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Catholic Caucus: Patron
5 April A.D. 2002 | father_elijah

Posted on 04/05/2002 12:57:16 PM PST by father_elijah

The Catholic Caucus of Freepers are in need of our own patron saint. We seem to be quickly developing into something of an apostolate of our own. So I think we should take time to post our ideas about who our patron saint(s) should be for our work here on FreeRepublic.


TOPICS: General Discusssion
KEYWORDS: abortionlist; catholic; catholiccaucus; catholiclist; christianlist; patron; patronsaint; prolife; saint
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Judging from the arrows that come our way -- perhaps St. Sebastian is a good idea. Then there is always the example of St. Catherine of Siena -- and I think she would be a very apt saint for us. Perhaps both of them. What ideas have you about this, O dearly beloved Catholic Caucus?

Also remember that this Sunday is Divine Mercy Sunday.

1 posted on 04/05/2002 12:57:16 PM PST by father_elijah
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To: Nubbin; notaliberal; american colleen; ltlflwr; fatima; nina0113; steve0113; B-Chan; Diago...
ping.........
(((((((bells ringing)))))))

2 posted on 04/05/2002 1:00:39 PM PST by father_elijah
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To: HowlinglyMind-BendingAbsurdity: tiki; redhead; Cap'n_Crunch; LadyDoc; pegleg; allend; electron1...
ping........
(((((((cathedral bells ringing)))))))

3 posted on 04/05/2002 1:07:03 PM PST by father_elijah
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To: father_elijah
Good suggestion. I seem to recall reading (somewhere) suggestions for a patron saint of the Internet but I can't recall the source. A while ago.

There have been so many great Catholic contributions to mass communications:


4 posted on 04/05/2002 1:14:56 PM PST by HowlinglyMind-BendingAbsurdity
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To: Domestic Church; Dajjal; SMEDLEYBUTLER; ThomasMore; Mr. Thorne; Petronski; nickcarraway...
ping.......
(((((((sanctus bells ringing)))))))

5 posted on 04/05/2002 1:15:47 PM PST by father_elijah
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To: Domestic Church; Dajjal; SMEDLEYBUTLER; ThomasMore; Mr. Thorne; Petronski; nickcarraway...
ping.......
(((((((sanctus bells ringing)))))))

6 posted on 04/05/2002 1:17:24 PM PST by father_elijah
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To: HowlinglyMind-BendingAbsurdity
St. Isidore of Seville is the patron saint of the internet in general .

Almighty and eternal God, who created us in Thy image and bade us to seek after all that is good, true and beautiful, especially in the divine person of Thy only-begotten Son, our Lord Jesus Christ, grant we beseech Thee that, through the intercession of Saint Isidore, bishop and doctor, during our journeys through the internet we will direct our hands and eyes only to that which is pleasing to Thee and treat with charity and patience all those souls whom we encounter. Through Christ our Lord.   Amen.

7 posted on 04/05/2002 1:18:50 PM PST by father_elijah
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To: father_elijah
Ah!

Thank you. Now I remember. Of course. The great encyclopaedist. A natural. And I had to write a paper on him in college.

8 posted on 04/05/2002 1:22:45 PM PST by HowlinglyMind-BendingAbsurdity
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To: father_elijah
There are days when I think it could only be St. Jude. Of course, I'm personally devoted to Nicholas, who at the first council of Nicaea slugged the arch-heretic Arius in the nose. Let's not forget John the Baptist -- "I am the voice of one crying in the wilderness." For those times when we need the intellect of an archangel, we could call on the warrior Michael or Gabriel, the bearer of good news. Lots of choices.
9 posted on 04/05/2002 1:23:05 PM PST by Romulus
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To: father_elijah; *Catholic_list; patent; Notwithstanding; ELS; JMJ333; Aunt Polgara; AgThorn...
pinging

Hmmm...I'll have to think about this.

My first gut reaction would be St. Paul.

Why St. Paul? When was the last time any of you actually asked him for intercession? And really, his Epistles have been adopted by our foes as an anti-Catholic curmuedgeon, when in reality they are thoroughly Catholic in nature.

Finally, I used to think he was a bit of a self agrandizing saint (please don't think I'm being sacriligious) but in the end he was just right for the times, speaking the Truth in season and out, even invading the very temples of the pagan gods with the Gospel of Christ.

We need to be bold, and even obnoxiously so if necessary, refusing to be silenced by the enemies of Christ and His Church.

I think St. Paul is a good candidate, even if he "lacks" the flair and romance of a more modern saint, whose life is better known.

If not him, how about Father Miguel Pro: Heroic Mexican Martyr.

"Viva Cristo Rey!"

10 posted on 04/05/2002 1:28:22 PM PST by Brian Kopp DPM
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To: father_elijah
I would love to reclaim Ss. Sergius and Bacchus. They were Christian Roman soldiers who were martyred for refusing to worship pagan idols. The gay activists have claimed them and rewritten their history to somehow include being lovers. Here is the traditional history:

Sergius and Bacchus Martyrs, d. in the Diocletian persecution in Coele-Syria about 303. Their martyrdom is well authenticated by the earliest martyrologies and by the early veneration paid them, as well as by such historians as Theodoret. They were officers of troops on the frontier, Sergius being primicerius, and Bacchus secundarius. According to the legend, there were high in esteem of the Caesar Maximianus on account of their bravery, but this favour was turned into hate when they acknowledged their Christian faith. When examined under torture they were beaten so severely with thongs that Bacchus died under the blows. Sergius, though, had much more suffering to endure; among other tortures, as the legend relates, he had to run eighteen miles in shoes which were covered on the soles with sharp-pointed nails that pierced through the foot. He was finally beheaded. The burial-place of Sergius and Bacchus was pointed out in the city of Resaph; in honour of Sergius the Emperor Justinian also built churches in honour of Sergius at Constantinople and Acre; the one at Constantinople, now a mosque, is a great work of Byzantine art. In the East, Sergius and Bacchus were universally honoured. Since the seventh century they have a celebrated church in Rome. Christian art represents the two saints as soldiers in military garb with branches of palm in their hands. Their feast is observed on 7 October. The Church calendar gives the two saints Marcellus and Apuleius on the same day as Sergius and Bacchus. They are said to have been converted to Christianity by the miracles of St. Peter. According to the "Martyrologium Romanum" they suffered martyrdom soon after the deaths of Sts. Peter and Paul and were buried near Rome. Their existing Acts are not genuine and agree to a great extent with those of Sts. Nereus and Achilleus. The veneration of the two saints is very old. A mass is assigned to them in the "Sacramentarium" of Pope Gelasius.

11 posted on 04/05/2002 1:28:36 PM PST by Notwithstanding
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To: father_elijah
Is Torquemada a saint? ;-)
12 posted on 04/05/2002 1:29:35 PM PST by Brian Kopp DPM
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To: Romulus
Let's just hope a "free Republic" is not a lost cause or totally hopeless case.
Then again, perhaps an online St. Jude Prayer group chapter is in order.
My guess is that his lines must be pretty busy right now.


13 posted on 04/05/2002 1:29:51 PM PST by HowlinglyMind-BendingAbsurdity
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To: father_elijah
I really wish that Padre Pio was a Saint - I love and greatly admire him.

I could go with St. Isidore.

Not sure about the good Dr.'s suggestion of Tomas de Torquemada - might offend some - kind of a sore point. ;-)

14 posted on 04/05/2002 1:34:02 PM PST by american colleen
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To: Romulus
Apologists:
Catherine of Alexandria
Justin Martyr
Thomas Aquinas

St Paul for evangelism

There are so many of them, how do we choose?

15 posted on 04/05/2002 1:34:17 PM PST by tiki
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To: tiki
The King's Good Servant
This site updated: 20 January, 2001.  
**"A Man for All Seasons":
A Saint for Our Times
**(descriptive quote by Robert Whittenton 
" More is a man of an angelic wit and singular learning; I know not his fellow. For where is the man of that gentleness, lowliness, and affability? And as time requireth, a man of marvelous mirth and past-time, and sometimes of sad gravity. A Man for all Seasons.")
Former Chancellor of England, author of "Utopia", a ground breaking work that gave the world the name for societies built on dreams,  Thomas More is well known in historical circles. Within the Church he loved and ultimately died to defend, he is less known, most people not even realizing that he was canonized for more than being a martyr of the Tudor "reformation". St. Thomas is called the patron of lawyers, since that is how he made his living. Christian humanists are fond of quoting him, as are secular humanists, who think he is one of them.
Most Catholics, if they know of St. Thomas, know of him mostly as a martyr who lost his head on July 6, 1535, because he wouldn't deny the supremacy of the Pope,  Many know of him from watching a movie called "A Man for All Seasons" written as a play in two acts by Robert Bolt. But Sir Thomas More was more; St. Thomas More is more. He was a man of strong faith and deep conviction. His prayer routine was a daily ritual lasting anywhere from two to seven hours a day. He made time for prayer by sleeping less. He believed deeply in practicing penance, both in the forms of almsgiving, frequent confession, and self mortification. While imprisoned in the Tower of London for refusing to take the Oath of Supremacy that would have declared Henry VIII the supreme head of the Church in England, Thomas, instead of giving in to family and friends to ignore his conscience and take the oath, turned his own imprisonment to good use by meditating on the Passion of our Lord, and then writing a book about his meditations.
Come and meet Sir Thomas More, who, when all of the rest of society was taking the easy way out because "everyone else did it",  followed his conscience. His reply to those who asked what his conscience mattered and why he couldn't just follow along with everyone else, "for fellowship's sake"? "...when you are all rewarded with heaven for following your conscience, and I am condemned to hell for NOT following mine, will not ye not all join me, for fellowship?" The man who said, "I do none harm, I think none harm, I say none harm, and if this be not enough to leave a man live, then in truth I long not to live" It wasn't enough, they killed him. 

16 posted on 04/05/2002 1:43:13 PM PST by Notwithstanding
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To: Notwithstanding
St. Thomas More: the king's good servant, but God's first.
17 posted on 04/05/2002 1:44:39 PM PST by Notwithstanding
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To: american colleen
I think we could use more than one saint

Saint Paul .... when we're dealing with the fundies, Calvinists, and other trying protestants.
Saint John of the Cross ..... when we need perseverance as Catholics
Blessed Padre Pio ..... when we need to engage the sins of the secular age and present the changeless truth of Christ and his Church.

18 posted on 04/05/2002 1:45:44 PM PST by history_matters
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To: american colleen; father_elijah
Correct me if I'm wrong but I believe Padre Pio will be canonized this May. :)
19 posted on 04/05/2002 1:45:46 PM PST by ltlflwr
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To: father_elijah
Come and meet Sir Thomas More, who, when all of the rest of society was taking the easy way out because "everyone else did it", followed his conscience. His reply to those who asked what his conscience mattered and why he couldn't just follow along with everyone else, "for fellowship's sake"? "...when you are all rewarded with heaven for following your conscience, and I am condemned to hell for NOT following mine, will not ye not all join me, for fellowship?" The man who said, "I do none harm, I think none harm, I say none harm, and if this be not enough to leave a man live, then in truth I long not to live" It wasn't enough, they killed him.
20 posted on 04/05/2002 1:46:15 PM PST by Notwithstanding
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To: father_elijah
Hi Father, I like Our Lady of Fatima of course,Queen of the most Holy Rosary,did you know there is a feast day dedicated to Our Lady everyday of the year.Remember everyone that tomorrow is First Saturday,fatima
21 posted on 04/05/2002 1:48:32 PM PST by fatima
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To: ltlflwr
Sorry, the actual date is June 16, 2002. Got the info from Padre Pio Foundation website.
22 posted on 04/05/2002 1:48:43 PM PST by ltlflwr
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To: father_elijah
His name, from the Hebrew Mikha'el-meaning "Who is like God?"-was the war cry of the good angels in the battle fought in Heaven against the rebellious angels.

'But I will tell thee what is set down in the scripture of truth: and none is my helper in all these things but Michael your prince."

"Michael shall rise up, the great prince, who standeth for the children of thy people; and a time shall come such as never was from time that nations began even until that time. And at that time shall thy people be saved, every one found written in the book."

"Michael is the breath of the Redeemer's spirit, who will, at the end of the world, combat and destroy Antichrist, as he did Lucifer in the beginning."-St. Thomas Aquinas

'O glorious Prince St. Michael, Chief and commander of the Heavenly Host, Guardian of souls, Vanquisher of rebel spirits, Servant in the House of the Divine King, and our admirable conductor, thou who dost shine with excellence and superhuman virtue, vouchsafe to deliver us from all evil, who turn to thee with confidence, and enable us, by thy gracious protection, to serve God more and more faithfully every day.'

'Pray for us O Glorious St. Michael, Prince of the Church of Jesus Christ, that we may be made worthy of His promises, Amen'

23 posted on 04/05/2002 1:59:39 PM PST by Cap'n Crunch
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To: ltlflwr
Isn't canonization different than being declared a Saint? I think canonization is the step before Sainthood, but I'm not 100% sure on this.

Padre Pio's life is so inspiring!

24 posted on 04/05/2002 2:11:45 PM PST by american colleen
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To: father_elijah
I know I'm being a little premature, Father, but I certainly like the sound of, "Saint Mother Theresa".

She had the heart of an angel and the ability to silence heads of state with a phrase or glance. She is in my opinion, one of the most beautiful women God ever created.

25 posted on 04/05/2002 2:11:46 PM PST by EODGUY
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To: father_elijah; JMJ333
I've got a feeling JMJ333 will come up with the perfect saint to be our patron.
26 posted on 04/05/2002 2:26:46 PM PST by EODGUY
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To: american colleen
Beatification (sp?) is the second step towards canonization as a Saint (third step).

I do love Padre Pio myself. My grandmother lived in his area of southern Italy and went to one of his last Masses. But then again, I'm biased towards the mystics:)

27 posted on 04/05/2002 2:35:57 PM PST by Canticle_of_Deborah
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To: father_elijah
So many good choices!! I like the idea of St. Catherine of Siena. Wasn't she the one who took the corrupt clergy in the Church to task? St. Paul is a good choice too for reasons already stated. So many good ones to choose from!
28 posted on 04/05/2002 2:38:32 PM PST by Canticle_of_Deborah
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To: father_elijah
...who our patron saint(s) should be for our work here on FreeRepublic.

What exactly is our work here on FR? It seems to me that if we have a clearer idea of our mission or purpose as Catholics at FR, then we may be able to narrow down the list of possible patrons. Maybe I'm the only one who doesn't see clearly what our work is on FR.

29 posted on 04/05/2002 3:04:37 PM PST by ELS
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To: father_elijah
I saw St.Isidore listed as patron of the internet on spiritdaily.com but I didn't know he was official yet(but then that site has some visionaries, lol.) I do like the idea of St. Sebastian...makes me think of Cardinal Wiseman's Fabiola. Peace and all good things.
30 posted on 04/05/2002 3:19:34 PM PST by Domestic Church
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To: father_elijah
St. Edmund Campion
31 posted on 04/05/2002 3:28:34 PM PST by kidd
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Comment #32 Removed by Moderator

To: father_elijah
I'm a psychiatrist. I vote for Saint Dymphna, patron saint of the mentally ill.
33 posted on 04/05/2002 4:15:28 PM PST by johniegrad
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To: johniegrad
Seriously, now, I submit for your approval, St. Benedict who wrote the Rule for community living for monks with special emphasis on the treatment of guests who deserved to treated like Christ. We need to treat all guests to our threads like Christ if we hope to educate them about The Church. We need to attend to the multiple levels of humility outlined by Benedict in his Rule. I seriously think that the patron saint of our cause should be Benedict.
34 posted on 04/05/2002 4:19:45 PM PST by johniegrad
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To: johniegrad
bttt
35 posted on 04/05/2002 4:20:55 PM PST by johniegrad
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To: ELS
The way I see it, ELS, is that before Lent, during Lent, and especially during Holy Week, God has given us "our work" which has been (1)to fend off false attacks on the Catholic Church, (2) to support each other during a time of crisis and to continue to be a clear Catholic voice in any conservaitve discussion, (3)and to present the truth about the Lord and Holy Mother Church without reservation and with courage.

Maybe I've got it wrong. But that is what I see.

36 posted on 04/05/2002 4:30:13 PM PST by history_matters
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To: Cap'n Crunch
You have my attention! St. Michael the Archangel -- Thank you for the complete post with the prayers.
37 posted on 04/05/2002 4:43:21 PM PST by father_elijah
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To: history_matters
I think you have said it well.
38 posted on 04/05/2002 4:44:52 PM PST by father_elijah
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To: father_elijah

It's probably not a bad idea to consider Catholic
contributions to the internet as ultimately directed
toward divine mercy and the freedom which
comes from liberation from sin through God's grace.
Thanks for the reminder.

39 posted on 04/05/2002 5:09:53 PM PST by HowlinglyMind-BendingAbsurdity
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To: american colleen
I don't know if it's been on FR but did you see the statue of Padre Pio in Sicily(?) was emitting what they thought was blood? The BBC reported it, can't remember if I saw it on Drudge or another site. Last I heard they were going to send the fluid off to be tested.

Anybody have any update?

40 posted on 04/05/2002 5:13:35 PM PST by Cap'n Crunch
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To: father_elijah
Your welcome. St. Michael is my patron, so I'm a bit biased. :0)
41 posted on 04/05/2002 5:15:42 PM PST by Cap'n Crunch
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To: history_matters
A mission statement? May I add an educational aspect to this also? Sometimes my memory isn't so good at remembering the fundamentals taught way back when. There have been a few posts where I have relearned forgotten things and even new things about the Church. This can be helpful for the cradle Catholics as well as the Catholic-curious.
42 posted on 04/05/2002 5:16:07 PM PST by Canticle_of_Deborah
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To: father_elijah
St. Teresa of Avila
St. Joseph
Venerable Solaus Casey
St. Michael the Archangel
43 posted on 04/05/2002 5:24:40 PM PST by redhead
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To: Cap'n Crunch

This may be the link (Reuters?/Messina, Italy): Padre Pio

44 posted on 04/05/2002 5:46:34 PM PST by HowlinglyMind-BendingAbsurdity
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To: father_elijah
Father Guido Sarducci -- A Free Spirit....
45 posted on 04/05/2002 6:03:03 PM PST by drstevej
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To: history_matters;Askel5
Thank you. I submit as a possible patron saint the Angelic and Common Doctor St. Thomas Aquinas. His teaching can provide an infrastructure for fending off false attacks on the Catholic Church, being a clear Catholic voice in any conservative discussion, and to presenting the truth about the Lord and Holy Mother Church.

Here is a brief excerpt from an essay on Aquinas in the Seminaries:

For three decades now an infected seminary system has been sedulously vilifying the Angelic Doctor. To their mind, for good reason. Most theologians know well that this Common Doctor is the thick steel wall protecting the Faith against the seepage of Modernity. Tear it down, and the Faith is fatally exposed. That's not hyperbole, it's the Magisterium. After citing six hundred years of Pontifical praise for St. Thomas, Leo XIII concludes a section of Aeterni Patris with: " . . . while to these judgments of great Pontiffs on Thomas Aquinas comes the crowning testimony of Innocent VI: ‘His teaching above that of others . . . enjoys such an elegance of phraseology, a method of statement, a truth of proposition, that those who hold to it are never found swerving from the path of truth, and he who dares assail it will always be suspected of error.'" (Aeterni Patris, #16) As an intriguing aside the same encyclical reveals, "For it has come to light that there were not lacking among the leaders of heretical sects some who openly declared that, if the teaching of St. Thomas Aquinas were only taken away, they could easily battle with all Catholic teachers, gain the victory, and abolish the Church. A vain hope indeed, but no vain testimony." Thirty years of priestly deprivation of St. Thomas give ringing confirmation to these Leonine monita.

An interesting bit of trivia from a little farther down which certainly appies to the Internet as a form of mass communication:

What a shock to the Canadian bishops when they asked Dr. Marshall McLuhan how they could better understand the modern communications revolution. He promptly responded, "Read St. Thomas Aquinas' De Spiritualibus Creaturis."

And from the final paragraph (the author speaks of priests because the essay is about seminaries, but it can apply to laity as well):

Priests must begin to lean their head upon the wisdom of St. Thomas as he so often leaned his head on the tabernacle. God gives man priests to guard the walls of the Sacred City of the Church. But they stand strong only when carrying the weaponry of Aquinas. If not, the City falls.

46 posted on 04/05/2002 6:07:26 PM PST by ELS
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To: HowlinglyMind-BendingAbsurdity
I remember it was the BBC. Just can't remember where I saw the story. It was in Messina though, now that I read this story. The BBC showed a picture of the statue and the church.

I can sure understand why that holy priest is crying. Thanks for the picture, it cheered me right up.

47 posted on 04/05/2002 6:07:34 PM PST by Cap'n Crunch
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To: Cap'n Crunch
BBC on Padre Pio statue
48 posted on 04/05/2002 6:09:22 PM PST by HowlinglyMind-BendingAbsurdity
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To: drstevej
I live very close by his parents, his father just passed away last week. I've occasionally seen him around town.
49 posted on 04/05/2002 6:10:05 PM PST by Cap'n Crunch
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To: HowlinglyMind-BendingAbsurdity
That's the one! It's probably too early for the tests to have been completed. Quite an awesome God we serve.
50 posted on 04/05/2002 6:14:29 PM PST by Cap'n Crunch
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