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Catholic Caucus - St. Therese of Lisieux
St. Therese of Lisieux

Posted on 04/12/2002 4:46:50 PM PDT by history_matters

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To: history_matters

The home page of the Carmelite monastery where she lived.

AVAILABLE BOOKS FROM THE INSTITUTE OF CARMELITE STUDIES IN WASHINGTON, D.C.: (Click on each to read about it.)

These are the critical translations and have lots of extra notes. Don't be put off by that and think that they are too intellectual -- they're not.

If you order (can be same or different titles or any combination):

1 or 2 books 20% off
3 or 4 books 30% off
5 or more 40% off.

51 posted on 04/14/2002 3:26:36 PM PDT by BlessedBeGod
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To: history_matters
You do such a good job defending our Faith on other threads. God bless!

Sometimes I wonder why I do. They have their own interpretation and don't seem to be open to discussion -- just Catholic bashing.

I will go back to the Catholic Haters thread later and see what comments I get from my remarks about the EXACT words used in absolution. The priestly power comes directly from Jesus Christ through His Death and Resurrection. (They were talking about Catholics having to do penance.)

Strange.........did not John the Baptist phrophesy, "Repent."

52 posted on 04/14/2002 3:29:49 PM PDT by Salvation
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To: BlessedBeGod
Thanks for all those links!
53 posted on 04/14/2002 3:34:07 PM PDT by Salvation
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To: dansangel; redhead; EODGUY; .45MAN; Diago; Aquinasfan; constitutiongirl; JMJ333
Just wanted to flag you to this nice thread now with some good links from BlessedBeGod.

God bless!

54 posted on 04/14/2002 4:21:42 PM PDT by history_matters
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To: history_matters; salvation
h_m: thanks for the ping. I needed to read this thread. You must have been reading my mind.

Salvation: keep up the good work. I tend to lurk more than I should on the Catholic-bashing threads, for lack of confidence in what I have to say. You do a wonderful job. Thank-you, too, for the history of St. Therese.

55 posted on 04/14/2002 4:40:10 PM PDT by dansangel
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To: history_matters
We have a "little litany" we include before our daily rosary. St. Joseph, spouse of Mary and Guardian of the Church, St. Maximillian, St. Faustina, St. Teresa of Avila, Ven. Solanus Casey, Bl. Padre Pio, and Mother Teresa of Calcutta. We chose St. Teresa because she was such a "prayer warrior." She is our patroness whenever we pick up our rosaries, and leads the way into battle.

Answered prayer: We have prayed for the last couple of years that this scandal would be exposed, including the evil bishops. Has anyone else been praying for this?

56 posted on 04/14/2002 5:47:26 PM PDT by redhead
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To: history_matters
"just to let you know that I am praying for your daughter's fever to abate and for tomorrow to be a glorious day for her First Eucharist. Blessed be God!" ***********Thank you for your prayers and all who posted to this thread for such wondeful inspiration and focus. It was a glorious morning for First Eucharist here even though the weather report said rain and our tulips all opened at once! I really feel St.Therese interceded in lowering the fever and keeping the younger children from being ill too. Deo gratias.
57 posted on 04/14/2002 6:03:30 PM PDT by Domestic Church
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To: redhead
  We have a "little litany" we include before our daily rosary. St. Joseph, spouse of Mary and Guardian of the Church, St. Maximillian, St. Faustina, St. Teresa of Avila, Ven. Solanus Casey, Bl. Padre Pio, and Mother Teresa of Calcutta.

Yes, we have been praying for it to be exposed and uprooted. It was first suggested to me as an object of prayer by a dear secular Carmelite.

Your litany is similar to the one we say after the Rosary except we add St. Vincent de Paul, Protector of the Clergy, as well as St. Therese. I have a personal devotion to Ven. Solanus Casey. I believe he is interceding mightily for the exposure of all evil in the Church and for the growth of genuine vocations.

58 posted on 04/14/2002 6:09:51 PM PDT by history_matters
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To: Domestic Church
Thank you for this beautiful report. Thanks be to God!
59 posted on 04/14/2002 6:10:27 PM PDT by history_matters
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To: Marie Antoinette
Hah! Congratulations. Now we have even farther to go to catch up!

God bless you and the little one,

patent

60 posted on 04/14/2002 7:49:42 PM PDT by patent
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To: Coleus; notwithstanding; victim soul; motherofeight
ping

Mary, Queen of All Saints, pray for us.

61 posted on 04/14/2002 11:04:32 PM PDT by history_matters
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To: Marie Antoinette
My most heartfelt congratulations! I will say a rosary tomorrow for your new baby boy and for you and your family. God bless you forever!
62 posted on 04/14/2002 11:05:39 PM PDT by history_matters
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To: history_matters
Thank you for the ping.

God Bless,

EODGUY

63 posted on 04/15/2002 5:37:42 AM PDT by EODGUY
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To: Aggie Mama; 4ourprogeny
ping
64 posted on 04/15/2002 9:28:46 AM PDT by history_matters
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To: father_elijah
ping to you! God bless!

Lord Jesus Christ, thou Good Physician, heal thy Church, we beseech thee.
Mary, Queen of All Saints, pray for us.

65 posted on 04/15/2002 9:50:15 AM PDT by history_matters
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Comment #66 Removed by Moderator

To: history_matters
Thanks for all the pings today. =)
67 posted on 04/15/2002 10:19:06 AM PDT by Aggie Mama
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To: Nubbin
This is my favorite! I say this one quite often.
68 posted on 04/15/2002 10:37:34 AM PDT by Aggie Mama
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To: Catholic_list
To write to the Pope, you can send your letters to:


His Holiness Pope John Paul II
The Apostolic Palace
La Santa Sede
00120 Vatican City
Europe

69 posted on 04/15/2002 6:14:06 PM PDT by history_matters
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To: Maeve; Siobhan

BTTT on 10-01-04


70 posted on 10/01/2004 9:20:04 AM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: All

BTTT on the Memorial of Saint Thérèse of the Child Jesus, virgin and doctor of the Church, October 01, 2005!


71 posted on 10/01/2005 10:21:13 AM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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St. Thérèse of Lisieux

St. Thérèse of Lisieux
(1873-1897)
Feast day: October 1, 2007

"I prefer the monotony of obscure sacrifice to all ecstasies. To pick up a pin for love can convert a soul." These are the words of Theresa of the Child Jesus, a Carmelite nun called the "Little Flower," who lived a cloistered life of obscurity in the convent of Lisieux, France. [In French-speaking areas, she is known as Thérèse of Lisieux.] And her preference for hidden sacrifice did indeed convert souls. Few saints of God are more popular than this young nun. Her autobiography, The Story of a Soul, is read and loved throughout the world. Thérèse Martin entered the convent at the age of 15 and died in 1897 at the age of 24.
     Life in a Carmelite convent is indeed uneventful and consists mainly of prayer and hard domestic work. But Thérèse possessed that holy insight that redeems the time, however dull that time may be. She saw in quiet suffering redemptive suffering, suffering that was indeed her apostolate. Thérèse said she came to the Carmel convent "to save souls and pray for priests." And shortly before she died, she wrote: "I want to spend my heaven doing good on earth."
     October 19, 1997, Pope John Paul II proclaimed her a Doctor of the Church, the third woman to be so recognized in light of her holiness and the influence of her teaching on spirituality in the Church.

Comment:

     Thérèse has much to teach our age of the image, the appearance, the "sell." We have become a dangerously self-conscious people, painfully aware of the need to be fulfilled, yet knowing we are not. Thérèse, like so many saints, sought to serve others, to do something outside herself, to forget herself in quiet acts of love. She is one of the great examples of the gospel paradox that we gain our life by losing it, and that the seed that falls to the ground must die in order to live (see John 12).
     Preoccupation with self separates modern men and women from God, from their fellow human beings and ultimately from themselves. We must relearn to forget ourselves, to contemplate a God who draws us out of ourselves and to serve others as the ultimate expression of selfhood. These are the insights of St. Thérèse of Lisieux, and they are more valid today than ever.

Quote:


     All her life St. Thérèse suffered from illness. As a young girl she underwent a three-month malady characterized by violent crises, extended delirium and prolonged fainting spells. Afterwards she was ever frail and yet she worked hard in the laundry and refectory of the convent. Psychologically, she endured prolonged periods of darkness when the light of faith seemed all but extinguished. The last year of her life she slowly wasted away from tuberculosis. And yet shortly before her death on September 30 she murmured, "I would not suffer less."
     Truly she was a valiant woman who did not whimper about her illnesses and anxieties. Here was a person who saw the power of love, that divine alchemy which can change everything, including weakness and illness, into service and redemptive power for others. Is it any wonder that she is patroness of the missions? Who else but those who embrace suffering with their love really convert the world?

72 posted on 10/01/2007 9:58:19 AM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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