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Catholic Caucus: Daily Mass Readings, 07-07-14
USCCB.org/RNAB ^ | 07-07-14 | Revised New American Bible

Posted on 07/06/2014 7:34:48 PM PDT by Salvation

July 7, 2014

Monday of the Fourteenth Week in Ordinary Time

 

 

Reading 1 Hos 2:16, 17c-18, 21-22

Thus says the LORD:
I will allure her;
I will lead her into the desert
and speak to her heart.
She shall respond there as in the days of her youth,
when she came up from the land of Egypt.

On that day, says the LORD,
She shall call me “My husband,”
and never again “My baal.”

I will espouse you to me forever:
I will espouse you in right and in justice,
in love and in mercy;
I will espouse you in fidelity,
and you shall know the LORD.

Responsorial Psalm Ps 145:2-3, 4-5, 6-7, 8-9

R. (8a) The Lord is gracious and merciful.
Every day will I bless you,
and I will praise your name forever and ever.
Great is the LORD and highly to be praised;
his greatness is unsearchable.
R. The Lord is gracious and merciful.
Generation after generation praises your works
and proclaims your might.
They speak of the splendor of your glorious majesty
and tell of your wondrous works.
R. The Lord is gracious and merciful.
They discourse of the power of your terrible deeds
and declare your greatness.
They publish the fame of your abundant goodness
and joyfully sing of your justice.
R. The Lord is gracious and merciful.
The LORD is gracious and merciful,
slow to anger and of great kindness.
The LORD is good to all
and compassionate toward all his works.
R. The Lord is gracious and merciful.

Gospel Mt 9:18-26

While Jesus was speaking, an official came forward,
knelt down before him, and said,
“My daughter has just died.
But come, lay your hand on her, and she will live.”
Jesus rose and followed him, and so did his disciples.
A woman suffering hemorrhages for twelve years came up behind him
and touched the tassel on his cloak.
She said to herself, “If only I can touch his cloak, I shall be cured.”
Jesus turned around and saw her, and said,
“Courage, daughter! Your faith has saved you.”
And from that hour the woman was cured.

When Jesus arrived at the official’s house
and saw the flute players and the crowd who were making a commotion,
he said, “Go away! The girl is not dead but sleeping.”
And they ridiculed him.
When the crowd was put out, he came and took her by the hand,
and the little girl arose.
And news of this spread throughout all that land.



TOPICS: Catholic; General Discusssion; Prayer; Worship
KEYWORDS: catholic; ordinarytime; prayer
For your reading, reflection, faith-sharing, comments, questions, discussion.

1 posted on 07/06/2014 7:34:48 PM PDT by Salvation
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To: nickcarraway; NYer; ELS; Pyro7480; livius; ArrogantBustard; Catholicguy; RobbyS; marshmallow; ...
Alleluia Ping

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2 posted on 07/06/2014 7:36:56 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

From: Hosea 2:16, 17c-18, 21-22 (NAB)
Hosea 2:14, 15c-16, 19-20 (NRSV, RSV-CE and New Vulgate)

Restoration and a new Covenant


[14] Therefore, behold, I will allure her,
and bring her into the wilderness,
and speak tenderly to her.
[15] And there I will give her her vineyards,
and make the Valley of Achor a door of hope.
And there she shall answer as in the days of her youth.
as at the time when she came out of the land of Egypt.

[16] And in that day, says the Lord, you will call me, ‘My husband,’ and no lon-
ger will you call me, ‘My Baal.’ [17] For I will remove the names of the Baals
from her mouth, and they shall be mentioned by name no more. [18] And I will
make for you a covenant on that day with the beasts of the field, the birds of the
air, and the creeping things of the ground; and I will abolish the bow, the sword,
and war from the land; and I will make you lie down in safety. [19] And will be-
troth you to me for ever; I will betroth you to me in righteousness and in justice,
in steadfast love, and in mercy. [20] I will betroth you to me in faithfulness; and
you shall know the Lord.

*********************************************************************************************
Commentary:

2:2-23. This long poem contains the key to the book of Hosea. It explains the
symbolism of the account of the poet’s marriage contained in these three chap-
ters; and it sums up the content and form of the oracles in the later part of the
book. The poem begins (v. 2) with a complaint by Hosea about his wife (and
therefore by God about his people); and it ends with the prospect of rehabilita-
tion and blessing (vv. 14-23); the second and third parts in the book also begin
with a charge laid by the Lord against his people (4:1:-12:2), and end with a pro-
mise of salvation. The message of these verses is perfectly clear. Like the pro-
phet’s wife, Israel has prostituted herself by worshipping other gods. The Lord
spies on her and punishes her, to get her to return to him (vv. 2-13). But so great
is his love for Israel that, despite her infidelity, he decides to woo her all over a-
gain, to draw her to himself, and thereby to embark on a new relationship with
her in which all will be wonderful and there will never again be infidelity (vv. 14-
23). This passage contains very rich teaching about the nature of God: the initia-
tive is always his; he is not indifferent to the infidelity of his followers; if he wat-
ches what they do and punishes them, he does so to encourage them to come
back to him. Moreover, if that does not work, he has another approach to fall
back on: he can start again from the beginning: he can renew his relationships
with his faithful and with all creation. The imagery used to describe the rehabili-
tation of Israel (vv. 14-23) is very rich and full of meaning: meditation on this pas-
sage helps the reader to appreciate what God is really like.

The first part of the poem (vv. 2-13) begins with some words of complaint about
the unfaithful wife who has left her husband and become a prostitute. However,
the reader very soon sees that what is being said here also applies to Israel and
the Lord. From v. 8 onwards, the perspective is slightly different: the dominant
theme is the relationship between God and Israel, although the reader is also
aware of the husband-wife relationship. In this way the sacred writer ensures that
the reader can see the symbolism of the message; the whole story, the imagery,
carries a message about the Lord and his people. The best example of the au-
thor’s method is in the opening words (vv. 2-3) which summarize the passage.
They declare that the marriage is over (”she is not my wife, and I am not her hus-
band”: v. 2) and give the reason why (”harlotry” and “adultery” in v. 2 mean the
adornments, tattoos, amulets etc. worn by prostitutes and loose women: cf. Gen
38:15; Prov 7:10): there is also a reference to the way in which an adulterous wife
was shunned (v. 3): stripping the woman of her garments is known to have formed
part of the punishment of her crime according to some laws in force in the ancient
East (cf. Is 47:2-3; Jer 13:22; Ezek 16:37-39; etc.). But then he moves directly on-
to the symbolic plane of God and Israel: the Israelites pay homage to the Canaa-
nite fertility gods, yet there is only one God, the Creator of heaven and earth, who
sends rain and makes things fertile. That God is the Lord: he can turn Israel into
a parched land (v. 3). So, the faults that the prophet is condemning here are reli-
gious ones. He reproves the Israelites for their feast days in honor of Canaanite
gods (vv. 11, 14); they think they ought to thank the Baals for bread and water
and the produce of the earth (vv. 5, 9, 12), whereas all these things come in fact
front the one God and Lord (v. 8).

The second part of the poem (vv. 14-23) speaks very directly about God and his
people. It proclaims that a time of salvation is coming which will see the faithful-
ness of old fully restored, stronger than ever. It begins (vv. 14-15) by nostalgical-
ly recalling the secluded life that they enjoyed together in the wilderness, during
the exodus from Egypt — depicted here as a sort of golden age in which the Lord
was his people’s only God (v. 14; cf. 11:1-4; Amos 5:25). That is why it mentions
the Valley of Achor (v. 15), which, being near Jericho, was the access route to
the promised land. It was the scene of a sin of infidelity, which God punished (cf.
Josh 7:24-26); hence its name, which means misadventure, misfortune; but be-
cause it is the only route into the holy land, the Lord now calls it a ‘’door of hope’’.

The text goes on (vv. 16-23) to describe the new Covenant that will be made ‘’on
that day’’ (vv. 16, 18, 21). The passage deals with two distinct themes: where the
second person is used (v 16, 19-20), the spousal covenant is being described;
where it is in the third person (vv. 17-18; 21-23), it is describing the effects that
that covenant will have on the whole land. The first condition of the spousal cove-
nant is that Israel will call her God “My husband” and not “My Baal” (v. 16). Baal
is a word that can mean god, and also lord or husband. In wanting to be called
“My husband”, the Lord is rejecting any type of mixing of religions: the God of Is-
rael is not one more god like the Baals; he is the only God there is. This exclu-
siveness in the area of married love, which transfers over into the Covenant, is
spelt out in vv. 19-20: it will last forever, it will be made in “righteousness and in
justice”, that is, God will provide special protection to Israel (cf. Mic 6:5; Jer 23:
6), and it will be in “steadfast love, and in mercy”: the words that the text uses
are “hesed” and “rahamin”, taking in, then, all the nuances of faithful love (cf.
the note on Is 49:15).

Later verses uses the third person (vv. 17-18, 21-23) to describe the consequen-
ces that will flow from this renewed Covenant: all creation will enjoy the peace
of Eden (v. 18), and the land of Israel will benefit most of all (vv. 21-23). Perhaps
the most significant thing here is the use of the verb “to answer”: when Israel
“answers” (cf. v. 15) God’s love, the heavens will answer the earth, and the earth
will answer its fruits (vv. 21-22). What this means is that nothing will be barren,
there will be no desire that goes unsatisfied; a proof of this is the new change
of names (v. 23): names implying indictment are replaced by names of salva-
tion.

*********************************************************************************************
Source: “The Navarre Bible: Text and Commentaries”. Biblical text from the
Revised Standard Version and New Vulgate. Commentaries by members of
the Faculty of Theology, University of Navarre, Spain.

Published by Four Courts Press, Kill Lane, Blackrock, Co. Dublin, Ireland, and
by Scepter Publishers in the United States. We encourage readers to purchase
The Navarre Bible for personal study. See Scepter Publishers for details.

“Ignorance of Scripture is ignorance of Christ.” — St Jerome

Please pray for this ministry and support it via PayPal.

“The Father uttered one Word; that Word is His Son, and He utters Him forever
in everlasting silence: and in silence the soul has to hear it.
— St John of the Cross
Ad Majorem Dei Gloriam (To the Greater Glory of God)

For: Monday, July 9, 2012

14th Week in Ordinary Time

Optional Memorial: St Augustine Zhao Rong, Priest and Martyr,
and Companions, Martyrs

From: Hosea 2:16, 17c-18, 21-22 (NAB)
Hosea 2:14, 15c-16, 19-20 (NRSV, RSV-CE and New Vulgate)

Restoration and a new Covenant


[14] Therefore, behold, I will allure her,
and bring her into the wilderness,
and speak tenderly to her.
[15] And there I will give her her vineyards,
and make the Valley of Achor a door of hope.
And there she shall answer as in the days of her youth.
as at the time when she came out of the land of Egypt.

[16] And in that day, says the Lord, you will call me, ‘My husband,’ and no lon-
ger will you call me, ‘My Baal.’ [17] For I will remove the names of the Baals
from her mouth, and they shall be mentioned by name no more. [18] And I will
make for you a covenant on that day with the beasts of the field, the birds of the
air, and the creeping things of the ground; and I will abolish the bow, the sword,
and war from the land; and I will make you lie down in safety. [19] And will be-
troth you to me for ever; I will betroth you to me in righteousness and in justice,
in steadfast love, and in mercy. [20] I will betroth you to me in faithfulness; and
you shall know the Lord.

*********************************************************************************************
Commentary:

2:2-23. This long poem contains the key to the book of Hosea. It explains the
symbolism of the account of the poet’s marriage contained in these three chap-
ters; and it sums up the content and form of the oracles in the later part of the
book. The poem begins (v. 2) with a complaint by Hosea about his wife (and
therefore by God about his people); and it ends with the prospect of rehabilita-
tion and blessing (vv. 14-23); the second and third parts in the book also begin
with a charge laid by the Lord against his people (4:1:-12:2), and end with a pro-
mise of salvation. The message of these verses is perfectly clear. Like the pro-
phet’s wife, Israel has prostituted herself by worshipping other gods. The Lord
spies on her and punishes her, to get her to return to him (vv. 2-13). But so great
is his love for Israel that, despite her infidelity, he decides to woo her all over a-
gain, to draw her to himself, and thereby to embark on a new relationship with
her in which all will be wonderful and there will never again be infidelity (vv. 14-
23). This passage contains very rich teaching about the nature of God: the initia-
tive is always his; he is not indifferent to the infidelity of his followers; if he wat-
ches what they do and punishes them, he does so to encourage them to come
back to him. Moreover, if that does not work, he has another approach to fall
back on: he can start again from the beginning: he can renew his relationships
with his faithful and with all creation. The imagery used to describe the rehabili-
tation of Israel (vv. 14-23) is very rich and full of meaning: meditation on this pas-
sage helps the reader to appreciate what God is really like.

The first part of the poem (vv. 2-13) begins with some words of complaint about
the unfaithful wife who has left her husband and become a prostitute. However,
the reader very soon sees that what is being said here also applies to Israel and
the Lord. From v. 8 onwards, the perspective is slightly different: the dominant
theme is the relationship between God and Israel, although the reader is also
aware of the husband-wife relationship. In this way the sacred writer ensures that
the reader can see the symbolism of the message; the whole story, the imagery,
carries a message about the Lord and his people. The best example of the au-
thor’s method is in the opening words (vv. 2-3) which summarize the passage.
They declare that the marriage is over (”she is not my wife, and I am not her hus-
band”: v. 2) and give the reason why (”harlotry” and “adultery” in v. 2 mean the
adornments, tattoos, amulets etc. worn by prostitutes and loose women: cf. Gen
38:15; Prov 7:10): there is also a reference to the way in which an adulterous wife
was shunned (v. 3): stripping the woman of her garments is known to have formed
part of the punishment of her crime according to some laws in force in the ancient
East (cf. Is 47:2-3; Jer 13:22; Ezek 16:37-39; etc.). But then he moves directly on-
to the symbolic plane of God and Israel: the Israelites pay homage to the Canaa-
nite fertility gods, yet there is only one God, the Creator of heaven and earth, who
sends rain and makes things fertile. That God is the Lord: he can turn Israel into
a parched land (v. 3). So, the faults that the prophet is condemning here are reli-
gious ones. He reproves the Israelites for their feast days in honor of Canaanite
gods (vv. 11, 14); they think they ought to thank the Baals for bread and water
and the produce of the earth (vv. 5, 9, 12), whereas all these things come in fact
front the one God and Lord (v. 8).

The second part of the poem (vv. 14-23) speaks very directly about God and his
people. It proclaims that a time of salvation is coming which will see the faithful-
ness of old fully restored, stronger than ever. It begins (vv. 14-15) by nostalgical-
ly recalling the secluded life that they enjoyed together in the wilderness, during
the exodus from Egypt — depicted here as a sort of golden age in which the Lord
was his people’s only God (v. 14; cf. 11:1-4; Amos 5:25). That is why it mentions
the Valley of Achor (v. 15), which, being near Jericho, was the access route to
the promised land. It was the scene of a sin of infidelity, which God punished (cf.
Josh 7:24-26); hence its name, which means misadventure, misfortune; but be-
cause it is the only route into the holy land, the Lord now calls it a ‘’door of hope’’.

The text goes on (vv. 16-23) to describe the new Covenant that will be made ‘’on
that day’’ (vv. 16, 18, 21). The passage deals with two distinct themes: where the
second person is used (v 16, 19-20), the spousal covenant is being described;
where it is in the third person (vv. 17-18; 21-23), it is describing the effects that
that covenant will have on the whole land. The first condition of the spousal cove-
nant is that Israel will call her God “My husband” and not “My Baal” (v. 16). Baal
is a word that can mean god, and also lord or husband. In wanting to be called
“My husband”, the Lord is rejecting any type of mixing of religions: the God of Is-
rael is not one more god like the Baals; he is the only God there is. This exclu-
siveness in the area of married love, which transfers over into the Covenant, is
spelt out in vv. 19-20: it will last forever, it will be made in “righteousness and in
justice”, that is, God will provide special protection to Israel (cf. Mic 6:5; Jer 23:
6), and it will be in “steadfast love, and in mercy”: the words that the text uses
are “hesed” and “rahamin”, taking in, then, all the nuances of faithful love (cf.
the note on Is 49:15).

Later verses uses the third person (vv. 17-18, 21-23) to describe the consequen-
ces that will flow from this renewed Covenant: all creation will enjoy the peace
of Eden (v. 18), and the land of Israel will benefit most of all (vv. 21-23). Perhaps
the most significant thing here is the use of the verb “to answer”: when Israel
“answers” (cf. v. 15) God’s love, the heavens will answer the earth, and the earth
will answer its fruits (vv. 21-22). What this means is that nothing will be barren,
there will be no desire that goes unsatisfied; a proof of this is the new change
of names (v. 23): names implying indictment are replaced by names of salva-
tion.

*********************************************************************************************
Source: “The Navarre Bible: Text and Commentaries”. Biblical text from the
Revised Standard Version and New Vulgate. Commentaries by members of
the Faculty of Theology, University of Navarre, Spain.

Published by Four Courts Press, Kill Lane, Blackrock, Co. Dublin, Ireland, and
by Scepter Publishers in the United States.


3 posted on 07/06/2014 7:37:54 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

From: Matthew 9:18-26

The Raising of Jairus’ Daughter


[18] While He (Jesus) was speaking to them, behold, a ruler came in and knelt
before Him, saying, “My daughter has just died; but come and lay Your hand on
her, and she will live.” [19] And Jesus rose and followed him, with His disciples.

The Curing of the Woman with a Hemorrhage


[20] And behold, a woman who had suffered from a hemorrhage for twelve years
came up behind Him and touched the fringe of His garment; [21] for she said to
herself, “If I only touch His garment, I shall be made well.” [22] Jesus turned,
and seeing her He said, “Take heart, daughter; your faith has made you well.”
And instantly the woman was made well. [23] And when Jesus came to the ru-
ler’s house, and saw the flute players, and the crowd making a tumult, [24] He
said, “Depart; for the girl is not dead but sleeping.” And they laughed at Him.
[25] But when the crowd had been put outside, He went in and took her by the
hand, and the girl arose. [26] And the report of this went through all that district.

*********************************************************************************************
Commentary:

18-26. Here are two miracles which occur almost simultaneously. From parallel
passages in Mark (5:21-43) and Luke (8:40-56) we know that the “ruler” (of the
synagogue) referred to here was called Jairus. The Gospels report Jesus raising
three people to life—this girl, the son of the widow of Nain, and Lazarus. In each
case the identity of the person is clearly given.

This account shows us, once again, the role faith plays in Jesus’ saving actions.
In the case of the woman with the hemorrhage we should note that Jesus is won
over by her sincerity and faith: she does not let obstacles get in her way. Simi-
larly, Jairus does not care what people will say; a prominent person in his city,
he humbles himself before Jesus for all to see.

18. “Knelt before Him”: the eastern way of showing respect to God or to impor-
tant people. In the liturgy, especially in the presence of the Blessed Eucharist,
reverences are a legitimate and appropriate external sign of internal faith and
adoration.

23. “The flute players”: engaged to provide music at wakes and funerals.

24. “Depart, for the girl is not dead, but sleeping”: Jesus says the same thing
about Lazarus: “Our friend Lazarus has fallen asleep, but I go to awaken him”
(John 11:11).

Although Jesus speaks of sleep, there is no question of the girl — or Lazarus,
later — not being dead. For our Lord there is only one true death — that of
eternal punishment (cf. Matthew 10:28).

*********************************************************************************************
Source: “The Navarre Bible: Text and Commentaries”. Biblical text from the
Revised Standard Version and New Vulgate. Commentaries by members of
the Faculty of Theology, University of Navarre, Spain.

Published by Four Courts Press, Kill Lane, Blackrock, Co. Dublin, Ireland, and
by Scepter Publishers in the United States.


4 posted on 07/06/2014 7:39:23 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Scripture readings taken from the Jerusalem Bible, published and copyright © 1966, 1967 and 1968 by Darton, Longman & Todd

Readings at Mass


First reading

Hosea 2:16,17-18,21-22 ©

It is the Lord who speaks:

I am going to lure her

and lead her out into the wilderness

and speak to her heart.

I am going to give her back her vineyards,

and make the Valley of Achor a gateway of hope.

There she will respond to me as she did when she was young,

as she did when she came out of the land of Egypt.

When that day comes – it is the Lord who speaks –

she will call me, ‘My husband’,

no longer will she call me, ‘My Baal.’

I will betroth you to myself for ever,

betroth you with integrity and justice,

with tenderness and love;

I will betroth you to myself with faithfulness,

and you will come to know the Lord.


Psalm

Psalm 144:2-9 ©

The Lord is kind and full of compassion.

I will bless you day after day

  and praise your name for ever.

The Lord is great, highly to be praised,

  his greatness cannot be measured.

The Lord is kind and full of compassion.

Age to age shall proclaim your works,

  shall declare your mighty deeds,

shall speak of your splendour and glory,

  tell the tale of your wonderful works.

The Lord is kind and full of compassion.

They will speak of your terrible deeds,

  recount your greatness and might.

They will recall your abundant goodness;

  age to age shall ring out your justice.

The Lord is kind and full of compassion.

The Lord is kind and full of compassion,

  slow to anger, abounding in love.

How good is the Lord to all,

  compassionate to all his creatures.

The Lord is kind and full of compassion.


Gospel Acclamation

cf.Jn6:63,68

Alleluia, alleluia!

Your words are spirit, Lord, and they are life;

you have the message of eternal life.

Alleluia!

Or

cf.2Tim1:10

Alleluia, alleluia!

Our Saviour Jesus Christ abolished death

and he has proclaimed life through the Good News.

Alleluia!


Gospel

Matthew 9:18-26 ©

While Jesus was speaking, up came one of the officials, who bowed low in front of him and said, ‘My daughter has just died, but come and lay your hand on her and her life will be saved.’ Jesus rose and, with his disciples, followed him. Then from behind him came a woman, who had suffered from a haemorrhage for twelve years, and she touched the fringe of his cloak, for she said to herself, ‘If I can only touch his cloak I shall be well again.’ Jesus turned round and saw her; and he said to her, ‘Courage, my daughter, your faith has restored you to health.’ And from that moment the woman was well again.

  When Jesus reached the official’s house and saw the flute-players, with the crowd making a commotion he said, ‘Get out of here; the little girl is not dead, she is asleep.’ And they laughed at him. But when the people had been turned out he went inside and took the little girl by the hand; and she stood up. And the news spread all round the countryside.


5 posted on 07/06/2014 7:43:11 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Perpetual Novena for the Nation (Ecumenical)
6 posted on 07/06/2014 7:47:48 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Prayers for The Religion Forum (Ecumenical)
7 posted on 07/06/2014 7:48:14 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

 
Jesus, High Priest
 

We thank you, God our Father, for those who have responded to your call to priestly ministry.

Accept this prayer we offer on their behalf: Fill your priests with the sure knowledge of your love.

Open their hearts to the power and consolation of the Holy Spirit.

Lead them to new depths of union with your Son.

Increase in them profound faith in the Sacraments they celebrate as they nourish, strengthen and heal us.

Lord Jesus Christ, grant that these, your priests, may inspire us to strive for holiness by the power of their example, as men of prayer who ponder your word and follow your will.

O Mary, Mother of Christ and our mother, guard with your maternal care these chosen ones, so dear to the Heart of your Son.

Intercede for our priests, that offering the Sacrifice of your Son, they may be conformed more each day to the image of your Son, our Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ. Amen.

Saint John Vianney, universal patron of priests, pray for us and our priests

This icon shows Jesus Christ, our eternal high priest.

The gold pelican over His heart represents self-sacrifice.

The border contains an altar and grapevines, representing the Mass, and icons of Melchizedek and St. Jean-Baptiste Vianney.

Melchizedek: king of righteousness (left icon) was priest and king of Jerusalem.  He blessed Abraham and has been considered an ideal priest-king.

St. Jean-Baptiste Vianney is the patron saint of parish priests.

8 posted on 07/06/2014 7:48:53 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Pray a Rosary each day for our nation.

Pray the Rosary

1.  Sign of the Cross:  In the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit.  Amen.

2.  The Apostles Creed:  I BELIEVE in God, the Father almighty, Creator of heaven and earth, and in Jesus Christ, His only Son, our Lord, who was conceived by the Holy Spirit, born of the Virgin Mary, suffered under Pontius Pilate, was crucified, died, and was buried. He descended into hell; on the third day he rose again from the dead; he ascended into heaven, and is seated at the right hand of God, the Father Almighty; from there He shall come to judge the living and the dead.

I believe in the Holy Spirit, the holy catholic Church, the communion of saints, the forgiveness of sins, the resurrection of the body, and the life everlasting. Amen.

3.  The Lord's Prayer:  OUR Father, who art in heaven, hallowed be Thy name. Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done on earth as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread and forgive us our trespasses as we forgive those who trespass against us. And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil. Amen.

4. (3) Hail Mary:  HAIL Mary, full of grace, the Lord is with thee. Blessed art thou amongst women and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus. Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners, now, and in the hour of our death. Amen. (Three times)

5. Glory Be:  GLORY be to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit. As it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be, world without end. Amen.

Fatima Prayer: Oh, my Jesus, forgive us our sins, save us from the fires of hell, lead all souls to heaven, especially those in most need of your mercy.

Announce each mystery, then say 1 Our Father, 10 Hail Marys, 1 Glory Be and 1 Fatima prayer.  Repeat the process with each mystery.

End with the Hail Holy Queen:

Hail, Holy Queen, Mother of Mercy, our life, our sweetness and our hope! To thee do we cry, poor banished children of Eve! To thee do we send up our sighs, mourning and weeping in this vale of tears! Turn then, most gracious advocate, thine eyes of mercy towards us; and after this, our exile, show unto us the blessed fruit of thy womb, Jesus!

O clement, O loving, O sweet Virgin Mary! Pray for us, O holy Mother of God, that we may be made worthy of the promises of Christ.

Final step -- The Sign of the Cross

 

The Mysteries of the Rosary

By tradition, Catholics meditate on these Mysteries during prayers of the Rosary.
The biblical references follow each of the Mysteries below.


The Joyful Mysteries
(Mondays and Saturdays)

1. The Annunciation (Luke 1:26-38) [Spiritual fruit - Humility]
2. The Visitation (Luke 1: 39-56) [Spiritual fruit - Love of Neighbor]
3. The Nativity (Luke 2:1-20) [Spiritual fruit - Poverty of Spirit]
4. The Presentation (Luke 2:21-38) [Spiritual fruit - Purity of mind & body]
5. The Finding of Jesus in the Temple (Luke 2:41-52) [Spiritual fruit - Obedience ]

9 posted on 07/06/2014 7:49:19 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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~ PRAYER ~

St. Michael, the Archangel, defend us in battle
 Be our protection against the wickedness
and snares of the devil;
May God rebuke him, we  humbly pray,
 and do thou, O Prince of the heavenly host,
 by the power of God,
 Cast into hell Satan and all the evil spirits
who prowl through the world seeking the ruin of souls.
 Amen
+

10 posted on 07/06/2014 7:49:51 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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A Prayer for our Free Nation Under God
God Save Our Country web site (prayer warriors)
Prayer Chain Request for the United States of America
Pray for Nancy Pelosi
Prayer and fasting will help defeat health care reform (Freeper Prayer Thread)
Prayer Campaign Started to Convert Pro-Abortion Catholic Politicians to Pro-Life
[Catholic Caucus] One Million Rosaries
Non-stop Rosary vigil to defeat ObamaCare

From an Obama bumper sticker on a car:

"Pray for Obama.  Psalm 109:8"

   

PLEASE JOIN US -

Evening Prayer
Someone has said that if people really understood the full extent of the power we have available through prayer, we might be speechless.
Did you know that during WWII there was an advisor to Churchill who organized a group of people who dropped what they were doing every day at a prescribed hour for one minute to collectively pray for the safety of England, its people and peace?  


There is now a group of people organizing the same thing here in America. If you would like to participate: Every evening at 9:00 PM Eastern Time (8:00 PM Central) (7:00 PM Mountain) (6:00 PM Pacific), stop whatever you are doing and spend one minute praying for the safety of the United States, our troops, our citizens, and for a return to a Godly nation. If you know anyone else who would like to participate, please pass this along. Our prayers are the most powerful asset we have.    Please forward this to your praying friends.


11 posted on 07/06/2014 7:50:16 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Most Precious Blood of Our Lord Jesus Christ
 

 
July Devotion: The Precious Blood

July Devotion: The Precious Blood 
Like the Sacred Wounds of Jesus, His Precious Blood deserves special honor because of its close relation to the Sacred Passion. That honor was given to it from the beginning by the Apostles who praised its redeeming power. (Rom. 5:9 "we are justified by His blood"; Heb. 13:12 "and so Jesus also, that He might sanctify the people by His blood, suffered outside the gate"; 1 John 1:7 "and the blood of Jesus Christ, His Son, cleanses us from all sin.") 
The Church has always held devotion to the Precious Blood in high esteem. We continue to recognize and publicly acknowledge the profound indebtedness of the whole human race to Christ, Priest and Victim. 
Standing at the foot of the cross, we see Jesus' head, hands, feet, and side pouring out streams of precious blood. It is precious because it: 
•      Redeems us and atones for our sins. Through His precious blood we are reconciled to God, made one with Him. Death ceases to be death and heaven's gates are opened to us.  
•      Cleanses us from all sin.  
•      Preserves us and keeps us safe from the grasp of evil.  When the Father sees us washed in the Blood of the Lamb we are spared.  
•      Comforts us. It is the constant reminder that Jesus - true God and true man suffered and died to save us and to open heaven to us because He loves us.  
•      Sanctifies us.  The same blood that justifies by taking away sin, continues to work within us.  Its action gives us the grace to continue on the path toward the Kingdom of God.  It assists us in achieving our new nature, leading us onward in subduing sin and in following the commands of God.  
Jesus shed His precious blood seven times during His life on earth.  They events were: 
•      Jesus shed His Blood in the Circumcision  
•      Jesus shed His Blood whilst praying in the Garden of Olives  
•      Jesus shed His Blood in the scourging  
•      Jesus shed His Blood in the crowning with thorns  
•      Jesus shed His Blood while carrying His cross  
•      Jesus shed His Blood in the crucifixion  
•      Jesus shed His Blood and water when His side was pierced 
 
The Power of the Precious Blood 
"I adore You, O Precious Blood of Jesus, flower of creation, fruit of virginity, ineffable instrument of the Holy Spirit, and I rejoice at the thought that You came from the drop of virginal blood on which eternal Love impressed its movement; You were assumed by the Word and deified in His person. I am overcome with emotion when I think of Your passing from the Blessed Virgin's heart into the heart of the Word, and, being vivified by the breath of the Divinity, becoming adorable because You became the Blood of God." (St. Albert the Great)
 

At their recent meeting, the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops had continuous Adoration of the Blessed Sacrament for "healing and peace."   They encouraged parishes and communities to have ongoing Adoration of the Blessed Sacrament.  In these dark months of woundedness, pain and violence we need to turn to the Precious Blood of Jesus in the Eucharist, for healing, peace, and light.  
"What power we have in the Precious Blood of Jesus in the Holy Eucharist!  He is there to protect us, to be our refuge and our redemption.  (In Exodus 12, God told Moses to have His chosen people mark their door posts with the blood of an unblemished lamb, during the first Passover. Those who did this were spared when the Angel of the death passed by). This is why Archbishop Sheen said that we must call down the Blood of the Lamb, Jesus in the Most Blessed Sacrament.  For, he warned, when we stop calling down the Blood of the Lamb, we start calling down the blood of each other."  (From our book Bread of Life)      
"And the Lamb on the throne will shepherd them. He will lead them to springs of life-giving water" (Rev 7:17). 
"In the tumultuous events of our time, it is important to look to the Eucharist: it must be at the heart of the life of priests and consecrated people; the light and strength of spouses in putting into practice their commitment to fidelity, chastity and the apostolate; the ideal in education and in training children, adolescents and young people; the comfort and support of those who are troubled, of the sick and all who are weeping in the Gethsemane of life."  (Pope John Paul II)  
Precious Blood of Jesus, save us! 
"The only time our Lord asked the Apostles for anything was the night when He went into His agony.  But as often in the history of the church since that time, evil was awake, but the disciples were asleep.  That is why there came out of His anguished and lonely Heart a sigh: 'Could you not watch one hour with Me?'" (Mt 26:40).  Not for an hour of activity did he plead, but for an hour of friendship (Archbishop Fulton J. Sheen).  
 
St. Maria Goretti,  Patroness of Youth & Children of Mary, Feast-July 6 St. Maria of Italy (1890-1902), couldn't wait to make her First Communion.  She wanted to receive Jesus in the Holy Eucharist so that she could become more beautiful and pure like Him; she wanted Him to live in her, close to her heart.  After she received Jesus in the Blessed Sacrament for the first time, she stayed in Church for a long time after Mass to talk to Him. Maria's family lived with and worked for a farmer. His son Alessandro kept trying to make Maria sin against purity.  One day, when everyone else was working, Alessandro grabbed Maria and tried to make her sin.  Maria kept crying out for him to stop, and each time she did, he stabbed her. Courageously,   Maria resisted him and was stabbed fourteen times. St. Maria died the next day.  
"Look at Maria Goretti....  Like her, be capable of defending your purity of heart and body.  Be committed to the struggle against evil and sin.  Always esteem and love, purity and virginity." (Pope John Paul II, 1990)      
 
A Prayer for Priests 
O my God, help those priests who are faithful to remain faithful; to those who are falling, stretch forth Your Divine Hand that they may grasp it as their support.  In the great ocean of Your mercy, lift those poor unfortunate ones who have fallen, that being engulfed therein they may receive the grace to return to Your Great Loving Heart.  Amen.  Precious Blood of Jesus, protect them!
 
The Eucharist is the fruit of our Lords Passion. Jesus gave up His Body on the cross so that He may give you His Body in the Holy Eucharist. Jesus poured out His very last drop of Blood on the cross so that He may fill you with His Divine Love each time that you receive Him in Holy Communion and visit Him in Eucharistic Adoration! 
"The Eucharist, in the Mass and outside of the Mass, is the Body and Blood of Jesus Christ, and is therefore deserving of the worship that is given to the living God, and to Him alone" (Pope John Paul II, September 29, 1979, Phoenix Park, Ireland) 
"The bread and wine, fruit of human hands, transformed through the power of the Holy Spirit into the body and blood of Christ, become a pledge of the 'new heaven and new earth,' announced by the Church in her daily mission." "In Christ, whom we adore present in the mystery of the Eucharist, the father uttered his final word with regard to humanity and human history." "To live the Eucharist, it is necessary, as well, to spend much time in adoration in front of the Blessed Sacrament, something which I myself experience every day drawing from it strength, consolation and assistance."  "How could the Church fulfill her vocation without cultivating a constant relationship with the Eucharist, without nourishing herself with this food which sanctifies, without founding her missionary activity on this indispensable support?" "To evangelize the world there is need of apostles who are 'experts' in the celebration, adoration and contemplation of the Eucharist" (Pope John Paul II, World Mission Message 2004).
 
The Power of the Precious Blood of Jesus in the Holy Eucharist  
 
"The Precious Blood belongs in an especial manner to men. Much more, therefore, does God invite them to come to its heavenly baths, and receive therein, not only the cleansing of their souls, but the power of a new and amazing life. Every doctrine in theology is a call to the Precious Blood.  Every ceremony in the Church tells of it . . . .  Every supernatural act is a growth of it. Everything that is holy on earth is either a leaf, bud, blossom or fruit of the Blood of Jesus. To its fountains God calls the sinner, that he may be lightened of his burdens. There is no remission of him in anything else.  Only there is his lost sonship to be found. The saints are no less called by God to these invigorating streams. It is out of the Precious Blood that men draw martyrdoms, vocations, celebacies, austerities, heroic charities, and all the magnificent graces of high sanctity.  The secret nourishment of prayer is from those fountains" (Father Faber, The Precious Blood).  
 

The Most Precious Blood of Jesus
July is traditionally associated with the Precious Blood of Our Lord. It may be customary to celebrate the votive Mass of the Precious Blood on July 1.

The extraordinary importance of the saving Blood of Christ has ensured a central place for its memorial in the celebration of this cultic mystery: at the centre of the Eucharistic assembly, in which the Church raises up to God in thanksgiving "the cup of blessing" (1 Cor 10, 16; cf Ps 115-116, 13) and offers it to the faithful as a "real communion with the Blood of Christ" (1 Cor 10, 16); and throughout the Liturgical Year. The Church celebrates the saving Blood of Christ not only on the Solemnity of the Body and Blood of Christ, but also on many other occasions, such that the cultic remembrance of the Blood of our redemption (cf 1 Pt 1, 18) pervades the entire Liturgical Year. Hence, at Vespers during Christmastide, the Church, addressing Christ, sings: "Nos quoque, qui sancto tuo redempti sumus sanguine, ob diem natalis tui hymnum novum concinimus." In the Paschal Triduum, the redemptive significance and efficacy of the Blood of Christ is continuously recalled in adoration. During the adoration of the Cross on Good Friday the Church sings the hymn: "Mite corpus perforatur, sanguis unde profluit; terra, pontus, astra, mundus quo lavanturflumine", and again on Easter Sunday, "Cuius corpus sanctissimum in ara crucis torridum, sed et cruorem roesum gustando, Deo vivimus (194).

Catholic Word of the Day: LITANY OF THE PRECIOUS BLOOD, 09-25-12
ST. GASPAR: Founder of the Society of the Precious Blood
Mass in the Cathedral of the Most Precious Blood of Our Lord Jesus Christ (London, 9/18)

Devotion to the Drops of Blood Lost by our Lord Jesus Christ on His Way to Calvary (Prayer/Devotion)
Chaplet of the Most Precious Blood
Catholic Word of the Day: PRECIOUS BLOOD, 12-03-11
The Traditional Feast of the Most Precious Blood of Our Lord Jesus Christ (Catholic Caucus)
Devotion to the Precious Blood
DOCTRINE OF THE BLOOD OF CHRIST
,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,And More on the Precious Blood
Litany of the Most Precious Blood of Our Lord Jesus Christ
NOTHING IS MORE POTENT AGAINST EVIL THAN PLEADING THE PRECIOUS BLOOD OF CHRIST
Litany of the Most Precious Blood of Jesus


"Amen, amen, I say to you, unless you eat the flesh of the Son of Man and drink his blood, you do not have life within you"  (Jn 6:53).  

12 posted on 07/06/2014 8:00:29 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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July 2014

Pope's Intentions

Universal: That sports may always be occasions of human fraternity and growth.

For Evangelization: That the Holy Spirit may support the work of the laity who proclaim the Gospel in the poorest countries.

13 posted on 07/06/2014 8:01:03 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Daily Gospel Commentary

Monday of the Fourteenth week in Ordinary Time

Commentary of the day
Saint Augustine (354-430), Bishop of Hippo (North Africa) and Doctor of the Church
Sermons on Saint John’s Gospel, no.49, 1-3

"Come, lay your hand on her, and she will live"

“The hour is coming, in the which all that are in the graves shall hear His voice, and shall come forth” (Jn 5,28)… We have read in the Gospel of three dead persons who were raised to life by the Lord, and, let us hope, to some good purpose. For surely the Lord's deeds are not merely deeds, but signs... We were listening with wonder… in the reading of the Gospel, how Lazarus was restored to life (Jn 11). If we turn our thoughts to the still more wonderful works of Christ, every one that believes rises again: if we all consider, and understand that more horrifying kind of death, everyone who sins dies.

But every man is afraid of the death of the flesh; few, of the death of the soul... Man, destined to die, labors to avert his dying; and yet man, destined to live for ever, labors not to cease from sinning..! Oh that we could arouse men, and be ourselves aroused along with them, to be as great lovers of the life that abides, as men are of that which passes away..! Who has had it said to him: “Be off to sea if you would escape with your life”, and has delayed to do so? Who has had it said to him: “Set to work if you would preserve your life”, and has continued a sluggard? It is but little that God requires of us, that we may live for ever: and we neglect to obey Him...

If, then, the Lord in the greatness of His grace and mercy raises our souls to life, that we may not die for ever, we may well understand that those three dead persons whom He raised in the body, have some figurative significance of that resurrection of the soul which is effected by faith.


14 posted on 07/06/2014 8:04:11 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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The greatest mercy of God is not to let those nations remain in peace with each other who are not at peace with God.

-- Saint Padre Pio of Pietrelcina

15 posted on 07/06/2014 8:15:49 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Just A Minute Just A Minute (Listen)
Some of EWTN's most popular hosts and guests in a collection of one minute inspirational messages. A different message each time you click.

16 posted on 07/06/2014 8:16:44 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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The Angelus 

The Angel of the Lord declared to Mary: 
And she conceived of the Holy Spirit. 

Hail Mary, full of grace, the Lord is with thee; blessed art thou among women and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus.
Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners, now and at the hour of our death. Amen. 

Behold the handmaid of the Lord: Be it done unto me according to Thy word. 

Hail Mary . . . 

And the Word was made Flesh: And dwelt among us. 

Hail Mary . . . 


Pray for us, O Holy Mother of God, that we may be made worthy of the promises of Christ. 

Let us pray: 

Pour forth, we beseech Thee, O Lord, Thy grace into our hearts; that we, to whom the incarnation of Christ, Thy Son, was made known by the message of an angel, may by His Passion and Cross be brought to the glory of His Resurrection, through the same Christ Our Lord.

Amen. 


17 posted on 07/06/2014 8:17:56 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Information: St. Ethelburga

Feast Day: July 7

Died: 664 at Faremoutier, France

18 posted on 07/07/2014 6:16:42 AM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Interactive Saints for Kids

 

 

Blessed Roger Dickenson, Blessed Ralph Milner and Blessed Lawrence Humphrey

Feast Day: July 07
Born/Died: (sixteenth century)

These three martyrs lived in England at a time when the Catholic Church was under terrible torture by Queen Elizabeth I.

"Mr." Roger Dickenson was an Englishman from Lincoln who studied to become a priest in Rheims, France. Father Dickenson was then sent on a mission to England. There he worked as an undercover diocesan priest. He said Mass, helped Catholics receive the sacraments and strengthen their faith. He could not do it openly because he knew he would be arrested and put in prison or even killed. And although he was happy to die for Jesus, he was needed by the Catholic community, so they could practice their faith.

Ralph Milner was an uneducated farmer from Flacstead in Hampshire, who had a wife and eight children. He was brought up as a Protestant but was so impressed by the good example of his Catholic neighbors, that he took instructions and was received into the Catholic Church. On the day he made his First Communion he was put into prison for being a Catholic.

The prison guards respected and trusted Farmer Milner because of his good behavior. So for many years, he went on "parole" to find supplies of food and utilities. He also helped the prisoners with their spiritual needs by bringing them undercover priests. This is how he met Father Dickenson.

While on parole, he was of great help to Father Dickenson and Father Stanney, a Jesuit priest. Finally, the day came when Father Dickenson and Farmer Milner were both arrested when they were going around the local villages meeting the needs of the Catholics there.

They were taken to the Winchester jail and brought to trial together. Father Dickenson was charged for the crime of being a Catholic priest. Farmer Milner was charged with helping Father Dickenson perform his ministry.

The judge looked at Mrs. Milner and the couple's eight children and took pity on them. He wanted to free Milner at all costs. "All you have to do," he said, "is visit a Protestant church, just for a few minutes, to say you have been there. I'll let you go free to be with your family." Mr. Milner quietly and firmly refused saying he would rather die for his faith.

On July 7, 1591, he and Father Dickenson went bravely to their deaths where they were hung, drawn and quartered.

The third martyr, Lawrence Humphrey was born at Hampshire in England. With the help of Father Stanney, S.J., he was converted and became a Catholic. Lawrence was just twenty-one years old when he was arrested but he would not give up the faith he had so recently found. He too was hanged, drawn and quartered at the Winchester prison.

Reflection: How deep is my faith and relationship with God? Am I ready to give my life for Him?


19 posted on 07/07/2014 6:28:27 AM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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CATHOLIC ALMANAC

Monday, July 7

Liturgical Color: Green

Blessed Mother Teresa of Calcutta
founded the Missionaries of Charity on
this day in 1950. "Prayer begets faith,
faith begets love, and love begets service
on behalf of the poor." -Bl. Teresa of Calcutta

20 posted on 07/07/2014 2:04:41 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Day 206 - How can one be delivered from serious sin? // What are vices? // Are we responsible for other people's sins?

How can a person be delivered from a serious sin and reunited with God?

In order to heal the break with God that is caused by a serious sin, a Catholic Christian must be reconciled with God through confession.


What are vices?

Vices are negative habits that deaden and dull the conscience, incline a person to evil, and habitually prepare him for sin.

Human vices are found in connection with the capital sins of pride, avarice, envy, anger, lust, gluttony, and sloth (or acedia, spiritual boredom).


Are we responsible for the sins of other people?

No, we are not responsible for other people's sins, unless we are guilty of misleading or seducing another person to sin or of cooperating in it or of encouraging someone else to sin or of neglecting to offer a timely warning or our help. (YOUCAT questions 317-319)


Dig Deeper: CCC section (1865-1868) and other references here.


21 posted on 07/07/2014 2:11:50 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Part 3: Life in Christ (1691 - 2557)

Section 1: Man's Vocation — Life in the Spirit (1699 - 2051)

Chapter 1: The Dignity of the Human Person (1700 - 1876)

Article 8: Sin (1846 - 1876)

V. THE PROLIFERATION OF SIN

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1865

Sin creates a proclivity to sin; it engenders vice by repetition of the same acts. This results in perverse inclinations which cloud conscience and corrupt the concrete judgment of good and evil. Thus sin tends to reproduce itself and reinforce itself, but it cannot destroy the moral sense at its root.

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Vices can be classified according to the virtues they oppose, or also be linked to the capital sins which Christian experience has distinguished, following St. John Cassian and St. Gregory the Great. They are called "capital" because they engender other sins, other vices.138 They are pride, avarice, envy, wrath, lust, gluttony, and sloth or acedia.

138.

Cf. St. Gregory the Great, Moralia in Job, 31,45:PL 76,621A.

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The catechetical tradition also recalls that there are "sins that cry to heaven": the blood of Abel,139 the sin of the Sodomites,140 the cry of the people oppressed in Egypt,141 the cry of the foreigner, the widow, and the orphan,142 injustice to the wage earner.143

139.

Cf. Gen 4:10.

140.

Cf. Gen 18:20; 19:13.

141.

Cf. Ex 3:7-10.

142.

Cf. Ex 20:20-22.

143.

Cf. Deut 24:14-15; Jas 5:4.

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Sin is a personal act. Moreover, we have a responsibility for the sins committed by others when we cooperate in them:


22 posted on 07/07/2014 2:31:04 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Catholic Culture

 

Daily Readings for:July 07, 2014
(Readings on USCCB website)

Collect: O God, who in the abasement of your Son have raised up a fallen world, fill your faithful with holy joy, for on those you have rescued from slavery to sin you bestow eternal gladness. Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son, who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.

RECIPES

o    Baked Potato Soup

o    Pumpkin Orange Cake

ACTIVITIES

o    Confidence in God

o    Family Rosary

o    Religion in the Home for Elementary School: July

o    Religion in the Home for Preschool: July

PRAYERS

o    Novena to Our Lady of Mount Carmel

·         Ordinary Time: July 7th

·         Monday of the Fourteenth Week of Ordinary Time

Old Calendar: Sts. Cyril and Methodius, bishops and confessors; St. Willibald, bishop; St. Pantaenus, Church father

According to the 1962 Missal of St. John XXIII the Extraordinary Form of the Roman Rite, today is the feast of Sts. Cyril and Methodius. Their memorial in the Ordinary Form of the Roman Rite is celebrated on March 7. Today is also the historical feast of St. Willibald and St. Pantaenus, Father of the Church, (+ c. 216).


St. Willibard
St. Willibard was son of the holy king St. Richard, and was born about the year 704 in the kingdom of the West-Saxons, about the place where Southampton now stands. When he was three years old his life was despaired of in a violent sickness; but when all natural remedies proved unsuccessful, his parents carried him and laid him at the foot of a great cross which was erected in a public place near their house, according to the custom in Catholic countries to this day. There they poured forth their prayers with great fervor, and made a promise to God that in case the child recovered they would consecrate him to the divine service. God accepted their pious offering, and the child was immediately restored to his health. St. Richard kept the child two years longer at home, but only regarded him as a sacred depositum committed to him by God; and when he was five years old placed him under the Abbot Egbald, and other holy tutors in the monastery of Waltheim. The young saint, from the first use of his reason, in all his thoughts and actions seemed to aspire only to heaven, and his heart seemed full only of God and his holy love. He left this monastery about the year 721, when he was seventeen years old, and his brother Winibald nineteen, to accompany his father and brother in a pilgrimage of devotion to the tombs of the apostles at Rome, and to the Holy Land. They visited many churches in France on their road; but St. Richard died at Lucca, where his relics are still venerated in the church of St. Fridian, and he is commemorated in the Roman Martyrology on the 7th of February. The two sons went on to Rome, and there took the monastic habit.

About two years after this, Winibald having been obliged to return to England, St. Willibald, with two or three young Englishmen, set out to visit the holy places which Christ had sanctified by his sacred presence on earth. They added most severe mortifications to the incredible fatigues of their journey, living only on bread and water, and at land using no other bed than the bare ground. They sailed first to Cyprus and thence into Syria. At Emesa St. Willibald was taken by the Saracens for a spy, was loaded with irons, and suffered much in severe confinement for several months, till certain persons, who were charmed with his wonderful virtue, and moved with compassion for his disaster, satisfied the caliph of his innocence, and procured his enlargement. The holy pilgrims expressed their gratitude to their benefactors, and pursued their journey to the holy places. They resolved in visiting them to follow our Divine Redeemer in the course of his mortal life; and therefore they began their devotions at Nazareth. Our saint passed there some days with his companions in the continual contemplation of the infinite mercies of God in the great mystery of the incarnation; and the sight of the place in which it was wrought drew from his eyes streams of devout tears during all the time of his stay in that town. From Nazareth he went to Bethlehem, and thence into Egypt, making no account of the fatigues and hardships of his journey, and assiduously meditating on what our Blessed Redeemer had suffered in the same. He returned to Nazareth, and thence traveled to Cana, Capharnaum, and Jerusalem. In this last place he made a long stay to satisfy his fervor in adoring Christ in the places where he wrought so many great mysteries, particularly on the mountains of Calvary and Olivet, the theaters of his sacred death and ascension. He likewise visited all the famous monasteries, lauras, and hermitages in that country, with an ardent desire of learning and imitating all the most perfect practices of virtue, and whatever might seem most conducive to the sanctification of his soul. The tender and lively sentiments of devotion with which his fervent contemplation on the holy mysteries of our redemption inspired him at the sight of all those sacred places, filled his devout soul with heavenly consolations, and made on it strong and lasting impressions. In his return a severe sickness at Acon exercised his patience and resignation. After seven years employed in this pilgrimage he arrived safe with his companions in Italy.

The celebrated monastery of Mount Cassino having been lately repaired by Pope Gregory II., the saint chose that house for his residence, and his fervent example contributed very much to settle in it the primitive spirit of its holy institute during the ten years that he lived there. He was first appointed sacristan, afterwards dean or superior over ten monks, and during the last eight years porter, which was an office of great trust and importance, and required a rooted habit of virtue which might suffer no abatement by external employs and frequent commerce with seculars. It happened that in 738 St. Boniface, coming to Rome, begged of Pope Gregory III. that Willibald, who was his cousin, might be sent to assist him in his missions in Germany. The pope desired to see the monk, and was much delighted with the history of his travels, and edified with his virtue. In the close of their conversation, he acquainted him of Bishop Boniface’s request. Willibald desired to go back at least to obtain the leave and blessing of his abbot; but the pope told him his order sufficed, and commanded him to go without more ado into Germany. The saint replied that he was ready to go wheresoever his holiness should think fit. Accordingly he set out for Thuringia, where St. Boniface then was, by whom he was ordained priest. His labors in the country about Aichstadt, in Franconia and Bavaria, were crowned with incredible success, and he was no less powerful in words than in works.

In 746 he was consecrated by St. Boniface bishop of Aichstadt. This dignity gave his humility much to suffer, but it exceedingly excited his zeal. The cultivation of so rough a vineyard was a laborious and painful task; but his heroic patience and invincible meekness overcame all difficulties. His charity was most tender and compassionate, and he had a singular talent in comforting the afflicted. He founded a monastery which resembled in discipline that of Mount Cassino, to which he often retired. But his love of solitude diminished not his pastoral solicitude for his flock. He was attentive to all their spiritual necessities, he visited often every part of his charge, and instructed all his people with indefatigable zeal and charity. His fasts were most austere, nor did he allow himself any indulgence in them or in his labors on account of his great age, till his strength was entirely exhausted. Having labored almost forty-five years in regulating and sanctifying his diocese, he died at Aichstadt on the 7th of June, 790, being eighty-seven years old. He was honored with miracles, and buried in his own cathedral. Pope Leo VII. canonized him in 938. In 1270 the Bishop Hildebrand built a church in his honor, into which his relics were translated, and are honorably preserved to this day; but a portion is honored at Furnec in Flanders. See the three lives of St. Willibald, written by contemporary authors, especially that by a nun of his sister St. Walburga’s monastery. She gives from the saint’s own relation a curious and useful description of the Holy Land, as it stood in that age; which is rendered more curious by the notes of Mabillon, and those of Basnage in his edition of Canisius’s Lect. Antiquae.
Rev. Alban Butler (1711-73). Volume VII: July.

Excerpted from Butler's The Lives of the Saints


St. Pantaenus

This learned father and apostolic man flourished in the second century. He was by birth a Sicilian, by profession a Stoic philosopher. His esteem for virtue led him into an acquaintance with the Christians, and being charmed with the innocence and sanctity of their conversation, he opened his eyes to the truth. He studied the Holy Scriptures under the disciples of the apostles, and his thirst after sacred learning brought him to Alexandria, in Egypt, where the disciples of St. Mark had instituted a school of the Christian doctrine.

Pantænus sought not to display his talents in that great mart of literature and commerce; but this great progress in sacred learning was after some time discovered, and he was drawn out of that obscurity in which his humility sought to bury itself. Being placed at the head of the Christian school some time before the year 179, by his learning and excellent manner of teaching he raised its reputation above all the schools of the philosophers, and the lessons which he read, and which were gathered from the flowers of the prophets and apostles, conveyed light and knowledge into the minds of all his hearers.

The Indians who traded at Alexandria entreated him to pay their country a visit, whereupon he forsook his school and went to preach the Gospel to the Eastern nations. St. Pantænus found some seeds of the faith already sown in the Indies, and a book of the Gospel of St. Matthew in Hebrew, which St. Bartholomew had carried thither. He brought it back with him to Alexandria, whither he returned after he had zealously employed some years in instructing the Indians in the faith.

St. Pantænus continued to teach in private till about the year 216, when he closed a noble and excellent life by a happy death.

Excerpted from Lives of the Saints, by Alban Butler, Benziger Bros. ed. [1894]


24 posted on 07/07/2014 3:00:00 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
The Word Among Us

Meditation: Matthew 9:18-26

14th Week in Ordinary Time

Your faith has saved you. (Matthew 9:22)

You’ve probably watched Olympic figure skating before, but you may not know how complicated the judging is. The judges use instant replay to decide on a technical score for each element of a skater’s routine such as jumps or spins. Then they use a component score for factors such as skating skills, choreography, and transitions. For each segment of a routine, the technical score is added to the component score, and a computer selects scores from the judges to get a total score. That’s a lot of scoring and calculating, isn’t it?

Some of us may think that Jesus is like one of these judges. We imagine that he was keeping score of the official with the sick daughter and the woman with the hemorrhage. He must have looked at how much faith they had and decided to give them a passing grade—to hear their prayers and intervene in their lives.

But look at the way Matthew tells the story. He doesn’t give any indication that these two had any more faith than anyone else. Of course, they believed that he would help them. But so did many in the crowd. What was different about these two people was their determination to get right in front of—or behind—Jesus. The official interrupted Jesus while he was speaking to a crowd. And the woman pushed through all those people to touch Jesus’ cloak. Notice too that when they got to him, Jesus didn’t subject them to any scrutiny. He responded with love, just as he responds to anyone who comes to him with even a mustard seed of faith.

Isn’t this great news? What counts with Jesus is that we come to him. It’s true that we must believe that he can and will reward those who seek him. But it’s okay if you are feeling lost, scared, broken, or not in the right frame of mind. Simply trust Jesus and push through your doubt so that you can encounter him. He may not give you a spectacular healing, but he will give himself to you—his faith, his compassion, his mercy. And that’s more than enough to see you through any challenge!

“Lord, I’m not asking for perfect faith—just faith! Help me to find the courage to come to you. Today I will trust you in everything, known and unknown!”

Hosea 2:16-18, 21-22; Psalm 145:2-9


25 posted on 07/07/2014 3:53:54 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

Marriage=One Man and One Woman 'Til Death Do Us Part

Daily Marriage Tip for July 7, 2014:

“For when I am weak, then I am strong.” (2 Cor 12:10) Sometimes spouses can be a thorn in each other’s side. Annoying as this can be, it can also be a path to self-correction and humility. Name your own weaknesses and strengths.

26 posted on 07/07/2014 4:08:04 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Vultus Christi

The Mass — You Can’t Live Without It, Part I

Monday, 07 July 2014 13:54


On Saturday, 5 July 2014, I gave the following talk at the Evangelium Ireland Conference  for young people held at St Patrick’s College, Maynooth. Part II of the same talk will follow.

Man’s True Self

In my long monastic life how often have I heard young men aspiring to become monks say, “I want to be myself”? And how often have I found myself saying to young men aspiring to become monks, “Be yourself”? The one thing I can say unreservedly about this need to be oneself is that man becomes his true self only on the way to the altar. God created man to be an offerer, a sacerdos, one who makes things over to God. God gave man all created things that they might become, in his sacerdotal hands, an offering of thanksgiving. Finally, God willed that this whole round world, created by him, should serve as man’s altar: a place from which man can reach into heaven to present there his sacrifice to God. Man becomes his true self, his best self, the self God intends him to be insofar as he recovers his own sacerdotal dignity and discovers in all things created matter for a holy oblation. Ultimate the search to become one’s true self leads one to the altar and to the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass. Hence, the title of my talk: “The Mass — You Can’t Live Without It”.

Homo Sapiens

We refer to man as the homo sapiens: that is, one who tastes life, who experiences all things through his senses; who interprets what he has experiened, organises what he has interpreted, and finds meaning in what he has organised.

Homo Liturgicus

Man, however, is more than the homo sapiens. He is also the homo liturgicus, the homo hieraticus, the sacerdos. All that is good, beautiful, and true has been given into his hands. Delighting in what is good, true, and beautiful, man plays in the sight of the Most High. His play is, at once, both solemn and divine. It is an innocent play, bringing joy to the human heart and delighting the Heart of God. Thus is the word fulfilled in which Wisdom says, “I was at his side, a master-workman, my delight increasing with each day, as I made play before him all the while; made play in this world of dust, with the sons of Adam for my play-fellows” (Proverbs 8:30–31).

Homo Eucharisticus

Man is, morever, the homo eucharisticus: the one creature uniquely capable of offering thanksgiving to God. All that he has received from God, he lifts up and gives back to God in thanksgiving. Being the homo eucharisticus, man sees the liturgical potential of all created things; he recognises their doxological finality — for all things attain that for which they were created by uttering something of the glory of God.

Sursum Corda

There is something deep in the soul that stirs to life when one hears the solemn cry from the altar, rising over the earth in the age–old intoning of the Sursum corda, “Hearts on high!” And again, Gratias agamus Domino Deo nostro, “Let us give thanks unto the Lord our God”. One becomes one’s true self only by saying to this solemn invitation: Dignum et iustum est, “It is right and just”.

Becoming an Offering

The human vocation is eucharistic, priestly, and victimal; that is to say that man becomes his true self by giving thanks, by making the holy offering and, finally, by offering not only things to God, but by making the oblation of himself. The Latin word for victim is hostia, from which we derive the English word host, signifying the bread set apart for the Holy Sacrifice. In the Eastern Churches, the same bread set apart for the Holy Mysteries is called the lamb. By offering himself to God, man becomes a sacrificial victim, a hostia (host), an offering made over to God and identified with “the Lamb slain from the foundation of the world” (Apocalypse 13:8).

In the Image of God

It is helpful to reflect, I think, on what Sacred Scripture means in saying: “And God created man to his own image: to the image of God he created him: male and female he created them” (Genesis 1:27). Man is created in the image of God the Word, the Second Person of the Blessed Trinity.  In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was facing God, and the Word was God” (John 1:1). The Son, eternally begotten of the Father, finds Himself face–to–face with the Father and, in every moment of eternity, offers Himself to the Father in an oblation of self–giving love and of praise. The Father, for His part, holds the Son in the gaze of His love, and takes delight in the ceaseless offering that rises from the Son in the Holy Spirit. Already, even before His descent into the womb of His Virgin Mother as Priest and Victim, the Son exercises a divine priesthood, offering Himself to the Father.

Adam and Eve, a Royal Priestly Couple

Enchanted by the eternal priesthood of the Son, the Father willed to extend that priesthood to men and women created in His image. Adam and Eve emerged from the creating hands of the Father facing the Father, even as the Son faces Him from all eternity. Seeing the Father, their hearts leaped up in a surge of self–offering and of thanksgiving. Adam and Eve were, from the beginning, invested with a royal priesthood. Not only were they moved to make the spontaneous and gratuitous offering of themselves to God; they were given all of creation as matter for a grand priestly oblation of thanksgiving. Seeing all that God created for them in beauty, in goodness, and in truth, Adam and Eve were compelled to give back what they themselves had received. This was the sacrificial liturgy of the earthly paradise such as God intended it: a royal, priestly couple making over to God — that is sacrificing — what God had made over to them. In exercising this natural priesthood, Adam and Eve realised their highest vocation. Theirs it was to give back to God all that God has bestowed upon them.

Original Sin: Anti–Eucharistic

Then came the tragedy of original sin. Satan, hating the liturgy of the earthly paradise, despising the royal priesthood of Adam and Eve, and disgusted by the consecration of all things created to the Creator, laid his plans to destroy the liturgical, to defile the sacerdotal, and to stop the sacrifice. Deceived by Satan, Adam and Eve fixed their gaze upon one thing and refused to give it up to God. Instead of making an offering to God of the good, the true, and the beautiful things given them, they took what was given them to be sacrificed and left untouched for God — the fruit of the tree — and, grasping it, clutched it to themselves. In that terrible moment they sinned against their sacerdotal dignity. The temple of the earthly paradise was defiled; their royal priesthood was perverted; the earth, designed by God to be an altar, became instead a tomb. The original sin was, it is clear, anti–eucharistic, anti–sacerdotal, and anti–liturgical. Thus was the great and glorious plan of God frustrated; thus did man stop being himself as God intended him to be.

Cain and Abel

The divine spark of Adam’s natural priesthood survived, nonetheless, in the souls of their sons. In Abel, whose sacrifice is still recalled daily in the Roman Canon, it blossomed into a fair offering pleasing to God. In Cain it was troubled and perverse.

And Abel was a shepherd, and Cain a husbandman. And it came to pass after many days, that Cain offered, of the fruits of the earth, gifts to the Lord. Abel also offered of the firstlings of his flock, and of their fat: and the Lord had respect to Abel, and to his offerings. But to Cain and his offerings he had no respect: and Cain was exceedingly angry, and his countenance fell. (Genesis 4:2–5)

Noah Builds an Altar

After the Great Flood, all things having been destroyed, Noah responds to the sacerdotal spark within him and builds an altar. Man cannot be himself without an altar, without a sacrificial oblation, and without exercising his natural priesthood. Man is, by God’s unchanging design, an altar–builder, a sacrificer, and an offering.

“Then Noah built an altar to the Lord” (Genesis 8:20). While both Cain and Abel brought offerings to the Lord (Genesis 4:3), they did so without presenting them upon an altar. Noah is the first altar-builder of the Bible. He builds an altar and offers burnt offerings upon it (cf. Genesis 8:20). Thus does the mystic triad of altar, offering, and offerer appear in the Bible for the first time. Noah, his altar, and his sacrifice already foreshadow the mystery of Christ sung in the reformed Roman Missal’s magnificent fifth Preface for Paschaltide:

Christ, by the offering of His own Body,
brought to perfection the ancient sacrifices in the truth of the cross
and, in commending Himself to you for our salvation,
showed Himself to be at once the priest, the altar, and the lamb.

Earth Rising Heavenward

After Noah, Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob all built altars to the Lord. In addition to being the place of sacrifices and libations, the altars built by the patriarchs marked a place of divine intervention. They localized and memorialized the encounter of man with God. Originally a mound of rocks or elevation, the altar symbolizes the earth rising above itself and straining heavenward. It is, at the same time, the place where heaven bends low to touch the earth, to receive man’s offering.

The Meaning of Sacrifice

When, in a sacrificial action, a creature is placed upon an altar, it is made over to God and given up to His hands. Jesus Himself says in Matthew 23:19 that it is, “the altar that makes the offering sacred”. It is by virtue of being placed on the altar that the offering becomes a sacrifice. Saint Augustine (in Book X of The City of God) teaches that whatsoever is placed on the altar becomes sacrificium, a thing made over to God, a thing made sacred. When the same creature is set ablaze in a holocaust, its rising smoke carries the prayer of the offerer into heaven where God takes pleasure in its fragrance.

Communion with God

The altar is the place of a mysterious exchange. The altar of the sacrifice is, at the same time, the sacred table of a mysterious at-one-ment (adunatio) with God. Offerings of food and libations become the food and drink of God; food and drink received from the altar become the means of communion with God.

Blood–Bonding

The altar is also the place of a bonding in blood. Moses takes the blood of sacrifices, pours it upon altar, and throws it over the people (cf. Exodus 24:5-8). Altar-blood becomes the blood of a covenant, the blood-bond between God and the people. “And Moses took half of the blood and put it in basins, and half of the blood he threw against the altar. . . . And Moses took the blood and threw it upon the people, and said, ‘Behold the blood of the covenant which the Lord has made with you in accordance with these words” (Exodus 24:6-8).

An Altar You Shall Make for Me

In Exodus, the Lord speaks to Moses amidst thunders, lightnings, thick cloud, and trumpet blast (Ex 20:18), giving instruction on how to build an altar: “An altar of earth you shall make for me and sacrifice on it your burnt offerings and your peace offerings, your sheep and your oxen; in every place where I cause my name to be remembered I will come to you and bless you. And if you make me an altar of stone, you shall not build it of hewn stones, for if you wield your tool upon it you profane it” (Ex 20:24-5). Later, the Lord requires a portable “tabernacle of the tent of meeting” (Ex 39:32), a sign that He dwells in the midst of His people even as they journey in the wilderness. At the center of the tabernacle of the tent of meeting stands the altar. The Lord prescribes the form of this portable altar. “You shall make the altar of acacia wood, five cubits long and five cubits broad; the altar shall be square, and its height shall be three cubits” (Ex 27:1).

A History of Altars

In some way, the history of the Chosen People is a history of altars. The building of multiple altars marks a movement toward the one altar of the the one God that, in the temple of Jerusalem, will be the sign of the one worship offered by God’s one people. The religious life of Israel revolves around the altar. The prophet Ezekiel describes in detail the temple altar and its fittings (cf. Ezechiel 43:13-17). While the Levites will be charged with ordering the service of God in a more general way, the Aaronic priesthood will be centered exclusively on the service of the altar (cf. Numbers 3:6-10 and 1 Chronicles 6:48-49).

The Body of Christ

The one altar of the one temple, in turn, points to Christ. The true and indestructible altar is the Body of Christ Himself, covered with the outpouring of His Precious Blood. True God and true Man, Jesus, raised high on the wood of the Cross, fulfills the mystery signified in every mound of rock and earth straining heavenward to receive the descending glory of God. “And I, if I be lifted up from the earth, will draw all things to myself” (John 12:32).  Christ, being our true Communion Sacrifice, establishes in the blood-bond of His new and everlasting covenant those who drink from the chalice offered in thanksgiving to God at the altar.

Christ the Altar

It is in this sense that the tradition speaks of the altar as Christ. The altar signifies Christ because His Body is the one altar of Christians, the one altar of the Church, the one altar of the cosmos, covered with the Blood of the Lamb. The altars we build are sacred signs pointing to Christ, the one altar upon which all men can be consecrated, the one altar from which ascends the “worship in spirit and in truth” (John 4:24) that the Father seeks.

Consecration of the Altar

The consecration of the altar is the high point of the rite of the Dedication of a Church. The altar is anointed lavishly with Holy Chrism, making it a sign of Christ, the Anointed of the Father. The smoke of burning incense rises from the altar itself; it is the prayer of Christ and of the Church ascending to the Father in the sweet fragrance of the Holy Spirit. The altar is clothed in holy vesture; more than merely functional or even festive table linens, the altar cloth signifies the splendor of the risen Christ in the midst of the Church. “The Lord has reigned; He is clothed with beauty” (Psalm 92:1). The illumination of the altar with candles evokes the gladsome radiance of Christ; all who look to the altar and all who approach it reflect something of the light of Christ. “Look towards Him” says the psalm, “and be radiant” (Psalm 33:6). Worked into the base of the altar, beneath the holy table itself, is a miniature sepulchre prepared for the relics of the saints. Thus does the altar signify Christ the Head’s indissoluble union with the members of His Mystical Body.

Overshadowed by the Holy Spirit

The altar is often considered in relation to Christ; less frequently is it seen as the rock from which the Holy Spirit flows to irrigate the Church and make her fruitful. In every celebration of the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass, the Holy Spirit overshadows the altar, the offerings placed on it, and the people assembled around it. Even outside of Mass the altar remains a sign and pledge of the overshadowing of the Holy Spirit.

Theology of the Altar

A primary source for any theology — and for any spirituality — of the altar is the proper Mass given in the Roman Missal for the Dedication of an Altar. The Preface, in particular, deserves to be studied, repeated, and held in the heart:

It is truly right and just, our duty and our salvation,
always and everywhere to give you thanks,
Lord, holy Father, almighty and eternal God,
through Christ our Lord.
He is the true priest and He is the victim
who offered Himself to you on the altar of the cross
and commanded us ceaselessly to celebrate
the memorial of that sacrifice.
And so your people have built this altar
which we dedicate to you with surpassing joy.
Here is the true high place
where the sacrifice of Christ is continually offered in mystery;
here perfect praise is given to you;
here our redemption is set forth.
Here is made ready the table of the Lord
where your children are refreshed by the Body of Christ
and gathered into the Church one and holy.
Here your faithful drink deeply of the Spirit
from the streams of water flowing from Christ the spiritual rock;
through Him they themselves become a holy oblation, a living altar.
Therefore, Lord, with all the Angels and Saints,
we praise you, singing in joy.

Veneration of the Altar

We express this rich significance of the altar and impress it upon ourselves by means of certain prescribed gestures. Clergy and laity alike, passing before the altar, venerate it with a profound bow; if the Blessed Sacrament is reserved there, one genuflects. The priest and deacon kiss the altar upon arriving in the sanctuary and before leaving it. In the traditional rite of Holy Mass the priest kisses the altar frequently; these repeated kisses signify the desire of the priest — representing both Christ the Bridegroom and the whole bridal Body of His Church — for the fruitful consummation of their sacramental union. The suppression of the repeated kissing of the altar in the Novus Ordo is a cold rationalistic innovation foreign to the language of love in which one or even two kisses are not enough.

The incensation of the altar at Lauds during the Benedictus (Canticle of Zechariah), at Vespers during the Magnificat (Canticle of the Blessed Virgin Mary), and at several key moments during Mass evokes the mystery of Christ through whom every prayer of ours ascends to the Father and through whom every “grace and heavenly blessing” (Roman Canon) descend to us.

The Heart of Ecclesial and Missionary Life

The altar at the heart of our churches is, in the deepest sense, the heart of the Church. Man becomes his true self only in relation to the altar of the Holy Sacrifice. “I will come to the altar of God, the God of my joy” (Ps 42:4). Man cannot become his true self, his best self, the eucharistic, sacerdotal, and oblative self that God wills him to be, apart from actual participation in the Holy Sacrifice of Mass.

To be continued.


27 posted on 07/07/2014 4:15:34 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Regnum Christi

Faith is All-Powerful.
U. S. A. | SPIRITUAL LIFE | SPIRITUALITY
July 7, 2014. Monday of the Fourteenth Week in Ordinary Time

Matthew 9:18-26

While Jesus was speaking, an official came forward, knelt down before him, and said, "My daughter has just died. But come, lay your hand on her, and she will live." Jesus rose and followed him, and so did his disciples. A woman suffering hemorrhages for twelve years came up behind him and touched the tassel on his cloak. She said to herself, "If only I can touch his cloak, I shall be cured." Jesus turned around and saw her, and said, "Courage, daughter! Your faith has saved you." And from that hour the woman was cured. When Jesus arrived at the official´s house and saw the flute players and the crowd who were making a commotion, he said, "Go away! The girl is not dead but sleeping." And they ridiculed him. When the crowd was put out, he came and took her by the hand, and the little girl arose. And news of this spread throughout all that land.

Introductory Prayer: Jesus, you are my savior and redeemer; I believe that you want to hear from me. I approach you in confidence and offer this prayer for those who are afraid to draw near to you.

Petition: Grant me, Jesus, a deeper faith in your power to heal me and my loved ones.

1. Awaiting Our Move: We note that the official´s faith moves Jesus to action. Remarkable! The Son of God accommodates a mere creature, due to a show of faith. So often we see problems around us and expect God to solve them without any effort on our part. God knows our problems better than we do (cf. Matthew 6:8). Yet, he sometimes doesn´t act until he sees an act of faith on our part. The official showed such faith. It was extraordinary, after all, for him to approach Jesus in front of other people and ask point-blank for a miracle. Do I have such confidence when I approach Jesus in prayer? Is my faith strong enough to ask him for something extraordinary?

2. Touching Moment: The woman suffering hemorrhages had great faith in Jesus, too. In her case, she didn´t express it in words. Rather, she expressed it in a deed, by discreetly touching Jesus´ cloak. That kind of faith speaks volumes. It helps if our words are joined with actions. Petitions don´t always suffice. We have to act, to move, to leave our comfort zone, in order to approach Jesus. Prayer is good; prayer plus action gives God even more fertile ground to work with. How can I complement my prayer life? Can I help my pastor with a special project, for instance?

3. Mourning Has Broken: In Our Lord´s time it was not uncommon to have professional mourners show up when someone died. Jesus´ comment that the official´s daughter was merely sleeping brought ridicule on him. Who needs mourners if the young lady is alive? We can be like professional mourners at times, resigned to the evil and death around us. We might throw up our hands and think we can hope for nothing better. We might even be tempted, like the mourners, to ignore Our Lord´s reassuring presence. We might think: "What! Me, be a saint?" Or: "Me, called to the priesthood or consecrated life?" Or: "Do you really expect us to handle another child right now?" Luckily for us, Christ is undeterred. He comes to bring us life, to lead us out of sin, to make us more generous. In a word, he comes to call us to holiness. Do I resist such a call?

Conversation with Christ: The official and the suffering woman show an admirable faith. I want to have that same kind of faith, Lord. Sometimes I feel paralyzed by my problems, so much so that I find it hard to approach you confidently. Increase my faith and sense of hope. Let me live as if I really believe that you rule the world.

Resolution: I will offer up a sacrifice (or a visit to the Blessed Sacrament or an act of charity) for a special intention.


28 posted on 07/07/2014 4:18:25 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
One Bread, One Body

One Bread, One Body

Language: English | Español

All Issues > Volume 30, Issue 4

<< Monday, July 7, 2014 >>
 
Hosea 2:16-18, 21-22
View Readings
Psalm 145:2-9 Matthew 9:18-26
Similar Reflections
 

BLOW UP THE DAM!

 
"I will espouse you in right." —Hosea 2:21
 

I studied forestry in college. My colleagues clearly understood the delicate balance of a natural ecosystem. Artificially altering even part of an ecosystem threatens the health of the whole forest. For example, when a river is dammed, its life-giving flow is blocked. Above and below the dam, plant and animal life and critical habitat are altered, often catastrophically. Despite this knowledge, my colleagues ardently supported zero population growth. They favored limiting human reproduction through artificial contraception or sterilization. They reasoned that humans ruin natural ecosystems faster than anything else, and thus God's beautiful ecosystem of human procreation should be dammed.

Almighty God has a divine ecology and economy that brings all His creation into unity with the perfect unity of the Holy Trinity (Catechism, 260). All creation interacts harmoniously when subject to His beautiful order. God pours out His superabundant, overflowing river of love to all humanity, trying to allure us back into His loving order (Rm 5:5; Hos 2:16). As my forestry colleagues instinctively realized, it's the human beings that block the divine ecology. Just as a husband and wife utilize contraceptive barriers to limit or block their reproductive powers, we build dams and walls to try to control or block His love. What follows is a catastrophe: divorce, depression, loss of faith, disobedience, and devastation left behind for the next generation.

Are you swamped? Are you struggling to keep your head above water? Repent of blocking God's order. Blow up the dam! Let the fresh, flowing water of the Holy Spirit restore God's refreshing harmony to your life (Jn 7:37).

 
Prayer: Father, it's only a small step from dammed to damned. Let Your river of everlasting life flow through me (Ez 47:8ff).
Promise: "Your faith has restored you to health." —Mt 9:22
Praise: Mary and Tom did not block God's grace through artificial contraception and were blessed with ten children.

29 posted on 07/07/2014 4:31:44 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

Prayer to End Abortion

Lord God, I thank you today for the gift of my life,
And for the lives of all my brothers and sisters.

I know there is nothing that destroys more life than abortion,
Yet I rejoice that you have conquered death
by the Resurrection of Your Son.

I am ready to do my part in ending abortion.
Today I commit myself
Never to be silent,
Never to be passive,
Never to be forgetful of the unborn.

I commit myself to be active in the pro-life movement,
And never to stop defending life
Until all my brothers and sisters are protected,
And our nation once again becomes
A nation with liberty and justice
Not just for some, but for all.

Through Christ our Lord. Amen


30 posted on 07/07/2014 4:35:23 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Salvation
Matthew
  English: Douay-Rheims Latin: Vulgata Clementina Greek NT: Byzantine/Majority Text (2000)
  Matthew 9
18 As he was speaking these things unto them, behold a certain ruler came up, and adored him, saying: Lord, my daughter is even now dead; but come, lay thy hand upon her, and she shall live. Hæc illo loquente ad eos, ecce princeps unus accessit, et adorabat eum, dicens : Domine, filia mea modo defuncta est : sed veni, impone manum tuam super eam, et vivet. ταυτα αυτου λαλουντος αυτοις ιδου αρχων εις ελθων προσεκυνει αυτω λεγων οτι η θυγατηρ μου αρτι ετελευτησεν αλλα ελθων επιθες την χειρα σου επ αυτην και ζησεται
19 And Jesus rising up followed him, with his disciples. Et surgens Jesus, sequebatur eum, et discipuli ejus. και εγερθεις ο ιησους ηκολουθησεν αυτω και οι μαθηται αυτου
20 And behold a woman who was troubled with an issue of blood twelve years, came behind him, and touched the hem of his garment. Et ecce mulier, quæ sanguinis fluxum patiebatur duodecim annis, accessit retro, et tetigit fimbriam vestimenti ejus. και ιδου γυνη αιμορροουσα δωδεκα ετη προσελθουσα οπισθεν ηψατο του κρασπεδου του ιματιου αυτου
21 For she said within herself: If I shall touch only his garment, I shall be healed. Dicebat enim intra se : Si tetigero tantum vestimentum ejus, salva ero. ελεγεν γαρ εν εαυτη εαν μονον αψωμαι του ιματιου αυτου σωθησομαι
22 But Jesus turning and seeing her, said: Be of good heart, daughter, thy faith hath made thee whole. And the woman was made whole from that hour. At Jesus conversus, et videns eam, dixit : Confide, filia, fides tua te salvam fecit. Et salva facta est mulier ex illa hora. ο δε ιησους επιστραφεις και ιδων αυτην ειπεν θαρσει θυγατερ η πιστις σου σεσωκεν σε και εσωθη η γυνη απο της ωρας εκεινης
23 And when Jesus was come into the house of the ruler, and saw the minstrels and the multitude making a rout, Et cum venisset Jesus in domum principis, et vidisset tibicines et turbam tumultuantem, dicebat : και ελθων ο ιησους εις την οικιαν του αρχοντος και ιδων τους αυλητας και τον οχλον θορυβουμενον
24 He said: Give place, for the girl is not dead, but sleepeth. And they laughed him to scorn. Recedite : non est enim mortua puella, sed dormit. Et deridebant eum. λεγει αυτοις αναχωρειτε ου γαρ απεθανεν το κορασιον αλλα καθευδει και κατεγελων αυτου
25 And when the multitude was put forth, he went in, and took her by the hand. And the maid arose. Et cum ejecta esset turba, intravit : et tenuit manum ejus, et surrexit puella. οτε δε εξεβληθη ο οχλος εισελθων εκρατησεν της χειρος αυτης και ηγερθη το κορασιον
26 And the fame hereof went abroad into all that country. Et exiit fama hæc in universam terram illam. και εξηλθεν η φημη αυτη εις ολην την γην εκεινην

31 posted on 07/07/2014 5:43:46 PM PDT by annalex (fear them not)
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To: annalex
18. While he spoke these things to them, behold, there came a certain ruler; and worshipped him, saying, My daughter is even now dead: but come and lay your hand upon her, and she shall live.
19. And Jesus arose, and followed him, and so did his disciples.
20. And, behold, a woman, which was diseased with an issue of blood twelve years, came behind him, and touched the hem of his garment:
21. For she said within herself, If I may but touch his garment, I shall be whole.
22. But Jesus turned him about, and when He saw her, he said, Daughter, be of good comfort; your faith has made you whole. And the woman was made whole from that hour.

CHRYS; After His instructions He adds a miracle, which should mightily discomfit the Pharisees, because He who came to beg this miracle, was a ruler of the synagogue, and the mourning was great, for she was his only child, and of the age of twelve years, that is, when the flower of youth begins; While he spoke these things to them, behold there came one of their chief men to him.

AUG; This narrative is given both by Mark and Luke, but in a quite different order; namely, when after the casting out of time demons and their entrance into the swine, he had returned across the lake from the country of the Gerasenes. Now Mark does indeed tell us that this happened after He had crossed the lake, but how long after He does not determine. Unless there had been some interval of time, that could not have taken place that Matthew relates concerning the feast in his house. After this, immediately follows that concerning the ruler of the synagogue's daughter. If the ruler came to Him while He was yet speaking that of the new patch, and the new wine, then no other act of speech of his intervened. And in Mark's account, the place where these things might come in, is evident. In like manner, Luke does not contradict Matthew; for what he adds, And behold a man, whose name was Jairus, is not to be taken as though it followed instantly what had been related before, but after that feast with the Publicans, as Matthew relates. While he spoke these things to them, behold, one of their chief men, namely, Jairus, the ruler of the synagogue, came to him, and worshipped him, saying, Lord, my daughter is even now dead. It should be observed, lest there should seem to be some discrepancy, that the other two Evangelists represent her as at the point of death, but yet not dead, but so as afterwards to say that there came afterwards some saying, She is dead, trouble not the Master, for Matthew for the sake of shortness represents the Lord as having been asked at first to do that which it is manifest He did do, namely, raise the dead. He looks not at the words of the father respecting his daughter, but rather his mind. For he had so far despaired of her life, that he made his request rather for her to be called to life again, thinking it impossible that she, whom he had left dying, should be found yet alive. The other two then have given Jairus' words; Matthew has put what he wished and thought. Indeed had either of them related that it was the father himself that said that Jesus should not be troubled for she was now dead, in that case the words that Matthew has given would not have corresponded with the thoughts of the ruler. But we do not read that he agreed with the messengers. Hence we learn a thing of the highest necessity, that we should look at nothing in any man's words, but his meaning to which his words ought to be subservient; and no man gives a false account when he repeats a man's meaning in words other than those actually used.

CHRYS; Or; The ruler says, she is dead, exaggerating his calamity. As it is time manner of those that prefer a petition to magnify their distresses, and to represent them as something more than they really are, in order to gain the compassion of those to whom they make supplication; whence he adds, But come and lay your hand upon her, and she shall live. See his dullness. He begs two things of Christ, to come, and to lay His hand upon her. This was what Naaman the Syrian required of the Prophet. For they who are constituted thus hard of heart have need of sight and things sensible.

REMIG; We ought to admire and at the same time to imitate the humility and mercifulness of the Lord; as soon as ever He was asked, He rose to follow him that asked; And Jesus rose, and followed him. Here is instruction both for such as are in command, and such as are in subjection. To these He has left an example of obedience; to those who are set over others He shows how earnest and watchful they should be in teaching; whenever they hear of any being dead in spirit, they should hasten to Him; And his disciples went with him.

CHRYS; Mark and Luke say that He took with Him three disciples only, namely, Peter, James, and John; He took not Matthew, to quicken his desires, and because he was yet not perfectly minded; and for this reason He honors these three, that others may become like-minded. It was enough meanwhile for Matthew to see the things that were done respecting her that had the issue of blood, concerning whom it follows; And, behold, a woman who had suffered an issue of blood twelve years, came behind and touched the hem of his garment.

JEROME; This woman that had the flux came to the Lord not in the house, nor in the town, for she was excluded from them by the Law, but by the way as He walked; thus as He goes to heal one woman, another is cured.

CHRYS; She came not to Christ with an open address through shame concerning this her disease, believing herself unclean; for in the Law this disease was esteemed highly unclean. For this reason she hides herself.

REMIG; in which her humility must be praised, that she came not before His face, but behind, and judged herself unworthy to touch the Lord's feet, yea, she touched not His whole garment, but the hem only; for the Lord wore a hem according to the command of the Law . So the Pharisees also wore hems which they made large, and in some they inserted thorns. But the Lord's hem was not made to wound, but to heal, and therefore it follows, For she said within herself, If I can but touch his garment, I shall be made whole. How wonderful her faith, that though she despaired of healing from the physicians, on whom notwithstanding she had exhausted her living, she received that a heavenly Physician was at hand, and therefore bent her whole soul on Him; whence she deserved to be healed; But Jesus turning and seeing her, said, Be of good cheer, daughter, your faith has made you whole.

RABAN; What is this that He bids her, Be of good cheer, seeing if she had not had faith, she would not have sought healing of Him? He requires of her strength and perseverance, that she may come to a sure and certain salvation.

CHRYS; Or because the woman was fearful, therefore He said, Be of good cheer. He calls her daughter, for her faith had made her such.

JEROME; He said not, Your faith shall make you whole, but, has made you whole; for in that you have believed, thou art already made whole.

CHRYS; She had not yet a perfect mind respecting Christ, or she would not have supposed that she could be hid from Him; but Christ would not suffer her to go away unobserved, not that He sought fame, but for many reasons. First, He relieves the woman's fear, that she should not be pricked in her conscience as though she had stolen this boon; secondly, He corrects her error in supposing she could be hid from Him; thirdly, He displays her faith to all for their imitation; and fourthly, He did a miracle, in that He showed He knew all things, no less than in drying the fountain of her blood. It follows, And the woman was made whole from that hour.

GLOSS; This must be understood as the time in which she touched the hem of His garment, not in which Jesus turned to her; for she was already healed, as the other Evangelists testify, and as may be inferred from the Lord's words.

HILARY; Herein is to be observed the marvelous virtue of the Lord, that the power that dwelt in His body should give healing to things perishable, and the heavenly energy extended even through the hems of His garments; for God is not comprehensible that He should be shut in by a body, for His taking a body to Him did not confine His power, but His power took upon it a frail body for our redemption. Figuratively, this ruler is to be understood as the Law, which prays the Lord that He would restore life to the dead multitude which it had brought up for Christ, preaching that His coming was to be looked for.

RABAN; Or; The ruler of the synagogue signifies Moses; he is named Jairus, ' illuminating,' or, ' that shall illuminate,' because he received the words of life to give to us, and by them enlightens all, being himself enlightened by the Holy Spirit. The daughter of the ruler, that is, the synagogue itself, being as it were in the twelfth year of its age, that is, in the season of puberty, when it should have borne spiritual progeny to God, fell into the sickness of error. While then the Word of God is hastening to this ruler's daughter to make whole the sons of Israel, a holy Church is gathered from among the Gentiles, which while it was perishing by inward corruption, received by faith that healing that was prepared for others. It should be noted, that the ruler's daughter was twelve years old, and this woman had been twelve years afflicted; thus she had begun to be diseased at the very time the other was born, so in one and the same age the synagogue had its birth among the Patriarchs, and the nations without began to be polluted with the pest of idolatry. For the issue of blood may be taken in two ways, either for the pollution of idolatry, or for obedience to the pleasures of flesh and blood. Thus as long as the synagogue flourished, the Church languished; the falling away of the first was made the salvation of the Gentiles. Also the Church draws nigh and touches the Lord, when it approaches Him in faith. She believed, spoke her belief; and touched, for by these three things, faith, word, and deed, all salvation is gained. She came behind Him, as He spoke, If any one serve me, let him follow me; or because, not having seen the Lord present in the flesh, when the sacraments of His incarnation were fulfilled, she came at length to the grace of the knowledge of Him. Thus also she touched the hem of His garment, because the Gentiles, though they had not seen Christ in the flesh, received the tidings of His incarnation. The garment of Christ is put for the mystery of His incarnation, wherewith His Deity is clothed; the hem of His garment are the words that hang upon His incarnation. She touches not the garment, but the hem thereof; because she saw not the Lord in the flesh but received the word of the incarnation through the Apostles. Blessed is he that touches but the uttermost part of the word by faith. She is healed while the Lord is not in the city, but while the Lord is yet on the way; as the Apostles cried, Because you judge yourselves unworthy of eternal life, lo, we turn to the Gentiles. And from the time of the Lord's coming the Gentiles began to be healed.

23. And when Jesus came into the ruler's house, and saw the minstrels and the people making a noise,
24. He said to them, Give place: for the maid is not dead, but sleeps. And they laughed him to scorn.
25. But when the people were put forth, he went in, and took her by the hand, and the maid arose.
26. And the fame hereof went abroad into all that land.

GLOSS; After the healing of the woman with the issue of blood, follows the raising of the dead; And when Jesus was come into the ruler's house.

CHRYS; We may suppose that He proceeded slowly, and spoke longer to the woman whom He had healed, that He might suffer the maid to die and thus an evident miracle of restoring to life might be wrought. In the case of Lazarus also He waited till the third day And when he saw the minstrels and the people making a noise; this was proof of her death.

AMBROSE; For by the ancient custom minstrels were engaged to make lamentation for the dead.

CHRYS; But Christ put forth all the pipers, but took in the parents, that it might not be said that He had healed her by any other means; and before the restoring to life He excites their expectations by His words. And he said, Give place: for the maid is not dead, but sleeps.

BEDE; As though He had said To you she is dead, but to God who has power to give life, she sleeps only both in soul and body.

CHRYS; By this saying, He soothes the minds of those that. were present, and shows that it is easy to Him to raise the dead; the like He did in the case of Lazarus, Our friend Lazarus sleeps. This was also a lesson to them not to be afraid of death; forasmuch as He Himself also should die, He made His disciples learn in the persons of others confidence and patient endurance of death. For when He was near, death was but as sleep. When He had said this, They mocked him. And he did not rebuke their mocking; that this mocking, and the pipes and all other things, might be a proof of her death. For often times at His miracles when men would not believe, He convicted them by their own answers; as in the case of Lazarus when He said, Where have you laid him? so that they that answered, Come and see, and, He stinks, for he has now been dead four days, could no longer disbelieve that He had raised a dead man.

JEROME; They that had mocked the Reviver were not worthy to behold the mystery of the revival; and therefore it follows, And when the multitude was put forth, he entered, and took her by the hand, and the maid arose.

CHRYS; He restored her to life not by bringing in another soul, but by recalling that which had departed, and as it were raising it from sleep, and through this sight preparing the way for belief of the resurrection. And He not only restores her to life, but commands food to be given her, as the other Evangelists relate, that that which was done might be seen to be no delusion. And the fame of it went abroad into all that country.

GLOSS. The fame, namely, of the greatness and novelty of the miracle, and its established truth; so that it could not be supposed to be a forgery.

HILARY; Mystically; The Lord enters the ruler's house, that is, the synagogue, throughout which there resounded in the songs of the Law a strain of wailing.

JEROME; To this day the damsel lays dead in the ruler's house; and they that seem to be teachers are but minstrels singing funeral dirges. The Jews also are not the crowd of believers, but of people making a noise. But when the fullness of the Gentiles shall come in, then all Israel shall be saved.

HILARY; But that the number of the elect. might be known to be but few out of the whole body of believers, the multitude is put forth; the Lord indeed would that they should be saved, but they mocked at His sayings and actions, and so were not worthy to be made partakers of His resurrection.

JEROME; He took her by the hand, and the maid arose; because if the hands the Jews which are detailed with blood be not first cleansed, their synagogue which is dead shall not revive.

HILARY; His fame went about into all that country; that is the salvation of the elect, the gift and works of Christ are preached.

RABAN; Morally; The damsel dead in the house is the soul dead in thought. He says that she is asleep, because they that are now asleep in sin may yet be roused by penitence. The minstrels are flatterers who cherish the dead.

GREG; The multitude are put forth that the damsel may be raised; for unless the multitude of worldly cares is first banished from the secrets of the heart, the soul which is laid dead within, cannot rise again.

RABAN; The maiden is raised in the house with few to witness, the young man without the gate, and Lazarus in the presence of many; for a public scandal requires a public expiation; a less notorious, a lesser remedy; and secret sins may be done away by penitence.

Catena Aurea Matthew 9
32 posted on 07/07/2014 5:44:14 PM PDT by annalex (fear them not)
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To: annalex


The woman with the issue of blood

Early 4th Century
Catacomb of Sts. Marcellinus and Peter, Rome

33 posted on 07/07/2014 5:44:42 PM PDT by annalex (fear them not)
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