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Pope Francis At It Again (Comrade Frank)
National Catholic Reporter ^ | Jun. 17, 2014 | Michael Sean Winters

Posted on 06/17/2014 9:05:04 AM PDT by Gamecock

I am pretty sure the editors of the Wall Street Journal would be disinclined to endorse Pope Francis' call for international regulation of markets via state action, to promote impact investment. Yet, that is just what he called for yesterday in speaking to a meeting at the Vatican on the theme "Investing in the Poor," which was organized, in part, by the University of Notre Dame. The pope said:

Advances in technology have increased the speed of financial transactions, but in the long run this is significant only to the extent that it better serves the common good. In this regard, speculation on food prices is a scandal which seriously compromises access to food on the part of the poorest members of our human family. It is urgent that governments throughout the world commit themselves to developing an international framework capable of promoting a market of high impact investments, and thus to combating an economy which excludes and discards.

No spinning that is there. I am sure our libertarian friends think this pope just keeps wandering down the road to serfdom.


TOPICS: General Discusssion
KEYWORDS: popefrancis; redistribution; reparations; romancatholicism
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1 posted on 06/17/2014 9:05:04 AM PDT by Gamecock
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To: ConservingFreedom; Alex Murphy
Sez Frank: It is urgent that governments throughout the world commit themselves to developing an international framework capable of promoting a market of high impact investments, and thus to combating an economy which excludes and discards.
2 posted on 06/17/2014 9:05:59 AM PDT by Gamecock (#BringTheAdultsBackToDC)
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To: Gamecock
"speculation on food prices is a scandal which seriously compromises access to food"

That is patently false.

Stick with G-d, and leave economics to business people. We'll deliver the food because we're self interested in doing so. Alternate economics for delivering food have been much less successful. See China, 1950s, North Korea, recently, etc.

3 posted on 06/17/2014 9:07:54 AM PDT by Uncle Miltie (Radicalized via the Internet)
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To: Gamecock

What is the Pope’s preferred price setting mechanism?

If he hasn’t a plan, then STFU.


4 posted on 06/17/2014 9:08:26 AM PDT by Uncle Miltie (Radicalized via the Internet)
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To: Gamecock

Jesus said: “You will always have the poor among you, and you can help them whenever you want to.” Mk 14:7

Sorry pope but you appear to be a communista.


5 posted on 06/17/2014 9:09:27 AM PDT by bunkerhill7 ("The Second Amendment has no limits on firepower"-NY State Senator Kathleen A. Marchione.")
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To: Gamecock

Mistranslated again, perhaps.


6 posted on 06/17/2014 9:09:31 AM PDT by Colonel_Flagg ("Compromise" means you've already decided you lost.)
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To: Uncle Miltie
Stick with G-d, and leave economics to business people.

And how do we know that he gets God right?

7 posted on 06/17/2014 9:10:13 AM PDT by freerepublicchat
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To: Uncle Miltie
What is the Pope’s preferred price setting mechanism?

From each according to his ability, to each according to his need . . . . .

8 posted on 06/17/2014 9:10:15 AM PDT by Opinionated Blowhard ("When the people find they can vote themselves money, that will herald the end of the republic.")
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To: Uncle Miltie

‘Alternate economics for delivering food have been much less successful. See China, 1950s, North Korea, recently, etc.’

See Venezuela!

“Hundreds of National Guardsmen in riot gear and armoured vehicles prevented an “empty pots march” from reaching Venezuela’s food ministry on Saturday to protest against chronic food shortages.”

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/mar/09/venezuela-protest-food-shortages


9 posted on 06/17/2014 9:11:50 AM PDT by Fantasywriter (Any attempt to do forensic work using Internet artifacts is fraught with pitfalls. JoeProbono)
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To: Fantasywriter

The Pope’s hated speculation in food prices is illegal in Venezuela.

People are starving.

Way to go, Comrade Pope.


10 posted on 06/17/2014 9:14:43 AM PDT by Uncle Miltie (Radicalized via the Internet)
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To: Gamecock

Man does not live by bread alone.


11 posted on 06/17/2014 9:15:55 AM PDT by Paulie
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To: Uncle Miltie

Well I thought it would be apt since Venezuela is in his part of the world, but I didn’t know that about food price speculation being illegal. Thanks for bolstering my point!


12 posted on 06/17/2014 9:16:38 AM PDT by Fantasywriter (Any attempt to do forensic work using Internet artifacts is fraught with pitfalls. JoeProbono)
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To: Gamecock

I’m pretty much alarmed at Pope Francis’ economic illiteracy. This guy isn’t stupid, but he’s in waaayyy over his head, intellectually, failing to recognize that his immediate two predecessors had a knack for such commentary on such a wide range of subjects because they were absolute geniuses, that they could immediately distill truth out of hundreds of conflicting theories.

However, speculation on food prices is the modern equivalent to hoarding, and it is, quote in fact, spectacularly evil. Especially, in this case, because the hoarders aren’t driven by self-preservation, merely pure profit motive.

And while the NCR is more socialist than Catholic, there is no need to adopt socialism to prevent speculation; it’s a problem which has attracted libertarian and other free-market approaches.


13 posted on 06/17/2014 9:19:08 AM PDT by dangus
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To: Gamecock

My limited knowlege of speculation is that without speculation you won’t have price swings but you will have empty shelves.


14 posted on 06/17/2014 9:24:18 AM PDT by RightOnTheBorder
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To: Colonel_Flagg
Mistranslated again, perhaps.

I'd bet on that.

15 posted on 06/17/2014 9:28:19 AM PDT by painter ( Isaiah: “Woe to those who call evil good and good evil,")
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To: Gamecock

Oh, lookie, lookie, lookie! The REAL quote, IN CONTEXT, promotes FREE-MARKET solutions and INDIVIDUAL CHOICES as to how to invest in a more Christian light:

Impact investors are those who are conscious of the existence of serious unjust situations, instances of profound social inequality and unacceptable conditions of poverty affecting communities and entire peoples. These investors turn to financial institutes which will use their resources to promote the economic and social development of these groups through investment funds aimed at satisfying basic needs associated with agriculture, access to water, adequate housing and reasonable prices, as well as with primary health care and educational services.

Investments of this sort are meant to have positive social repercussions on local communities, such as the creation of jobs, access to energy, training and increased agricultural productivity. The financial return for investors tends to be more moderate than in other types of investment.

The logic underlying these innovative forms of intervention is one which “acknowledges the ultimate connection between profit and solidarity, the virtuous circle existing between profit and gift … Christians are called to rediscover, experience and proclaim to all this precious and primordial unity between profit and solidarity. How much the contemporary world needs to rediscover this beautiful truth!” (Preface to the book of Cardinal Gerhard Müller, Povera per i poveri. La missione della Chiesa [“Poor for the Poor.” The Mission of the Church]).

It is important that ethics once again play its due part in the world of finance and that markets serve the interests of peoples and the common good of humanity. It is increasingly intolerable that financial markets are shaping the destiny of peoples rather than serving their needs, or that the few derive immense wealth from financial speculation while the many are deeply burdened by the consequences.

Advances in technology have increased the speed of financial transactions, but in the long run this is significant only to the extent that it better serves the common good. In this regard, speculation on food prices is a scandal which seriously compromises access to food on the part of the poorest members of our human family. It is urgent that governments throughout the world commit themselves to developing an international framework capable of promoting a market of high impact investments, and thus to combating an economy which excludes and discards.


16 posted on 06/17/2014 9:28:52 AM PDT by dangus
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To: All

17 posted on 06/17/2014 9:29:09 AM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: painter

Not mistranslated, but out of context.


18 posted on 06/17/2014 9:29:21 AM PDT by dangus
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To: dangus
**It is urgent that governments throughout the world commit themselves to developing an international framework**

Central Planning at it's finest.

19 posted on 06/17/2014 9:30:25 AM PDT by Gamecock (#BringTheAdultsBackToDC)
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To: dangus

Yep,I thought so!


20 posted on 06/17/2014 9:32:48 AM PDT by painter ( Isaiah: “Woe to those who call evil good and good evil,")
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To: RightOnTheBorder

No, you are confusing price-gouging with speculation. In price-gouging, a commodity is already scarce, but a supplier (or current owner) charges extra because he knows the purchaser has no alternatives. The alternative is to sell cheaply, but run out quicker (although the same amount of product is sold).

A speculator PREDICTS a shortage, and stocks up ahead of time. This can be a virtuous act, if he stocking up means saving. (In this sense, one could say Joseph son of Isaac was a speculator.) But many foodstuffs spoil, and hoarding can mean less actual product is available for consumption. Also, the prediction can be wrong and can needlessly produce a shortage, or suffering where there need not have been any. In the worst sense, some speculators have tried to corner the market, creating an artificial scarcity. While this is very difficult to accomplish on the global market, it has allegedly happened globally (Soros’ silver, 2008 oil panic), and certain CAN happen locally with spoilables.


21 posted on 06/17/2014 9:38:08 AM PDT by dangus
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To: Gamecock

Oh look at you! You can quote out of context even more unfairly than the NCR! I bet you’re so proud of yourself!


22 posted on 06/17/2014 9:40:10 AM PDT by dangus
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To: Gamecock
I am pretty sure the editors of the Wall Street Journal would be disinclined to endorse Pope Francis' call for international regulation of markets via state action, to promote impact investment. Yet, that is just what he called for yesterday in speaking to a meeting at the Vatican on the theme "Investing in the Poor," which was organized, in part, by the University of Notre Dame.

Yeah, but it's the National Catholic Reporter that's being critical of the endorsement. Therefore, FRoaman Catholics will most likely take the opposite position, and advocate for increased regulation.

Related thread:
Catholics 'more likely to back state economic intervention' [European Central Bank study]

23 posted on 06/17/2014 9:45:33 AM PDT by Alex Murphy ("the defacto Leader of the FR Calvinist Protestant Brigades")
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To: Gamecock

how does he feel about corn ethanol?


24 posted on 06/17/2014 9:49:58 AM PDT by Buckeye McFrog
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To: RightOnTheBorder

Without speculation, the economy would contract by 80%. Massive unemployment and poverty.


25 posted on 06/17/2014 9:52:13 AM PDT by dfwgator
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To: freerepublicchat
By reading Scripture.

 

Luke, chapter 12



View all books of the Bible

CHAPTER 12

Saying against Greed.

13* Someone in the crowd said to him, “Teacher, tell my brother to share the inheritance with me.”

14He replied to him, “Friend, who appointed me as your judge and arbitrator?”h

15Then he said to the crowd, “Take care to guard against all greed, for though one may be rich, one’s life does not consist of possessions.”i

Parable of the Rich Fool.

16Then he told them a parable. “There was a rich man whose land produced a bountiful harvest.

17He asked himself, ‘What shall I do, for I do not have space to store my harvest?’

18And he said, ‘This is what I shall do: I shall tear down my barns and build larger ones. There I shall store all my grain and other goods

19j and I shall say to myself, “Now as for you, you have so many good things stored up for many years, rest, eat, drink, be merry!”’k

20But God said to him, ‘You fool, this night your life will be demanded of you; and the things you have prepared, to whom will they belong?’

21Thus will it be for the one who stores up treasure for himself but is not rich in what matters to God.”*

 


26 posted on 06/17/2014 9:54:30 AM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Gamecock
Why are you quoting from the anti-Catholic National Catholic Reporter, aka "Fishwrap"?

Nevermind...I figured it out.
27 posted on 06/17/2014 9:55:09 AM PDT by Carpe Cerevisi
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To: Alex Murphy

LOL, Alex Murphy! You sure scour the world for ways to discredit the Catholic Church!

Making a generalization of the entire world’s Catholic v Protestantism based on a comparison of Swiss cantons?

Try checking out an election map of Germany! You’ll notice the Catholic areas vote for the Christian Democrats consistently, and the Protestant areas consistently vote for the Socialists. And I really don’t think you want to make the argument that Swiss economic policy is guided by Christianity.

You can go back and forth on this forever: Ooh, look! For instance: Mexico is filled with Socialists! Yes, but that’s after a Protestant-funded anti-clerical regime killed tens of thousands of Catholic nuns, priests and catechists, setting up a socialist dictatorship for 80+ years.

Theology by ad-hominem is stupid, but it seems to be the passion that consumes your entire life.


28 posted on 06/17/2014 9:57:27 AM PDT by dangus
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To: dfwgator

Yes, but there’s good speculation and corrupt speculation. Joseph storing up seven years of grain was good speculation. Attempts to manipulate prices by creating artificial scarcity is bad speculation.


29 posted on 06/17/2014 9:59:15 AM PDT by dangus
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To: Gamecock

I must say...
there ARE problems we CAN fix in the structure of the food marketplace

we have zillions of subsidy dollars going into agriculture, it is one of the most powerful lobby groups in WashDC
(dating from the Great Depression before the current one, when the FDR administration wanted to prevent even more massive farm foreclosures....difficult conditions make for problematic laws).

Anyway, for all the good FDR’s programs did in the 1930’s, we still have them today!!!!

AND.... as part of all this, millions of pounds of perfectly good food is deliberately thrown into the garbage by government order.....in order to help “stabilize the agricultural markets” ... this alone constitutes tremendous waste of food

we certainly can ask our Congresscritters to...at the very least...end all this waste of good food! (and then reconsider the larger questions perhaps )

But yes, I, too, am concerned with some of His Holiness’s statements...at least as reported in the mass media. I hope to see a longer quotation soon on this


30 posted on 06/17/2014 10:15:03 AM PDT by faithhopecharity ((Brilliant, Profound Tag Line Goes Here, just as soon as I can think of one..)w)
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To: Fantasywriter

We discussed price ceilings in Econ 202 (Micro Principles) today. I mentioned that Hugo Chavez’s price controls in Venezuela are leading to food shortages. Here’s an article that describes what’s going on.

Meat cuts vanished from Venezuelan supermarkets this week, leaving only unsavory bits like chicken feet, while costly artificial sweeteners have increasingly replaced sugar, and many staples sell far above government-fixed prices.

President Hugo Chávez’s administration blames the food supply problems on speculators, but industry officials say government price controls that strangle profits are responsible.

Such shortages have sporadically appeared with items from milk to coffee since early 2003, when Chávez began regulating prices for 400 basic products as a way to counter inflation and protect the poor.

Yet inflation has soared to an accumulated 78 percent in the last four years in an economy awash in petrodollars, and food prices have increased particularly swiftly, creating a widening discrepancy between official prices and the true cost of getting goods to market in Venezuela.

‘’Shortages have increased significantly as well as violations of price controls,’’ Central Bank director Domingo Maza Zavala told Unión Radio on Thursday. ``The difference between real market prices and controlled prices is very high.’’

It’s an excellent example of someone trying to fight the invisible hand and the invisible hand fighting back.
http://marketpower.typepad.com/market_power/2007/02/price_controls_.html


31 posted on 06/17/2014 10:19:27 AM PDT by Uncle Miltie (Radicalized via the Internet)
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To: Fantasywriter

We discussed price ceilings in Econ 202 (Micro Principles) today. I mentioned that Hugo Chavez’s price controls in Venezuela are leading to food shortages. Here’s an article that describes what’s going on.

Meat cuts vanished from Venezuelan supermarkets this week, leaving only unsavory bits like chicken feet, while costly artificial sweeteners have increasingly replaced sugar, and many staples sell far above government-fixed prices.

President Hugo Chávez’s administration blames the food supply problems on speculators, but industry officials say government price controls that strangle profits are responsible.

Such shortages have sporadically appeared with items from milk to coffee since early 2003, when Chávez began regulating prices for 400 basic products as a way to counter inflation and protect the poor.

Yet inflation has soared to an accumulated 78 percent in the last four years in an economy awash in petrodollars, and food prices have increased particularly swiftly, creating a widening discrepancy between official prices and the true cost of getting goods to market in Venezuela.

‘’Shortages have increased significantly as well as violations of price controls,’’ Central Bank director Domingo Maza Zavala told Unión Radio on Thursday. ``The difference between real market prices and controlled prices is very high.’’

It’s an excellent example of someone trying to fight the invisible hand and the invisible hand fighting back.
http://marketpower.typepad.com/market_power/2007/02/price_controls_.html


32 posted on 06/17/2014 10:19:42 AM PDT by Uncle Miltie (Radicalized via the Internet)
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To: Gamecock

"I have dedicated my life to fight against the heinous rottenness of modern capitalism because it robs the laborer of this world's goods."

33 posted on 06/17/2014 10:30:03 AM PDT by Zionist Conspirator (The Left: speaking power to truth since Shevirat HaKelim.)
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To: Uncle Miltie

Interesting info! Goes into the reason for food shortages in a socialist system, though it could have explored production problems a bit more. I’m not an economist, so correct me if this is wrong, but here’s my take. If you legislate that people cannot afford to produce—much less actually make $ producing—production ceases, or virtually so. Then the *real* shortages set in.

& btw, with Hugo gone, things in Venezuela have only gotten worse. It’s telling that, per the article I linked, the Venezuelan gov won’t allow peaceful protests—not even of the absence of crucial food items. Perhaps that is a big part of the appeal of socialism? That along with ‘income redistribution’ you also get as much power over a citizenry as you want.

For example, a group of peaceful women, banging on empty pots to signify the lack of basic food, are countered with armed guards. Anybody enamored of control is going to fall head over heels for that type of government. Says something really bad about human nature, doesn’t it?


34 posted on 06/17/2014 10:31:25 AM PDT by Fantasywriter (Any attempt to do forensic work using Internet artifacts is fraught with pitfalls. JoeProbono)
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To: Colonel_Flagg

You’d think he could hire a translator....


35 posted on 06/17/2014 10:35:31 AM PDT by Mamzelle
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To: Mamzelle

He could. Or he couldread John 21, where Jesus commands the Christian to “feed my sheep” instead of banks or governments.


36 posted on 06/17/2014 10:38:46 AM PDT by Colonel_Flagg ("Compromise" means you've already decided you lost.)
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To: Gamecock; All

From Wikipedia:

Among the NUSJ's articles of faith were work and income guarantees, nationalizing necessary industry, wealth redistribution through taxation of the wealthy, federal protection of worker's unions, and decreasing property rights in favor of the government controlling the country's assets for public good.[17] Illustrative of his disdain for free market capitalism is his statement

We maintain the principle that there can be no lasting prosperity if free competition exists in industry. Therefore, it is the business of government not only to legislate for a minimum annual wage and maximum working schedule to be observed by industry, but also to curtail individualism that, if necessary, factories shall be licensed and their output shall be limited.[18]

37 posted on 06/17/2014 10:41:04 AM PDT by Zionist Conspirator (The Left: speaking power to truth since Shevirat HaKelim.)
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To: Gamecock; All
"NUSJ" in the above Wikipedia quote stands for National Union for Social Justice.
38 posted on 06/17/2014 10:42:32 AM PDT by Zionist Conspirator (The Left: speaking power to truth since Shevirat HaKelim.)
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To: dangus

“The REAL quote, IN CONTEXT, promotes FREE-MARKET solutions and INDIVIDUAL CHOICES as to how to invest in a more Christian light”

Not really.

“Investments of this sort are meant to have positive social repercussions on local communities, such as the creation of jobs, access to energy, training and increased agricultural productivity. The financial return for investors tends to be more moderate than in other types of investment.”

That in turn means they will LOSE in a free market.

“Christians are called to rediscover, experience and proclaim to all this precious and primordial unity between profit and solidarity.”

I don’t know what that means, and I doubt Francis does either.

“It is increasingly intolerable that financial markets are shaping the destiny of peoples rather than serving their needs, or that the few derive immense wealth from financial speculation while the many are deeply burdened by the consequences.”

In a free market, people make great wealth by doing a very good job of providing people with what they want at a price they are willing to pay. That is the reward for doing something admirable, not something despicable.

“It is urgent that governments throughout the world commit themselves to developing an international framework capable of promoting a market of high impact investments...”

Please explain in what sense government regulation, across borders, constitutes “FREE-MARKET solutions and INDIVIDUAL CHOICES”.


39 posted on 06/17/2014 10:42:48 AM PDT by Mr Rogers (Left wing. Right wing. One buzzard.)
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To: Zionist Conspirator; Gamecock
"I have dedicated my life to fight against the heinous rottenness of modern capitalism because it robs the laborer of this world's goods."

Other quotes by Father Coughlin:

"Oh you poor laborers and farmers, we have tried, time and again, to tell you that there can be no resurrection for America until Congress begins to coin and regulate the value money. We have endeavored to teach you, time and again, that there can be no coming out of this depression until what you earn goes to sustain your wife and your children."

"Roosevelt or ruin."

"The New Deal is Christ's deal."

"I need not recall for you that both the laboring and agricultural classes of America are forced to work for less than a living wage while the owners of industry boastfully proclaim that their profits are increasing."

"I believe that when a banker speaks, you can go the opposite way and be right. That has been proved in recent years."


40 posted on 06/17/2014 10:46:15 AM PDT by Alex Murphy ("the defacto Leader of the FR Calvinist Protestant Brigades")
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To: dangus

There are almost no Protestants in Germany. We had a German exchange student live with us for a year in New Mexico. He said our tiny town had more churches in a 2 block radius than his home city.

“With 25,100,727 members in 2006, around 30 percent of all Germans belong to a member church of the EKD. Average church attendance is lower, however, with only around a million people attending a service on Sunday.”

IOW, 4% of the nominal Protestants in Germany attend church regularly.


41 posted on 06/17/2014 10:48:18 AM PDT by Mr Rogers (Left wing. Right wing. One buzzard.)
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To: Alex Murphy

~~~”When we get through with the Jews in America, they’ll think the treatment they received in Germany was nothing.”~~~

Sounds like quite the fun guy at parties.


42 posted on 06/17/2014 10:51:45 AM PDT by F15Eagle (1Jn4:15;5:4-5,11-13;Mt27:50-54;Mk15:33-34;Jn3:17-18,6:69,11:25,14:6,20:31;Ro10:8-11;1Tm2:5-6;Ti3:4-7)
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To: Gamecock

I saw a clever cartoon in the Investor’s Business daily a few weeks ago.

It had the Pope up there on the altar read from the Gospel according to Marx.


43 posted on 06/17/2014 10:59:04 AM PDT by Trapped Behind Enemy Lines
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To: Gamecock

Comrade indeed... your post sheds light on that fact. Francis is a liberation theologian from Argentina, plain and simple, a flat out Marxist.

Yet the RF, supposedly a conservative forum, anti-marxist and pro-free market, is flooded with Francis fawners, go figure.


44 posted on 06/17/2014 11:09:04 AM PDT by sasportas
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To: sasportas

~~~a liberation theologian~~~

He will find a fan base in Obama and ‘the rev.’ Jeremiah Wright, Jr. Oh, and James Cone.


45 posted on 06/17/2014 11:14:22 AM PDT by F15Eagle (1Jn4:15;5:4-5,11-13;Mt27:50-54;Mk15:33-34;Jn3:17-18,6:69,11:25,14:6,20:31;Ro10:8-11;1Tm2:5-6;Ti3:4-7)
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To: Gamecock

Pope Peron I follows his Argentine roots yet again.

Maybe this paragraph is taken out of context but it sounds to me like he is giving up on church charity and now expecting an all powerful government overlord to see to charity.


46 posted on 06/17/2014 11:19:23 AM PDT by Organic Panic
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To: sasportas; All
Comrade indeed... your post sheds light on that fact. Francis is a liberation theologian from Argentina, plain and simple, a flat out Marxist.

Yet the RF, supposedly a conservative forum, anti-marxist and pro-free market, is flooded with Francis fawners, go figure.

First of all, some conservatives do put too much emphasis on economic issues rather than religious and moral issues. We suffer most of all because we do not live by the Laws of G-d, to which we are each and every one bound. And for all its virtues, capitalism is not a utopian system. It has failures and there are people who under it have nothing. Believe me, I know from personal experience.

That being said, the Catholic Church has been around a long time. It pre-existed the United States and the "American way of life." Its "good old days" are the middle ages and its organic/corporate/guild culture (which many Catholics regard as utopia).

According to Marxism, "socialism" is the final state of historical development, following feudalism and capitalism. Without these intervening stages, socialism cannot come into existence. Capitalism, therefore, must replace feudalism in order for socialism to then replace it in turn. Many Catholics point out that had capitalism not replaced feudalism, Marxism would not even have been a "dirty thought."

Capitalism does indeed have a modernizing and corrosive side. It also has a side of promoting innovation, social mobility, and freedom. But it is not utopia. Only a Theocracy, a Kingdom of G-d on earth, can be a "utopia."

It is not so much Francis' critiques of capitalism that I don't get. It's his theological liberalism that makes FReeper Catholic apologists for him so hard for me to understand.

47 posted on 06/17/2014 11:22:17 AM PDT by Zionist Conspirator (The Left: speaking power to truth since Shevirat HaKelim.)
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To: All

How long will it be before he starts promoting abortion and advocating gay marriage?


48 posted on 06/17/2014 11:24:46 AM PDT by newnhdad (Our new motto: USA, it was fun while it lasted.)
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To: Fantasywriter
It’s telling that, per the article I linked, the Venezuelan gov won’t allow peaceful protests

Do they call it "racist" or a "hate crime?"

49 posted on 06/17/2014 11:24:52 AM PDT by Zionist Conspirator (The Left: speaking power to truth since Shevirat HaKelim.)
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To: Organic Panic
Pope Peron I follows his Argentine roots yet again.

Peron called his ideology Justicialismo, which came from the expression justicia social (social justice).

There have been American organizations that advocate for this European/Latin form of Rightism, for example, various Falangist and National Syndicalist parties. Some of these consider not only Peron a hero, but also Father Coughlin and Huey P. Long. One such web site had a link to the John Birch Society, which is supposed to advocate libertarian/Austrian policies. Hmm.

50 posted on 06/17/2014 11:30:23 AM PDT by Zionist Conspirator (The Left: speaking power to truth since Shevirat HaKelim.)
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