
funded her work with her inheritance; as
a child her parents taught her that wealth
was to be shared.

27 posted on 03/03/2014 9:57:08 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 26 | View Replies]

To: All
Catholic Culture

 

Daily Readings for:March 03, 2014
(Readings on USCCB website)

Collect: God of love, you called Saint Katharine Drexel to teach the message of the Gospel and to bring the life of the Eucharist to the Native American and African American peoples; by her prayers and example, enable us to work for justice among the poor and the oppressed, and keep us undivided in love in the Eucharistic community of your Church. Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son, who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.

RECIPES

o    Hopi Corn Stew

ACTIVITIES

o    Namedays

o    What is a Nameday?

PRAYERS

o    Novena in Honor of St. Katharine Drexel

LIBRARY

o    St. Katharine Drexel Evangelized Native and African Americans | Unknown

·         Ordinary Time: March 3rd

·         Optional Memorial of St. Katharine Drexel, virgin (USA)

Today the dioceses of the United States celebrate the optional memorial of St. Katharine Drexel. Born into a wealthy Philadelphia family, Katharine took an avid interest in the material and spiritual well-being of African and Native Americans. She founded the Sisters of the Blessed Sacrament for Indians and Colored People, and opened mission schools in the West for Native Americans and in the South for African Americans. In 1915 she founded Xavier University in New Orleans. At her death, there were more than 500 sisters teaching in 63 schools.


St. Katharine Drexel

Katharine Drexel was born in Philadelphia in 1858. She had an excellent education and traveled widely. As a rich girl, she had a grand debut into society. But when she nursed her stepmother through a three-year terminal illness, she saw that all the Drexel money could not buy safety from pain or death, and her life took a profound turn.

She had always been interested in the plight of the Indians, having been appalled by reading Helen Hunt Jackson's A Century of Dishonor. While on a European tour, she met Pope Leo XIII and asked him to send more missionaries to Wyoming for her friend Bishop James O'Connor. The pope replied, "Why don't you become a missionary?" His answer shocked her into considering new possibilities.

Back home, she visited the Dakotas, met the Sioux leader Red Cloud and began her systematic aid to Native American missions.

She could easily have married. But after much discussion with Bishop O'Connor, she wrote in 1889, "The feast of Saint Joseph brought me the grace to give the remainder of my life to the Indians and the Colored." Newspaper headlines screamed "Gives Up Seven Million!"

After three and a half years of training, she and her first band of nuns (Sisters of the Blessed Sacrament for Indians and Colored) opened a boarding school in Santa Fe. A string of foundations followed. By 1942 she had a system of African American Catholic schools in thirteen states, plus forty mission centers and twenty-three rural schools. Segregationists harassed her work, even burning a school in Pennsylvania. In all, she established fifty missions for Native Americans in sixteen states.

Two saints met when she was advised by Mother Cabrini about the "politics" of getting her order's rule approved in Rome. Her crowning achievement was the founding of Xavier University in New Orleans, the first university in the United States for African Americans.

At seventy-seven, she suffered a heart attack and was forced to retire. Apparently her life was over. But now came almost twenty years of quiet, intense prayer from a small room overlooking the sanctuary. Small notebooks and slips of paper record her various prayers, ceaseless aspirations and meditation. She died at ninety-six and was canonized in 2000.

Excerpted from Saint of the Day, Leonard Foley, O.F.M.

Things to Do:


28 posted on 03/03/2014 10:06:03 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 27 | View Replies]

To: All
The Word Among Us

Meditation: Mark 10:17-27

Saint Katharine Drexel, Virgin

Come, follow me (Mark 10:21)

In the fantasy film Labyrinth, a teenager named Sarah tries to rescue her baby brother from the evil Goblin King. To reach him, she must make her way through an enormous labyrinth. At one point she meets a character named the Junk Lady, who distracts her by showing her an exact copy of her room at home. She shows Sarah her toys, saying, “Everything you’ve ever cared about is here.” Then Sarah remembers that she still has to save her brother. “It’s all junk!” she cries, throwing one of her toys against her mirror. At that moment, the room dissolves, and she is able to escape.

Like Sarah, the rich young man in today’s Gospel was faced with a decision about his possessions. But while Sarah saw through the “junk” that trapped her, this fellow could not.

We are all faced with the same question that this young man faced: who is Jesus? Is he the eternal Son of God, sent to save us from sin and open heaven for us? Or is he just a good teacher and charismatic leader? Or, to put it another way, is Jesus far more important than our possessions, or is he just one of many equally good things in our lives? This isn’t just an issue of money, either. Many other “idols” can compete with the Lord, including our strongly held opinions, our social standing, and the grudges and resentments we choose to hold onto.

There is an old hymn that says, when we “look full in his wonderful face,” the “things of earth will grow strangely dim.” So today, imagine yourself as the rich young man. Go ahead and say to him whatever you want. But then, when he looks into your eyes, stay there for a minute, and look back at him. Imagine the look on his face and the intensity of his gaze. See his love and compassion for you. See how your heart is moved to love him in return. That’s the moment when you’re ready to give up anything and everything for him. That’s the moment when you have escaped.

“Lord, help me to find my treasure in you. Come, Jesus, and fill my heart with the fire of your love. Lord, I give everything to you!”

1 Peter 1:3-9; Psalm 111:1-2, 5-6, 9-10


29 posted on 03/03/2014 10:07:50 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 28 | View Replies]

To: All

Marriage=One Man and One Woman 'Til Death Do Us Part

Daily Marriage Tip for March 3, 2014:

Lent is just a few days away. Have you spoken yet with your spouse about ideas to grow spiritually this Lent? Set aside time to do so today, and talk about how you can encourage each other.

30 posted on 03/03/2014 10:33:39 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 29 | View Replies]

To: All
Regnum Christi

The Price Is Right and the Choice Is Yours
| SPIRITUAL LIFE | SPIRITUALITY
Monday of the Eighth Week in Ordinary Time

 

Mark 10: 17-27

As Jesus was setting out on a journey, a man ran up, knelt down before him, and asked him, "Good teacher, what must I do to inherit eternal life?" Jesus answered him, "Why do you call me good? No one is good but God alone. You know the commandments: You shall not kill; you shall not commit adultery; you shall not steal; you shall not bear false witness; you shall not defraud; honor your father and your mother." He replied and said to him, "Teacher, all of these I have observed from my youth." Jesus, looking at him, loved him and said to him, "You are lacking in one thing. Go, sell what you have, and give to the poor and you will have treasure in heaven; then come, follow me." At that statement his face fell, and he went away sad, for he had many possessions. Jesus looked around and said to his disciples, "How hard it is for those who have wealth to enter the Kingdom of God!" The disciples were amazed at his words. So Jesus again said to them in reply, "Children, how hard it is to enter the Kingdom of God! It is easier for a camel to pass through the eye of a needle than for one who is rich to enter the kingdom of God." They were exceedingly astonished and said among themselves, "Then who can be saved?" Jesus looked at them and said, "For human beings it is impossible, but not for God. All things are possible for God."

Introductory Prayer: Once again, Lord, I come to you to pray. Even though I cannot see you, I trust that you are present and want very much to instruct me in your teachings. In the same way you demonstrate your love for me by spending this time with me, I want to express my love for you by dedicating this time to you with a spirit of faith, confidence and attention. Here I am, Lord, to listen to you and respond with love.

Petition: Lord, help me to be detached from the goods of this world so I can follow you more closely.

1. God Is Good: The rich young man recognized Christ’s goodness. He kneels down before him knowing that Jesus possesses something that he does not have. What is it? The spirit of unconditional love. Christ leads us out of ourselves and asks us to trust him more. And so, Pope Emeritus Benedict encourages us, “I say to you, dear young people: Do not be afraid of Christ! He takes nothing away, and he gives you everything. When we give ourselves to him, we receive a hundredfold in return. Yes, open, open wide the doors to Christ – and you will find true life” (Homily, April 24, 2005).

2. Looking at the Good Side of Things: It is easy to dwell on the cost of something. The young man’s face falls because he looks more at the cost than at the reward. The price is something that he would feel now, while the reward is something that will come later. How often in life do we experience this truth! The world we live in seeks instant gratification without wanting to pay the price. Rather than concentrating on the cost, we should focus on the benefits promised by God. We will discover that the cost is small and the benefits last forever. Do I have spiritual endurance? Am I am able to wait for the Lord and patiently invest in eternal goods now?

3. Detachment: Saint Paul tells us that nothing can outweigh the knowledge of Christ Jesus. But in this man’s case, he had allowed something else to outweigh Christ. Comfort, security and material things beat the invitation of Christ to be perfect. Attachments lead to sadness; there is no room for God in a heart that is already full of the things of this world. Only detachment leads to true joy. God gives himself to the one who seeks him without any strings attached.

Conversation with Christ: Lord Jesus, help me to live a life of freedom. Help me to recognize your goodness. May my faith always see the good side of things, seeing all in my life as an opportunity to love you. I want to be attached to you and detached completely from my sinfulness.

Resolution: I will pick one thing that I can detach myself from today.


31 posted on 03/03/2014 10:37:20 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 30 | View Replies]

To: All

Homily of the Day

In today’s Gospel, the Lord shows us what he wants from each of us. He wants that we be very clear about what we must do and be in order to inherit eternal life.” Good Master, what must I do to inherit eternal life?” a young man asks him. Jesus answers by bringing him to an examination of conscience, an examination of his life. He finds the man not guilty of any sin against the Ten Commandments. The Gospel tells us that after this confession Jesus gazed intently at the young man and loved him, for he was indeed a very good man, even from his youth. But to inherit the Kingdom of God, he had to be perfect. “Go and sell everything you own and give the money to the poor” and then follow me”

Jesus did not compromise with the young man even if he loved him. And the message for each one of us is the same. In order for us to inherit eternal life, we too must sell everything we possess, give the money to the poor and follow Jesus. Very hard indeed. And the Lord himself tells us that it is almost an impossible task. Only with and in his power are we able to do as he tells us, like a camel entering the eye of a needle. The reward indeed is very great – ETERNAL LIFE. No wonder those who do follow him were considered saints.

Today, let us pray for the power, courage and the strength from God to sell all our possessions and to follow the Lord. God promised that with Him we can stand. Let us claim this – that with God all things are possible.


32 posted on 03/03/2014 10:38:39 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 31 | View Replies]

To: All
One Bread One Body

One Bread, One Body

Language: English | Español

All Issues > Volume 30, Issue 2

<< Monday, March 3, 2014 >> St. Katharine Drexel
 
1 Peter 1:3-9
View Readings
Psalm 111:1-2, 5-6, 9-10 Mark 10:17-27
Similar Reflections
 

THE CROSS OF BEING RICH

 
"The man's face fell. He went away sad, for he had many possessions. Jesus looked around and said to His disciples, 'How hard it is for the rich to enter the kingdom of God!' " —Mark 10:22-23
 

Most people in the USA are rich by historical and international standards. Whether or not we are rich, we are "falling into temptation and a trap" if we even want to be rich (1 Tm 6:9). We are letting ourselves "be captured by foolish and harmful desires which drag men down to ruin and destruction" (1 Tm 6:9). It's not wrong to be rich but wrong to want to be rich.

"It is easier for a camel to pass through a needle's eye than for a rich man to enter the kingdom of God" (Mk 10:25). Therefore, we should be reluctant to be rich and do so only if the Lord insists on it. If we are rich, we must be good and faithful servants of the Lord (Mt 25:21), Who is the Owner of all the possessions and money which He has entrusted to us. We must tithe, give alms, and give sacrificially. Some think this will prevent them from staying rich. However, the Lord always outgives us. So those rich who are good servants of the Lord often get richer (see Mt 25:28). Occasionally, the Lord will let a rich person divest themselves of their responsibilities of stewardship. He gives them more freedom and puts them in a position less dangerous to their salvation.

Therefore, give "good measure pressed down, shaken together, running over" (Lk 6:38). This may get you out of being rich. However, if giving makes you richer, take up your cross of being rich, responsible, and endangered, and be a faithful steward.

 
Prayer: Father, send the Holy Spirit to teach me (Jn 14:26) how to be poor (Mt 5:3).
Promise: "You may for a time have to suffer the distress of many trials; but this is so that your faith, which is more precious than the passing splendor of fire-tried gold, may by its genuineness lead to praise, glory, and honor when Jesus Christ appears." —1 Pt 1:6-7
Praise: St. Katharine used her great wealth to lead American Indians and African-Americans to new life and hope in Christ.

33 posted on 03/03/2014 10:42:29 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 32 | View Replies]

To: All
New book makes kids PRO-LIFE
Angel in the Waters -- New Pro-Life book for children [Tissue Alert]
34 posted on 03/03/2014 10:45:42 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 33 | View Replies]

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
Religion
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson