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Catholic Caucus: Sunday Mass Readings, 06-15-14, SOL, Most Holy Trinity
USCCB.org/RNAB ^ | 06-15-14 | Revised New American Bible

Posted on 06/14/2014 7:57:44 PM PDT by Salvation

June 15, 2014

The Solemnity of the Most Holy Trinity

 

Reading 1 Ex 34:4b-6, 8-9

Early in the morning Moses went up Mount Sinai
as the LORD had commanded him,
taking along the two stone tablets.

Having come down in a cloud, the LORD stood with Moses there
and proclaimed his name, "LORD."
Thus the LORD passed before him and cried out,
"The LORD, the LORD, a merciful and gracious God,
slow to anger and rich in kindness and fidelity."
Moses at once bowed down to the ground in worship.
Then he said, "If I find favor with you, O Lord,
do come along in our company.
This is indeed a stiff-necked people; yet pardon our wickedness and sins,
and receive us as your own."

Responsorial Psalm Dn 3:52, 53, 54, 55, 56

R/ (52b) Glory and praise for ever!
Blessed are you, O Lord, the God of our fathers,
praiseworthy and exalted above all forever;
And blessed is your holy and glorious name,
praiseworthy and exalted above all for all ages.
R/ Glory and praise for ever!
Blessed are you in the temple of your holy glory,
praiseworthy and glorious above all forever.
R/ Glory and praise for ever!
Blessed are you on the throne of your kingdom,
praiseworthy and exalted above all forever.
R/ Glory and praise for ever!
Blessed are you who look into the depths
from your throne upon the cherubim,
praiseworthy and exalted above all forever.
R/ Glory and praise for ever!

Reading 2 2 Cor 13:11-13

Brothers and sisters, rejoice.
Mend your ways, encourage one another,
agree with one another, live in peace,
and the God of love and peace will be with you.
Greet one another with a holy kiss.
All the holy ones greet you.

The grace of the Lord Jesus Christ
and the love of God
and the fellowship of the Holy Spirit be with all of you.

Gospel Jn 3:16-18

God so loved the world that he gave his only Son,
so that everyone who believes in him might not perish
but might have eternal life.
For God did not send his Son into the world to condemn the world,
but that the world might be saved through him.
Whoever believes in him will not be condemned,
but whoever does not believe has already been condemned,
because he has not believed in the name of the only Son of God.



TOPICS: Catholic; General Discusssion; Prayer; Worship
KEYWORDS: catholic; ordinarytime; prater; trinity
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For your reading, reflection, faith-sharing, comments, questions, discussion.

1 posted on 06/14/2014 7:57:44 PM PDT by Salvation
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2 posted on 06/14/2014 7:59:31 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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From: Exodus 34:4b-6, 8-9

The Covenant is Renewed


[4] He (Moses) rose early in the morning and went up on Mount Sinai, as the
LORD had commanded him, and took in his hand two tables of stone. [5] And
the LORD descended in the cloud and stood with him there, and proclaimed the
name of the LORD.

God Appears


[6] The LORD passed before him, and proclaimed, “The LORD, the LORD, a God
merciful and gracious, slow to anger, and abounding in steadfast love and faithful-
ness.” [8] And Moses made haste to bow his his head toward the earth, and wor-
shipped. [9] And he said, “If now I have found favor in thy sight, O Lord, let the
Lord, I pray thee, go in the midst of us, although it is a stiff-necked people; and
pardon our iniquity and our sin, and take us for thy inheritance.”

*********************************************************************************************
Commentary:

34:1-28. This chapter narrating the renewal of the Covenant follows the same pat-
tern as the account of its original establishment (cf. Ex 19-24); but it is shorter, con-
centrating on the two main protagonists, God and Moses. Thus, it begins with the
preparations for the theophany and for the encounter with the Lord (vv. 1-5); then
follows the revelation of God, and Moses’ prayer (vv. 6-9); and it ends with the re-
newal of the Covenant and the so-called Rite of the Covenant (vv. 10-28). The ac-
count hinges on the remaking of the tables of stone after the sin of the golden calf;
the tables symbolize God’s offer to keep to the pact and never to go back on it.

34:1-5. The theophany is described very soberly here, but it has exactly the same
elements as given in chapter 19: very careful preparation by Moses (v. 2; cf 19:10-
11); the people forbidden to approach the mountain (v. 3; cf. 19:12-13); God ap-
pearing wrapped in the cloud (v. 5; cf. 19:16-20).

Comparing the two accounts, this one says less about the transcendence of God
and puts more stress on his closeness to Moses: “he stood with him there” (v. 5).
God’s initiative in drawing close to man is clear to see; it lies at the very basis of
the Covenant.

“He proclaimed the name of the Lord” (v. 6); the context would suggest that it is
Moses who proclaims the name of the Lord, but the Hebrew could indeed be as
the RSV has it, “and he proclaimed his name, ‘Lord’ “. The same wording appears
in v. 6 implying that it is the Lord who is “proclaiming”, defining himself as he pro-
mised he would (cf. 33:19). The sacred writer may have intentionally left these
words open to either interpretation; whether spoken by Moses or said directly by
God, they are equal from the revelation point of view.

34:6-7. In response to Moses’ pleading, the Lord makes himself manifest. The
solemn repetition of the name of Yahweh (Lord) emphasizes that the Lord is in-
troducing himself liturgically to the assembled Israelites. In the description of
himself which follows (and which is repeated elsewhere, cf. 20:5-6; Num 14:18;
Deut 5:9-18; etc.), two key attributes of God are underlined—justice and mercy.
God cannot let sin go unpunished, nor does he; the prophets, too, will teach that
sin is, first and foremost, something personal (cf. Jer 31:29; Ezek 18:2ff). But
this ancient text refers only in a general way to the fact that God is just, and
puts more stress on his mercy. A person who is conscious of his own sin has
access to God only if he is sure that God can and will forgive him. “The concept
of ‘mercy’ in the Old Testament,” John Paul II comments, “has a long and rich hi-
story. We have to refer back to it in order that the mercy revealed by Christ may
shine forth more clearly. [...] Sin too constitutes man’s misery. The people of the
Old Covenant experienced this misery from the time of the Exodus, when they
set up the golden calf. The Lord himself triumphed over this act of breaking the
covenant when he solemnly declared to Moses that he was a ‘God merciful and
gracious, slow to anger, and abounding in steadfast love and faithfulness’ (Ex
34:6). It is in this central revelation that the chosen people, and each of its mem-
bers, will find, every time that they have sinned, the strength and the motive for
turning to the Lord to remind him of what he had exactly revealed about himself
and to beseech his forgiveness” (”Dives In Misericordia”, 4). On “God’s jealousy”,
see the note on 20:5-6.

34:8-9. Moses once more implores the Lord on behalf of his people; he makes
three requests, which sum up many earlier petitions: he begs God to stay with
the people and protect them in their hazardous journeying in the desert (cf.
33:15-17), to forgive the very grave sin they have committed (cf. 32:11-14), and
finally to make them his own property, thereby distinguishing them from all other
peoples (cf. 33:16) and restoring them to their status as “his own possession”
(cf. 19:5). These three requests are ones that were constantly on the lips of the
people of Israel and in the hearts of everyone who acknowledges God (cf. Ps
86:1-15; 103:8-10; etc.).

*********************************************************************************************
Source: “The Navarre Bible: Text and Commentaries”. Biblical text from the
Revised Standard Version and New Vulgate. Commentaries by members of
the Faculty of Theology, University of Navarre, Spain.

Published by Four Courts Press, Kill Lane, Blackrock, Co. Dublin, Ireland, and
by Scepter Publishers in the United States.


3 posted on 06/14/2014 8:00:39 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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From: 2 Corinthians 13: 11-13

Epilogue


[11] Finally, brethren, farewell. Mend your ways, heed my appeal, agree with one
another, live in peace, and the God of love and peace will be with you. [12] Greet
one another with a holy kiss. [13] All the saints greet you.

*********************************************************************************************
Commentary:

11. In his words of farewell, the Apostle once more shows his great affection for
the faithful of Corinth, exhorting them to practise the fraternity proper to Christians
and thus live in concord and peace (cf. 1 Cor 1:10-17). And, St John Chrysostom
comments, he tells them what this will lead to: “Live in peace, and the God of love
and peace will be with you, for God is a God of love and a God of peace, and in
these he takes his delight. It is love that will give you peace and remove every evil
from your church” (”Hom. on 2 Cor”, 30).

St Paul’s call to the faithful to be cheerful is particularly significant — “gaudete”
(rejoice) in the New Vulgate — contains a rnessage he repeats on other occasions:
“Rejoice in the Lord always; again I will say, Rejoice” (Phil 4:4; cf. 3:1). Joy is
something very characteristic of Christians because their awareness of being chil-
dren of God tells them that they are in the hands of God, who knows everything
and can do everything (cf. note on 5:10). Therefore, we should never be sad; on
the contrary: we should go out into the world, St. Escriva says, “to be sowers of
peace and joy through everything we say and do” (”Christ Is Passing By”, 168).

12. On the “holy kiss”, see the note on 1 Cor 16:20.

“The saints” who send greetings to the Corinthians are the Christians of Macedo-
nia, from where St Paul is writing. Regarding this description of Christians, see
the note on 1 Cor 1:2.

*********************************************************************************************
Source: “The Navarre Bible: Text and Commentaries”. Biblical text from the
Revised Standard Version and New Vulgate. Commentaries by members of
the Faculty of Theology, University of Navarre, Spain.

Published by Four Courts Press, Kill Lane, Blackrock, Co. Dublin, Ireland, and
by Scepter Publishers in the United States.


4 posted on 06/14/2014 8:04:27 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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From: John 3:16-18

The Visit of Nicodemus (Continuation)


(Jesus said to Nicodemus,) [16] “For God so loved the world that He gave His on-
ly Son, that whoever believes in Him should not perish but have eternal life. [17]
For God sent the Son into the world, not to condemn the world, but that the world
might be saved through Him. [18] He who believes in Him is not condemned; He
who does not believe is condemned already, because He has not believed in the
name of the only Son of God.

*********************************************************************************************
Commentary:

16-21. These words, so charged with meaning, summarize how Christ’s death
is the supreme sign of God’s love for men (cf. the section on charity in the “In-
troduction to the Gospel according to John”: pp. 31ff above). “’For God so loved
the world that He gave His only Son’ for its salvation. All our religion is a revela-
tion of God’s kindness, mercy and love for us. ‘God is love’ (1 John 4:16), that is,
love poured forth unsparingly. All is summed up in this supreme truth, which ex-
plains and illuminates everything. The story of Jesus must be seen in this light.
‘(He) loved me’, St. Paul writes. Each of us can and must repeat it for himself —
‘He loved me, and gave Himself for me’ (Galatians 2:20)” (Paul VI, “Homily on
Corpus Christi”, 13 June 1976).

Christ’s self-surrender is a pressing call to respond to His great love for us: “If
it is true that God has created us, that He has redeemed us, that He loves us
so much that He has given up His only-begotten Son for us (John 3:16), that He
waits for us—every day!—as eagerly as the father of the prodigal son did (cf.
Luke 15:11-32), how can we doubt that He wants us to respond to Him with all
our love? The strange thing would be not to talk to God, to draw away and for-
get Him, and busy ourselves in activities which are closed to the constant
promptings of His grace” (St. J. Escriva, “Friends of God”, 251).

“Man cannot live without love. He remains a being that is incomprehensible for
himself, his life is senseless, if love is not revealed to him, if he does not encoun-
ter love, if he does not experience it and make it his own, if he does not partici-
pate intimately in it. This [...] is why Christ the Redeemer ‘fully reveals man to
himself’. If we may use the expression, this is the human dimension of the mys-
tery of the Redemption. In this dimension man finds again the greatness, dignity
and value that belong to his humanity. [...] The one who wishes to understand
himself thoroughly [...] must, with his unrest and uncertainty and even his weak-
ness and sinfulness, with his life and death, draw near to Christ. He must, so to
speak, enter into Him with all his own self, he must ‘appropriate’ and assimilate
the whole of the reality of the Incarnation and Redemption in order to find himself.
If this profound process takes place within him, he then bears fruit not only of
adoration of God but also of deep wonder at himself.

How precious must man be in the eyes of the Creator, if he ‘gained so great a
Redeemer’, (”Roman Missal, Exultet” at Easter Vigil), and if God ‘gave His only
Son’ in order that man ‘should not perish but have eternal life’. [...]

‘Increasingly contemplating the whole of Christ’s mystery, the Church knows with
all the certainty of faith that the Redemption that took place through the Cross
has definitively restored his dignity to man and given back meaning to his life in
the world, a meaning that was lost to a considerable extent because of sin. And
for that reason, the Redemption was accomplished in the paschal mystery, lea-
ding through the Cross and death to Resurrection” (John Paul II, “Redemptor
Hominis”, 10).

Jesus demands that we have faith in Him as a first prerequisite to sharing in His
love. Faith brings us out of darkness into the light, and sets us on the road to sal-
vation. “He who does not believe is condemned already” (verse 18).

“The words of Christ are at once words of judgment and grace, of life and death.
For it is only by putting to death that which is old that we can come to newness
of life. Now, although this refers primarily to people, it is also true of various world-
ly goods which bear the mark both of man’s sin and the blessing of God. [...] No
one is freed from sin by himself or by his own efforts, no one is raised above him-
self or completely delivered from his own weakness, solitude or slavery; all have
need of Christ, who is the model, master, liberator, savior, and giver of life. Even
in the secular history of mankind the Gospel has acted as a leaven in the inte-
rests of liberty and progress, and it always offers itself as a leaven with regard to
brotherhood, unity and peace” (Vatican II, “Ad Gentes”, 8).

*********************************************************************************************
Source: “The Navarre Bible: Text and Commentaries”. Biblical text from the
Revised Standard Version and New Vulgate. Commentaries by members of
the Faculty of Theology, University of Navarre, Spain.

Published by Four Courts Press, Kill Lane, Blackrock, Co. Dublin, Ireland, and
by Scepter Publishers in the United States.


5 posted on 06/14/2014 8:05:37 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Scripture readings taken from the Jerusalem Bible, published and copyright © 1966, 1967 and 1968 by Darton, Longman & Todd

Readings at Mass


First reading

Exodus 34:4-6,8-9 ©

With the two tablets of stone in his hands, Moses went up the mountain of Sinai in the early morning as the Lord had commanded him. And the Lord descended in the form of a cloud, and Moses stood with him there.

  He called on the name of the Lord. The Lord passed before him and proclaimed, ‘The Lord, a God of tenderness and compassion, slow to anger rich in kindness and faithfulness.’ And Moses bowed down to the ground at once and worshipped. ‘If I have indeed won your favour, Lord,’ he said ‘let my Lord come with us, I beg. True, they are a headstrong people, but forgive us our faults and our sins, and adopt us as your heritage.’


Canticle

Daniel 3:52-55 ©

You are blest, Lord God of our fathers.

  To you glory and praise for evermore.

Blest your glorious holy name.

  To you glory and praise for evermore.

You are blest in the temple of your glory.

  To you glory and praise for evermore.

You are blest on the throne of your kingdom.

  To you glory and praise for evermore.

You are blest who gaze into the depths.

  To you glory and praise for evermore.

You are blest in the firmament of heaven.

  To you glory and praise for evermore.


Second reading

2 Corinthians 13:11-13 ©

Brothers, we wish you happiness; try to grow perfect; help one another. Be united; live in peace, and the God of love and peace will be with you.

  Greet one another with the holy kiss. All the saints send you greetings.

  The grace of the Lord Jesus Christ, the love of God and the fellowship of the Holy Spirit be with you all.


Gospel Acclamation

cf.Rv1:8

Alleluia, alleluia!

Glory be to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit;

the God who is, who was, and who is to come.

Alleluia!


Gospel

John 3:16-18 ©

Jesus said to Nicodemus:

‘God loved the world so much that he gave his only Son,

so that everyone who believes in him may not be lost

but may have eternal life.

For God sent his Son into the world

not to condemn the world,

but so that through him the world might be saved.

No one who believes in him will be condemned;

but whoever refuses to believe is condemned already,

because he has refused to believe in the name of God’s only Son.’


6 posted on 06/14/2014 8:17:11 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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7 posted on 06/14/2014 8:19:31 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Perpetual Novena for the Nation (Ecumenical)
8 posted on 06/14/2014 8:22:52 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Prayers for The Religion Forum (Ecumenical)
9 posted on 06/14/2014 8:23:15 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Jesus, High Priest
 

We thank you, God our Father, for those who have responded to your call to priestly ministry.

Accept this prayer we offer on their behalf: Fill your priests with the sure knowledge of your love.

Open their hearts to the power and consolation of the Holy Spirit.

Lead them to new depths of union with your Son.

Increase in them profound faith in the Sacraments they celebrate as they nourish, strengthen and heal us.

Lord Jesus Christ, grant that these, your priests, may inspire us to strive for holiness by the power of their example, as men of prayer who ponder your word and follow your will.

O Mary, Mother of Christ and our mother, guard with your maternal care these chosen ones, so dear to the Heart of your Son.

Intercede for our priests, that offering the Sacrifice of your Son, they may be conformed more each day to the image of your Son, our Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ. Amen.

Saint John Vianney, universal patron of priests, pray for us and our priests

This icon shows Jesus Christ, our eternal high priest.

The gold pelican over His heart represents self-sacrifice.

The border contains an altar and grapevines, representing the Mass, and icons of Melchizedek and St. Jean-Baptiste Vianney.

Melchizedek: king of righteousness (left icon) was priest and king of Jerusalem.  He blessed Abraham and has been considered an ideal priest-king.

St. Jean-Baptiste Vianney is the patron saint of parish priests.

10 posted on 06/14/2014 8:25:14 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Pray a Rosary each day for our nation.

Pray the Rosary

1.  Sign of the Cross:  In the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit.  Amen.

2.  The Apostles Creed:  I BELIEVE in God, the Father almighty, Creator of heaven and earth, and in Jesus Christ, His only Son, our Lord, who was conceived by the Holy Spirit, born of the Virgin Mary, suffered under Pontius Pilate, was crucified, died, and was buried. He descended into hell; on the third day he rose again from the dead; he ascended into heaven, and is seated at the right hand of God, the Father Almighty; from there He shall come to judge the living and the dead.

I believe in the Holy Spirit, the holy catholic Church, the communion of saints, the forgiveness of sins, the resurrection of the body, and the life everlasting. Amen.

3.  The Lord's Prayer:  OUR Father, who art in heaven, hallowed be Thy name. Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done on earth as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread and forgive us our trespasses as we forgive those who trespass against us. And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil. Amen.

4. (3) Hail Mary:  HAIL Mary, full of grace, the Lord is with thee. Blessed art thou amongst women and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus. Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners, now, and in the hour of our death. Amen. (Three times)

5. Glory Be:  GLORY be to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit. As it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be, world without end. Amen.

Fatima Prayer: Oh, my Jesus, forgive us our sins, save us from the fires of hell, lead all souls to heaven, especially those in most need of your mercy.

Announce each mystery, then say 1 Our Father, 10 Hail Marys, 1 Glory Be and 1 Fatima prayer.  Repeat the process with each mystery.

End with the Hail Holy Queen:

Hail, Holy Queen, Mother of Mercy, our life, our sweetness and our hope! To thee do we cry, poor banished children of Eve! To thee do we send up our sighs, mourning and weeping in this vale of tears! Turn then, most gracious advocate, thine eyes of mercy towards us; and after this, our exile, show unto us the blessed fruit of thy womb, Jesus!

O clement, O loving, O sweet Virgin Mary! Pray for us, O holy Mother of God, that we may be made worthy of the promises of Christ.

Final step -- The Sign of the Cross

 

The Mysteries of the Rosary

By tradition, Catholics meditate on these Mysteries during prayers of the Rosary.
The biblical references follow each of the Mysteries below.


The Glorious Mysteries
(Wednesdays and Sundays)
1.The Resurrection (Matthew 28:1-8, Mark 16:1-18, Luke 24:1-12, John 20:1-29) [Spiritual fruit - Faith]
2. The Ascension (Mark 16:19-20, Luke 24:50-53, Acts 1:6-11) [Spiritual fruit - Christian Hope]
3. The Descent of the Holy Spirit (Acts 2:1-13) [Spiritual fruit - Gifts of the Holy Spirit]
4. The Assumption [Spiritual fruit - To Jesus through Mary]
5. The Coronation [Spiritual fruit - Grace of Final Perseverance]


11 posted on 06/14/2014 8:25:43 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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~ PRAYER ~

St. Michael, the Archangel, defend us in battle
 Be our protection against the wickedness
and snares of the devil;
May God rebuke him, we  humbly pray,
 and do thou, O Prince of the heavenly host,
 by the power of God,
 Cast into hell Satan and all the evil spirits
who prowl through the world seeking the ruin of souls.
 Amen
+

12 posted on 06/14/2014 8:26:10 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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A Prayer for our Free Nation Under God
God Save Our Country web site (prayer warriors)
Prayer Chain Request for the United States of America
Pray for Nancy Pelosi
Prayer and fasting will help defeat health care reform (Freeper Prayer Thread)
Prayer Campaign Started to Convert Pro-Abortion Catholic Politicians to Pro-Life
[Catholic Caucus] One Million Rosaries
Non-stop Rosary vigil to defeat ObamaCare

From an Obama bumper sticker on a car:

"Pray for Obama.  Psalm 109:8"

   

PLEASE JOIN US -

Evening Prayer
Someone has said that if people really understood the full extent of the power we have available through prayer, we might be speechless.
Did you know that during WWII there was an advisor to Churchill who organized a group of people who dropped what they were doing every day at a prescribed hour for one minute to collectively pray for the safety of England, its people and peace?  


There is now a group of people organizing the same thing here in America. If you would like to participate: Every evening at 9:00 PM Eastern Time (8:00 PM Central) (7:00 PM Mountain) (6:00 PM Pacific), stop whatever you are doing and spend one minute praying for the safety of the United States, our troops, our citizens, and for a return to a Godly nation. If you know anyone else who would like to participate, please pass this along. Our prayers are the most powerful asset we have.    Please forward this to your praying friends.


13 posted on 06/14/2014 8:26:48 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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June Devotion: The Sacred Heart

Since the 16th century Catholic piety has assigned entire months to special devotions. The month of June is set apart for devotion to the Sacred Heart of Jesus. "From among all the proofs of the infinite goodness of our Savior none stands out more prominently than the fact that, as the love of the faithful grew cold, He, Divine Love Itself, gave Himself to us to be honored by a very special devotion and that the rich treasury of the Church was thrown wide open in the interests of that devotion." These words of Pope Pius XI refer to the Sacred Heart Devotion, which in its present form dates from the revelations given to Saint Margaret Mary Alacoque in 1673-75.

The devotion consists in the divine worship of the human heart of Christ, which is united to His divinity and which is a symbol of His love for us. The aim of the devotion is to make our Lord king over our hearts by prompting them to return love to Him (especially through an act of consecration by which we offer to the Heart of Jesus both ourselves and all that belongs to us) and to make reparation for our ingratitude to God.

INVOCATION

O Heart of love, I put all my trust in Thee; for I fear all things from my own weakness, but I hope for all things from Thy goodness.
Saint Margaret Mary Alacoque

PRAYER TO THE SACRED HEART

Devotion to the Sacred Heart was the characteristic note of the piety of Saint Gertrude the Great (1256-1302), Benedictine nun and renowned mystic. She was, in fact, the first great exponent of devotion to the Sacred Heart. In our efforts to honor the Heart of Jesus we have this prayer as a model for our own:
Hail! O Sacred Heart of Jesus, living and quickening source of eternal life, infinite treasure of the Divinity, and burning furnace of divine love. Thou art my refuge and my sanctuary, 0 my amiable Savior. Consume my heart with that burning fire with which Thine is ever inflamed. Pour down on my soul those graces which flow from Thy love, and let my heart be so united with Thine, that our wills may be one, and mine in all things be conformed to Thine. May Thy divine will be equally the standard and rule of all my desires and of all my actions. Amen.
Saint Gertrude

FOR THE CHURCH

O most holy Heart of Jesus, shower Thy blessings in abundant measure upon Thy holy Church, upon the Supreme Pontiff and upon all the clergy; to the just grant perseverance; convert sinners; enlighten unbelievers; bless our relations, friends and benefactors; assist the dying; deliver the holy souls in purgatory; and extend over all hearts the sweet empire of Thy love. Amen.

A PRAYER OF TRUST

O God, who didst in wondrous manner reveal to the virgin, Margaret Mary, the unsearchable riches of Thy Heart, grant that loving Thee, after her example, in all things and above all things, we may in Thy Heart find our abiding home.
Roman Missal

ACT OF LOVE

Reveal Thy Sacred Heart to me, O Jesus, and show me Its attractions. Unite me to It for ever. Grant that all my aspirations and all the beats of my heart, which cease not even while I sleep, may be a testimonial to Thee of my love for Thee and may say to Thee: Yes, Lord, I am all Thine;
pledge of my allegiance to Thee rests ever in my heart will never cease to be there. Do Thou accept the slight amount of good that I do and be graciously pleased to repair all m] wrong-doing; so that I may be able to bless Thee in time and in eternity. Amen.
Cardinal Merry del Val

MEMORARE TO THE SACRED HEART
Remember, O most sweet Jesus, that no one who has had recourse to Thy Sacred Heart, implored its help, or sought its mercy was ever abandoned. Encouraged with confidence, O tenderest of hearts, we present ourselves before Thee, crushed beneath the weight of our sins. In our misery, O Sacred Heart of Jesus, despise not our simple prayers, but mercifully grant our requests. Amen.

Prayer Source: Prayer Book, The by Reverend John P. O'Connell, M.A., S.T.D. and Jex Martin, M.A., The Catholic Press, Inc., Chicago, Illinois, 1954

Only for Love: The Sacred Heart and the Priesthood [Catholic Caucus]

Catholic Word of the Day: LITANY OF THE SACRED HEART, 10-19-09
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Devotion to the Sacred Heart Today
The Biblical Foundation of Devotion to the Sacred Heart of Jesus [Ecumenical]
Heart to Heart (Sacred Heart of Jesus Devotion) [St. Margaret Mary Alacoque]
(June) The Month of the Sacred Heart {Catholic/Orthodox Caucus]
First Friday Devotion to the Sacred Heart of Jesus [St. Margaret Mary Alacoque]
The Heart of the World (On the Sacred Heart of Jesus) (Catholic Caucus)
The Sacred Heart Is The Holy Eucharist(Catholic Caucus)
The Origin of the Sacred Heart Badge

Importance of Devotion to the Sacred Heart
An Awesome Homily on the Solemnity of the Sacred Heart of Jesus by Father Edmond Kline
Catholic Prayer and Devotion: June the Month of the Sacred Heart
Catholic Devotions: Sacred Heart of Jesus
Pope Urges Jesuits to Spread Sacred Heart Devotion
Homilies preached by Father Altier on the Feast of the Sacred Heart
Catholic Meditation and Devotion: The Sacred Heart of Jesus
Daily Recomendation to the Sacred Heart of Jesus powerful prayer!
The Sacred Heart and the Eucharist
The Love of the Sacred Heart

On the Sacred Heart - "We Adore God's Love of Humanity"
HAURIETIS AQUAS (On Devotion To The Sacred Heart) - Encyclical by Pope Pius XII
Solemnity Most Sacred Heart of Jesus and Immaculate Heart of Mary
Sacred Heart a Feast of God's Love, Says John Paul II
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‘God Will Act and Will Reign’
About Devotion To The Sacred Heart:The Story Of Saint Margaret Mary Alacoque
Rediscover Feast of Sacred Heart, John Paul II Tells Youth

 
 

"Behold this Heart which has loved men so much, and yet men do not want to love Me in return. Through you My divine Heart wishes to spread its love everywhere on earth."

- Jesus to Saint Margaret Mary

Our Lord also made 12 promises to St. Margaret Mary for those that are devoted to His Sacred Heart.

  1. I will give them all the graces necessary for their state in life.
  2. I will give peace in their families.
  3. I will console them in all their troubles.
  4. They shall find in My Heart an assured refuge during life and especially at the hour of death.
  5. I will pour abundant blessings on all their undertakings.
  6. Sinners shall find in My Heart the source and infinite ocean of mercy.
  7. Tepid souls shall become fervent.
  8. Fervent souls shall speedily rise to great perfection.
  9. I will bless the homes in which the image of My Sacred Heart shall be exposed and honoured.
  10. I will give to priests the power to touch the most hardened hearts.
  11. Those who propagate this devotion shall have their name written in My Heart, and it shall never be effaced.
  12. The all-powerful love of My Heart will grant to all those who shall receive Communion on the First Friday of nine consecutive months the grace of final repentance; they shall not die under My displeasure, nor without receiving their Sacraments; My Heart shall be their assured refuge at the last hour.


14 posted on 06/14/2014 8:27:20 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
June 2014 Year A

Pope's Intentions

Universal: That the unemployed may receive support and find the work they need to live in dignity.

For Evangelization: That Europe may rediscover its Christian roots through the witness of believers.

15 posted on 06/14/2014 8:28:23 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Daily Gospel Commentary

The Most Holy Trinity - Solemnity - Year A

Commentary of the day
Saint Teresa Benedicta of the Cross [Edith Stein] (1891-1942), Carmelite, martyr, co-patron of Europe
Poem « I will remain with you », 1938 (trans. ©Washington Province of Discalced Carmelites, 1992)

« Then the angel showed me the river of Life…flowing from the throne of God and of the Lamb » (Rv 22,1)

You reign at the Father's right hand  (Ps 109 (110),1)
In the kingdom of his eternal glory
As God's Word from the beginning. (Jn 1,1)

You reign on the Almighty's throne
Also in transfigured human form,
Ever since the completion of your work on earth (Jn 17,4; 19,30).
I believe this because your word teaches me so,
And because I believe, I know it gives me joy,
And blessed hope blooms forth from it.

For where you are, there also are your own, (Jn 17,24)
Heaven is my glorious homeland,
I share with you the Father's throne. (Ap 3,21)

The Eternal who made all creatures,
Who, thrice holy, encompasses all being,
In addition has a silent, special kingdom of his own.

The innermost chamber of the human soul
Is the Trinity's favorite place to be,
His heavenly throne on earth.

To deliver this heavenly kingdom from the hand of the enemy,
The Son of God has come as Son of Man,
He gave his blood as the price of deliverance.
In the heart of Jesus, which was pierced, (Jn 19,34)
The kingdom of heaven and the land of earth are bound together.
Here is for us the source of life. (Jn 7,38)

This heart is the heart of the triune Divinity,
And the center of all human hearts
That bestows on us the life of God.

It draws us to itself with secret power, (Jn 12,32)
It conceals us in itself in the Father's bosom
And floods us with the Holy Spirit.


16 posted on 06/14/2014 8:29:59 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Zenit.org

The Trinity Is a Communion of Love and Light and Man Is Its True Image

Lectio Divina: Solemnity of the Most Holy Trinity, Year A

Paris, June 13, 2014 (Zenit.org) Monsignor Francesco Follo | 579 hits

Roman Rite

Ex 34: 4b-6. 8-9; PS: Dn 3, 52.56; 2 Cor 13: 11-13; Jn 3: 16-18

Introduction.
     The Trinity is a shining mystery: "As only three, each is contained in the other, so that there is only one light, given the intimate interpenetration" (St. John Damascene). The revelation of the Most Holy Trinity is summarized in a simple and profound way in the short phrase from the First Letter of St. John: "God is love." God is so not only in relation to us or to the created Universe. He is so in himself, in his intimacy, essentially, infinitely, eternally. On the other hand, love is truly itself in the relationship with another that constitute it. To be charity, love must lean towards another (St. Gregory the Great).

1) To live is living together.
     There are two fundamental mysteries of the Christian faith: the Unity and Trinity[1] of God and the incarnation, passion, death and resurrection of Jesus Christ.
     However, despite the importance that the Trinity has for our faith, we often have the impression that for many it is nothing more than a truth to be believed, a completely incomprehensible mystery about which we should not ask many questions.
     The Trinity is a dogma that can be perceived far away and not affecting our life. Instead, it is the revelation of the secret of life, of wisdom about life, death and love. It affirms: at the beginning of all there is the bond of freedom that is communion of love.
     One God in three persons: God is not solitude but communion, the ocean of his being vibrates with an infinite movement of love, reciprocity, exchange, encounter, family and celebration. When "at the beginning” God says, "Let us make man in our image and likeness", the image he speaks about is not that of the Creator, neither the one of the Spirit, nor the one of the eternal Word of God, but it is all of these things together.
     In front of the revelation of the Trinity not only silence, but also wonder and joy are required because this is indeed a reality inaccessible and infinitely greater than we are, but it is at the same time a shining reality. Man himself is all lit up by it in the mind and in the heart, in contemplation and in action.
     This revelation is done not to satisfy our need to know God; it directly affects the destiny of man and creation. Salvation, as a communion of love of God and of man, reflects the characters of the two entities that constitute it: God and man. Man cannot be understood without starting from God, he is made in God's image and modeled on Christ, the perfect image of God (Col 1:15). The questions and the answers about God are of fundamental importance to understand man.
     In knowing the Father (The Lover[2]), the Son (the Beloved) and the Spirit (love), we catch a glimpse that, in his innermost being, God is a dialogue, a life of love among the three Persons. This is the originality of the Christian conception of God, and it is here that man finds the true explanation of himself. Man feels an irrepressible yearning for community, solidarity and dialogue; he needs it to live and grow, he needs it more than the air. But it is only in the light of the Trinity that this finding acquires an unexpected depth: we are meant to meet, to dialogue and to love, because we are "image of God", and God is, in fact - as far as we are given to understand - a community of love.

2) Life is love.
     The vocation to community is the trace of the Trinity in man. “If we see love, we see the Trinity" (St. Augustine[3]). Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI explains: "The Spirit, in fact, is that interior power which harmonizes the hearts of the believers with Christ's heart and moves them to love their brethren as Christ loved them "(Letter Enc. Deus Caritas Est, n. 19). The Spirit immerses us in the rhythm of divine life, which is a life of love, making us personally in relations between the Father and the Son. It is not without significance that when Paul lists the fruits of the Spirit, puts love in the first place: "The fruit of the Spirit is love, joy, peace, etc...” (Gal 5:22). And since by definition love unites, this means first of all that the Spirit is the creator of communion within the Christian community, as we say at the beginning of Mass "... the communion of the Holy Spirit [i.e. the one that is made by him] be with you all "(2 Cor 13:13). On the other hand, it is also true that the Spirit stimulates us to engage in relationships of charity with all men. Therefore, when we love we make room for the Spirit, we allow him to be fully manifested.
     The texts of today's liturgy, in fact, draw our attention not so much on the Mystery of the Three Persons, but on the reality of love that is contained in this first and supreme Mystery of our faith. The Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit are one because they are love and love is the absolute life-giving power. Unity created by love is more than a unit purely physical. The Father gives everything to the Son; the Son receives everything from the Father with gratitude; and the Holy Spirit is like the fruit of this mutual love of the Father and the Son.
     The passage taken today from the Gospel of St. John, makes us reflect and contemplate the amazing depth and gratuitousness of the love of the Father who gives us the Son.  He in his becoming flesh[4] touches man in his concrete reality and in whatever situation he finds himself. God took the human condition to heal it from all that separates it from him and to allow us to call Him, in his only-begotten Son, with the name "Abba, Father" and be truly children of God.  St. Irenaeus says: "This is why the Word became man, and the Son of God, Son of man: so that man, by entering into communion with the Word and thus receiving divine filiation, might become  son of God "(Adversus Haereses, 3,19,1: PG 7.939).
     The Word of God becomes flesh not for a legal requirement, but for a free requirement of love, thanks to an overabundance of love. The Trinity is nothing more than this superabundant mystery of love that has been poured out from heaven on the earth beyond all borders and all boundaries. God gives us the gift of his beloved Son, but let’s not forget that it is a gift for everyone and for the entire world.
     And that's why, again in today's Gospel, St. John goes on to say that God has sent his Son to save the world, not to judge it. But the fact remains that the presence of the gift leads to a crisis: the gift of the Father can be accepted or rejected.

3) Life is to welcome Life.
     What is our vocation? To live the life of the Trinity: there is no other vocation than this. Each of us is called to live the life of God and the life of God is the Holy Trinity. Our vocation is this. It is not to teach, to do a job, to work in the house or to look after the children. Our vocation is not even the simple prayer. Our vocation is God himself, to be in Him, to live Him. Our vocation calls us to this: to believe in love, to accept it, to live it.
      Who, at least once in the day, does not make the sign of the cross or doesn’t recite the Lord's Prayer? These are signs which indicate our natural belonging to God, who wants to make us divine like him. The Saints had well understood that, living their own life embodying the model of Trinitarian love along the roads of the world, such as S. Francis of Assisi in poverty, St. Pius of Pietrelcina in a paternal way, Mother Teresa of Calcutta in charity, St. Therese of Lisieux secretly behind the grates of a cloistered monastery, and the Martins, the parents of the Saint of Lisieux, in the family.
     Among all the Saints shines the Virgin Mary, the creature closest to the Holy Trinity: daughter of the Father, Mother of the Son, Spouse of the Holy Spirit. The Virgin Mary, in her docile humility, has become the humble servant of Love. She has been able to accept the will of the Father, thus conceiving the Son by the Holy Spirit. In her, the Almighty, has been able to build a temple worthy of Him, making her the model and the image of the Church, the house of communion for every man and woman.
     May Mary, mirror of the Trinity, help us to grow in faith and to welcome into our lives the Trinitarian mystery, a mystery that speaks of love, acceptance and communion.
     May the Consecrated Virgin be an example for us. They in the everyday life guard the call to holiness through a simple life with a "profane” job. With their style of life they make Christ present everyday so to transform the world according to the Heart of God -Trinity. These women do this especially through the practice of the evangelical recommendations. In fact, "The consecrated life is thus called constantly to deepen the gift of the evangelical counsels with a love which grows ever more genuine and strong in the Trinitarian dimension: love for Christ, which leads to closeness with him; love for the Holy Spirit, who opens our hearts to his inspiration; love for the Father, the first origin and supreme goal of the consecrated life. The consecrated life thus becomes a confession and a sign of the Trinity, whose mystery is held up to the Church as the model and source of every form of Christian life "(St. John Paul II, Apostolic exhortation. Post-Synodal Consecrated Life, n. 21)

 --

                                                   Patristic Reading

            St. Athanasius' first letter to Serapion (Ep. 1 ad Serapionem 28-30: PG 26, 594-95.

599)

"It will not be out of place to consider the ancient tradition, teaching and faith of the Catholic Church, which was revealed by the Lord, proclaimed by the apostles and guarded by the fathers. For upon this faith the Church is built, and if anyone were to lapse from it, he would no longer be a Christian either in fact or in name.

We acknowledge the Trinity, holy and perfect, to consist of the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit. In this Trinity there is no intrusion of any alien element or of anything from outside, nor is the Trinity a blend of creative and created being. It is a wholly creative and energizing reality, self-consistent and undivided in its active power, for the Father makes all things through the Word and in the Holy Spirit, and in this way the unity of the holy Trinity is preserved. Accordingly, in the Church, one God is preached, one God who is above all things and through all things and in all things. God is above all things as Father, for he is principle and source; he is through all things through the Word; and he is in all things in the Holy Spirit.

Writing to the Corinthians about spiritual matters, Paul traces all reality back to one God, the Father, saying: Now there are varieties of gifts, but the same Spirit; and varieties of service, but the same Lord; and there are varieties of service but the same Lord; and there are varieties of working, but it is the same God who inspires them all in everyone.

Even the gifts that the Spirit dispenses to individuals are given by the Father through the Word. For all that belongs to the Father belongs also to the Son, and so the graces given by the Son in the Spirit are true gifts of the Father. Similarly, when the Spirit dwells in us, the Word who bestows the Spirit is in us too, and the Father is present in the Word. This is the meaning of the text: My Father and I will come to him and make our home with him. For where the light is, there also is the radiance; and where the radiance is, there too are its power and its resplendent grace.

This is also Paul's teaching in his second letter to the Corinthians (2:13): The grace of our Lord Jesus Christ and the love of God and the fellowship of the Holy Spirit be with you all. For grace and the gift of the Trinity are given by the Father through the Son in the Holy Spirit. Just as grace is given from the Father through the Son, so there could be no communication of the gift to us except in the Holy Spirit. But when we share in the Spirit, we possess the love of the Father, the grace of the Son and the fellowship of the Spirit himself."  Saint Athanasius, Bishop of Alexandria

 --

[1] The mystery of the Trinity is the foundation of the Christian faith, and yet, paradoxically, although the faith of the early Christians had already been Trinitarian (cf. Mt 28:16 and 1 Corinthians), the term Trinity appears only at the end of the second century A. C. with Theophilus of Antioch, to indicate the mystery of God who is at once One and revealed in three persons: Father, Son and Holy Spirit.

[2] St. Augustine writes evocatively in his "De Trinitate," "God the Father, in thinking, generates his own inner wisdom, or Word. But it is above all a relationship of love that binds the thinking mind to his Logos. So, if you seecharity, you see the Trinity. The Father is unreservedly infinite donation, the Son is active receiving, and the Spirit is the perfect unity of the one who gives and the one who receives. They are three: the Lover, the Beloved, Love. "

[3] We can never be grateful enough to Augustine to have set his speech on the Trinity on the word of John: "God is love" (1 Jn 4:10). God is love for this reason, Augustine concludes, he is Trinity! "Love implies one who loves,  the object of love and love itself" -In the Trinity the Father is the one who loves, the source and  the beginning of all things; the Son is the one who is loved; the Holy Spirit is the love with which they love each other

[4] "The Word became flesh" (Jn 1:14). Here the word "flesh", according to the Hebrew usage, shows a man in full but just from the aspect of his transience and temporality, his poverty and contingency.


17 posted on 06/14/2014 8:48:37 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Arlington Catholic Herald

GOSPEL COMMENTARY JN 3:16-18

Living in divine love

Fr. Robert Wagner

Nowhere in Scripture do we find the word “trinity” in reference to God as three divine persons. Of course, it is in Scripture where this divine truth is revealed, for the Gospels distinguish the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit in many passages. For instance, when John baptizes Jesus in the Jordan River, the voice of the Heavenly Father announces Jesus as His Son, while the Holy Spirit descends in the form of a dove (Mt 3:13–17, Mk 1:9–11, Lk 3:21–22, Jn 1:31–34).

By calling God the Holy Trinity, we identify Him by his divine characteristics. This is nothing new. We say that God is omnipotent, omniscient, holy, perfect, merciful, and just because God has shown us these attributes through the ages. This helps us relate to God, to pray to Him, to place our faith in Him. Yet while adjectives like “omnipotent” and “perfect” are easily understood with regard to God, describing God as a trinity of three persons provides a characteristic that requires further reflection to grasp its importance with regard to our relationship with God and, in turn, our understanding of ourselves.

It is the incarnation of God, Jesus Christ, who not only shows us the face of God, but also reveals the Holy Trinity to us. The Gospel of John is the source of much of this teaching, especially in the Last Supper discourse found in chapters 14 through 16. As we celebrate the solemnity of the Most Holy Trinity, we hear another passage from John's Gospel where Jesus reveals, “God so loved the world that He gave His only Son, so that everyone who believes in Him might not perish but might have eternal life,” (Jn 3:16). This well-known passage, while brief, is a source of great fruitfulness in our reflection on the Holy Trinity.

Before the world was created, God existed as Father, Son and Holy Spirit, with each divine person distinct from the others yet sharing the same divine nature, no one person greater than the other, all three united eternally. This divine union lacks nothing, for what can be added to perfect perfection? However, the love of God is so abundant it becomes a creating force, flowing outward from the loving union of the Holy Trinity and filling the universe with all things, visible and invisible. Yes, God did not need creation, but in His abundant and overflowing generosity, He created and continues to create all that is.

Among His creation, humanity holds an honored place. Not only are we creatures formed in the image and likeness of God, but the second person of the Trinity, Jesus Christ, took on our human nature. Yes, God so loved the world that He gave His only Son, who took our flesh and offered Himself on the cross for us. Each of us is created out of the divine love of the Holy Trinity. Each of us is redeemed by the love of the Holy Trinity.

Not only that, but when we are baptized “in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit” (Mt 28:19), each of us becomes a partaker of the divine nature of God, members of the body of Christ and temples of the Holy Spirit (cf. Catechism, No. 1265). As baptized Christians, we are swept up into the intimate union of the Holy Trinity as Jesus promises: “Whoever loves me will keep my word, and my Father will love him, and we will come to him and make our dwelling with him” (Jn 14:23); “I will ask the Father, and He will give you another Advocate to be with you always, the Spirit of truth, … it remains with you, and will be in you” (Jn 14:16,17).

When we remain in God's grace, we are united to the Holy Trinity in an undeniable reality. Not only that, but also we are united to the whole church, the mystical body of Christ, because of the divine love of God. In this way, we also imitate the Holy Trinity, for we are made for communion, with God and with others. God is love (1 Jn 4:8). We are the result of that love and the dwelling places for that love. Let us live that love abundantly in this life, that we may share in its fullness for all of eternity.

Fr. Wagner is Arlington Bishop Paul S. Loverde’s secretary.","serif"'>


18 posted on 06/14/2014 8:51:51 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Salvation
The Work of God

Year A  -  The Most Holy Trinity

For God so loved the world that he gave his only Son

John 3:16-18

16 "For God so loved the world that he gave his only Son, so that everyone who believes in him may not perish but may have eternal life.
17 "Indeed, God did not send the Son into the world to condemn the world, but in order that the world might be saved through him.
18 Those who believe in him are not condemned; but those who do not believe are condemned already, because they have not believed in the name of the only Son of God. (NRSV)

Inspiration of the Holy Spirit - From the Sacred Heart of Jesus

In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth, He also created man and woman in his image for His own glory.

God the Father willed this creation, which was accomplished through my word as God the Son, by the power or our Holy Spirit. This is the first manifestation of God as trinity, a mystery that has puzzled men for thousands of years.

God is pure spirit; God is one. Yet this mystery cannot be comprehended completely by human beings until they become one with God in the Spirit.

The whole of creation is the first compelling witness of the presence of God the Father, creator of everything that exists. No one can deny the existence of the creator, but men, instead of praising God for having brought them into existence, go about their lives offending Him and denying themselves the rights that He has offered them as His children.

Sin has become a wall between God and men, the darkness of evil stops the light of God reaching them.

God so loved the world that He sent his only Son, so that anyone who believes in Him may not perish but have eternal life.

I came into the world to give my testimony as the Word of God. This word is the emanation of the spirit that brings the clarity of truth; the light that dispels the darkness, the purity that takes away sins, the life of God given to men so that they can obtain everlasting life.

I did not come to condemn but to save. You condemn yourselves to eternal death when you live in sin, but I offer eternal life to you if you believe in me and follow me.

I am the truth, and I came to witness the truth about God. Those who acknowledge me acknowledge God the Father, and those who live in the truth live in me and in my Father.

I came to the world to awaken everyone to the realities of the spiritual connection between God and men. Being created in the image of God you are his children, but sharing the spirit of God you must live a godly life.

When evil enters man, the Holy Spirit of God has to leave. Then the evil spirit reigns in that soul until repentance comes and the door is opened back to God for Him to enter and purify. If men don’t repent and change their evil ways, they are despising the truth that calls them to live the way God has disposed, in fact, they are condemning themselves.

I suffered and died in order to pay for the sins of the whole world, to manifest the mercy of God that desires everyone to be saved.

As a token of reconciliation between God and men, the Father and I have sent the Holy Spirit into the world to accompany and to advise, to purify, to heal and to sanctify.

The Holy Spirit is the third testimony of God in the world since creation; it is the fire of our love, which enters the soul to give witness our presence.

Blessed are those who yearn for the Holy Spirit, they will be rewarded for their good desire.

Fire will cleanse the world, the Holy Spirit will purify with holiness, and the fallen creation will rise in the presence of the Lord.

Author: Joseph of Jesus and Mary


19 posted on 06/14/2014 8:54:48 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Archdiocese of Washington

My God is So High, You can’t get Over Him….A Sermon for the Feast of the Holy Trinity

By: Msgr. Charles Pope

There is an old Spiritual that says, My God is so high, you can’t over him, he’s so low, you can’t under him, he’s so wide you can’t round him, you must come in, by and through the Lamb.

Not a bad way of saying that God is other, He is beyond what human words can tell or describe, He is beyond what human thoughts can conjure. And on the Feast of the Most Holy Trinity we do well to remember that we are pondering a mystery that cannot fit in our minds.

A mystery though, is not something wholly unknown. In the Christian tradition the word “mystery” refers to something partially revealed, much more of which lies hid. Thus, as we ponder the teaching on the Trinity, there are some things we can know by revelation, but much more is beyond our reach or understanding.

Lets ponder the Trinity by exploring it, seeing how it is exhibited in Scripture, and how we, who are made in God’s image experience it.

I. The Teaching on the Trinity Explored – Perhaps we do best to begin by quoting the Catechism which says, The Trinity is One. We do not confess three Gods, but one God in three persons: [Father, Son and Holy Spirit]…The divine persons do not share the one divinity among themselves but each of them is God whole and entire. (Catechism, 253).

So there is one God, and the three persons of the Trinity each possess the one Divine nature fully. The Father IS God, He is not 1/3 of God. Likewise the Son, Jesus, IS God. He is not 1/3 of God. And so too, the Holy Spirit IS God, not a mere third of God. So each of the three persons possesses the one Divine nature fully.

It is our experience that if there is only one of something, and I possess that something fully, there is nothing left for you. Yet, mysteriously each of the Three Persons fully possess the one and only Divine Nature fully while remaining distinct persons.

One of the great masterpieces of the Latin Liturgy is the preface for Trinity Sunday. The Preface, compactly, yet clearly sets for the Christian teaching on the Trinity. The following translation of the Latin is my own:

It is truly fitting and just, right and helpful unto salvation that we should always and everywhere give thanks to you O Holy Lord, Father almighty and eternal God: who, with your only begotten Son and the Holy Spirit are one God, one Lord: not in the oneness of a single person, but in a Trinity of one substance. For that which we believe from your revelation concerning your glory, we acknowledge of your Son and the Holy Spirit without difference or distinction. Thus, in the confession of the true and eternal Godhead there is adored a distinctness of persons, a oneness in essence, and an equality in majesty, whom the angels and archangels, the Cherubim also and the Seraphim, do not cease to daily cry out with one voice saying: Holy Holy, Holy….

Wowza! A careful and clear masterpiece, but one which baffles the mind as its words and phrases come forth. So deep is this mystery that we had to invent a paradoxical word to summarize it: Triune (or Trinity). “Triune” literally means, “Three-one” (tri+unus) and “Trinity is a conflation of “Tri-unity” meaning the “three-oneness” of God.

If all this baffles you, good. If you were to say, you fully understood all this, I would have to call you a heretic. For the teaching on the Trinity, while not contrary to reason per se, does transcend it.

A final picture or image, before we leave our exploration stage. The picture at the upper right is an experiment I remember doing back in High School. We took three projectors, each of which projected a circle:  One was red, another green, another blue. As we made the three circles intersect, at that intersection, was the color white (see above). Mysteriously, three colors are present there, but only one shows forth. There are three but there is one. The analogy is not perfect (no analogy is, it wouldn’t be an analogy) for Father, Son and Spirit do not “blend” to make God. But the analogy does manifest a mysterious three-oneness of the color white. Somehow in the one, three are present. (By the way, this experiment only works with light, don’t try it with paint    )

II. The Teaching on the Trinity Exhibited : Scripture too presents images and pictures of the Trinity. Interestingly enough most of  the pictures I want to present are from the Old Testament.

Now I want to say, as a disclaimer, that Scripture Scholars debate the meaning of the texts I am about to present, that’s what they get paid the big bucks to do. Let me be clear to say that I am reading these texts as a New Testament Christian and seeing in them a Doctrine that later became clear. I am not getting in a time machine and trying to understand them as a Jew from the 8th Century BC might have understood them. Why should I? That’s not what I am.  I am reading these texts as a Christian in the light of the New Testament, as I have a perfect right to do. You of course, the reader are free to decide if these texts really ARE images or hints of the Trinity from your perspective. Take them or leave them. Here they are:

1. From today’s first reading we have: Having come down in a cloud, the Lord stood with Moses there and proclaimed his name, “LORD.” Thus the Lord passed before him and cried out, ”The LORD, the LORD, a merciful and gracious God, slow to anger and rich in kindness and fidelity. And thus we see that the LORD announces his name three times, LORD…LORD…LORD. It is not without some implied instruction hat the LORD announces his name formally three times; as if to say LORD once, for each person. Coincidence or of significance? You decide.

2. “Then God said, “Let us make man in our image, after our likeness…  (Gen 1:26) So God speaks to himself in the plural: “let us….our.”  Some claim this is just an instance of the “Royal We” being used. Perhaps but I see an image of the Trinity. There is one (God said) but there is also a plural (us, our). Right at the very beginning in Genesis there is already a hint that God is not all by himself, but is in a communion of love.

2. Elohim?? In the quote above, the word used for God is אֱלֹהִ֔ים (Elohim). Now it is interesting that this word is in a plural form. From the view point of pure grammatical form Elohim means “Gods.”  However, the Jewish people understood the sense of the word to be singular. Now this is a much debated point and you can read something more of it from a Jewish perspective here: Elohim as Plural yet Singular. My point here is not to try and understand it as a Jew from the 8th Century BC or a Jew today might understand it. Rather, what I observing is that it is interesting that one of the main words for God in the Old Testament is plural, yet singular, singular yet plural. It is one, it  is also plural. God is one, yet he is three. I say this as a  Christian observing this about one of the main titles of God. I see an image of the Trinity.

3.  And the LORD appeared to [Abram] by the oaks of Mamre, as he sat at the door of his tent in the heat of the day.  He lifted up his eyes and looked, and behold, three men stood in front of him. When he saw them, he ran from the tent door to meet them, and bowed himself to the earth,  and said, “My Lord, if I have found favor in your sight, do not pass by your servant.  Let a little water be brought, and wash your feet, and rest yourselves under the tree,  while I fetch a morsel of bread, that you may refresh yourselves, and after that you may pass on — since you have come to your servant.” So they said, “Do as you have said.” (Gen 18:1-5).  Now this passage from a purely grammatical point of view is very difficult since we switch back and forth  from singular references to plural. Note first that the Lord (singular) appeared to Abram. (In this case יְהוָ֔ה Yahweh  (YHWH) is the name used for God). And yet what Abram sees is three men. Some have wanted to say, this is just God and two angels. But I see the Trinity being imaged or alluded to here. And yet when Abram address “them” he says, “My Lord” (singular). The “tortured” grammar continues as Abram asks that water be fetched so that he can “wash your feet” (singular) and that the “LORD” (singular) can rest yourselves (plural). The same thing happens in the next sentence where Abram wants to fetch bread that you (singular) may refresh yourselves (plural) In the end the LORD (singular) gives answer but it is rendered: “So they said”  Plural, singular….. what is it? Both. God is one, God is three. For me, as a Christian,  this is a picture of the Trinity. Since the reality of God cannot be reduced to words we have here a grammatically difficult passage. But I “see” what is going on. God is one and God is three, he is singular and yet is plural.

4.  In the year that King Uzziah died I saw the Lord sitting upon a throne, high and lifted up; and his train filled the temple. Above him stood the Seraphim; each had six wings: with two he covered his face, and with two he covered his feet, and with two he flew. And one called to another and said: “Holy, holy, holy is the LORD of hosts; the whole earth is full of his glory. (Is 6:1-3) God is Holy, Holy, and yet again, Holy. Some say this is just a Jewish way of saying “very Holy” but as Christian I see more. I see a reference to each of the Three Persons. Perfect praise here requires three “holys”, why? Omni Trinum Perfectum (all things are perfect in threes), but why? So, as a Christian I see the angels not just using the superlative but also praising each of the Three persons. God is three (Holy, Holy, Holy) and God is one, and so the text says, Holy  ”IS the Lord.” Three declarations “Holy”: Coincidence or of significance? You decide.

5. In the New Testament there are obviously many references but let me just refer to three quickly. Jesus says, The Father and I are one (Jn 10:30). He says again, To have seen me is to have seen the Father (Jn. 14:9). And, have you ever noticed that in  the baptismal formula Jesus uses is “bad” grammar? He says, Baptize them in the Name (not names as it grammatically “should” be) of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit (Matt 28:19). God is One (name) and God is three (Father, Son and Holy Spirit).

Thus Scripture exhibits the teaching of the Trinity, going back even to the beginning

III. The Teaching of the Trinity Experienced – We who are made in the image and likeness of God ought to experience something of the mystery of the Trinity within us. And sure enough we do.

For, it is clear that we are all distinct individuals. I am not you, you are not me. Yet it is also true that we are made for communion. Humanly we cannot exist apart from one another. Obviously we depend on our parents through whom God made us. But even beyond physical descent, we need one another for completion.

Despite what old songs say, no man is a rock or an island. There is no self-made man. Even the private business owner needs customers, suppliers and shippers, and other middle men. He uses roads he did not build, has electricity supplied to him over lines he did not string, and speaks a language to his customers and others he did not create. Further, whatever the product he makes, he is likely the heir of technologies and processes he did not invent, others before him did. And the list could go on.

We are individual, but we are social. We are one, but linked to many. Clearly we do not possess the kind of unity God does, but the three oneness of God echoes in us. We are one, yet we are many.

We have entered into perilous times where our interdependence and communal influence are under appreciated. That attitude that prevails today is a rather extreme individualism wherein “I can do as I please.” There is a reduced sense at how our individual choices affect the whole of the community, Church or nation. That I am an individual is true, but it is also true that I live in communion with others and must respect that dimension of who I am. I exist not only for me, but for others. And what I do affects others, for good or ill.

The “It’s none of my business, what others do” attitude also needs some attention. Privacy and discretion have important places in our life, but so does having concern for what others do and think, the choices they are making and the effects that such things have on others. A common moral and religious vision is an important thing to cultivate. It is ultimately important what others think and do, and we should care about fundamental things like respect for life, love, care for the poor, education, marriage and family. Indeed, marriage an family are fundamental to community, nation and the Church. I am one, but I am also in communion with others and they with me.

Finally there is a rather remarkable conclusion that some have drawn, that  the best image of God in us is not a man alone, or a woman alone, but, rather, a man and a woman together in lasting a fruitful relationship we call marriage. For, when God said, “Let us make man in our image” (Genesis 1:26) the text goes on to say, “Male and female he created them” (Genesis 1:27). And God says to them, “Be fruitful and multiply” (Gen 1:28). So the image of God (as God sets it forth most perfectly) is the married and fruitful couple.

Here of course we must be careful to understand that what we manifest sexually, God manifests spiritually. For God is not male or female in His essence. Thus, we may say, The First Person loves the Second Person, and the Second Person loves the First Person. And so real is that love that it bears fruit in the Third Person. In this way the married couple images God, for the husband loves his wife and the wife loves her husband, and their love bears fruit in their children. [1]

So, today as we extol the great mystery of the Trinity, we look not merely outward and upward to understand but also inward to discover that mystery at work in us who are made in the image and likeness of God.


20 posted on 06/14/2014 8:59:40 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Sunday Gospel Reflections

Trinity Sunday
Reading I: Exodus 34:4-6,8-9 II: 2Cor 13:11-13


Gospel
John 3:16-18

16 For God so loved the world that he gave his only Son, that whoever believes in him should not perish but have eternal life.
17 For God sent the Son into the world, not to condemn the world, but that the world might be saved through him.
18 He who believes in him is not condemned; he who does not believe is condemned already, because he has not believed in the name of the only Son of God.


Interesting Details
One Main Point

God's love for the world is so great that he sent his son, Jesus, to save us. Whoever believes in Jesus will have the eternal life.


Reflections
  1. John insisted on the intimate relationship between faith and love. Faith is a loving union with Jesus. Is my faith a "loving faith?" Is my faith closely tied to the standards and principles?
  2. What experiences in my life have helped me see God's love for me?
  3. How does Jesus' teaching lead me close to God?
  4. Through what activities do I nourish my faith?

21 posted on 06/14/2014 9:13:40 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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And wilt Thou pardon, Lord,

A sinner such as I,

Although Thy book his crimes record,

Of such a crimson dye?

 

So deep are they engraved,

So terrible their fear,

The righteous scarcely shall be saved,

And where shall I appear?

 

O Thou Physician blest,

Make clean my guilty soul

And me, by many a sin oppressed,

Restore and keep me whole.

 

I know not how to praise

Thy mercy and Thy love;

But deign my soul from earth to raise

And learn from Thee above.

 

 

-- Saint Joseph the Hymnographer


22 posted on 06/14/2014 9:16:27 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Just A Minute Just A Minute (Listen)
Some of EWTN's most popular hosts and guests in a collection of one minute inspirational messages. A different message each time you click.

23 posted on 06/14/2014 9:17:08 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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The Angelus 

The Angel of the Lord declared to Mary: 
And she conceived of the Holy Spirit. 

Hail Mary, full of grace, the Lord is with thee; blessed art thou among women and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus.
Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners, now and at the hour of our death. Amen. 

Behold the handmaid of the Lord: Be it done unto me according to Thy word. 

Hail Mary . . . 

And the Word was made Flesh: And dwelt among us. 

Hail Mary . . . 


Pray for us, O Holy Mother of God, that we may be made worthy of the promises of Christ. 

Let us pray: 

Pour forth, we beseech Thee, O Lord, Thy grace into our hearts; that we, to whom the incarnation of Christ, Thy Son, was made known by the message of an angel, may by His Passion and Cross be brought to the glory of His Resurrection, through the same Christ Our Lord.

Amen. 


24 posted on 06/14/2014 9:18:51 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Trinity Sunday

Trinity Sunday
The Sunday after Pentecost

The Holy Trinity (detail) from Disputa dei Sacramento - The Triumph of the Christian Faith Raphael (ca 1508) Stanza della Segnatura, Apostolic Palace, Vatican

The Trinity is the mystery of one God in three Persons:
Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.
The revealed truth of the Holy Trinity is at the very root of the Church's living faith as expressed in the Creed.

The mystery of the Trinity in itself is inaccessible to the human mind, and is the object of faith only because it was revealed by Jesus Christ, the Divine Son of the Eternal Father.

- Catechism of the Catholic Church

Prayer & Readings - Creeds - Litany - Family Activities - Hymns to the Trinity


The Mystery of the Most Holy Trinity

"The mystery of the Most Holy Trinity is the central mystery of the Christian faith and of Christian life. God alone can make it known to us by revealing Himself as Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.

"The Incarnation of God's Son reveals that God is the eternal Father and that the Son is consubstantial with the Father, which means that, in the Father and with the Father, the Son is one and the same God.

"The mission of the Holy Spirit, sent by the Father in the name of the Son (John 14:26) and by the Son: from the Father (John 15:26), reveals that, with them, the Spirit is one and the same God. "With the Father and the Son He is worshipped and glorified" (Nicene Creed).

"Inseparable in what they are, the Divine Persons are also inseparable in what they do. But within the single divine operation each shows forth what is proper to Him in the Trinity, especially in the divine missions of the Son's Incarnation and the gift of the Holy Spirit."

-- Catechism of the Catholic Church §§ 261, 262, 263, 267


Antiphon
Benedictus sit Deus Pater, unigenitusque Dei Filius,
Sanctus quoque Spiritus, quia fecit nobiscum misericordiam suam.

Blessed be God the Father and His only begotten Son
and the Holy Spirit, who has shown us His merciful love.

Collect
God our Father, who by sending into the world
the Word of truth and the Spirit of sanctification
made known to the human race your wondrous mystery,
grant us, we pray, that in professing the faith,
we may acknowledge the Trinity of eternal glory
and adore your Unity, powerful in majesty.
Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son,
who lives and reigns with you in unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God, for ever and ever. +Amen.

Year A
First Reading: Exodus 34:4b-6, 8-9

With the two tablets of stone in his hands, Moses went up on Mount Sinai, as the Lord had commanded him, and took in his hand two tables of stone. And the Lord descended in the cloud and stood with him there, and proclaimed the name of the Lord. The Lord passed before him, and proclaimed, "The Lord, the Lord, a God merciful and gracious, slow to anger, and abounding in steadfast love and faithfulness". And Moses made haste to bow his head toward the earth, and worshipped. And he said, "If now I have found favor in Thy sight, O Lord, let the Lord, I pray thee, go in the midst of us, although it is a stiffnecked people; and pardon our iniquity and our sin, and take us for thy inheritance."

 

Second Reading: II Corinthians 13:11-13

Finally, brethen, farewell. Mend your ways, heed my appeal, agree with one another, live in peace, and the God of love and peace will be with you. Greet one another with a holy kiss. All the saints greet you. The grace of the Lord Jesus Christ and the love of God and the fellowship of the Holy Spirit be with you all.

 

Gospel Reading: John 3:16-18

For God so loved the world that He gave His only begotten Son, that whoever believes in Him should not perish but have eternal life. For God sent the Son into the world, not to condemn the world, but that the world might be saved through Him. He who believes in Him is not condemned; he who does not believe is condemned already, because he has not believed in the name of the only Son of God.


Year B
First Reading: Deuteronomy 4:32-34,39-40
Second Reading: Romans 8:14-17
Gospel Reading: Matthew 28:16-20

Year C
First Reading: Proverbs 8:22-31
The Lord created me at the beginning of His work, the first of His acts of old.
Ages ago I was set up, at the first, before the beginning of the earth.
When there were no depths I was brought forth, when there were no springs abounding with water.
Before the mountains had been shaped, before the hills, I was brought forth; before He had made the earth with its fields, or the first of the dust of the world.

When He established the heavens, I was there, when He drew a circle on the face of the deep, when He made firm the skies above, when He established the fountains of the deep, when He assigned to the sea its limit, so that the waters might not transgress His command, when He marked out the foundations of the earth, then I was beside Him, like a master workman; and I was daily His delight, rejoicing before Him always, rejoicing in His inhabited world and delighting in the sons of men.

Second Reading: Romans 5:1-5
Therefore, since we are justified by faith, we have peace with God through our Lord Jesus Christ. Through Him we have obtained access to this grace in which we stand, and we rejoice in our hope of sharing the glory of God. More than that, we rejoice in our sufferings, knowing that suffering produces endurance, and endurance produces character, and character produces hope, and hope does not disappoint us, because God's love has been poured into our hearts through the Holy Spirit which has been given to us.

Gospel Reading: John 16:12-15
"I have yet many things to say to you, but you cannot bear them now. When the Spirit of truth comes, He will guide you into all the truth; for He will not speak on His own authority, but whatever He hears He will speak, and He will declare to you the things that are to come. He will glorify me, for He will take what is mine and declare it to you. All that the Father has is mine; therefore I said that He will take what is mine and declare it to you.


Creeds

The word Creed comes from the Latin word Credo -- I believe -- and the Creeds are summaries of the Christian faith. There are three Creeds, or professions of faith, that are symbols of the faith, affirming the essential Trinitarian dogma: the Apostles' Creed, the Nicene Creed, and the Athanasian Creed, also called the Quicumque, an important Trinitarian formula dating from the 4th Century, intended to address the Arian heresy which denied the two natures of Christ. The Creeds are called "symbols of faith", from the Greek word symbolon, meaning identifiers or summaries.

The Catechism of the Catholic Church describes the Apostles' and Nicene Creeds thus:

"The Apostles Creed is so called because it is rightly considered to be a faithful summary of the apostles' faith. It is the ancient baptismal symbol of the Church of Rome. Its great authority arises from this fact: It is 'the Creed of the Roman Church, the See of Peter, the first of the apostles, to which he brought the common faith.'"

"The Niceno-Constantinopolitan or Nicene Creed draws its great authority from the fact that it stems from the first two ecumenical Councils (in 35 and 381). It remains common to all the great Churches of both East and West to this day."

[CCC §§194, 195].

The plan of presentation of Catholic doctrine and dogmas in the Catechism of the Catholic Church follows the Apostles Creed, "the oldest Roman catechism".

(For more on the Creeds, see the Catechism §§184-197. Note: The entire Catechism is availale online from the Holy See. See Links page for web access.)

Litany to the Holy Trinity

V. Blessed be the holy Trinity and undivided Unity;
R. We will give glory to Him, because He hath shown His mercy to us.

V. O Lord our Lord, how wonderful is Thy Name in all the earth!
R. O the depth of the riches of the wisdom and of the knowledge of God!

Lord, have mercy.
Lord, have mercy.
Christ, have mercy.
Christ, have mercy.
Lord, have mercy.
Lord, have mercy
Blessed Trinity, hear us.
Adorable Unity, graciously hear us.

 

God the Father of Heaven, Response: have mercy on us.
God the Son, Redeemer of the world,
God the Holy Ghost,
Holy Trinity, One God,
Father from Whom are all things,
Son through Whom are all things,
Holy Ghost in Whom are all things,
Holy and undivided Trinity,
Father everlasting,
Only-begotten Son of the Father,
Spirit Who preceedeth from the Father and the Son,
Co-eternal Majesty of Three Divine Persons,
Father, the Creator,
Son, the Redeemer,
Holy Ghost, the Comforter,
Holy, holy, holy, Lord God of hosts,
Who art, Who wast, and Who art to come,
God Most High, Who inhabitest eternity,
To Whom alone are due all honor and glory,
Who alone doest great wonders,
Power infinite,
Wisdom, incomprehensible,
Love unspeakable,

Be merciful,
Spare us, O Holy Trinity.
Be merciful,
Graciously hear us, O Holy Trinity.


From all evil, Response: Deliver us, O Holy Trinity.
From all sin,
From all pride,
From all love of riches,
From all uncleanness,
From all sloth,
From all inordinate affection,
From all envy and malice,
From all anger and impatience,
From every thought, word, and deed contrary to Thy holy law,
From Thine everlasting malediciton,
Through Thy plenteous loving kindness,
Through the exceeding treasure of Thy goodness and love,
Through the depths of Thy wisdom and knowledge,
Through all Thy unspeakable perfections,

We sinners,
Beseech Thee to hear us.

That we may ever serve Thee alone, Response: We beseech Thee to hear us.
That we may worship Thee in spirit and in truth,
That we may love Thee with all our heart, with all our soul, and with all our strength,
That, for Thy sake, we may love our neighbor as ourselves,
That we may faithfully keep Thy holy commandments,
That we may never defile our bodies and souls with sin,
That we may go from grace to grace, and from virtue to virtue,
That we may finally enjoy the sight of Thee in glory,
That Thou wouldst vouchsafe to hear us,

O Blessed Trinity,
We beseech Thee, deliver us.
O Blessed Trinity,
We beseech Thee, save us.
O Blessed Trinity,
Have mercy on us.
Lord, have mercy,
Christ, have mercy,
Lord, have mercy.

Our Father (silently). Hail Mary (silently).

V. Blessed art Thou, O Lord, in the firmament of Heaven,
R. And worthy to be praised, and glorious, and highly exalted forever.

Let Us Pray:

Almighty and everlasting God, Who hast granted Thy servants in the confession of the True Faith, to acknowledge the glory of an Eternal Trinity, and in the power of Thy majesty to adore Thy Unity: we beseech Thee that by the strength of this faith we may be defended from all adversity. Through Jesus Christ Our Lord. Amen.+


Family Activities to honor the Holy Trinity

Doxology and Sign of the Cross: The most fundamental -- and simplest -- affirmation of the Holy Trinity is the invocation known as the doxology, a prayer of praise: Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit, accompanied by the sign of the cross. Even very small children can learn to make the sign of the cross. (See Sign of the Cross page.) The Trinity is always invoked at baptism: "In the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit."

Teaching stories
The truth of the Trinity should be taught to children, even if no one can penetrate this mystery given to us by the Lord. Two saints of the distant past left accounts.

Saint Augustine recounted that when he was walking on the beach one day, trying to understand the Trinity, he saw a little boy digging a hole in the sand near the water. Augustine noticed that the hole was filled with water, and asked the child how deep the hole was. The boy replied that its depth is fathomless, immeasurable -- like the mystery of the Trinity Augustine vainly sought to comprehend.

Saint Patrick attempted to illustrate the "Three-in-One and One-in-Three" by using a three-leaf shamrock. At this time of year, many people have a stand of new green clover in their lawns. You might illustrate the Saint Patrick story by taking children outside to find clover so that they can see that the structure of the one leaf consists of three parts. One part cannot be removed without destroying the wholeness of the leaf.

On a walk around the neighborhood -- or even around the house, look for any objects that could symbolize the concept of the Trinity. (Hint: find triangles!)

Family Dinner suggestions:

Cloverleaf rolls: Have the children help make these rolls, by placing three walnut-sized balls of dough in each cup of a muffin pan. If you haven't time or inclination to make real cloverleaf rolls, a simple way is to make the dough from baking mix or -- even easier -- to from tubes of canned biscuit dough. Use this dough to make the balls. Folllow the baking directions on the box or tube. Brush the cloverleaf rolls with milk just before baking.

Three-in-one salad: Use three fruits in a fruit salad (e.g. apples, bananas, and grapes/pineapple, oranges, bananas); or add three different kinds of fruit to jello.

"Trinity" candle: An effective table decoration is a pillar candle with three wicks. You can usually find these in candle shops.

You could make a somewhat less clearly symbolic but still-pretty substitute by binding three candles together with narrow ribbon, and affixing them to a small plate with florist's wax. (Be sure to tie the ribbon low enough that it will not be ignited!)

Centerpiece of flowers could appropriately combine clover, or oxalis (which also has tripartite leaves) with iris, which has three upright petals (standards) supported by three "falls". (The wild flower, trillium, also has three triangular petals, but although it usually blooms at this time of year, it is hard to find.)

Doxology: Say the doxology in praise of the Holy Trinity before Grace, either in English or in Latin.

Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit,
As it was in the beginning, is now and ever shall be, world without end. Amen.

Gloria Patri et Filio et Spiritui Sancto,
Sicut erat in principio et nunc et semper in secula seculorum. Amen.


Links on the Vatican Website:

Solemnity of the Most Holy Trinity, POPE BENEDICT XVI, ANGELUS, Sunday, 30 May 2010

Solemnity of the Most Holy Trinity, POPE BENEDICT XVI, ANGELUS, Sunday, 7 June 2009


25 posted on 06/15/2014 6:52:45 AM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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The fleur-de-lis
The Trinity: A Mystery for Eternity
1 and 1 and 1 Makes One. A meditation on the Solemnity of the Holy Trinity
The Trinity: Three Persons in One Nature
Essays for Lent: The Trinity
Pope to theologians: focus on the Trinity
Defend the Doctrine of the Holy Trinity! [Catholic caucus]
Hold Fast to the Confession of the Father and the Son and the Holy Spirit [Catholic Caucus]

[Ecumenical] Lent through Eastertide - Divine Mercy Diary Exerpts: The Holy Trinity
One God, Three Equal Persons: St. Gregory of Nazianzus {Ecumenical Thread}
Radio Replies Second Volume - The Holy Trinity
The Blessed Trinity {Ecumenical}
A Mystery for Eternity (Reflection on the Solemnity of the Most Holy Trinity)
On the Trinity (Angelus Address from 5/30/2010)
Mystery of the Trinity
The Trinity: More Than Just Doctrine
Origen on the Trinity: A Man Ahead of His Time
Radio Replies First Volume - The Holy Trinity

‘We live to love and be loved,’ teaches Pope while reflecting on Trinity (absolutely beautiful!)
Deathbed Request: 'Tell me About the Trinity’
Catholic Doctrine on the Holy Trinity
The Most Holy Trinity
What You [Catholics] Need to Know: Trinity [Catholic/Orthodox Caucus]
The Holy Trinity (excerpt from the Light of Faith by St. Thomas Aquinas)
The Concept of the Most Holy Trinity - The Relationship between the Three Persons in One God
A Brief Catechism for Adults - Lesson 3: God and the Holy Trinity
Sheed on the Trinity (Catholic Caucus)
The Father as the Source of the Whole Trinity - Greek and Latin Traditions About the Filioque

Trinity Facts
The Real Trinity
We believe in one only God, Father, Son and Holy Spirit
Brief Reflections on the Trinity, the Canon of Scripture,...
Why Do We Believe in the Trinity?
The Holy Trinity
Trinity Sunday (and the Trinity season)
Trinitarian Mystery
HaSheeloosh HaKadosh: The Holy Trinity
MARY’S RELATIONSHIP WITH THE TRINITY
The Divine Trinity

26 posted on 06/15/2014 6:53:58 AM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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A Prayer for Fathers

A Prayer for Fathers

Most gracious Heavenly Father,

We thank you for our earthly fathers, those to whom you have entrusted the responsibility to provide loving protection of their families and guidance of their children. We thank you, also, for our priests and bishops, whose spiritual fatherhood is so vital to the faith of your people.

May our earthly fathers imitate the manly courage of Abraham, Jesse and Joseph, and all the holy fathers of the past in providing wise counsel to the children you have given to their care. And may our spiritual fathers be guided by the examples of Saints Peter and Paul, all the Apostles and their saintly successors. Give them valiant faith in the face of confusion and conflict, hope in time of trouble and sorrow, and steadfast love for you, for their families, and for all your people throughout the world.

Assist all fathers of families, all spiritual fathers, and all Christian men, that through your Grace they may steadily grow in holiness and in knowledge and understanding of your Truth. May they generously impart this knowledge to those who rely on them.

As you, our Heavenly Father, so loved the world, sending your only Son to be our Savior and Redeemer, we ask you to help all men to imitate His fatherly gentleness and mercy toward those who are weak; His humility, perfect obedience to your Will, and fearless witness to your Truth. May their lives be examples to all of heroic faithfulness to you.

We ask your blessing on all those to whom you have entrusted fatherhood. May your Holy Spirit constantly inspire them with justice and mercy, wisdom and strength, fidelity and self-giving love. May they receive your Grace abundantly in this earthly life, and may they look forward to eternal joy in your presence in the life to come.

We ask this through Jesus Christ, your Son and Our Lord, AMEN.

o o +++ o o

Prodigal Son - Pencil drawing by Helen Hull Hitchcock


27 posted on 06/15/2014 7:00:30 AM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
St. Joseph, WD40, and a Craftsman Wrench (Happy Father's Day!)
Pope at Mass: The joy of fatherhood
Holy Husbands: A Heavenly Gift
What Happened to Dads?
"Be a Dad!" (Book Review)
Divine Fatherhood is the Source of Human Fatherhood: Fathers as Gift
Priests of the Domestic Church: A Father's Day Homily (Tissue Alert)

A Prayer for Fathers
No Better Gift for Father’s Day
Gift of Fatherhood: Kneel before the Father from Whom Every Family in Heaven on Earth is named
Fathers are important
Fathers
Fatherhood and Religion
The New Catholic Manliness (about priests)
Dads: Men for All Seasons
The Father of Fathers
On The Demise of Fatherhood

Father’s Day 2009: “An End to Buffoonish Fathers”
Of Treacheries, Tykes, and the Trinity (Fatherhood, Family, Effects of Abortion)
Priests and the importance of fatherhood [Catholic Caucus]
[OPEN] The Government, Divorce, and the War on Fatherhood
Study Shows Christianity Makes Men Better Husbands and Fathers
Study Shows Christianity Makes Men Better Husbands and Fathers (Open)
Honoring Thy Fathers
Priests of the Domestic Church: A Father's Day Homily
The Blueprint for Heroic Family Life [Fathers' Day] [Ecumenical]
Honoring Thy Fathers

A Father's Tough Love
Children Who Have An Active Father Figure Have Fewer Psychological And Behavioral Problems
Where Have All the Christian Men Gone? My Conversation with John Eldredge
The Transforming Power of Prayer [Part 1] (Catholic Man)
The Transforming Power of Prayer, Part 2 (Catholic Man)
The 10 Paradoxes of Fatherhood, There is a certain immediacy about motherhood that cannot
The Story of Champions [Father's Day]
What Makes a Man a Hero? [Father's Day]
The New Catholic Manliness
Applying St. Benedict's Rule to Fatherhood and Family Life - Using 6th-Century Wisdom Today

28 posted on 06/15/2014 7:01:35 AM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Saint Germaine Cousin

Saint Germaine Cousin
June 15th

Patroness of Victims of Child Abuse and Shepherdesses

"Dear God, please don't let me be too hungry or too thirsty.
Help me to please my mother. And help me to please you."

-- Prayer of Saint Germaine


Born 1579, Died 1601. Beatified May 7, 1864 and Canonized June 29, 1867 by Pope Pius IX

Saint Germaine Cousin (pronounced coo-zan) was the child of a poor farmer, born in 1579 at Pibrac, France, north of Toulouse. Her mother died when she was an infant. Her father remarried and her step family was very cruel to her. She had to sleep in a stable, was scalded with hot water, was beaten and was fed scraps of food. She was born with a deformed hand and had the disease of scrofula. Despite her misfortunes she shared her daily allowance of bread with the poor and practiced many austerities as reparation for the sacrileges perpetrated by heretics in the neighboring churches.

At age nine she became a shepherdess. She prayed the Rosary on "beads" she made of knotted string. Her piety increased on the approach of every feast of Our Lady. She gathered children of the village to teach them the cathechism (using the Rosary) and to instill in them the love of Jesus and Mary. Her devotion to the Angelus was so great that she would fall on her knees at the sound of the bells, even if she were crossing a stream. She attended daily Mass, leaving the sheep in the care of her guardian angel. The wolves never harmed the sheep while she was away. She always went to Mass, rain or snow. On occasions the swollen waters were seen to open so that she could cross to get to church with getting wet.

She died in 1601 at the age of 22.


(Principal source - Catholic Encyclopedia - 1913 edition, )

Saint Germaine Cousin - illustration by Helen Hull Hitchcock

Prayer to Saint Germaine

O Saint Germaine, look down from Heaven and intercede for the many abused children in our world. Help them to sanctify these sufferings. Strengthen children who suffer the effects of living in broken families. Protect those children who have been abandoned by their parents and live in the streets. Beg God's mercy on the parents who abuse their children. Intercede for handicapped children and their parents.

Saint Germaine, you who suffered neglect and abuse so patiently, pray for us. Amen +


29 posted on 06/15/2014 7:05:02 AM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Interactive Saints for Kids

St. Germaine of Pibrac

Feast Day: June 15
Born: 1579 :: Died: 1601

Pibrac is the little village in France where Germaine was born and where she spent her whole life. Her father Laurent Cousin was a farm worker and her mother Marie Laroche died when Germaine was just a baby.

She was always a sickly girl and not pretty. In fact, she suffered from scrofula and her right hand was deformed and helpless. Her father ignored her and her stepmother Hortense did not want Germaine around her own healthy children. Hortense and her children treated Germaine very badly. She was only given scraps of food, was forced to sleep in a cupboard under the stairs and had hot water thrown on her if she disobeyed.

So Germaine slept with the sheep in the barn, even in cold weather. She dressed in rags and was laughed at by other children. By the time she was nine she was put to work as a shepherdess and spent all day tending the sheep out in the fields. When she came home at night, her stepmother often screamed at her and beat her.

Yet this poor girl learned to talk with God and to remember that he was with her all the time. She spent much time praying and made herself a rosary with knotted string. She always managed to get to daily Mass leaving her sheep in care of her guardian angel. Not once did a sheep wander away from her shepherd's staff that she planted in the ground.

Germaine often gathered young children around her to teach them simple catechism. She wanted their hearts to be full of God's love. She tried her best to help the poor, too and shared with beggars the little bit of food she was given to eat.

One winter day, her stepmother accused her of stealing bread. Hortense chased her with a stick and Germaine immediately opened her apron to return the food. To everyone's surprise what fell from Germaine's apron was not bread but summer flowers.

Now people no longer made fun of Germaine but began to treat her as a holy person. In fact, they loved and admired her. Her parents asked her to return and live with them in the house, but she chose to continue sleeping in the barn.

Then, one morning in 1601, when she was twenty-two, she was found dead on her straw mattress. Her life of great suffering was over. God worked more than four hundred miracles in her name to show that she was a saint.

Reflection: In our sufferings, we can always turn to Jesus and ask him to remain in our heart especially when we receive him in Holy Communion.

"Dear God, please don't let me be too hungry or too thirsty. Help me to please my mother. And help me to please you." - prayer of Saint Germaine


30 posted on 06/15/2014 8:13:06 AM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Salvation
John
  English: Douay-Rheims Latin: Vulgata Clementina Greek NT: Byzantine/Majority Text (2000)
  John 3
16 For God so loved the world, as to give his only begotten Son; that whosoever believeth in him, may not perish, but may have life everlasting. Sic enim Deus dilexit mundum, ut Filium suum unigenitum daret : ut omnis qui credit in eum, non pereat, sed habeat vitam æternam. ουτως γαρ ηγαπησεν ο θεος τον κοσμον ωστε τον υιον αυτου τον μονογενη εδωκεν ινα πας ο πιστευων εις αυτον μη αποληται αλλ εχη ζωην αιωνιον
17 For God sent not his Son into the world, to judge the world, but that the world may be saved by him. Non enim misit Deus Filium suum in mundum, ut judicet mundum, sed ut salvetur mundus per ipsum. ου γαρ απεστειλεν ο θεος τον υιον αυτου εις τον κοσμον ινα κρινη τον κοσμον αλλ ινα σωθη ο κοσμος δι αυτου
18 He that believeth in him is not judged. But he that doth not believe, is already judged: because he believeth not in the name of the only begotten Son of God. Qui credit in eum, non judicatur ; qui autem non credit, jam judicatus est : quia non credit in nomine unigeniti Filii Dei. ο πιστευων εις αυτον ου κρινεται ο δε μη πιστευων ηδη κεκριται οτι μη πεπιστευκεν εις το ονομα του μονογενους υιου του θεου

31 posted on 06/15/2014 2:25:41 PM PDT by annalex (fear them not)
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To: annalex
16. For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believes in him should not perish, but have everlasting life.
17. For God sent not his Son into the world to condemn the world; but that the world through him might be saved.
18. He that believes in him is not condemned: but he that believes not is condemned already, because he has not believed in the name of the only begotten Son of God.

CHRYS. Having said, Even so must the Son of man be lifted up, alluding to His death; lest His hearer should be cast down by His words, forming some human notion of Him, and thinking of His death as an evil, He corrects this by saying, that He who was given up to death was the Son of God, and that His death would be the source of life eternal; So God loved the world, that He gave His only begotten Son, that whosoever believes in Him should not perish, but have everlasting life; as if He said, Marvel not that I must be lifted up, that you may be saved: for so it seems good to the Father, who has so loved you, that He has given His Son to suffer for ungrateful and careless servants. The text, God so loved the world, shows intensity of love. For great indeed and infinite is the distance between the two. He who is without end, or beginning of existence, Infinite Greatness, loved those who were of earth and ashes, creatures laden with sins innumerable. And the act which springs from the love is equally indicative of its vastness. For God gave not a servant, or an Angel, or an Archangel, but His Son. Again, had He had many sons, and given one, this would have been a very great gift; but now He has given His Only Begotten Son.

HILARY; If it were only a creature given up for the sake of a creature, such a poor and insignificant loss were no great evidence of love. They must be precious things which prove our love, great things must evidence its greatness. God, in love to the world, gave His Son, not an adopted Son, but His own, even His Only Begotten. Here is proper Sonship, birth, truth: no creation, no adoption, no lie: here is the test of love and charity, that God sent His own and only begotten Son to save the world.

THEOPHYL As He said above, that the Son of man came down from heaven, not meaning that His flesh did come down from heaven, on account of the unity of person in Christ, attributing to man what belonged to God: so now conversely what belongs to man, he assigns to God the Word. The Son of God was impassible; but being one in respect of person with man who was passable, the Son is said to be given up to death, inasmuch as He truly suffered, not in His own nature, but in His own flesh. From this death follows an exceeding great and incomprehensible benefit: viz. that whosoever believes in Him should not perish, but have everlasting life. The Old Testament promised to those who obey obeyed it, length of days: the Gospel promises life eternal, and imperishable.

BEDE; Note here, that the same which he before said of the Son of man, lifted up on the cross, he repeats of the only begotten Son of God: viz. That whosoever believes in Him, &c. For the same our Maker and Redeemer, who was Son of God before the world was, was made at the end of the world the Son of man; so that He who by the power of His Godhead had created us to enjoy the happiness of an endless life, the same restored us to the life we have lost by taking our human frailty upon Him.

ALCUIN. Truly through the Son of God shall the world have life; for no other cause came He into the world, except to save the world. God sent not His Son into the world to condemn the world, but that the world through Him might be saved.

AUG. For why is He called the Savior of the world, but because He saves the world? The physician, so far as his will is concerned, heals the sick. If the sick despises or will not observe the directions of the physician, he destroys himself.

CHRYS. Because however He says this, slothful men in the multitude of their sins, and excess of carelessness, abuse God's mercy, and say, There is no hell, no punishment; God remits us all our sins. But let us remember, that there are two advents of Christ; one past, the other to come. The former was, not to judge but to pardon us: the latter will be, not to pardon but to judge us. It is of the former that He says, I have not come to judge the world. Because He is merciful, instead of judgment, He grants an internal remission of all sins by baptism; and even after baptism opens to us the door of repentance, which had He not done all had been lost; for all have sinned, and come short of the glory of God. Afterwards, however, there follows something about the punishment of unbelievers, to warn us against flattering ourselves that we can sin with impunity. Of the unbeliever He says, 'he is judged already.' - But first He says, He that believes in Him is not judged. He who believes, He says, not who inquires. But what if his life be impure? Paul very strongly declares that such are not believers: They confess, he says, that they know God, but in works deny Him. That is to say, Such will not be judged for their belief, but will receive a heavy punishment for their works, though unbelief will not be charged against them.

ALCUIN. He who believes in Him, and cleaves to Him as a member to the head, will not be condemned.

AUG. What did you expect Him to say of him who believed not, except that he is condemned. Yet mark His words: He that believes not is condemned already. The Judgment has not appeared, but it is already given. For the Lord knows who are His; who are awaiting the crown, and who the fire.

CHRYS. Or the meaning is, that disbelief itself is the punishment of the impenitent: inasmuch as that is to be without light, and to be without light is of itself the greatest punishment. Or He is announcing what is to be. Though a murderer be not yet sentenced by the Judge, still his crime has already condemned him. In like manner he who believes not, is dead, even as Adam, on the day that he ate of the tree, died.

GREG. Or thus: In the last judgment some perish without being judged, of whom it is here said, He that believes not is condemned already. For the day of judgment does not try those who for unbelief are already banished from the sight of a discerning judge, are under sentence of damnation; but those, who retaining the profession of faith, have no works to show suitable to that profession. For those who have not kept even the sacraments of faith, do not even hear the curse of the Judge at the last trial. They have already, in the darkness of their unbelief, received their sentence, and are not thought worthy of being convicted by the rebuke of Him whom they had despised Again; For an earthly sovereign, in the government of his state, has a different rule of punishment, in the case of the disaffected subject, and the foreign rebel. In the former case he consults the civil law; but against the enemy he proceeds at once to war, and repays his malice with the punishment it deserves, without regard to law, inasmuch as he who never submitted to law, has no claim to suffer by the law.

ALCUIN. He then gives the reason why he who believes not is condemned, viz. because he believes not in the name of the only begotten Son of God. For in this name alone is there salvation. God has not many sons who can save; He by whom He saves is the Only Begotten.

AUG. Where then do we place baptized children? Amongst those who believe? This is acquired for them by the virtue of the Sacrament, and the pledges of the sponsors. And by this same rule we reckon those who are not baptized, among those who believe not.

Catena Aurea John 3
32 posted on 06/15/2014 2:26:56 PM PDT by annalex (fear them not)
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To: annalex


Mystical Crucifixion

Matteo di Giovanni

1450

33 posted on 06/15/2014 2:27:32 PM PDT by annalex (fear them not)
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To: All

Day 182 - May a husband and wife who are always fighting get a divorce?

May a husband and wife who are always fighting get a divorce?

The Church has great respect for the ability of a person to keep a promise and to bind himself in lifelong fidelity. She takes people at their word. Every marriage can be endangered by crises. Talking things over together, prayer (together), and often therapeutic counseling as well can open up ways
out of the crisis. Above all, remembering that in a sacramental marriage there is always a third party to the bond Christ can kindle hope again and again. Someone for whom marriage has become unbearable, however, or who may even be exposed to spiritual or physical violence, may divorce. This is called a "separation from bed and board", about which the Church must be notified. In these cases, even though the common life is broken off, the marriage remains valid. Indeed, there are also cases in which the crisis in a marriage ultimately goes back to the fact that one spouse or both was not eligible at the time of the wedding or did not fully consent to the marriage. Then the marriage is invalid in the canonical (legal) sense. In such cases an annulment procedure can be introduced at the diocesan tribunal. (YOUCAT question 269)


Dig Deeper: CCC section (1649) and other references here


34 posted on 06/15/2014 3:28:11 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

Part 2: The Celebration of the Christian Mystery (1066 - 1690)

Section 2: The Seven Sacraments of the Church (1210 - 1690)

Chapter 3: The Sacraments at the Service of Communion (1533 - 1666)

Article 7: The Sacrament of Matrimony (1601 - 1666)

V. THE GOODS AND REQUIREMENTS OF CONJUGAL LOVE

The fidelity of conjugal love

2383
(all)

1649

Yet there are some situations in which living together becomes practically impossible for a variety of reasons. In such cases the Church permits the physical separation of the couple and their living apart. The spouses do not cease to be husband and wife before God and so are not free to contract a new union. In this difficult situation, the best solution would be, if possible, reconciliation. The Christian community is called to help these persons live out their situation in a Christian manner and in fidelity to their marriage bond which remains indissoluble.159

159.

Cf. FC 83; CIC, cann. 1151-1155.


35 posted on 06/15/2014 3:29:15 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Salvation
Saint Germaine Cousin [Catholic Caucus]
36 posted on 06/15/2014 3:41:53 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Catholic Culture

 

Daily Readings for:June 15, 2014
(Readings on USCCB website)

Collect: God our Father, who by sending into the world the Word of truth and the Spirit of sanctification made known to the human race your wondrous mystery, grant us, we pray, that in profession the true faith, we may acknowledge the Trinity of eternal glory and adore your Unity, powerful in majesty. Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son, who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.

RECIPES

o    Elegant Barbecued Chicken

o    Superb Barbecue Sauce

ACTIVITIES

o    Feast of the Holy Trinity

o    Prayers to the Blessed Trinity

o    Stitching Feast-Day Symbols

o    Teaching the Trinity

o    The Trinity and the Mass

PRAYERS

o    Prayer Cards for Easter Grace at Meals

o    Prayer for Trinity Sunday

o    Book of Blessings: Blessing Before and After Meals: Easter (1st Plan)

o    Te Deum

o    Litany of the Most Holy Trinity

LIBRARY

o    Catechesis on the Holy Trinity | Pope John Paul II

o    Christ's Passion Reveals Glory of the Trinity | Pope John Paul II

o    Glory of the Trinity in Christ's Ascension | Pope John Paul II

o    Glory of the Trinity in the Heavenly Jerusalem | Pope John Paul II

o    Glory of the Trinity Is Revealed in History | Pope John Paul II

o    Holy Trinity Is Revealed at Jesus' Baptism | Pope John Paul II

o    Incarnation Reveals Glory of the Trinity | Pope John Paul II

o    Presence of the Trinity in Human Life | Pope John Paul II

o    Saints Reflect Infinite Love of Trinity | Pope John Paul II

o    The Divine Romance: The Blessed Trinity | Archbishop Fulton J. Sheen

o    The Father as the Source of the Whole Trinity: The Procession of the Holy Spirit in Greek and Latin Traditions | Pontifical Council for Promoting Christian Unity

o    The Name of the Holy Trinity Is Engraved In the Universe | Pope Benedict XVI

o    The Trinity in the Life of the Church | Pope John Paul II

o    The Trinity: Fountain of Love and Light | Pope John Paul II

o    Trinity Is Mysteriously Present in Creation | Pope John Paul II

o    Trinity Is Present in Christ's Resurrection | Pope John Paul II

·         Ordinary Time: June 15th

·         Solemnity of the Most Holy Trinity

Old Calendar: Trinity Sunday

The fundamental dogma, on which everything in Christianity is based, is that of the Blessed Trinity in whose name all Christians are baptized. The feast of the Blessed Trinity needs to be understood and celebrated as a prolongation of the mysteries of Christ and as the solemn expression of our faith in this triune life of the Divine Persons, to which we have been given access by Baptism and by the Redemption won for us by Christ. Only in heaven shall we properly understand what it means, in union with Christ, to share as sons in the very life of God.

The feast of the Blessed Trinity was introduced in the ninth century and was only inserted in the general calendar of the Church in the fourteenth century by Pope John XXII. But the cultus of the Trinity is, of course, to be found throughout the liturgy. Constantly the Church causes us to praise and adore the thrice-holy God who has so shown His mercy towards us and has given us to share in His life.


Trinity Sunday
The dogma of faith which forms the object of the feast is this: There is one God and in this one God there are three Divine Persons; the Father is God, the Son is God, the Holy Spirit is God. Yet there are not three Gods, but one, eternal, incomprehensible God! The Father is not more God than the Son, neither is the Son more God than the Holy Spirit. The Father is the first Divine Person; the Son is the second Divine Person, begotten from the nature of the Father from eternity; the Holy Spirit is the third Divine Person, proceeding from the Father and the Son. No mortal can fully fathom this sublime truth. But I submit humbly and say: Lord, I believe, help my weak faith.

Why is this feast celebrated at this particular time? It may be interpreted as a finale to all the preceding feasts. All three Persons contributed to and shared in the work of redemption. The Father sent His Son to earth, for "God so loved the world as to give His only-begotten Son." The Father called us to the faith. The Son, our Savior Jesus Christ, became man and died for us. He redeemed us and made us children of God. He ever remains the liturgist par excellence to whom we are united in all sacred functions. After Christ's ascension the Holy Spirit, however, became our Teacher, our Leader, our Guide, our Consoler. On solemn occasions a thanksgiving Te Deum rises spontaneously from Christian hearts.

The feast of the Most Holy Trinity may well be regarded as the Church's Te Deum of gratitude over all the blessings of the Christmas and Easter seasons; for this mystery is a synthesis of Christmas, Epiphany, Easter, Ascension and Pentecost. This feast, which falls on the first Sunday after Pentecost, should make us mindful that actually every Sunday is devoted to the honor of the Most Holy Trinity, that every Sunday is sanctified and consecrated to the triune God. Sunday after Sunday we should recall in a spirit of gratitude the gifts which the Blessed Trinity is bestowing upon us. The Father created and predestined us; on the first day of the week He began the work of creation. The Son redeemed us; Sunday is the "Day of the Lord," the day of His resurrection. The Holy Spirit sanctified us, made us His temple; on Sunday the Holy Spirit descended upon the infant Church. Sunday, therefore, is the day of the Most Holy Trinity.

Excerpted from The Church's Year of Grace, Pius Parsch

Symbols of the Trinity: Equilateral Triange; Circle of Eternity; Three interwoven Circles; Triangle in Circle; Circle within Triangle; Interwoven Circle and Triangle; Two Triangles interwoven in shape of Star of David; Two Triangles in shape of Star of David interwoven with Circle; Trefoil; Trefoil and Triangle; Trefoil with points; Triquetra; Triquetra and circle; Shield of the Holy Trinity; Three Fishes linked together in shape of a triangle; Cross and Triangle overlapping; Fleur de Lys; St. Patrick's Shamrock.

Things to Do:


37 posted on 06/15/2014 3:49:53 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
The Word Among Us

Meditation: Exodus 34:4-6, 8-9

The Most Holy Trinity

Moses at once bowed down to the ground in worship. (Exodus 34:6, 8)

The Holy Trinity. Three persons in one God. Really, it’s too much for our minds to handle. The greatest theologians and philosophers in history have had to acknowledge their inadequacy in the face of such an awesome mystery. And maybe that’s the point. God isn’t some thing to be dissected and understood; he is some One to be worshipped and adored.

Look at Moses in today’s first reading. God gave him a glimpse of his glory, and it moved Moses to bow to the ground and worship. God proclaimed his name and revealed his nature: merciful, gracious, slow to anger, rich in kindness and fidelity. It was just one little glimpse of divine mercy and kindness—Moses saw only God’s back—but it was enough to bring Moses to his knees in humble adoration (Exodus 33:22-23).

Today at Mass, all of God’s attributes will be on display—if we have the eyes to see. At the Penitential Rite, his mercy will flow freely. In the Liturgy of the Word, God will speak to us and reveal his love and faithfulness. In the Eucharist, his glory will shine as he comes to us in the form of bread and wine—and we are brought into that glory as we receive him.

Try to sense God’s presence in these ways. Contemplate his love, his mercy, and his glory. And as you’re contemplating them, look for the Spirit to give you more insight, deeper healing, and more love. Then, like Moses, bow down before him in worship. Thank him for his faithfulness; praise him for being slow to anger; honor him for his kindness. Truly, we serve an awesome, merciful God!

“Lord, you are so far beyond my understanding! Expand my capacity to know you as I worship you today. Father, Son, and Holy Spirit, I love you!”

(Psalm) Daniel 3:52-56; 2 Corinthians 13:11-13; John 3:16-18

Questions for Reflection or Group Discussion

(Acts Exodus 34:4-6,8-9; (Psalm) Daniel 3:52-56; 2 Corinthians 13:11-13; John 3:16-18)

1. In the first reading, God describes himself as “merciful and gracious,” and “slow to anger and rich in kindness and fidelity.” We have been created in God’s image and likeness. If this is the way that God treats you, then out of gratitude to him, whom specifically do you think that God wants you to treat in a similar manner?

2. In the Responsorial Psalm from the book of Daniel, we hear words of blessing and praise to God from Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego -- after they were thrown into the fiery furnace on orders from King Nebuchadnezzar. What are the things that God has done in your life that make him worthy of your blessing and praise?

3. Paul encourages us in the letter to the Corinthians to “encourage one another.” How would you rate yourself as an “encourager”? How can you better reach out to other others in your parish or in your fellowship groups in order to provide deeper support and friendship? What about you - what are some of the things that keep you from asking for help from a brother or sister in Christ?

4. Paul also tells us to “live in peace.” What are the stress areas in your life that cause you to lose your peace? How do you think God wants you to deal with these areas so that you would experience greater peace?

5. We are all familiar with John 3:16 from the Gospel reading. Jesus came not to condemn the world but to save it. He reached out in love to each one of us in order to reconcile us to his Father. St. Paul says it this way: “All this is from God, who has reconciled us to himself through Christ and given us the ministry of reconciliation” (2 Corinthians 5:18). Who are the people in your life with whom you must still be reconciled? If reconciliation requires you to forgive those who have hurt you or wronged you, are you willing to do this out of gratitude for the forgiveness and love you have received from God? Why or why not? What would be the next step for you in this reconciliation after forgiveness?

6. In the meditation, we hear these words: “God isn’t some thing to be dissected and understood; he is some One to be worshipped and adored.” What do these words mean to you? What part does worship and adoration of God play in your daily life? What about your own personal prayer time? What steps can you take make worship and adoration of God a greater part of it?

7. Take some time now to pray and ask for a deeper revelation and knowledge of God as Father, Son, and Holy Spirit, and a deeper experience of his great love for you – so you can love him more deeply in return. Use the prayer at the end of the meditation as the starting point.


38 posted on 06/15/2014 3:53:21 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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39 posted on 06/15/2014 4:01:39 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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A Christian Pilgrim

THE HOLY TRINITY: THE FATHER, THE SON, AND THE HOLY SPIRIT

(A biblical reflection on the Solemnity of THE MOST HOLY TRINITY- Sunday, 15 June 2014)

Gospel Reading: John 3:16-18

First Reading: Exodus 34:4b-6,8-9; Psalms: Daniel 3:52-56; Second Reading: 2Corinthians 13:11-13

The-Holy-Trinity-A.-de-PEREDA

The Scripture Text
For God so loved the world that He gave His only Son, that whoever believes in Him should not perish but have eternal life. For God sent the Son into the world, not to condemn the world, but that the world might be saved through Him. He who believes in Him is not condemned, He does not believe is condemned already, because He has not believed in the name of the only Son of God. (John 3:16-18 RSV)

Our faith teaches us that in God there are three persons. We call the first person “Father.” When we speak of Goad as “Father” we could just as easily say “Mother” or, better still, “Parent,” for in God there is no sex. Nonetheless, when you say the word “father,” you necessarily imply the existence of another person, the child. Fatherhood is a quality which is then added to his person. A father is a man, a person, long before he becomes a father.

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God is a Father, and this name necessarily implies another person, the Son. But God did not become a Father. In fact, there was no time when He was not Father, for fatherhood is not a quality which is added to God. God the Father is fatherhood personified. Remember that being a father means giving life to another. From all eternity God the Father gives life to His Son, and the only thing that makes Him a distinct person is the fact that He gives life to His Son. God the Father does not have a relationship to His Son. He is the relationship itself.

God is also a Son, a Child. A child is one who receives life from another. We are children of our parents, but being a child does not exhaust our personhood. We are persons in our own right, which we can see from the fact that when our parents die we continue to exist. But the only thing that makes God the Son a person is the fact that He receives life from His Father. God the Son does not have a relationship to the Father. He is that relationship.

Between parents and their children, in a good home, there is a bond which we call “love.” Love is difficult to describe. It is a warmth, and affection, a feeling – and most important of all it is a bond which unites people. Love is many things, but the only thing that love is not, in our experience, is a person. In God love is a person. Between God the Father and God the Son there is a bond of union, uniting them in love. In God this bond is the Holy Spirit. The Holy Spirit does not give a relationship of love to Father and Son. He is love personified.

The truth of the Trinity has an important bearing on how we should live. Some people wonder why in church, where we come to worship God, we hear so much about how we are to treat people. But think about if for a moment. We believe that we are made in the image and likeness of God. We are called to become like God Himself. The Trinity shows us three person, each of whom is entirely unselfish and each of whom is a real person only in relationship to another. The Father gives Himself completely to His Son. The Son in concerned only with looking to the first person as His Father. The Spirit exist only to unite Father and Son in an eternal embrace of love.

LAMBANG TRINITAS

Our fulfilment as human beings comes about only in our relationships with God and other people, and not in being turned inward upon ourselves. Our greatest happiness comes from being generous and unselfish. Reflect on people who think only of themselves – people who are so wealthy; for example, that their whole lives are taken jup with pleasure and play. We may be tempted to envy such people until we hear that their marriage has ended in divorce, or that they have turned to drugs in an attempt to alleviate boredom, or worse still that in complete despair they have taken their own lives. On the other hand, the happiest and most fulfilled human beings are the saints, men like Saint Vincent de Paul [1581-1660] who devoted himself to the salvation of the destitute people of France, and women like Blessed Mother Teresa of Calcutta [1910-1997], who dedicated her life the poorest of the poor in India and many other places in the world.

After serious reflection we can see that our own greatest happiness has come when we have tried to get out of ourselves, when we have made the effort to be unselfish and generous toward someone else, whether a member of our family or otherwise. God’s revelation of Himself as three persons tells us that we find fulfilment not as rugged individuals but in relationships to other people, and that we come to happiness not in selfishness but in genuine concern and love for those around us. In being generous and loving we begin to match the image according to which we are made, a God in whom there are three persons whose whole being consists in unselfishness.

PRAYER: Almighty, eternal, just and merciful God, grant us in our misery that we may do for your sake alone what we know you want us to do, and always want what pleases You; so that, cleansed and enlightened interiorly and fired with the ardour of the Holy Spirit, we may be able to follow in the footsteps of Your Son, our Lord Jesus Christ, and so make our way to You, Most High, by Your grace alone, You who live and reign in perfect Trinity and simple Unity, and are glorified, God all-powerful, for ever and ever. Amen. (A prayer of SaintFrancis of Assisi [1224] at the close of his Letter to a General Chapter).

40 posted on 06/15/2014 4:04:41 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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A Christian Pilgrim

THREE, YET ONE

(A biblical reflection on the Solemnity of THE MOST HOLY TRINITY- Sunday, 15 June 2014)

First Reading: Exodus 34:4b-6,8-9; Psalms: Daniel 3:52-56; Second Reading: 2Corinthians 13:11-13; Gospel Reading: John 3:16-18

BRONOWSKI - THE ASCENT OF MAN

In his brilliant series The Ascent of Man, author Jacob Bronowski devotes an episode to mathematics under the title “The Music of the Spheres.” He shows historically how man’s ascent in civilization was marked by an increasing understanding of mathematical patterns which he saw reflected in the harmonies of music, for example, or in the motion of the spheres around the sun.

One of the most fascinating geometric discoveries by the early Greeks was the fact that three fixed points, not all on the same line, determine uniquely one and only one triangle, one and only one plane, and one only one circle. Why this should be, we don’t know. All we can do is observe it as a fact and apply it to the real world in art, architecture, engineering and science.

Even more mysterious is our belief that there are three Persons, yet one and only one God. Why this should be, we don’t know. All we can do is accept it as a revealed fact and apply it to our Christian life.

NIKODEMUS LAGI DENGAN YESUS

Today’s readings are part of this Trinitarian revelation. In Exodus we read about God announcing His name to Moses as YHWH, and then giving us the meaning of that name as a God who is merciful and gracious. In the second reading, St. Paul concluded his letter to the Corinthians with a Trinitarian farewell: “The grace of our Lord Jesus Christ, and the love of God, and the fellowship of the Holy Spirit be with you all” (2Corinthians 13:13).

Finally, in the Gospel of John, Jesus tells Nicodemus that God has Father so loved the world that He sent His only Son. Recall that last Sunday on Pentecost we also read in John’s Gospel that Jesus breathed on His disciples and said: “Receive the Holy Spirit.”

In his book The Theology of the Trinity, Laurence Cantwell devotes a chapter to interpreting the Trinity in the light of the universal religious sense of mankind.

This sense of religion makes itself felt first in a feeling of awe at finding ourselves in a world we did not make. We see evidence of God’s hand in creation, but we don’t see God Himself. Our awe expresses itself in worship.

Second, a religious sense is felt by an insight into God’s presence at the heart of the world. Poetry, music, art and human love awaken in us an awareness of divine presence in our very midst. We perceive that human activity has a divine dimension.

secret-rosarycreed

If the first religious sense can be characterized as vertical, pointing beyond the world, then the second way can be characterized as horizontal, pointing the way within the world. In the first way we look at God as that mysterious source from which creation came – the Father as we would say. In the second way, we see God as a presence within creation – the Son as we would say.

There is a third dimension to the ways a religious sense is felt, a depth dimension whereby we detect a presence within ourselves. Great artists, for example, testify to an inspiration from within their very being which moves them to creative activity. This divine spark within us we call the Holy Spirit.

No matter where we look, then – up into the universe, out into this world, or inside our own hearts – we sense the presence of a mysterious God who is three, yet one.

In every dimension of our existence God reveals Himself to us in order to surround us with His light, share with us His life and draw us into His love. May we always praise the Father for creating us, the Son for redeeming us and the Holy Spirit for sanctifying us.

Source: Fr. Albert Cylwicki CSB, HIS WORD RESOUNDS, Makati, Philippines: St. Paul Publications, 1991, pages 42-43.

41 posted on 06/15/2014 4:16:21 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Marriage=One Man and One Woman 'Til Death Do Us Part

Daily Marriage Tip for June 15, 2014:

“Encourage one another, agree with one another, live in peace, and the God of love and peace will be with you.” (2 Cor 13:11) Follow the advice of St. Paul today. Fathers, set an example of love and peace for your children.

42 posted on 06/15/2014 4:26:28 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Sunday Scripture Study

The Solemnity of the Most Holy Trinity - Cycle A

June 15, 2014

Click here for USCCB readings

Opening Prayer  

First Reading: Exodus 34:4b-6, 8-9

Psalm: Daniel 3:52-56

Second Reading: 2 Corinthians 13:11-13 

Gospel Reading: John 3:16-18

 

QUESTIONS:

 

Closing Prayer

Catechism of the Catholic Church:  §§ 232-267, 219, 444, 458, 679

 

Our Lord does not come down from Heaven every day to lie in a golden ciborium. He comes to find another heaven which is infinitely dearer to Him - the heaven of our souls, created in His Image, the living temples of the Adorable Trinity.   -St. Therese of Lisieux

43 posted on 06/15/2014 5:32:31 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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“For God So Loved the World…”

Pastor’s Column

Trinity Sunday

June 15, 2014

 

“God loved the world so much that he gave his only Son, so that everyone who believes in him might not perish, but may have eternal life.” John 3:16

We are now living in a time of great mercy from God. Yet we may legitimately ask, why was it necessary for our Lord to die the way he did? Couldn’t there have been another way? Even Jesus, in the garden of Gethsemane, prayed that the Father would take the cup away from him and that he knew that God could do all things, implying that there was another way. But this was the way God chose to save us. God the Father could have sent a surrogate.

We remember that Abraham was called upon by God to sacrifice Isaac, his only son. Yet, in the end, God did not ask this sacrifice of Abraham – he simply wanted to know if Abraham was willing. Instead, through Jesus, God the Father offers us his Son. Only in this way could God show us unequivocally that he loves us and how much he loves us.

How can we deny that God has given us everything when we realize who it was that died for us, who it was that was offered up for us? And we, as Catholics, renew this every time we come to Mass! In John chapter 3 Jesus also points out that some will not take him up on this offer. It seems incredible – who doesn’t want to have eternal life?

Ah, but others feel there must be strings attached – perhaps they think Jesus is going to cheat them out of a fun life. Or they think he’s a figment of somebody else’s imagination. They are perhaps too distracted or busy. Or, seemingly, a better offer comes along than waiting for eternal life – we want to live just the way we want to – in the here and now.

And it’s true – to have an authentic relationship with Christ does demand discipleship of us. We can’t meet him and stay the same way we were! But who would want to – after hearing the truth, we want to become truth ourselves in every aspect of our being.

Jesus warns us in John 3 that there are those who will refuse to believe in his mercy or even his existence – and, in the end, there is a cost to this because Christ is all that there is. The very fact that he came into the world begins the wheels of judgment turning because we human beings are in the process of sorting ourselves out between those who want to move in with God – which is heaven – and those of us who will refuse to go in – and this is hell.

It is not the will of God that anyone be lost – look at his open arms on the cross! They are nailed in a position of forgiveness. All we have to do is come to him. Only those who refuse to come to him invite the judgment. We as Catholics have a wonderful sacrament of reconciliation. We can come to Jesus with the greatest of sins, anytime we want and he will always forgive us.

                                    Father Gary


44 posted on 06/15/2014 5:50:19 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Solemnity of the Most Holy Trinity

45 posted on 06/15/2014 6:10:33 PM PDT by Coleus
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Reflections from Scott Hahn

How God Loves: Scott Hahn Reflects on The Solemnity of the Most Holy Trinity

Posted by Dr. Scott Hahn on 06.12.14 |

Readings:
Exodus 34:4-6, 8-9
Daniel 3:52-56
2 Corinthians 13:11-13
John 3:16-18

We often begin Mass with the prayer from today’s Epistle: “The grace of the Lord Jesus Christ, and the love of God, and the fellowship of the Holy Spirit be with all of you.” We praise the God who has revealed himself as a Trinity, a communion of persons.

Communion with the Trinity is the goal of our worship - and the purpose of the salvation history that begins in the Bible and continues in the Eucharist and sacraments of the Church.

We see the beginnings of God’s self-revelation in today’s First Reading, as He passes before Moses and cries out His holy name.

Israel had sinned in worshipping the golden calf (see Exodus 32). But God does not condemn them to perish. Instead He proclaims His mercy and faithfulness to His covenant.

God loved Israel as His firstborn son among the nations (see Exodus 4:22). Through Israel - heirs of His covenant with Abraham - God planned to reveal himself as the Father of all nations (see Genesis 22:18).

The memory of God’s covenant testing of Abraham - and Abraham’s faithful obedience - lies behind today’s Gospel.

In commanding Abraham to offer his only beloved son (see Genesis 22:2,12,16), God was preparing us for the fullest possible revelation of His love for the world.

As Abraham was willing to offer Isaac, God did not spare His own Son but handed Him over for us all (see Romans 8:32).

In this, He revealed what was only disclosed partially to Moses - that His kindness continues for a thousand generations, that He forgives our sin, and takes us back as His very own people (see Deuteronomy 4:20; 9:29).

Jesus humbled himself to die in obedience to God’s will. And for this, the Spirit of God raised Him from the dead (see Romans 8:11), and gave Him a name above every name (see Philippians 2:8-10).

This is the name we glorify in today’s Responsorial - the name of our Lord, the God who is Love (see 1 John 4;8,16).


46 posted on 06/15/2014 6:10:42 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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The Sacred Page

The Solemnity of the Most Holy Trinity

 

 Three Angels of Gen 18 as Symbol of Trinity

At the end of, and following, the Easter Season, we have a sort of “trifecta” of major feasts: Pentecost, Trinity, and Corpus Christi, as the Church celebrates the central mysteries of the faith before the Lectionary returns to the readings of the Ordinary Time cycle on Sundays once again.  This June we get a sort of “quadrafecta,” with the Solemnity of Sts. Peter and Paul landing on the Sunday after Corpus Christi. 

 

In any event, this weekend is Trinity Sunday, a meditation and celebration of the central mystery of the Christian faith, the dogma that distinguishes Christianity from all other religions.  Christians alone believe in one God, who nonetheless exists in three persons: Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.

 

Strangely, our Readings for this Sunday tend not to be classic “proof texts” for the idea that there is more than one person in the Godhead.  Instead, the readings tend to focus on the character or essence of God.  This is appropriate, because as we will see, the character of God is very different, and the meaning of salvation history as well, when one knows God to be a Trinity of persons. 

 

Reading 1: Exodus 34:4b-6, 8-9:

 

 

Early in the morning Moses went up Mount Sinai

as the LORD had commanded him,

taking along the two stone tablets.

 

Having come down in a cloud, the LORD stood with Moses there

and proclaimed his name, "LORD."

Thus the LORD passed before him and cried out,

"The LORD, the LORD, a merciful and gracious God,

slow to anger and rich in kindness and fidelity."

Moses at once bowed down to the ground in worship.

Then he said, "If I find favor with you, O Lord,

do come along in our company.

This is indeed a stiff-necked people; yet pardon our wickedness and sins,

and receive us as your own."

 

The context of this passage is very important, and hopefully the celebrant will explain in the homily.  This is not Moses’ first visit up the mountain.  It is his return visit after the debacle with the Golden Calf.  Moses had descended the mountain, interrupting his reception of the instructions for the Tabernacle, in order to regain control of the people, who were running wild in a pagan ritual-orgy in worship of the Egyptian bull god Apis.  He now returns to the mountain to intercede for the people and plead for forgiveness and covenant renewal.  God accepts his intercessions on behalf of Israel and agrees to forgive and renew the covenant, but Moses has an additional request: he wishes to see the face of God.  God cannot reveal his “face” (unmediated revelation) to Moses in this life, but he condescends to show his “back” (mediated or indirect revelation) to Moses on the mountain.  So God makes his presence pass before Moses while Moses is hid in a cleft in the rocks.  While his presence passes by, the LORD proclaims his “name,” that is, declares what his essence is:

 

"The LORD, the LORD, a merciful and gracious God,

slow to anger and rich in kindness and fidelity."

 

The term translated “kindness” here is that very freighted word “hesed,” which specifically connotes faithfulness and love in a covenant relationship. 

 

So why is this text read on Trinity Sunday?  On this day, we reflect on God’s very nature, and this is one of the most important texts of the Old Testament that addresses the issue of what God is.  The answer given is that God’s nature consists primarily in mercy, grace, forgiveness, truth, and especially covenant fidelity. 

 

This does relate to the Trinity, which has meaning for our redemption.  Several facts follow from the realization that the Son and the Spirit are God Himself.  First, it dawns on us that God did not send some other creature to suffer and die for us, but paid the penalty for our sins by himself (the Son).  Secondly, it becomes apparent that God does not merely share his energies or power with us, but shares with us his very life and self (the Spirit). 

 

For if God is not a Trinity, then Jesus the Son is a creature, and God sent a creature to work our redemption rather than doing it himself.  And if God is not a Trinity, the Holy Spirit is not God, but some active force or emanation from the almighty.  Therefore through faith and the sacraments we do not receive into our hearts the true God, but something else that radiates from him. 

 

Furthermore, the Trinity reveals that God is, in himself, a circle of self-giving love.  Prior to the creation of the universe, God did not exist as a self-aggrandizing sole individual, but he existed as a communion of persons bound by the gift of self in love. A possible way to imagine this: the Father continually gives himself to the Son, and the Son gives himself to the Father, and the Self they exchange is the Holy Spirit.  Thus, the gift of self in love, which is the essence of hesed, belongs to God’s nature from all time.  It is not an accidental feature of God’s character that arises when he creates other beings to be loved.

 

So doctrine of the Trinity enables us to understand that faithful love (hesed) is at the heart of God’s nature, and he shares himself with us in a way more profound and intimate than we would ever have imagined. God's hesed is on display in this First Reading, because God remains faithful to his covenant with Israel even when they have broken their covenant with him by worshiping other gods.

 

Responsorial Psalm: Daniel 3:52, 53, 54, 55, 56:

 

R/ (52b) Glory and praise for ever!

Blessed are you, O Lord, the God of our fathers,

praiseworthy and exalted above all forever;

And blessed is your holy and glorious name,

praiseworthy and exalted above all for all ages.

R/ Glory and praise for ever!

Blessed are you in the temple of your holy glory,

praiseworthy and glorious above all forever.

R/ Glory and praise for ever!

Blessed are you on the throne of your kingdom,

praiseworthy and exalted above all forever.

R/ Glory and praise for ever!

Blessed are you who look into the depths

from your throne upon the cherubim,

praiseworthy and exalted above all forever.

R/ Glory and praise for ever!

 

The revelation of God’s nature prompts praise from us, his people.  The Church turns to the Song of the Three Young Men, the song of praise they sang while being sacrificed in the fiery furnace.  The fiery furnace is an image of the burning love of God, which is more than our mortal nature can bear.  Yet God sustains us supernaturally, so that we can praise him while plunged in his presence.  The young men were being sacrificed because of their covenant fidelity to God expressed by their refusal to worship idols.  Their willingness to be faithful to God, even to death, leads them to a greater knowledge and experience of God’s nature, resulting in exuberant praise. 

 

Reading 2: 2 Corinthians 13:11-13:

 

Brothers and sisters, rejoice.

Mend your ways, encourage one another,

agree with one another, live in peace,

and the God of love and peace will be with you.

Greet one another with a holy kiss.

All the holy ones greet you.

 

The grace of the Lord Jesus Christ

and the love of God

and the fellowship of the Holy Spirit be with all of you.

 

Our Second Reading gives us a more explicitly Trinitarian text.  Although the doctrine of the Trinity is not explained in detail in the text of the New Testament, the reality of the Trinity must be presumed in order to make sense of the assertions and statements of the apostles and other sacred writers.  For example, in the concluding blessing of this short passage of St. Paul, it would be inappropriate to put the “grace of the Lord Jesus Christ” and the “fellowship of the Holy Spirit” in poetic parallelism with “the love of God” unless all three realities were of equally dignity.  If Jesus Christ and the Holy Spirit were mere creatures, they could not be the source of “grace” and “fellowship” on par with the “love of God.”  Furthermore, the term “grace” is particularly freighted, as elsewhere Paul develops the concept as a divine attribute.

 

Benedict XVI explained that dogmas are nothing other than authoritative interpretations of Scripture.  Another way to look at them would be as “truths one must assume in order to make sense of all the Scriptural data.”  The doctrine of the Trinity helps us make sense of this threefold blessing in 2 Corinthians 13 and many other passages as well.

 

Gospel John 3:16-18:

 

God so loved the world that he gave his only Son,

so that everyone who believes in him might not perish

but might have eternal life.

For God did not send his Son into the world to condemn the world,

but that the world might be saved through him.

Whoever believes in him will not be condemned,

but whoever does not believe has already been condemned,

because he has not believed in the name of the only Son of God.

 

Many may be more familiar with the formulation of these verses in the King James-Revised Standard tradition, which reads: "God so loved the world that he gave his only begotten Son."  "Only begotten" is an English rendering of the Greek monogenes, which in turn is probably an attempt to translate the Hebrew yahid, "unique, one and only."  St. John alludes here to Genesis 22, the near-sacrifice of Isaac by Abraham on the mountain top.  Abraham and Isaac's fidelity to God in this harrowing test merited a solemn divine oath which sealed forever the covenant God had made with them: "Because you have done this, and not withheld your son, your only begotten son (Heb. yahid, cf. RSVCE2), I will indeed bless you ... and through your seed all the nations of the earth will be blessed."  By describing Jesus as the "one and only" or "only begotten" son, St. John draws an intentional parallel to Isaac, and indicates that God's gift of his son Jesus is a fulfillment of covenant promises made to Abraham and Isaac over a thousand years before.  The gift of Jesus the Son is not without context; it is covenant fulfillment, a sign of God's hesed, covenant love, which is his essence.

Yes, love is the essence of the Trinity.  The Trinity tells us that God is not a monopersonal individual who had only himself to love before creatures were made.  Self-love is an imperfect form of love.  Therefore, God would have needed creatures to love in order to achieve perfection of love.  God would have been imperfect in himself.  Self-giving love is the highest form of love: “Greater love has no man than this: that he lay down his life for his friends.”  From all eternity Father and Son exchange their Life for each other.  Therefore, the gift of the Son by the Father to the world, and the Son’s gift of Himself for the world and for his Father, is nothing other than an invitation for the world to enter into the circle of love that defines God’s essence. 

 

Why is it necessary to believe in the Son?  Because only Jesus reveals to us the full truth about God.  Moses revealed some truth about God.  Mohammad portrayed God as an omnipotent, monopersonal master who has no children in any sense, does not give himself to or for us, and does not share with us his very being.  The Buddha was technically an agnostic, unconcerned with discovering God’s nature or even clearly affirming he existence of God.

 

Alone among the religious teachers and philosophers of the world, Jesus claims in word and deed that God is a loving Father who gave his only Son for the salvation of the world, and that the Son is, finally and mysteriously, the Father’s own Self, for “I and the Father are one,” and “He who has seen me, has seen the Father.”  Therefore, whoever does not believe in the Son is condemned forever to labor with an inadequate understanding of God, which leads—perhaps sooner, perhaps later—to estrangement from God.  We become like what we worship.  How important, then, truly to understand the nature of the God we worship.  The worship of the Trinity should lead us to a life of self-giving love.


47 posted on 06/15/2014 6:17:17 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Insight Scoop

The Central Mystery of the Faith, The Source of Reality

(Photo: © zwiebackesser - Fotolia.com)

A Scriptural Reflection on the Readings for The Solemnity of the Most Holy Trinity | Carl E. Olson

Readings:
• Ex 34:4b-6, 8-9
• Dan 3:52, 53, 54, 55, 56
• 2 Cor 13:11-13
• Jn 3:16-18

The Trinity, the Catechism states, is “the central mystery of Christian faith and life” (CCC 234). There are, I think, a couple of mistakes that can be made when it comes to thinking about this great mystery.

The first is to treat the dogma of the Trinity as a fascinating but abstract concept, a cosmic Rubik’s Cube that challenges us to fit all of the pieces into their place through elaborate, brain-twisting moves. What might begin as a sincere desire to understand better the mystery of one God in three persons can be a dry academic exercise. If we’re not careful, the Trinity can become a sort of theological artifact that is interesting to examine on occasion but which doesn’t affect how we think, speak, and live.

The second mistake is to simply avoid thoughtful consideration of the nature and meaning of the Trinity. The end result of this flawed perspective is similar to the first, minus all of the study: to throw up one’s hands in frustrated impatience, “Well, it doesn’t make any sense. I don’t see what it has to do with me and my life!” While many Christians might not consciously come to that conclusion, the way they think and live suggests that is, unfortunately, their attitude.

In a sermon given in the early 1970s, Father Joseph Ratzinger wrote of how “the Church makes a man a Christian by pronouncing the name of the triune God.” The essential point of being a Christian is to have faith in God. Yet, he wrote, this can be disappointing and incomprehensible if not understood correctly. The primary concern in Christianity, he explained, “is not the Church or man, but God. Christianity is not oriented to our own hopes, fears, and needs, but to God, to his sovereignty and power. The first proposition of the Christian faith and the fundamental orientation of Christian conversion is: ‘God is.’” (The God of Jesus Christ [Ignatius Press, 2008], pp 26-27).

This truth was dramatically revealed to Moses when God spoke from the burning bush and declared, “I AM WHO I AM” (Ex 3:14). In today’s Old Testament reading, from a later passage in Exodus, God further proclaims who and what He is: “a merciful and gracious God, slow to anger and rich in kindness and fidelity.”

But God, of course, is not static or even stoic. In the words of the French poet, Paul Claudel, “we worship a living God who acts, who breathes, who exhales his very Self.” This is beautifully expressed by Saint John the Theologian in today’s Gospel reading. While Moses had been sent by God to reveal the reality and name of God, the Son was sent by the Father to reveal the mystery of God’s inner life, which is perfect love and self-gift (cf., CCC 236, 257). “God so loved the world that he gave his only Son…” Why? That we might have eternal life. And what is eternal life? It is actually sharing in the supernatural life of the Blessed Trinity.

Far from being abstract or of little earthly value, the Trinity is the source of reality and the reason our earthly lives have meaning and purpose. Because God is, we have a reason to be. Because God is love, we are able to truly love. Because God is unity, we are able to be united to Him. Because God is three Persons, we are able to have communion with Him.

St. Gregory of Nazianzus once wrote, “Above all guard for me this great deposit of faith for which I live and fight, which I want to take with me as a companion, and which makes me bear all evils and despise all pleasures: I mean the profession of faith in the Father and the Son and the Holy Spirit.” (CCC 256). May we guard our belief in the Triune God with our lives. And may we better know that the Trinity gives us life. Make no mistake about it!

(This "Opening the Word" column originally appeared in the May 18, 2008, edition of Our Sunday Visitor newspaper.)


48 posted on 06/15/2014 6:35:12 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Vultus Christi

Elizabeth of the Trinity: Her Mission in Heaven

Sunday, 15 June 2014 08:36

Blessed Elizabeth in the Catechism

Opening the Catechism of the Catholic Church one morning, I discovered that among the ecclesiastical writers cited in the text, there are fifty-nine men and eight women. Three of the eight women cited are Carmelites, and one of the three is Blessed Elizabeth of the Trinity: an outstanding honour for a young nun who died, hidden in her Carmel at Dijon, at twenty-six years of age on November 9, 1906.

Light, Love, Life

Faced with death, Blessed Elizabeth said, “Je vais à la Lumière, à l’Amour à la Vie — I am going to the Light, to Love, to Life.” The influence of the young Carmelite has grown prodigiously all over the world. Her Prayer to the Holy Trinity has been translated into thirty-four languages.

Her Mission

Before her death, Elizabeth sensed that she would be entrusted with a mission in heaven. “I think,” she said, “that in Heaven my mission will be to draw souls by helping them go out of themselves to cling to God by a wholly simple and loving movement, and to keep them in this great silence within that will allow God to communicate Himself to them and transform them into Himself.”

God at Work in Us

Saint Paul, whose Epistles were the young Carmelite’s daily nourishment, says: “God is at work in you, both to will and to work for his good pleasure” (Phil 2:13). Blessed Elizabeth’s secret of holiness was total surrender to God at work in her for his good pleasure, transforming her into the Praise of His Glory (cf. Eph 1:6). Believing this, one dares to pray, “I trust, O God, that you are at work in me, even now, both to will and to work for the praise of your glory.”

For the Praise of His Glory

The Catechism says that, “even now we are called to be a dwelling for the Most Holy Trinity: ‘If a man loves me,” says the Lord, ‘he will keep my word, and my Father will love him, and we will come to him, and make our home with him’” (Jn 14:23). And as a kind of commentary on the mystery of the indwelling Trinity, the Catechism gives us Blessed Elizabeth’s magnificent prayer. I know souls who by dint of repeating that prayer day after day have learned it by heart; God alone knows what changes it has wrought in them . . . for the praise of His glory.


49 posted on 06/15/2014 6:41:42 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Vultus Christi

Most Holy Trinity

Sunday, 15 June 2014 08:47

Cascades of Jubilation

The Office of Lauds this morning was a torrent of undiluted praise. The Church gives us doxology upon doxology. She expresses her adoration in great cascades of jubilation. In some way, today’s Divine Office is a preview and foretaste of heaven. How is heaven described in the book of the Apocalypse? It is an immense and ceaseless liturgy of adoration. Angels and men together doxologize ceaselessly. In the presence of the Father, the Son, and the Holy Ghost all created things become an utterance of glory. Eternity’s ceaseless doxology begins here on earth. If this is apparent anywhere, it should be so in a monastery.

The Doxological Life

See how Moses exemplifies the doxological life. He rises “early in the morning” (Ex 34:5). You recall what God had said to him: “Be ready to come up to Mount Sinai in the morning, and there thou shalt stand before me on the mountain top” (Ex 34:2). God asks for readiness in the morning. He bids us come up in the morning to Mount Sinai. He asks that we present ourselves to Him on the mountain top. How are we to understand God’s commands to Moses?

Christ himself is our morning. You know Saint Ambrose’ marvelous hymn for the office of Lauds, Splendor Paternae Gloriae:

Thou Brightness of Thy Father’s Worth!
Who dost the light from Light bring forth;
Light of the light! light’s lustrous Spring!
Thou Day the day illumining.

If Christ Be Your Morning

For the soul who lives facing Christ it is always morning. For the soul who lives in the brightness of His Face it is always a new day. If Christ be your morning it is never too late to start afresh.

Christ the Mountain

God summons us to the mountain top. Christ Himself is our mountain. Christ is the high place from which earth touches heaven; Christ is the summit marked on earth by the imprint of heaven’s kiss. If your feet are set high on the rock that is Christ you are held very close to the Father’s heart, for Christ is the Son “who abides in the bosom of the Father” (Jn 1:18). “I am in the Father and the Father is in me” (Jn 14:11).

“Stand before me on the mountain top” (Ex 34:5), says God. What is God saying if not, “Offer yourself to Me there through Christ, in Christ, and with Christ.” God’s three commands to Moses are fulfilled for us in the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass.

Christ the Sun of Justice

The Holy Sacrifice of the Mass is the light of the Church’s day. Mother Marie-Adèle Garnier, the foundress of the Tyburn Benedictines in London, called the Mass “the Sun of her life.” Without the Most Holy Eucharist we have neither warmth nor light. Without Holy Mass there is no new day, no morning, no possibility of starting afresh. That is why the Christian martyrs of Carthage when interrogated by Diocletian’s proconsul could only answer, Sine dominico non possumus, “Without Sunday,” that is without the day of the Holy Sacrifice, “we cannot go on.” So long as we have the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass we have a new day. So long as we remain faithful to the Most Holy Sacrament of the Altar we will have before our eyes Christ, “the Sun of justice who rises with healing in His wings” (Mal 4:2).
Ravished Upward

The Holy Sacrifice of the Mass is the mountain top; it is the descent of heaven to earth. It is the summit of the Church’s life; it is from the rock of the altar that the Church is ravished upward into the love of things invisible. In the Holy Sacrifice we are certain of standing in the presence of the Father; Christ, the Priest and Victim of every Mass, says, “Nobody can come to the Father, except through me” (Jn 14:6). The Father waits for us in the Mass even as He waited for Moses on the heights of Mount Sinai. He “comes down to meet us hidden in cloud” (Ex 34:5) that is, in the Holy Spirit, to reveal to us His Name and His mystery.

Stand Before Me

God calls us to the mountain in the morning that we might stand before Him. “There thou shalt stand before me” (Ex 34:2). We go to the mountain to be offered. We go to Christ our Altar to be offered upon Him. We go to Christ our Priest to be offered by Him. We go to Christ our Victim to be offered with Him.

The offering takes place under the overshadowing of the Holy Ghost who, “like a bright cloud” (Mt 17:5), covers the mountain. For this we pray in every Mass, asking to be assumed into heaven, begging God to command our quick transport “to his altar on high in the sight of his divine majesty” (Supplices te rogamus, Roman Canon). “There thou shalt stand before me” (Ex 34:5), says God. This is the posture of the sacrificing priest before the altar. Saint Paul explains it, saying, “And now brethren, I appeal to you by God’s mercies, to offer up your bodies as a living sacrifice, consecrated to God and worthy of his acceptance; this is the worship due from you as rational creatures” (Rom 12:1).

The Lord Comes Down

Only after Moses obeys the commands of God by rising early, by climbing the mountain, and by presenting himself there, does the Lord “come down to meet him, hidden in cloud and Moses stood with him there” (cf. Ex 34:5). “Thus the Lord passed by, and he cried out, It is the Lord God, the ruler of all things, the merciful, the gracious, slow to take vengeance, rich in kindness, faithful to his promises, true to his promise of mercy a thousand times over” (Ex 34:6-7).

This too is a mystic foreshadowing of the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass. Holy Mass is the Lord passing before us. It is the Lord revealing himself merciful and gracious. In the Eucharist God makes himself known. In the Most Holy Eucharist He comes down hidden in cloud to meet us. In the Most Holy Eucharist He lays bare the merciful love of his heart a thousand times over.

Adoration

How does Moses respond to God’s revelation of Himself? “And Moses making haste, bowed down prostrate unto the earth, and adored” (Ex 34:8). He adored. Adoration is the only response worthy of God’s self-revelation. For the believer it becomes the only response possible. Out of adoration flows all else. Only adoration allows us to take in the mystery of the Lord passing before us.

The text says that Moses “made haste, bowed down prostrate unto the earth, and adored” (Ex 34:8). Why does he make haste to adore? Adoration cannot be delayed. Adoration is urgent at every hour. “The hour is coming and now is,” says Our Lord to the Samaritan woman, “when true adorers shall adore the Father in spirit and in truth. For such the Father seeks to adore him” (Jn 4:23). We make haste in going to adoration because the desire of the Father precedes us there. We cannot arrive a moment too soon. The imperative of adoration once understood brooks no delays, admits of no excuses. “Martha went, and called her sister Mary secretly, saying: ‘The Master is come, and is calling for you.’ She, as soon as she heard this, rose quickly, and came to him” (Jn 11:28-29).

In bowing down prostrate with his face to the ground Moses discovers something about himself and about his people. “This is indeed a stiff-necked people” (Ex 34:9). In adoration we discover just how stiff-necked we are, how unbending we are, how proud, and how resistant to grace.

Compunction

Adoration “in spirit and in truth” (Jn 4:24) leads to compunction. Compunction in turn leads to the prayer of contrition and to conversion of life: “Guilt of our sins do thou pardon,” says Moses, “and keep us for thy own” (Ex 34:9).

This then is the experience of Moses. It is ours as well. We know nonetheless that after the morning there is the rest of the day, that after the mountain’s height there is the descent into the plain, and that after the offering there is the sacrifice and the communion. Saint Paul spells out the consequences of this for us: “Perfect your lives, listen to the appeal we make, think the same thoughts, keep peace among yourselves, and the God of love and peace will be with you.” (2 Cor 13:11-12). Thus does the Eucharistic life radiate from the morning Sacrifice into every hour of the day; from the mountain into every valley and plain; from the place of offering into every occasion for sacrifice and communion.

Presence of the Trinity

The word “Trinity” occurs nowhere the Bible. The adorable Mystery is nonetheless wondrously present: Father, Son, and Holy Ghost, revealed in the morning light, shining on the mountain, summoning us into the Eucharistic life of offering, sacrifice, and communion. “God so loved the world that he gave up his only-begotten Son” (Jn 3:16).

Abba, Father

The gift of the only-begotten Son is renewed in Holy Mass. With the Body and Blood of the Son comes the outpouring of the Holy Ghost.  “To prove that you are sons, God has sent out the Spirit of his Son into your hearts, crying out in us, Abba! Father!” (Gal 4:6).  Make haste! It is time to adore.


50 posted on 06/15/2014 6:51:29 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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