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Why So Many Churches Hear So Little of the Bible
AlbertMohler.com ^ | 5-14-14 | Dr. Albert Mohler

Posted on 05/15/2014 9:40:21 PM PDT by ReformationFan

It is well and good for the preacher to base his sermon on the Bible, but he better get to something relevant pretty quickly, or we start mentally to check out.” That stunningly clear sentence reflects one of the most amazing, tragic, and lamentable characteristics of contemporary Christianity: an impatience with the Word of God.

The sentence above comes from Mark Galli, senior managing editor of Christianity Today in an essay entitled, “Yawning at the Word.” In just a few hundred words, he captures the tragedy of a church increasingly impatient with and resistant to the reading and preaching of the Bible. We may wince when we read him relate his recent experiences, but we also recognize the ring of truth.

Galli was told to cut down on the biblical references in his sermon. “You’ll lose people,” the staff member warned. In a Bible study session on creation, the teacher was requested to come back the next Sunday prepared to take questions at the expense of reading the relevant scriptural texts on the doctrine. Cutting down on the number of Bible verses “would save time and, it was strongly implied, would better hold people’s interest.”

As Galli reflected, “Anyone who’s been in the preaching and teaching business knows these are not isolated examples but represent the larger reality.”

Indeed, in many churches there is very little reading of the Bible in worship, and sermons are marked by attention to the congregation’s concerns, not by an adequate attention to the biblical text. The exposition of the Bible has given way to the concerns, real or perceived, of the listeners. The authority of the Bible is swallowed up in the imposed authority of congregational concerns.

As Mark Galli notes:

It has been said to the point of boredom that we live in a narcissistic age, where we are wont to fixate on our needs, our wants, our wishes, and our hopes—at the expense of others and certainly at the expense of God. We do not like it when a teacher uses up the whole class time presenting her material, even if it is material from the Word of God. We want to be able to ask our questions about our concerns, otherwise we feel talked down to, or we feel the class is not relevant to our lives.

And Galli continues:

It is well and good for the preacher to base his sermon on the Bible, but he better get to something relevant pretty quickly, or we start mentally to check out. Don’t spend a lot of time in the Bible, we tell our preachers, but be sure to get to personal illustrations, examples from daily life, and most importantly, an application that we can use.

The fixation on our own sense of need and interest looms as the most significant factor in this marginalization and silencing of the Word. Individually, each human being in the room is an amalgam of wants, needs, intuitions, interests, and distractions. Corporately, the congregation is a mass of expectations, desperate hopes, consuming fears, and impatient urges. All of this adds up, unless countered by the authentic reading and preaching of the Word of God, to a form of group therapy, entertainment, and wasted time—if not worse.

Galli has this situation clearly in his sights when he asserts that many congregations expect the preacher to start from some text in the Bible, but then quickly move on “to things that really interest us.” Like . . . ourselves?

One of the earliest examples of what we would call the preaching of the Bible may well be found in Nehemiah 8:1-8 (ESV):

And all the people gathered as one man into the square before the Water Gate. And they told Ezra the scribe to bring the Book of the Law of Moses that the Lord had commanded Israel. So Ezra the priest brought the Law before the assembly, both men and women and all who could understand what they heard, on the first day of the seventh month. And he read from it facing the square before the Water Gate from early morning until midday, in the presence of the men and the women and those who could understand. And the ears of all the people were attentive to the Book of the Law. And Ezra the scribe stood on a wooden platform that they had made for the purpose. And beside him stood Mattithiah, Shema, Anaiah, Uriah, Hilkiah, and Maaseiah on his right hand, and Pedaiah, Mishael, Malchijah, Hashum, Hashbaddanah, Zechariah, and Meshullam on his left hand. And Ezra opened the book in the sight of all the people, for he was above all the people, and as he opened it all the people stood. And Ezra blessed the Lord, the great God, and all the people answered, “Amen, Amen,” lifting up their hands. And they bowed their heads and worshiped the Lord with their faces to the ground. Also Jeshua, Bani, Sherebiah, Jamin, Akkub, Shabbethai, Hodiah, Maaseiah, Kelita, Azariah, Jozabad, Hanan, Pelaiah, the Levites, helped the people to understand the Law, while the people remained in their places. They read from the book, from the Law of God, clearly, and they gave the sense, so that the people understood the reading.

Ezra and his companions stood on a platform before the congregation. They read the scriptural text clearly, and then explained the meaning of the Scripture to the people. The congregation received the Word humbly, while standing. The pattern is profoundly easy to understand: the Bible was read and explained and received.

As Hughes Oliphant Old comments, “This account of the reading of the Law indicates that already at the time of the writing of this text there was a considerable amount of ceremonial framing of the public reading of Scripture. This ceremonial framing is a witness to the authority of the Bible.” The reading and exposition took place in a context of worship as the people listened to the Word of God. The point of the sermon was simple: “to make clear the reading of the Scriptures.”

In many churches, there is almost no public reading of the Word of God. Worship is filled with music, but congregations seem disinterested in listening to the reading of the Bible. We are called to sing in worship, but the congregation cannot live only on the portions of Scripture that are woven into songs and hymns. Christians need the ministry of the Word as the Bible is read before the congregation such that God’s people—young and old, rich and poor, married and unmarried, sick and well—hear it together. The sermon is to consist of the exposition of the Word of God, powerfully and faithfully read, explained, and applied. It is not enough that the sermon take a biblical text as its starting point.

How can so many of today’s churches demonstrate what can only be described as an impatience with the Word of God? The biblical formula is clear: the neglect of the Word can only lead to disaster, disobedience, and death. God rescues his church from error, preserves his church in truth, and propels his church in witness only by his Word—not by congregational self-study.

In the end, an impatience with the Word of God can be explained only by an impatience with God. We all, both individually and congregationally, neglect God’s Word to our own ruin.

As Jesus himself declared, “He who has ears to hear, let him hear.”


TOPICS: Evangelical Christian; Ministry/Outreach; Theology; Worship
KEYWORDS: bible; churches; mohler; preaching; wordofgod

1 posted on 05/15/2014 9:40:21 PM PDT by ReformationFan
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To: ReformationFan

There are some very interesting things in the Bible, including some good stories ( meaning stories a preacher should be able to make good sermons from— and yes, relevant sermons with good messages or “ bottom lines”) ). It’s hard to understand how how a cleric could be bored by it all. Perhaps he chose the wrong line of work ?


2 posted on 05/15/2014 10:01:56 PM PDT by faithhopecharity ((Brilliant, Profound Tag Line Goes Here, just as soon as I can think of one..))
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To: ReformationFan

When I was growing up, you walked into the sanctuary with a certain reverence because you were walking into God’s house. There was music playing softly, and we would busy ourselves with meditative prayer allowing the Holy Spirit to prepare our hearts to hear what the Word had for us that day.
Today, people saunter into church in shorts and flip flops carrying a latte and a cell phone and sit there texting or checking out some website while electric guitars play in the background, and others are carrying on conversations about their kid’s schoolwork or last soccer game. When the service starts a bunch of people show up on stage and perform as though they were on American Idol, with all the focus on them. Finally the preacher gets up in his jeans and t shirt and expounds on the latest pop “Christian” feel good psychology with a few Bible verses thrown in for seasoning.
No wonder people balk when they hear a real sermon from the Word of God. It just ain’t hip. And you gotta be hip to fill those empty seats.
Hey, maybe THAT’S why their empty.


3 posted on 05/15/2014 10:12:48 PM PDT by rickomatic
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To: ReformationFan
That’s funny . . . it’s the lack of Bible-based teaching that kept me out of most churches in the past.
4 posted on 05/15/2014 10:36:59 PM PDT by Olog-hai
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To: ReformationFan
Basically, pastors today are fairly uneducated.

One of the reasons they don't teach/preach the Bible is that they have no idea of context because they have no understanding of history. They apply everything directly to today which is not only shallow, it's arrogant and discounts the millions of believers who lived before us.

But I think revival is coming (which will be centered on Biblical truth). It's taking a while but maybe the longer it tarries, the longer it will last.

5 posted on 05/15/2014 10:52:16 PM PDT by what's up (su)
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To: ReformationFan

No one has any interest in hearing Scripture that is not convicted of their own sin.

In fact, if they’re not convicted of their own sin, the last thing they want to hear is Scripture.

Why would they need to hear about being saved if they’ve done nothing that merits any punishment ?

They certainly don’t want to hear about sin if they’re not truly convicted of their own sin.

That conviction is very upsetting. It’s only then that one really throws oneself upon God’s mercy.

It’s only then that one develops the need to hear God’s Word like one’s need for food, for bread, when starving. What have I been doing wrong ? How can I be obedient ? Some things I thought were wrong were actually not.

Absent the grace of God, people simply do “not want to go there”.


6 posted on 05/15/2014 11:03:29 PM PDT by PieterCasparzen (We have to fix things ourselves)
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To: ReformationFan

bookmark


7 posted on 05/16/2014 12:36:47 AM PDT by GOP Poet
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To: ReformationFan

I wonder if anyone yawned when Jesus preached?


8 posted on 05/16/2014 1:32:33 AM PDT by mitch5501 ("make your calling and election sure: for if ye do these things ye shall never fall")
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To: rickomatic
This is why I love and so appreciate the Catholic Mass of years ago. We would walk into church, say our prayers, and in a peaceful, solemn atmosphere, we could talk to the Lord, and quietly listen to our inner thoughts and think. The organist would softly play in the background, and we would sing our songs of prayer during the Mass. No guitars, or floor shows, no shouting out loud from the congregation or dancing as a form of expression..just the opportunity to think of what was being preached in the sermons and how it applied to our daily lives...there was always a lesson to be learned. Today,I'm housebound and I pray to the Lord daily. I'm as close to Him at home as I am at Church or anywhere, for that matter.
9 posted on 05/16/2014 2:17:29 AM PDT by itssme
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To: ReformationFan

“It has been said to the point of boredom that we live in a narcissistic age, where we are wont to fixate on our needs, our wants, our wishes, and our hopes—at the expense of others and certainly at the expense of God. We do not like it when a teacher uses up the whole class time presenting her material, even if it is material from the Word of God. We want to be able to ask our questions about our concerns, otherwise we feel talked down to, or we feel the class is not relevant to our lives.”

People need to understand that this (meaning EVERYTHING we take in with our five senses) is not about US.

None of it. Everything is about Jesus. Everything.


10 posted on 05/16/2014 3:09:51 AM PDT by ImaGraftedBranch (...By reading this, you've collapsed my wave function. Thanks.)
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To: ReformationFan

I don’t understand what the author means by “preaching the Bible.” The Bible is ... the Bible. If you’re reading (or reciting from memory) the words of the Bible, then you are. If you’re not, you’re not.

By “preaching the Bible,” does he mean “telling the congregation what I think about something in the Bible”?


11 posted on 05/16/2014 3:12:37 AM PDT by Tax-chick (If I offended you, you needed it.)
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To: ReformationFan
From 2 Tim 4 (that's in the Bible)

I charge you in the presence of God and of Christ Jesus, who is to judge the living and the dead, and by his appearing and his kingdom: preach the word; be ready in season and out of season; reprove, rebuke, and exhort, with complete patience and teaching. For the time is coming when people will not endure sound teaching, but having itching ears they will accumulate for themselves teachers to suit their own passions, and will turn away from listening to the truth and wander off into myths.

I ask: What else should be preached?

Mohler's article was written long ago and it is timeless. Right?

12 posted on 05/16/2014 4:50:51 AM PDT by kinsman redeemer (The real enemy seeks to devour what is good.)
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To: what's up
Basically, pastors today are fairly uneducated.
One of the reasons they don't teach/preach the Bible is that they have no idea of context because they have no understanding of history. They apply everything directly to today which is not only shallow, it's arrogant and discounts the millions of believers who lived before us.
But I think revival is coming (which will be centered on Biblical truth). It's taking a while but maybe the longer it tarries, the longer it will last.

Perhaps some educational standards might be set for pastors.

13 posted on 05/16/2014 5:39:36 AM PDT by cloudmountain
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To: Tax-chick
I don’t understand what the author means by “preaching the Bible.” The Bible is ... the Bible. If you’re reading (or reciting from memory) the words of the Bible, then you are. If you’re not, you’re not.
By “preaching the Bible,” does he mean “telling the congregation what I think about something in the Bible”?

Are there not possible errors that people may believe because they interpret the Bible differently from others?
Or doesn't that matter?

14 posted on 05/16/2014 5:42:06 AM PDT by cloudmountain
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To: Tax-chick

A sermon is not reading or reciting.

educating people about what’s in the Bible is essential.


15 posted on 05/16/2014 6:27:07 AM PDT by what's up (su)
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To: Olog-hai

I was amazed at the times I have been in a Protestant or non-Catholic Church. Once there was nothing preached, once a few lines from the Old Testament and the other time just some generalizations.

It puzzled me because I am used to hear Scripture spoken on every week.


16 posted on 05/16/2014 6:50:02 AM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: ReformationFan
I use to go to different independent churches then I would go with my mother out of respect to " Honor your Mother" to Mass. Funny thing I noticed. The Catholics had it all printed and scheduled and read for the day. And every day too. A different reading everyday.

May 16, 2014

Friday of the Fourth Week of Easter

Reading 1 Acts 13:26-33

When Paul came to Antioch in Pisidia, he said in the synagogue: “My brothers, children of the family of Abraham, and those others among you who are God-fearing, to us this word of salvation has been sent. The inhabitants of Jerusalem and their leaders failed to recognize him, and by condemning him they fulfilled the oracles of the prophets that are read sabbath after sabbath. For even though they found no grounds for a death sentence, they asked Pilate to have him put to death, and when they had accomplished all that was written about him, they took him down from the tree and placed him in a tomb. But God raised him from the dead, and for many days he appeared to those who had come up with him from Galilee to Jerusalem. These are now his witnesses before the people. We ourselves are proclaiming this good news to you that what God promised our fathers he has brought to fulfillment for us, their children, by raising up Jesus, as it is written in the second psalm, You are my Son; this day I have begotten you.”

Responsorial Psalm Ps 2:6-7, 8-9, 10-11ab

R. (7bc) You are my Son; this day I have begotten you. or:

R. Alleluia.

“I myself have set up my king on Zion, my holy mountain.” I will proclaim the decree of the LORD: The LORD said to me, “You are my Son; this day I have begotten you.”

R. You are my Son; this day I have begotten you. or:

R. Alleluia.

“Ask of me and I will give you the nations for an inheritance and the ends of the earth for your possession. You shall rule them with an iron rod; you shall shatter them like an earthen dish.”

R. You are my Son; this day I have begotten you. or:

R. Alleluia.

And now, O kings, give heed; take warning, you rulers of the earth. Serve the LORD with fear, and rejoice before him; with trembling rejoice.

R. You are my Son; this day I have begotten you. or:

R. Alleluia.

Gospel Jn 14:1-6

Jesus said to his disciples: “Do not let your hearts be troubled. You have faith in God; have faith also in me. In my Father’s house there are many dwelling places. If there were not, would I have told you that I am going to prepare a place for you? And if I go and prepare a place for you, I will come back again and take you to myself, so that where I am you also may be. Where I am going you know the way.” Thomas said to him, “Master, we do not know where you are going; how can we know the way?” Jesus said to him, “I am the way and the truth and the life. No one comes to the Father except through me.”

17 posted on 05/16/2014 7:10:52 AM PDT by johngrace (I am a 1 John 4! Christian- declared at every Sunday Mass , Divine Mercy and Rosary prayers!)
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To: johngrace

Gospel Jn 14:1-6

Jesus said to his disciples: “Do not let your hearts be troubled. You have faith in God; have faith also in me. In my Father’s house there are many dwelling places. If there were not, would I have told you that I am going to prepare a place for you? And if I go and prepare a place for you, I will come back again and take you to myself, so that where I am you also may be. Where I am going you know the way.” Thomas said to him, “Master, we do not know where you are going; how can we know the way?” Jesus said to him, “I am the way and the truth and the life. No one comes to the Father except through me.”


I heard an interesting homily on the Gospel verse at Mass this morning. I don’t remember all of it, but Father summed it up by saying that whenever he hear the phrase, “I am the way and the truth and the life,” it is a powerful reminder that it is only by entering into a personal relationship with Jesus that we can come to the Father through Him and enter eternal life.


18 posted on 05/16/2014 7:36:57 AM PDT by rwa265 (Love one another as I have loved you, says the Lord.)
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To: cloudmountain; what's up
Are there not possible errors that people may believe because they interpret the Bible differently from others? Or doesn't that matter?

You both seem to be saying that, by "preaching the Bible," the author means, "Telling the congregation what he thinks the Bible means."

19 posted on 05/16/2014 7:41:41 AM PDT by Tax-chick (If I offended you, you needed it.)
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To: ReformationFan

What would things look like if Satan really took control of a city? Over a half century ago, Presbyterian minister Donald Grey Barnhouse offered his own scenario in his weekly sermon that was also broadcast nationwide on CBS radio.

Barnhouse speculated that if Satan took over Philadelphia, all of the bars would be closed, pornography banished, and pristine streets would be filled with tidy pedestrians who smiled at each other. There would be no swearing. The children would say, “Yes, sir” and “No, ma’am,” and the churches would be full every Sunday . . . where Christ is not preached.


20 posted on 05/16/2014 7:43:51 AM PDT by dfwgator
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To: what's up
Basically, pastors today are fairly uneducated.

Actually, they are educated, but in the techniques of managment, rather than theology. As David Wells wrote, 20 years ago:

The new quest for contemporary practicality has transformed the nature of the Christian ministry, the work of the seminaries, and the inner workings in denominational headquarters, and in each case the transformation has sounded the death knell of theology. The Christian ministry has become a profession. In today's seminaries, Edward Farley observed, the "theological student neither studies divinity nor obtains scholarly expertise in theological sciences, but trains for professional activities." In other words, the old divinity has largely died, as has its importance for the Church, and so seminary training increasingly is about inculcating a kind of public demeanor and etiquette, along with know-how in the soul-caring business, to lay paths to successful careers for students. Seminary students are not blind to the fact that the big churches and the big salaries often go to those who are untheologica or even anti-theological. They know what kind of training they need to become managers who have the status of professionals, not scholars, thinkers, or theologians. (David F. Wells, No Place for Truth: Or Whatever Happened to Evangelical Theology? [Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1993], 112-13.)

I'd dispute Wells' use of the word "professional," as if it was a bad word: historically, the clergy was one of the learned professions in the traditional sense of an occupation that is also a calling: law, medicine, and divinity. Of course Wells means "professional" in the sense of pursuing an occupation as a livelihood, and I don't necessarily disagree with him there.

One of the reasons they don't teach/preach the Bible is that they have no idea of context because they have no understanding of history. They apply everything directly to today which is not only shallow, it's arrogant and discounts the millions of believers who lived before us.

Which is not necessarily a bad thing. Key to understanding the Bible is understanding its meaning in its original literary, social, and historical context: what it meant to its original audience. Which is why a learned clergy skilled in the art and science of hermeneutics is so crucial.

But it can't just be left in the past, otherwise it's just a Bible story. The art of preaching also requires that he bridge the gap between the original audience and the contemporary one, and tell me what its significance is today: how it is applicable to 21st-century life.

21 posted on 05/16/2014 8:29:54 AM PDT by RansomOttawa (tm)
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To: Tax-chick
By “preaching the Bible,” does he mean “telling the congregation what I think about something in the Bible”?

How do you tell the difference?

22 posted on 05/16/2014 8:31:26 AM PDT by RansomOttawa (tm)
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To: RansomOttawa

If that’s the definition, there is no difference. That was my question: “What does ‘preaching the Bible’ mean to the author?”


23 posted on 05/16/2014 9:00:03 AM PDT by Tax-chick (If I offended you, you needed it.)
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To: Tax-chick
If that’s the definition, there is no difference. That was my question: “What does ‘preaching the Bible’ mean to the author?”

When Al Mohler says "preaching the Bible," he means explaining the original meaning of the Bible in its own historical context, then drawing a contemporary application for his present listeners.

However, you're the one making a distinction between "preaching the Bible" and "telling the congregation what I think about something in the Bible." So please tell us, if you hear a bit of preaching, how you tell one from the other. Otherwise, it's merely a distinction without a difference.

24 posted on 05/16/2014 9:33:40 AM PDT by RansomOttawa (tm)
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To: RansomOttawa
No, I'm not making a distinction. I'm asking, "Is this what that means?" It seems to me that your answer is, "Yes, that is what it means." If so, I have nothing further to say.
25 posted on 05/16/2014 9:37:48 AM PDT by Tax-chick (If I offended you, you needed it.)
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To: what's up
Basically, pastors today are fairly uneducated.

Peter, James and John were simple fishermen, but when they were filled with the Holy Spirit, they amazed the religious leaders with God's wisdom.

Paul was one of the most educated men alive in his time. He had a zeal for God that led him to kill Believers. When he was saved, anointed by God, wisdom transformed him into one of the greatest evangelists of all time.

Knowledge is good. However, knowledge without wisdom is very dangerous. I would prefer an anointed man of God as a shepherd, before a theologian who is a spiritual babe. The latter usually places all confidence in the flesh - his knowledge and achievement. The Spirit-filled Believer leans heavily on God's Wisdom and Word, knowing that he is nothing without God's Truth and guidance. I have experienced examples of both types over the years, and seen the successes and rather dramatic failures of both.

I believe the revival is here, happening as we speak all over the world. People are so tired of religion. They want to really KNOW God, and worship Him the way He wants - in Spirit and Truth. I hear the same story often from folks that have sat in the same pews, heard the same sermons, watched the same ceremonies, and sang the same old songs. They are spiritually hungry and want more of God. Praise God there is so much more - you can have fresh revelation every day from Him. And He is raising up ministers, ministries, and churches to feed His Body His Pure Word. And if they can't get it from their local church, they will turn to their own Bible study, house churches, radio, TV, books, or even the Internet. I am amazed by the number of Internet visits I get from nations that are openly hostile to Christianity. God's Word is being preached all over the globe. Its the Truth that makes people free. And even if God has to use a talking donkey, He will water thirsty ground.

26 posted on 05/16/2014 10:01:27 AM PDT by Kandy Atz ("Were we directed from Washington when to sow and when to reap, we should soon want for bread.")
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To: Tax-chick
No, I'm not making a distinction. I'm asking, "Is this what that means?" It seems to me that your answer is, "Yes, that is what it means." If so, I have nothing further to say.

So are you telling me what I said, or just your opinion of what you think I meant?

27 posted on 05/16/2014 10:04:01 AM PDT by RansomOttawa (tm)
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To: ReformationFan
Great article from one of my favorite Baptists. Thanks for posting.

the concerns, real or perceived, of the listeners.

Seeker sensitivity bowing down to itching ears. You wind up moving from expositional preaching to topical preaching to the "needs" of the attendees. But they don't know what they need. God had tolds us what we need. Jesus preached in all of Scripture.

28 posted on 05/16/2014 10:08:19 AM PDT by Gamecock (#BringTheAdultsBackToDC)
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To: Tax-chick
Hit Post a little prematurely.

It seems to me that your answer is, "Yes, that is what it means."

Where in my post did I use language that suggested when Mohler said "preach the Bible," or that when he advocates understanding the Bible in its own context and explaining it to a contemporary reader, this was the equivalent of offering his personal opinion of what he thought it meant?

It is not me or him, apparently, but you that has a problem with confusing truth claims and opinions. Otherwise, if you have a specific beef with the way Mohler preachers or teaches his students to preach, just come out with it.

29 posted on 05/16/2014 10:08:48 AM PDT by RansomOttawa (tm)
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To: Tax-chick

When you teach that Jesus walked on the water is that only your interpretation or is that based on the word of God. There are plenty of things that are not a matter of individual interpretation but are clear. These need to be proclaimed in the churches.


30 posted on 05/16/2014 10:43:57 AM PDT by what's up (su)
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To: RansomOttawa

Yes application is essential. But you must often clarify the original intent before making it understandable and therefore applicable for today.


31 posted on 05/16/2014 10:51:27 AM PDT by what's up (su)
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To: ReformationFan

My SB minister teaches directly from the Bible-verse by verse.


32 posted on 05/16/2014 10:58:41 AM PDT by MamaB
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To: what's up
But you must often clarify the original intent before making it understandable and therefore applicable for today.

Yes, that's why I called it "key."

33 posted on 05/16/2014 11:03:20 AM PDT by RansomOttawa (tm)
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To: Salvation

My minister teaches from the Bible—verse by verse every time. Every church I have been to does/did the same. I do not know where you went but that is not common in all the churches I have been to over the past 7 decades.


34 posted on 05/16/2014 11:05:00 AM PDT by MamaB
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To: Kandy Atz

I agree that God uses simple men often to spread the love of Christ.

but he also uses people who know the word of God in depth. The reformation leaders for example were deeply learned men who were able to keep false teaching at bay because they were so learned in scripture as well as heresy that had occurred throughout history.

I believe there is so much lousy teaching around today because there are not enough people educated in the word of God preaching from the pulpits.


35 posted on 05/16/2014 11:05:37 AM PDT by what's up (su)
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To: rwa265
Amen!

On a Sad note I went to St Peter Chanel here in Georgia for Noon Mass. The priest told us something. Today is graduation day for High school. Well one of the students died last nite before she would have graduate. So sad. Please pray for family.

36 posted on 05/16/2014 12:32:27 PM PDT by johngrace (I am a 1 John 4! Christian- declared at every Sunday Mass , Divine Mercy and Rosary prayers!)
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To: RansomOttawa

I don’t have any problems with Rev. Mohler. I often read his articles and find them edifying. I’m just trying to understand.

Having considered it further, I agree that there’s a difference between what I was saying and what you’ve been saying.


37 posted on 05/16/2014 2:09:55 PM PDT by Tax-chick (If I offended you, you needed it.)
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To: Tax-chick
You both seem to be saying that, by "preaching the Bible," the author means, "Telling the congregation what he thinks the Bible means."

Well, my Protestant friends, they say, ARE allowed to interpret the Bible the way they want to. We Catholic are not.

I certainly don't mean to impugn ANYONE's belief.

38 posted on 05/16/2014 3:08:46 PM PDT by cloudmountain
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To: cloudmountain

Well, my parish priest tells us what he thinks the Bible means, too, many times. There’s not a single, authoritative way that a parable applies to daily life, for example.

Other comments above have said “preaching the Bible” includes giving historical information and so on, as well as discussing the meaning.


39 posted on 05/16/2014 3:19:43 PM PDT by Tax-chick (If I offended you, you needed it.)
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To: Tax-chick
Well, my parish priest tells us what he thinks the Bible means, too, many times. There’s not a single, authoritative way that a parable applies to daily life, for example.
Other comments above have said “preaching the Bible” includes giving historical information and so on, as well as discussing the meaning.

Is daily life SO very different today than it was 5000 years ago? Abraham Lincoln said that human behavior can be modified to some extent but human nature cannot be changed.

If your priest can, IN NO WAY, relate ANY parable to our daily life then either he is mumbling in his beard or no one is paying attention.

EVERY parable has a lesson on ONE or more of those seven deadly sins: pride, covetousness, lust, anger, gluttony, envy and sloth.

NOTE the first one, PRIDE. It's probably the worst. That was Lucifer's sin.

40 posted on 05/16/2014 3:41:09 PM PDT by cloudmountain
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To: cloudmountain

You seem to have understood rather the opposite of what I was saying.


41 posted on 05/16/2014 3:51:07 PM PDT by Tax-chick (If I offended you, you needed it.)
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To: Tax-chick

Well then, elucidate. And I do apologize for misunderstanding.


42 posted on 05/16/2014 3:52:19 PM PDT by cloudmountain
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To: cloudmountain

I meant that it’s expected in the Catholic Church that a priest or deacon will tell the congregation what he thinks about a Bible passage, along with other facts. We just don’t usually call it “preaching the Bible”; we call it “giving a homily.”

In most cases the Church doesn’t teach that a passage means “just this and nothing else.” We have “This is My Body” means “This is my Body,” but people can comment endless on the parable of the Prodigal Son or the implications of “I am the Good Shepherd.”


43 posted on 05/17/2014 2:41:46 AM PDT by Tax-chick (If I offended you, you needed it.)
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To: Tax-chick
Priests don't say "what they think." What they preach is pretty well scripted from what they were taught to preach about various Scripture readings in the seminary. They HAVE to be inculcated in regards to this as their "thoughts." THAT is the homily. There is no "free-wheeling" homilies on whatever, just what our Church teaches.

I've been a Catholic going on seven decades, a practicing Catholic and I go to daily Mass, so I've heard PLENTY of homilies. Also, every Catholic Church on the planet goes in a three-year cycle when it comes to Scripture readings, so I hear the same set of Scripture readings every fourth year.

"Commenting" isn't part of their training. That is why priests have a four year college education first, THEN go to the seminary for another four-six years. That is why priests don't really get rolling into their profession until they are almost 30. It is a CALLING, not just a profession.

PEOPLE can "comment" forever on whatever they want, but priests can't. There are some opinions and life experiences they bring into their homilies, which make them more interesting but the CORE of their homilies is quite regulated.

44 posted on 05/17/2014 6:02:13 AM PDT by cloudmountain
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To: cloudmountain

Okay, if you say so.


45 posted on 05/17/2014 10:30:38 AM PDT by Tax-chick (If I offended you, you needed it.)
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To: Tax-chick

Perhaps you ran into homily free-commenting priests. I never did. But what do I know? I’ve only been hearing Mass for almost seven decades, from many parts of the world.


46 posted on 05/18/2014 6:01:20 AM PDT by cloudmountain
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To: rickomatic

God is omnipresent, so He doesn’t live in a house.


47 posted on 05/18/2014 7:11:00 PM PDT by Old Yeller (Why is Jon Corzine a free man?)
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