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How does the Roman Catholic Church determine sainthood? [Catholic Caucus]
ABCActionNews ^ | April 24, 2014 | John Morris

Posted on 04/27/2014 7:23:53 AM PDT by Salvation

April 25, 2014 (WPVI) -- On Sunday, when Pope Francis presides over the dual canonization of Popes John Paul II and John XXIII he will be following a long established process.

Being named a saint is, usually, the end of a four-step process.

First, after the candidate's death, someone needs to begin gathering the evidence to support sainthood, and then present that to the Vatican's Congregation for the Causes of Saints.

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, it turns the candidate's name over to the Pope who proclaims the candidate "venerable."

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The next step is the investigation of possible miracles attributed to the candidate. These usually involve the healing of someone

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and forward the candidate's name to the pope for beatification

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It takes a second miracle to be canonized... usually. After canonization, the candidate can be called "saint."

(Excerpt) Read more at abclocal.go.com ...


TOPICS: Apologetics; Catholic; History; Theology
KEYWORDS: canonization; catholic; popes; saints
God does the healing. The saint is the intercessor.

Read the rest here.

1 posted on 04/27/2014 7:23:53 AM PDT by Salvation
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To: Salvation

Isn’t this where the “DEVIL’S ADVOCATE” stepped in?


2 posted on 04/27/2014 7:25:01 AM PDT by cloudmountain
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To: cloudmountain

ABC?


3 posted on 04/27/2014 7:27:32 AM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: cloudmountain

It wasn’t a very detailed article; just enough facts for all.


4 posted on 04/27/2014 7:28:22 AM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
How does the Roman Catholic Church determine sainthood? [Catholic Caucus]
How Many Miracles are Required to Canonize a Saint?
Saints [Catholic, Orthodox, Open]
SAINTHOOD 101: Rules for Becoming a Saint [Catholic Caucus]
The Process of Becoming a Saint (Canonization) [Catholic Caucus]
Pope Lists Criteria for Causes of Canonization
5 posted on 04/27/2014 7:32:42 AM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: nickcarraway; NYer; ELS; Pyro7480; livius; ArrogantBustard; Catholicguy; RobbyS; marshmallow; ...

Sainthood ping!


6 posted on 04/27/2014 7:34:36 AM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Comment #7 Removed by Moderator

Comment #8 Removed by Moderator

To: Salvation

I just heard on the news that the litany of saints included ALL the saints of the Catholic Church.

People don’t even know how ignorant they are.


9 posted on 04/27/2014 7:45:56 AM PDT by tiki
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Comment #10 Removed by Moderator

To: Salvation

For ABC, not a bad article.


11 posted on 04/27/2014 7:48:37 AM PDT by St_Thomas_Aquinas ( Isaiah 22:22, Matthew 16:19, Revelation 3:7)
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To: St_Thomas_Aquinas

12 posted on 04/27/2014 7:49:33 AM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: SkyDancer
Do we need man to determine who is a saint? We are all saints in Christ.

The Church wrote, preserved and canonized the Scriptures, so She is aware of these passages.

Saints, broadly speaking, are those who follow Jesus Christ and live their lives according to his teaching. Catholics, however, also use the term narrowly to refer to especially holy men and women who, through extraordinary lives of virtue, have already entered Heaven.

Sainthood in the New Testament

The word saint literally means "holy," and, in the New Testament, saint referred to all who believed in Jesus Christ and followed his teachings. Saint Paul often addressed his epistles to "the saints" of a particular city (see, for instance, Ephesians 1:1 and 2 Corinthians 1:1), and the Acts of the Apostles talks about Saint Peter going to visit the saints in Lydda (Acts 9:32). The assumption was that those who followed Christ had been so transformed that they were now different from other men and women and, thus, should be considered holy.

Practitioners of Heroic Virtue

Very early on, however, the meaning of the word began to change. As Christianity began to spread, it became clear that some Christians lived lives of extraordinary, or heroic, virtue. While other Christians struggled to live out the gospel of Christ, these people were eminent examples of the moral virtues, and they easily practiced the theological virtues of faith, hope, and charity.

The word saint thus became more narrowly applied to such people, who were venerated after their deaths as saints, usually by the members of their local church or the Christians in the region where they had lived, because they were familiar with their good deeds. Eventually, the Catholic Church created a process, called "canonization," through which such venerable people could be recognized as saints by all Christians everywhere.

Canonized and Acclaimed Saints

Most of the saints whom we refer to by that title (for instance, St. Elizabeth Ann Seton) have gone through this process of canonization. Others, such as Saint Peter and Saint Paul, received the title through acclamation, or the universal recognition of their holiness.

Catholics believe that both types of saints (canonized and acclaimed) are already in Heaven, which is why one of the requirements for the canonization process is proof of miracles performed by the possible saint after his death. Canonized saints can be venerated anywhere and prayed to publicly, and their lives are held up to Christians still struggling here on earth as examples to be imitated.

On this side of heaven, we cannot be absolutely certain of any particular person's salvation, unless that information is revealed by God and/or His Church, "the pillar and foundation of truth."

FYI, this is a caucus thread.

13 posted on 04/27/2014 7:55:33 AM PDT by St_Thomas_Aquinas ( Isaiah 22:22, Matthew 16:19, Revelation 3:7)
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To: Salvation

Beautiful photo


14 posted on 04/27/2014 7:57:10 AM PDT by St_Thomas_Aquinas ( Isaiah 22:22, Matthew 16:19, Revelation 3:7)
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To: SkyDancer
The word “saint” comes from the Greek word hagios, which means “consecrated to God, holy, sacred, pious." It is almost always used in the plural, “saints.” "…Lord, I have heard from many about this man, how much harm he did to Your saints at Jerusalem" (Acts 9:13). "Now as Peter was traveling through all those regions, he came down also to the saints who lived at Lydda" (Acts 9:32). "And this is just what I did in Jerusalem; not only did I lock up many of the saints in prisons …“ (Acts 26:10). There is only one instance of the singular use, and that is "Greet every saint in Christ Jesus…" (Philippians 4:21). In Scripture there are 67 uses of the plural “saints” compared to only one use of the singular word “saint.” Even in that one instance, a plurality of saints is in view: “…every saint…” (Philippians 4:21).

Therefore, scripturally speaking, the “saints” are the body of Christ, Christians, the church. All Christians are considered saints.

15 posted on 04/27/2014 8:52:26 AM PDT by Former Fetus (Saved by grace through faith)
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To: Former Fetus

small ‘s’ saints, yes.

capital ‘s’ Saints — in heaven, canonized, etc. A little different meaning there.

While we are on earth, we are all sinners.

As you pointed out, though, evangelists and Paul used the word ‘saints’ in greetings, etc.


16 posted on 04/27/2014 9:00:43 AM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Former Fetus

“Therefore, scripturally speaking, the “saints” are the body of Christ, Christians, the church. All Christians are considered saints.”

Yes, but there is more to Christianity than the literal word of the Bible. The Bible, after all, was written in languages that you most likely can’t even read. You, I, and just about everyone you know, rely on translations, lexicons, concordances, etc. Thus, over time, a word like “saint” can develop in how it is used. Today, we use “Saint” denote a saved person whose name is actually known to us. There’s no harm in that.


17 posted on 04/27/2014 12:27:43 PM PDT by vladimir998
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To: Salvation

Sainthood by ACCLAMATION!


18 posted on 04/27/2014 2:54:13 PM PDT by cloudmountain
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To: St_Thomas_Aquinas
Canonized and Acclaimed Saints

I had never heard of an "acclaimed" saint until now.
As I went through the lists of saints, I DID see the "acclaimed" saints.

Live and learn.

19 posted on 04/27/2014 3:06:16 PM PDT by cloudmountain
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To: Salvation
I thought that a non-Italian pope was the miracle.

Then we had the Polish Pope and the Panzer Pope.
Someday, there might even be an American pope. What do you think?

20 posted on 04/27/2014 3:07:51 PM PDT by cloudmountain
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To: Salvation
Pope John Paul XXIII was born DIRT poor.

His is an amazing story: from sharecropper's son to Pope. Talk about a success story in every sense of the word.
My, he must have been a bright star right from birth!

Angelo Giuseppe Roncalli was the fourth of 14 children born to a family of sharecroppers that lived in a village in Lombardy.

21 posted on 04/27/2014 3:11:08 PM PDT by cloudmountain
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To: cloudmountain

An informative thread, very interesting.


22 posted on 04/27/2014 7:47:39 PM PDT by Ciexyz
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To: vladimir998
Yes, but there is more to Christianity than the literal word of the Bible.

If a practice "adds to" scripture, it is not of God. God closed his revelation to us in the Revelation of Jesus Christ. Anyone who adds to the words of the prophecy are condemned to hell (and no real Christian will do so, but the damned will). Anyone who adds to scripture will be cursed. (See Revelation 22)

The Bible, after all, was written in languages that you most likely can’t even read. You, I, and just about everyone you know, rely on translations, lexicons, concordances, etc. Thus, over time, a word like “saint” can develop in how it is used. Today, we use “Saint” denote a saved person whose name is actually known to us. There’s no harm in that.

We use the meaning of words understood by the inspired writer, not what the words may have come to mean by other/subsequent usage. (We don't treat the Constitution this way, because it amounts to amending it through misconstruction. And only the people may amend it, not the courts.)

The harm is that it leads to organizations claiming to be Christian which are not. They are a counterfeit. The Bible explains who saints are (there are no capitalizations in original Greek unless they are all capitals (the first texts were uncials)). Saints are those born of God, every believer and these are not made so by men:

He came unto his own, and his own received him not. But as many as received him, to them gave he power to becomes the sons of God, even to them that believe on his name. Which were born not of blood, nor of the will of the flesh or nor of the will of man, but of God. (John 1:12,13)

To be be a saint one must believe the gospel--the death, burial and resurrection of Jesus Christ--as the only thing which saves--the completed work of Jesus Christ. Not my works or subsequent work--none of these can excuse or pay for my sin. Only he can. If one doesn't believe this, he has called God a liar.

If we receive the witness of men, the witness of GOd is greater: for this is the witness of God which he hath testified of his Son. He that believeth on the Son of God hath the witness in himself: he that believeth not God hath made him a liar; because he believeth not the record that God gave of his Son. And this is the record: that God has given to us eternal life and this life is in his Son. (1 John 5:9-11)

If one believes he can lose his salvation as the Catholics do, then he has not believed the record that God has given (that he has eternal life, not temporary life). All true saints believe they have eternal life and cannot lose it.

23 posted on 04/28/2014 8:39:56 AM PDT by nonsporting
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To: nonsporting

“If a practice “adds to” scripture, it is not of God.”

You mean as in the case of Protestant sect “altar calls”?


24 posted on 04/28/2014 10:41:28 AM PDT by vladimir998
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To: cloudmountain

An informative thread, very interesting.


25 posted on 04/28/2014 7:44:55 PM PDT by Ciexyz
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