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1 posted on 07/29/2002 6:21:47 AM PDT by NYer
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To: Siobhan; american colleen; sinkspur; Aliska; Lady In Blue; Salvation; Polycarp; narses; ...
Fascinating, isn't it? Juan Diego, or whatever name they wish to give him, would still be an excellent candidate for sainthood.
2 posted on 07/29/2002 6:24:03 AM PDT by NYer
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To: NYer
Wow!
3 posted on 07/29/2002 7:13:17 AM PDT by yendu bwam
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To: NYer
Amazing...

I was on a tour of Europe, one of 4 RCs in a group of 24. We went to Notre Dame. Like so many cathedrals in the name of Our Lady, there are chapels, one for every continent and there is one for Our Lady of Guadalupe. There's more, but that one I REALLY remember. One of the people on this tour asked is I knew anything about this. She had never heard of this. And I'm thinking...well, yeah. Anyway, I told her the story, and this woman was amazed at the amount of detail to the story, the roses (the flowers were roses, right?), the garment, and asked why I believed. And so I told her about the eyes. How can you not believe?
4 posted on 07/29/2002 7:56:56 AM PDT by Desdemona
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To: NYer
Just realized that I forgot to include the pictures. Here they are:

1.
There's a bearded man in this photo.


Here's a closer look at the bearded man.


According to Dr. Tonsmann, from left to right we see "the Indian", "Bishop Zumarraga", "the translator", "Juan Diego showing the tilma", and "the family"


The Family

5 posted on 07/29/2002 8:12:49 AM PDT by NYer
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To: NYer
The underlying image is inexplicably applied -- it floats on the surface of the tilma like a photographic emulsion -- to which several human additions have been made. In addition to being a beautiful piece of iconography, it unofficially serves as the national symbol of Mexico.
8 posted on 07/29/2002 9:28:48 AM PDT by eastsider
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To: NYer
Our Lady of Guadalupe is also known as Patroness of the Americas. Her feast day is Dec. 12....I believe this was the date of the Supreme Court decision in 2000. Not a mere coincidence IMHO.
13 posted on 07/29/2002 1:29:57 PM PDT by Litany
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To: HumanaeVitae
Juan Diego bump!
14 posted on 07/29/2002 1:30:15 PM PDT by NYer
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To: NYer
Very interesting. The bearded figure was, I believe, originally thought to be a Spaniard, and not Juan Diego (who was an Indian, and therefore had no beard).

I think that because of Mexican racial unease, Juan Diego has become progressively less Indian. I recally reading a few days ago that most of the devotional pictures of him show somebody with fair skin and a beard. The producer of this material said he made it because that was what the buyers wanted.

Very odd. But if you've ever spent any time in Mexico (as I have), you'll learn very fast that Mexicans make a big distinction between folks of European origin (not necessarily Spanish, since there are also many people of French, Irish, English and German origin who have been Mexicans for generations) and Indians. Unfortunately, I think the tendency of the Mexican government to make special allowances for Indians and give them special benefits has only made the animosity worse.

Juan Diego could be a powerful symbol of unity and equality before God, but somehow, I don't think this is what is happening right now.

19 posted on 07/29/2002 2:33:52 PM PDT by livius
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To: NYer
Oh, now you went and done it.

"Listen and let it penetrate your heart, my dear little son. Do no be troubled or weighed down with grief. Do not fear any illness or vexation, anxiety or pain. Am I not here who am your Mother? Are you not under my shadow and protection? Am I not your fountain of life? Are you not in the folds of my mantle? In the crossing of my arms? Is there anything else you need?"

The words of Our Lady of Guadalupe to (soon to be) St. Juan Diego Dec. 12th 1531

Cried like a baby the first time I read them.

Bump for Our Lady of Guadalupe

20 posted on 07/29/2002 2:42:57 PM PDT by Cap'n Crunch
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To: NYer
Here's EWTN's beautiful webpage:



22 posted on 07/29/2002 4:41:18 PM PDT by Lady In Blue
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To: NYer; All
American Catholic’s Saint of the Day

 

December 12, 2006
Our Lady of Guadalupe

The feast in honor of Our Lady of Guadalupe goes back to the sixteenth century. Chronicles of that period tell us the story.

A poor Indian named Cuauhtlatohuac was baptized and given the name Juan Diego. He was a 57-year-old widower and lived in a small village near Mexico City. On Saturday morning, December 9, 1531, he was on his way to a nearby barrio to attend Mass in honor of Our Lady.

He was walking by a hill called Tepeyac when he heard beautiful music like the warbling of birds. A radiant cloud appeared and within it a young Native American maiden dressed like an Aztec princess. The lady spoke to him in his own language and sent him to the bishop of Mexico, a Franciscan named Juan de Zumarraga. The bishop was to build a chapel in the place where the lady appeared.

Eventually the bishop told Juan Diego to have the lady give him a sign. About this same time Juan Diego’s uncle became seriously ill. This led poor Diego to try to avoid the lady. The lady found Diego, nevertheless, assured him that his uncle would recover and provided roses for Juan to carry to the bishop in his cape or tilma.

When Juan Diego opened his tilma in the bishop’s presence, the roses fell to the ground and the bishop sank to his knees. On Juan Diego’s tilma appeared an image of Mary as she had appeared at the hill of Tepeyac. It was December 12, 1531.

Comment:

Mary's appearance to Juan Diego as one of his people is a powerful reminder that Mary and the God who sent her accept all peoples. In the context of the sometimes rude and cruel treatment of the Indians by the Spaniards, the apparition was a rebuke to the Spaniards and an event of vast significance for Native Americans. While a number of them had converted before this incident, they now came in droves. According to a contemporary chronicler, nine million Indians became Catholic in a very short time. In these days when we hear so much about God's preferential option for the poor, Our Lady of Guadalupe cries out to us that God's love for and identification with the poor is an age-old truth that stems from the Gospel itself.

Quote:

Mary to Juan Diego: “My dearest son, I am the eternal Virgin Mary, Mother of the true God, Author of Life, Creator of all and Lord of the Heavens and of the Earth...and it is my desire that a church be built here in this place for me, where, as your most merciful Mother and that of all your people, I may show my loving clemency and the compassion that I bear to the Indians, and to those who love and seek me...” (from an ancient chronicle).



28 posted on 12/12/2006 9:59:18 AM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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