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Ash Wednesday
EWTN ^ | 1996 | James Akin

Posted on 03/03/2003 5:35:48 PM PST by Salvation

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To: Salvation
Ha, I just asked you about Ash Wednesday, then I did a search and found I asked you about this last year. I knew it all sounded too familiar, lol

way too embarassing!

pony

51 posted on 02/20/2004 3:05:45 AM PST by ponyespresso (simul justus et peccator)
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To: Salvation
A: Because in the Bible a mark on the forehead is a symbol of a person's ownership. By having their foreheads marked with the sign of a cross, this symbolizes that the person belongs to Jesus Christ, who died on a Cross.

Just as there is a mark or sign of the beast, there is a mark or sign of G-d.

Exodus 13 (KJV)
9 And it shall be for a sign unto thee upon thine hand, and for a memorial between thine eyes, that the LORD's law may be in thy mouth: for with a strong hand hath the LORD brought thee out of Egypt.

Exodus 13
16 And it shall be for a token upon thine hand, and for frontlets between thine eyes: for by strength of hand the LORD brought us forth out of Egypt.

Deuteronomy 6
8 And thou shalt bind them for a sign upon thine hand, and they shall be as frontlets between thine eyes.

Deuteronomy 11
18 Therefore shall ye lay up these my words in your heart and in your soul, and bind them for a sign upon your hand, that they may be as frontlets between your eyes.

from the Hebrew
226
'owth oth probably from 225 (in the sense of appearing); a signal (literally or figuratively), as a flag, beacon, monument, omen, prodigy, evidence, etc.:--mark, miracle, (en-)sign, token.
1)
sign, signal
a) a distinguishing mark

b) banner
c)
remembrance
d)
miraculous sign
e)
omen
f)
warning
2)
token, ensign, standard, miracle, proof

from the Hebrew
2903
towphaphah to-faw-faw' from an unused root meaning to go around or bind; a fillet for the forehead:--frontlet.
1) bands, phylacteries, frontlets, marks

Deuteronomy 11
18 Therefore shall ye lay up these my words in your heart and in your soul, and bind them for a sign upon your hand, that they may be as frontlets between your eyes.
19 And ye shall teach them your children, speaking of them when thou sittest in thine house, and when thou walkest by the way, when thou liest down, and when thou risest up.
22 For if ye shall diligently keep all these commandments which I command you, to do them, to love the LORD your God, to walk in all his ways, and to cleave unto him;

(Obedience is the test of true love for G-d.  Adam and Eve
disobeyed, and were kicked out of the Garden.  Abraham obeyed and it
was counted unto him as righteousness)

26 Behold, I set before you this day a blessing and a curse;

(G-d gives us a choice)

27 A blessing, if ye obey the commandments of the LORD your God, which I command you this day:
28 And a curse, if ye will not obey the commandments of the LORD your God, but turn aside out of the way which I command you this day, to go after other gods, which ye have not known.

The sign of G-d is His Torah, which in Hebrew means instructions and teachings. Those that accept the Torah are marked as those that are true children of G-d.

Now, that we know what YHWH's sign/mark is... just who's mark are you taking?

52 posted on 02/20/2004 3:38:57 AM PST by ET(end tyranny) (Isaiah 47:4 - Our Redeemer, YHWH of hosts is His name, The Holy One of Israel.)
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To: ET(end tyranny)
The ashes are a ritual of atonement and penance. They are not the (666) mark of the beast.
53 posted on 02/20/2004 7:19:20 AM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: ponyespresso
Here are some other links about Lent:

The Holy Season of Lent -- Fast and Abstinence

The Holy Season of Lent -- The Stations of the Cross

Lent and Fasting

Ash Wednesday

All About Lent

Kids and Holiness: Making Lent Meaningful to Children

54 posted on 02/20/2004 7:56:42 AM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: All
Ash Wednesday - Lent Begins

Ashes are a mark of faith and a symbol that we use to begin the season of Lent which leads us to Easter.

By wearing Ashes, we recall our baptism, and our welcoming of Jesus into our lives as we prepare ourselves for Easter. During the Ash Wednesday service, we listen to God's word and bless the ashes which are the burnt remains of the palms from Palm Sunday. On Palm Sunday we celebrate the day that Jesus was welcomed into Jerusalem with waving palms. In baptism, we welcomed Jesus as our friend, our guide, and our role model. The ashes which remain from the palms remind us that even though we may have turned away from God and made choices that have broken our friendship, still we are welcomed by God. The reading during the Ash Wednesday liturgy reminds us that God gives us the time and the chance to come back no matter how far we have wandered from the path of God's love: "You can still return to me with all your heart..." (Joel 2:12). The seeds of our faith and love are sheltered beneath the ashes much like a seedling in a forest: after a fire, the ashes may look dark, sad and barren, but the ashen remains of the burnt trees serve as a blanket and a shield for the seeds buried beneath. These seeds will sprout in the spring.

Lent is a reminder to all of us of our baptismal call.

Ash Wednesday is the beginning of Lent, which was originally a forty day retreat spent as time of preparation for adults preparing for baptism. The forty days recalled the time that Jesus spent in the desert preparing for his ministry of love, healing and teaching. As Jesus' disciples, we spend our Lenten retreat preparing for Easter and readying ourselves to follow Jesus' call to love.

Wearing ashes is a sign that we remember God's love and our Baptismal promises and we are returning to the hope and joy of God's call.

Ashes are a sign of repentance, that is turning away from sin and evil-anything that goes against God's love. In the early days of the church, persons who had committed serious sins wore ashes and spent time away from the community as a way to think about and heal the wound of their sin. In the Middle Ages, the tradition changed to include the whole community. This change recognized that all of us can forget God's love and friendship and make choices that turn us in a different direction, away from God. The whole community wears ashes as a reminder of God's call and our choice to follow God's way of love. In the Gospel of Ash Wednesday liturgy, Jesus reminds us that our signs of penance are not for making a big deal of our suffering.

We put on signs of faith as an outward sign of our heart's commitment to grow, to love and share.

The ashes we wear are meaningful when they are linked to prayer and acts of love and service.

Ash Wednesday is important because it begins our journey in Lent toward Easter.

Ashes also symbolize death and mourning.

Jesus turned death upside down by his resurrection. When we wear ashes, we remember the cycle of life and death. We remember our God who created us from the earth. We believe in faith that our lives are changed by God's love and that we will share in Jesus' resurrection. So "ashes are turned to garlands of joy" when we journey from Ash Wednesday to Easter.

As Paul said in his letter to the Romans:

"Yet God raised Jesus to life! God's Spirit now lives in you, and he will raise you to life by his Spirit." (Romans 8:11)

55 posted on 02/20/2004 12:50:11 PM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Salvation
The ashes are a ritual of atonement and penance.

Please cite the scripture saying that we are to have ash markings on our forheads, in the shape of a cross. Thanks. By the way, it seems that it may be more of a 'tradition of men', than a request of YHWH. ;)

1 Kings 18:21 (JPS)
21 And Elijah came near unto all the people, and said: 'How long halt ye between two opinions? if YHWH be God, follow Him; but if Baal, follow him.' And the people answered him not a word.

Now a rephrase...

1 Kings 18:21
21 And Elijah came near unto all the people, and said: 'How long halt ye between two opinions? if YHWH be God, follow Him; but if Jesus, follow him.' And the people answered him not a word.

At some point you will have to make a choice

56 posted on 02/20/2004 12:59:43 PM PST by ET(end tyranny) (Isaiah 47:4 - Our Redeemer, YHWH of hosts is His name, The Holy One of Israel.)
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To: ET(end tyranny)
Did you see this?

**Ashes are a sign of repentance, that is turning away from sin and evil-anything that goes against God's love. In the early days of the church, persons who had committed serious sins wore ashes and spent time away from the community as a way to think about and heal the wound of their sin. In the Middle Ages, the tradition changed to include the whole community. This change recognized that all of us can forget God's love and friendship and make choices that turn us in a different direction, away from God. The whole community wears ashes as a reminder of God's call and our choice to follow God's way of love.**

So, I don't think you are saying that you are sinless, I just think that you are saying you don't agree with this Tradition.

Can we agree to disagree here?

57 posted on 02/20/2004 1:59:16 PM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: All
BTTT!
58 posted on 02/23/2004 3:53:32 PM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: All
Mardi Gras' Catholic Roots [Shrove Tuesday]
59 posted on 02/23/2004 11:12:47 PM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: ponyespresso; *Catholic_list; father_elijah; nickcarraway; SMEDLEYBUTLER; Siobhan; Lady In Blue; ...
Ash Wednesday bump!
60 posted on 02/25/2004 7:30:52 AM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: All
Thought for the Day

In the sweat of thy face shalt thou eat bread till thou return to the earth, out of which thou wast taken: for dust thou art, and into dust thou shalt return.

 -- Genesis iii, 19

61 posted on 02/25/2004 7:44:09 AM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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Comment #62 Removed by Moderator

To: Salvation
Memento, homo, quia pulvis est et in pulverum reverteris.

(Remember, man, that thou art dust, and unto dust thou shalt return.)
63 posted on 02/25/2004 9:22:57 AM PST by TradicalRC (While the wicked stand confounded, Call me, with thy saints surrounded. -The Boondock Saints)
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To: Zviadist
LOL. What a nightmare.

The funny thing is many people reading your post won't understand what your problem is. Even worse many attending won't realize that there even is a problem.

64 posted on 02/25/2004 9:54:16 AM PST by AAABEST (<a href="http://www.angelqueen.org">Traditional Catholicism is Back and Growing</a>)
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To: Salvation
Hi Salvation, I have an Ash Wednesday question. I am being told this:

....when you pray, go to your inner room, close the door, and pray to your Father in secret.

But here I am sitting at my desk at work, getting all sorts of comments about the ashes on my forehead. I feel like I'm showing off, even tho I just quietly slipped away for a noon mass without any comment or fanfare. How do I reconcile this?

65 posted on 02/25/2004 12:17:28 PM PST by T Minus Four
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To: T Minus Four
Explain the ashes -- the scripture about sitting in ashes is an OT reading. Then that it is a way that Catholics start Lent.

And then invite them to further conversation -- off company time if they want to know more. Maybe even invite them to go with you to Mass during Lent.
66 posted on 02/25/2004 3:02:57 PM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: TradicalRC
And I guess a new one that the priests can now use is
Turn away from sin and be faithful to the gospel. Mark 1:15

At least it's in my missalette.
67 posted on 02/25/2004 3:04:16 PM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Zviadist
Our people who decorate the church put up a wonderful new banner that all can see as they enter the church.

"Welcome to the holy silence of Lent"

And it was much quieter today.
68 posted on 02/25/2004 3:06:21 PM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Salvation
That's pretty much what I do. Every year I explain the ashes, and most people are at least politely interested. I use it as a chance to talk about the Catholic faith a little.
69 posted on 02/25/2004 3:15:13 PM PST by T Minus Four
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To: T Minus Four
I have mentioned before, that as a convert I am hungry for tradition. Today was the first time I recieved the ashes, and wore them humbly all day. A few people asked about them, but most were surprised that it was already Lent!
70 posted on 02/25/2004 10:53:15 PM PST by lulu67 (Christ sacrificed Himself for me, a sinner)
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To: Zviadist; Desdemona; Salvation
Don't get me wrong: this was no "clown mass" church. It was very tastefully done (although barren, like Protestant). The priest was no clown. The problem is deeper: the new mass is banal and devoid of meaning. There is no "God" there.

This statement is pathetic.  Your puny little cross was too heavy, and it kept you from realizing the privilege of being in His presence and receiving Him.

You're absolutely right Salvation in bringing Jesus' words into this thread.
"Take care not to perform righteous deeds
in order that people may see them;
otherwise, you will have no recompense from your heavenly Father...."

71 posted on 02/26/2004 6:07:25 AM PST by GirlShortstop
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To: GirlShortstop; Zviadist
Zviadist doesn't post here any longer, as far as I can tell.

He was one of those "blame America" dolts after 9/11, and is also some sort of advocate for anarchy.

A nutty, Justin Raimondo-type.

72 posted on 02/26/2004 6:20:49 AM PST by sinkspur (Adopt a shelter dog or cat! You'll save one life, and maybe two!)
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To: Salvation
Turn away from sin and be faithful to the gospel. Mark 1:15

That's what we used yesterday. After last night's Mass, the head usher said that over 4500 people had come to Mass yesterday at five Masses. Even some non-Catholics came forward, I'm sure, to receive ashes. Lots of faces I've never seen before.

73 posted on 02/26/2004 6:22:46 AM PST by sinkspur (Adopt a shelter dog or cat! You'll save one life, and maybe two!)
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To: sinkspur
I did not see your testimony previously. It is so encouraging!

God bless.
74 posted on 03/03/2004 9:13:21 AM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: sinkspur; All
Someone asked me about the Biblical foundation for Ash Wednesday on the Ash Wednesday thread. Well, here it is!!

Reading I
Jon 3:1-10

The word of the LORD came to Jonah a second time:
"Set out for the great city of Nineveh,
and announce to it the message that I will tell you."
So Jonah made ready and went to Nineveh,
according to the LORD's bidding.
Now Nineveh was an enormously large city;
it took three days to go through it.
Jonah began his journey through the city,
and had gone but a single day's walk announcing,
"Forty days more and Nineveh shall be destroyed,"
when the people of Nineveh believed God;
they proclaimed a fast
and all of them, great and small, put on sackcloth.

When the news reached the king of Nineveh,
he rose from his throne, laid aside his robe,
covered himself with sackcloth, and sat in the ashes.
Then he had this proclaimed throughout Nineveh,
by decree of the king and his nobles:
"Neither man nor beast, neither cattle nor sheep,
shall taste anything;
they shall not eat, nor shall they drink water.
Man and beast shall be covered with sackcloth and call loudly to God;
every man shall turn from his evil way
and from the violence he has in hand.
Who knows, God may relent and forgive, and withhold his blazing wrath,
so that we shall not perish."
When God saw by their actions how they turned from their evil way,
he repented of the evil that he had threatened to do to them;
he did not carry it out.

75 posted on 03/03/2004 9:14:05 AM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: All

Reflection.
The liturgical use of ashes originated in the Old Testament times. Ashes symbolized mourning, mortality and penance. In the Book of Esther, Mordecai put on sackcloth and ashes when he heard of the decree of King Ahasuerus to kill all of the Jewish people in the Persian Empire (Esther 4:1). Job repented in sackcloth and ashes (Job 42:6). Prophesying the Babylonian captivity of Jerusalem, Daniel wrote, "I turned to the Lord God, pleading in earnest prayer, with fasting, sackcloth, and ashes" (Daniel 9:3).

Jesus  made reference to ashes, "If the miracles worked in you had taken place in Tyre and Sidon, they would have reformed in sackcloth and ashes long ago" (Matthew 11:21).
In the Middle Ages, the priest would bless the dying person with holy water, saying, "Remember that thou art dust and to dust thou shalt return."

The Church adapted the use of ashes to mark the beginning of the penitential season of Lent, when we remember our mortality and mourn for our sins. In our present liturgy for Ash Wednesday, we use ashes made from the burned palm branches distributed on the Palm Sunday of the previous year. The priest blesses the ashes and imposes them on the foreheads of the faithful, making the sign of the cross and saying, "Remember, man you are dust and to dust you shall return," or "Turn away from sin and be faithful to the Gospel." As we begin this holy season of Lent in preparation for Easter, we must remember the significance of the ashes we have received: We mourn and do penance for our sins. We again convert our hearts to the Lord, who suffered, died, and rose for our salvation. We renew the promises made at our baptism, when we died to an old life and rose to a new life with Christ. Finally, mindful that the kingdom of this world passes away, we strive to live the kingdom of God now and look forward to its fulfillment in heaven.

76 posted on 02/09/2005 7:03:06 AM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: All
Lent 2005, Prayer, Reflection, Action for All

Reflections for Lent: February 6 -- March 27, 2005

77 posted on 02/09/2005 7:06:43 AM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: All
Catholic Caucus: Daily Mass Readings, 02-09-05, Ash Wednesday
78 posted on 02/09/2005 7:10:45 AM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: All
From American Catholic.org

Although Ash Wednesday is not a Catholic holy day of obligation, it is an important part of the season of Lent. The first clear evidence of Ash Wednesday is around 960, and in the 12th century people began using palm branches from the previous Palm Sunday for ashes.

Catholic Update

Each issue carries an imprimatur from the Archdiocese of Cincinnati. Reprinting prohibited


Ash Wednesday
Our Shifting Understanding of Lent

Those who work with liturgy in parishes know that some of the largest crowds in the year will show up to receive ashes on Ash Wednesday. Though this is not a holy day of obligation in our tradition, many people would not think of letting Ash Wednesday go by without a trip to church to be marked with an ashen cross on their foreheads. Even people who seldom come to Church for the rest of the year may make a concerted effort to come for ashes.

How did this practice become such an important part of the lives of so many believers? Who came up with the idea for this rather odd ritual? How do we explain the popularity of smudging our foreheads with ashes and then walking around all day with dirty faces? Those who do not share our customs often make a point of telling us that we have something on our foreheads, assuming we would want to wash it off, but many Catholics wear that smudge faithfully all day.

Ashes in the Bible

The origin of the custom of using ashes in religious ritual is lost in the mists of pre-history, but we find references to the practice in our own religious tradition in the Old Testament. The prophet Jeremiah, for example, calls for repentance this way: "O daughter of my people, gird on sackcloth, roll in the ashes" (Jer 6:26).

The prophet Isaiah, on the other hand, critiques the use of sackcloth and ashes as inadequate to please God, but in the process he indicates that this practice was well-known in Israel: "Is this the manner of fasting I wish, of keeping a day of penance: that a man bow his head like a reed, and lie in sackcloth and ashes? Do you call this a fast, a day acceptable to the Lord?" (Is 58:5).

The prophet Daniel pleaded for God to rescue Israel with sackcloth and ashes as a sign of Israel's repentance: "I turned to the Lord God, pleading in earnest prayer, with fasting, sackcloth and ashes" (Dn 9:3).

Perhaps the best known example of repentance in the Old Testament also involves sackcloth and ashes. When the prophet Jonah finally obeyed God's command and preached in the great city of Nineveh, his preaching was amazingly effective. Word of his message was carried to the king of Nineveh. "When the news reached the king of Nineveh, he rose from his throne, laid aside his robe, covered himself with sackcloth, and sat in the ashes" (Jon 3:6).

In the book of Judith, we find acts of repentance that specify that the ashes were put on people's heads: "And all the Israelite men, women and children who lived in Jerusalem prostrated themselves in front of the temple building, with ashes strewn on their heads, displaying their sackcloth covering before the Lord" (Jdt 4:11; see also 4:15 and 9:1).

Just prior to the New Testament period, the rebels fighting for Jewish independence, the Maccabees, prepared for battle using ashes: "That day they fasted and wore sackcloth; they sprinkled ashes on their heads and tore their clothes" (1 Mc 3:47; see also 4:39).

In the New Testament, Jesus refers to the use of sackcloth and ashes as signs of repentance: "Woe to you, Chorazin! Woe to you, Bethsaida! For if the mighty deeds done in your midst had been done in Tyre and Sidon, they would long ago have repented in sackcloth and ashes" (Mt 11:21, Lk 10:13).

Ashes in the History of the Church

Despite all these references in Scripture, the use of ashes in the Church left only a few records in the first millennium of Church history. Thomas Talley, an expert on the history of the liturgical year, says that the first clearly datable liturgy for Ash Wednesday that provides for sprinkling ashes is in the Romano-Germanic pontifical of 960. Before that time, ashes had been used as a sign of admission to the Order of Penitents. As early as the sixth century, the Spanish Mozarabic rite calls for signing the forehead with ashes when admitting a gravely ill person to the Order of Penitents. At the beginning of the 11th century, Abbot Aelfric notes that it was customary for all the faithful to take part in a ceremony on the Wednesday before Lent that included the imposition of ashes. Near the end of that century, Pope Urban II called for the general use of ashes on that day. Only later did this day come to be called Ash Wednesday.

At first, clerics and men had ashes sprinkled on their heads, while women had the sign of the cross made with ashes on their foreheads. Eventually, of course, the ritual used with women came to be used for men as well.

In the 12th century the rule developed that the ashes were to be created by burning palm branches from the previous Palm Sunday. Many parishes today invite parishioners to bring such palms to church before Lent begins and have a ritual burning of the palms after Mass.

The Order of Penitents

It seems, then, that our use of ashes at the beginning of Lent is an extension of the use of ashes with those entering the Order of Penitents. This discipline was the way the Sacrament of Penance was celebrated through most of the first millennium of Church history. Those who had committed serious sins confessed their sins to the bishop or his representative and were assigned a penance that was to be carried out over a period of time. After completing their penance, they were reconciled by the bishop with a prayer of absolution offered in the midst of the community.

During the time they worked out their penances, the penitents often had special places in church and wore special garments to indicate their status. Like the catechumens who were preparing for Baptism, they were often dismissed from the Sunday assembly after the Liturgy of the Word.

This whole process was modeled on the conversion journey of the catechumens, because the Church saw falling into serious sin after Baptism as an indication that a person had not really been converted. Penance was a second attempt to foster that conversion. Early Church fathers even called Penance a "second Baptism."

Lent developed in the Church as the whole community prayed and fasted for the catechumens who were preparing for Baptism. At the same time, those members of the community who were already baptized prepared to renew their baptismal promises at Easter, thus joining the catechumens in seeking to deepen their own conversion. It was natural, then, that the Order of Penitents also focused on Lent, with reconciliation often being celebrated on Holy Thursday so that the newly reconciled could share in the liturgies of the Triduum. With Lent clearly a season focused on Baptism, Penance found a home there as well.

Shifting Understanding of Lent

With the disappearance of the catechumenate from the Church's life, people's understanding of the season of Lent changed. By the Middle Ages, the emphasis was no longer clearly baptismal. Instead, the main emphasis shifted to the passion and death of Christ. Medieval art reflected this increased focus on the suffering Savior; so did popular piety. Lent came to be seen as a time to acknowledge our guilt for the sins that led to Christ's passion and death. Repentance was then seen as a way to avoid punishment for sin more than as a way to renew our baptismal commitment.

With the gradual disappearance of the Order of Penitents, the use of ashes became detached from its original context. The focus on personal penance and the Sacrament of Penance continued in Lent, but the connection to Baptism was no longer obvious to most people. This is reflected in the formula that came to be associated with the distribution of ashes: "Remember that you are dust and to dust you will return." This text focuses on our mortality, as an incentive to take seriously the call to repentance, but there is little hint here of any baptismal meaning. This emphasis on mortality fit well with the medieval experience of life, when the threat of death was always at hand. Many people died very young, and the societal devastation of the plague made death even more prevalent.

Ash Wednesday After Vatican II

The Second Vatican Council (1962-65) called for the renewal of Lent, recovering its ancient baptismal character. This recovery was significantly advanced by the restoration of the catechumenate mandated by the Rite of Christian Initiation of Adults (1972). As Catholics have increasingly interacted with catechumens in the final stage of their preparation for Baptism, they have begun to understand Lent as a season of baptismal preparation and baptismal renewal.

Since Ash Wednesday marks the beginning of Lent, it naturally is also beginning to recover a baptismal focus. One hint of this is the second formula that is offered for the imposition of ashes: "Turn away from sin and be faithful to the gospel." Though it doesn't explicitly mention Baptism, it recalls our baptismal promises to reject sin and profess our faith. It is a clear call to conversion, to that movement away from sin and toward Christ that we have to embrace over and over again through our lives.

As the beginning of Lent, Ash Wednesday calls us to the conversion journey that marks the season. As the catechumens enter the final stage of their preparation for the Easter sacraments, we are all called to walk with them so that we will be prepared to renew our baptismal promises when Easter arrives.

The Readings for Ash Wednesday

The readings assigned to Ash Wednesday highlight this call to conversion. The first reading from the prophet Joel is a clarion call to return to the Lord "with fasting, and weeping and mourning." Joel reminds us that our God is "gracious and merciful...slow to anger, rich in kindness and relenting in punishment," thus inviting us to trust in God's love as we seek to renew our life with God. It is important to note that Joel does not call only for individual conversion. His appeal is to the whole people, so he commands: "Blow the trumpet in Zion, proclaim a fast, call an assembly; gather the people, notify the congregation; assemble the elders, gather the children and the infants at the breast." As we enter this season of renewal, we are united with all of God's people, for we all share the need for continued conversion and we are called to support one another on the journey. Imitating those who joined the Order of Penitents in ages past, we all become a community of penitents seeking to grow closer to God through repentance and renewal.

With a different tone but no less urgency, St. Paul implores us in the second reading to "be reconciled to God." "Now," he insists, "is a very acceptable time; behold, now is the day of salvation." The time to return to the Lord is now, this holy season, this very day.

The Gospel for Ash Wednesday gives us good advice on how we are to act during Lent. Jesus speaks of the three main disciplines of the season: giving alms, praying and fasting. All of these spiritual activities, Jesus teaches us, are to be done without any desire for recognition by others. The point is not that we should only pray alone and not in community, for example, but that we should not pray in order to be seen as holy. The same is true of fasting and works of charity; they do not need to be hidden but they are to be done out of love of God and neighbor, not in order to be seen by others.

There is a certain irony that we use this Gospel, which tells us to wash our faces so that we do not appear to be doing penance on the day that we go around with "dirt" on our foreheads. This is just another way Jesus is telling us not to perform religious acts for public recognition. We don't wear the ashes to proclaim our holiness but to acknowledge that we are a community of sinners in need of repentance and renewal.

From Ashes to the Font

The call to continuing conversion reflected in these readings is also the message of the ashes. We move through Lent from ashes to the baptismal font. We dirty our faces on Ash Wednesday and are cleansed in the waters of the font. More profoundly, we embrace the need to die to sin and selfishness at the beginning of Lent so that we can come to fuller life in the Risen One at Easter.

When we receive ashes on our foreheads, we remember who we are. We remember that we are creatures of the earth ("Remember that you are dust"). We remember that we are mortal beings ("and to dust you will return"). We remember that we are baptized. We remember that we are people on a journey of conversion ("Turn away from sin and be faithful to the gospel"). We remember that we are members of the body of Christ (and that smudge on our foreheads will proclaim that identity to others, too).

Renewing our sense of who we really are before God is the core of the Lenten experience. It is so easy to forget, and thus we fall into habits of sin, ways of thinking and living that are contrary to God's will. In this we are like the Ninevites in the story of Jonah. It was "their wickedness" that caused God to send Jonah to preach to them. Jonah resisted that mission and found himself in deep water. Rescued by a large fish, Jonah finally did God's bidding and began to preach in Nineveh. His preaching obviously fell on open ears and hearts, for in one day he prompted the conversion of the whole city.

From the very beginning of Lent, God's word calls us to conversion. If we open our ears and hearts to that word, we will be like the Ninevites not only in their sinfulness but also in their conversion to the Lord. That, simply put, is the point of Ash Wednesday!

A Prayer for Ash Wednesday

Blessed are you, O Lord our God, the all-holy one, who gives us life and all things. As we go about our lives, the press of our duties and activities often leads us to forget your presence and your love. We fall into sin and fail to live out the responsibilities that you have entrusted to those who were baptized into your Son.

In this holy season, help us to turn our minds and hearts back to you. Lead us into sincere repentance and renew our lives with your grace. Help us to remember that we are sinners, but even more, help us to remember your loving mercy.

As we live through this Ash Wednesday, may the crosses of ashes that mark our foreheads be a reminder to us and to those we meet that we belong to your Son. May our worship and prayer and penitence this day be sustained throughout these 40 days of Lent. Bring us refreshed and renewed to the celebration of Christ’s resurrection at Easter.

We ask this through your Son, Jesus Christ, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit for ever and ever. Amen.

 

 

Lawrence E. Mick is a priest of the Archdiocese of Cincinnati. He holds a master's degree in liturgical studies from the University of Notre Dame. He is author of over 500 articles in various publications. His latest books are Forming the Assembly to Celebrate Eucharist and Forming the Assembly to Celebrate Sacraments (Liturgy Training Publications).


79 posted on 02/09/2005 7:18:56 AM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: WaveThatFlag

On Good Friday, a Solemn Liturgical Service is conducted, usually in the afternoon. This is not a Mass, since no Consecration takes place. In former years, this service was known as the "Mass of the Pre-Sanctified" meaning that the Hosts for Communion were previously consecrated at Holy Thursday's Mass. The one reason I am familiar with why an actual Mass is not said this day is because Good Friday recalls the very day that the original Sacrifice of the Mass (the Sacrifice of Calvary) took place. So, in deference to that we simply recall the original event. On all other days, we have the unbloody renewal of that same sacrifice, known as the Mass. Also, Holy Thursday recalls the Last Supper, which was the first Mass, as it was the foreshadowing of the Sacrifice about to take place. Mel Gibson did an awesome job of illustrating this very point in his flashbacks in THE PASSION. So, this explains using Consecrated Hosts from the previous night.


80 posted on 02/09/2005 7:22:24 AM PST by jrny (Tenete traditionem quam tradidi vobis)
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To: jrny

Thank you!


81 posted on 02/09/2005 7:25:25 AM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: NWU Army ROTC

Below is a reflection on Ash Wednesday I (NWU Army ROTC) wrote for our campus' conservative newspaper. If anyone is interested, nothing illicit I hope:

This Wednesday, 9 February 2005, marked the beginning of the Christian Holy season of Lent. Lent is the forty days of preparations that precede the Easter Triduum. Through prayer, fasting, and almsgiving the Christian begins the Lenten journey, preparing for the Passion of Good Friday and the Resurrection of Easter Sunday. Catholics mark themselves with ash as a sign of penance and of mortality.

Lent is a season of penance and contrition for our sins. As a society, we have our faults. Most prominent is the Culture of Death that attacks the dignity of the human person and sadly our society has fully embraced. There are the deliberate murders of one and a half million children in abortion during the last three hundred and sixty-five days. There are the inequities of a criminal justice system where justice is not always blind, the guilty not always punished, and the innocent sometimes convicted and even executed. There is the sacrifice of human life in the form of embryonic stem cell research, in the name of progress. A society filled with violence toward one another and ourselves, where drugs destroy our bodies, and sexual perversity demeans our dignity. There is Corporate Greed that allows CEOs and others to exploit those who rely on them in order to line their pockets. There is the assault on traditional values in regard to the human person, relationships, marriage, and the family. We are not an innocent society. Yet, Lent carries another message as well.

Lent is a season of Joy in Thanksgiving for the mercy which we do not deserve, but we receive from above. It is a season where we can turn away from our sins and our faults. We can abandon the Altar of Death. We can turn away from our pride, our lusts, our greed, our anger, our jealousy, our gluttony, our sloth. We can turn away. We can joyfully leave these shortcomings. We can embrace life. We can embrace the Culture of Life that treats every human person as deserving of dignity and respect. We can honor life from conception to natural death. We can seek mercy and change our ways. We can.

During this Lent, we also recognize the twilight of life. John Paul II, the spiritual leader of the Roman Catholic Church for more than twenty-five years is approaching the end of life. His journey shows us our own mortality, but also offers a lesson that our society is loathed to listen too, but we must. John Paul II has taught against communism, materialism, and the attack on life itself. Now, he is teaching us a more important lesson than anything previous. He is teaching us, how to die. John Paul II is teaching us how to go with dignity to our Maker, not on our terms, but on God’s. Even life at the moment of death, wracked by Parkinson’s Disease and old age, is worthy of dignity and respect. It is not our place to decide when our lives are ended, it is God’s choice, John Paul is showing that to us.

Ash Wednesday is a reminder of our mortality. It has a lesson for us, if we listen. Lent is a time to recall our sins and be sorry for them. We are not innocent. Lent is a time of joy, because mercy is available to us and we can turn away from our faults. We can. Will we?


82 posted on 02/20/2005 5:56:26 AM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: All

BTTT!


83 posted on 02/24/2006 8:32:35 PM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: All
Ash Wednesday

Ash Wednesday: Our Shifting Understanding of Lent

Ash Wednesday: Preparing For Easter

Pope will preside at Ash Wednesday Mass, procession; act will renew ancient tradition

84 posted on 02/24/2006 8:36:02 PM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Salvation
Ash Wednesday: Our Shifting Understanding of Lent
85 posted on 02/24/2006 8:42:18 PM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Salvation; Gophack

When I lived in NYC, virtually all of my black Protestant friends used to go to receive ashes before work...

Catholic or not, the thought was there and everybody understood it.


86 posted on 02/24/2006 9:38:42 PM PST by livius
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To: All

BTTT for Ash Wednesday -- tomorrow!


87 posted on 02/28/2006 7:29:01 AM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Salvation

bttt


88 posted on 02/28/2006 7:40:46 AM PST by trisham (Zen is not easy. It takes effort to attain nothingness. And then what do you have? Bupkis.)
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To: Salvation

Ash Wednesday, 2006, BTTT!


89 posted on 03/01/2006 9:27:05 AM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: All

BTTT on Ash Wednesday, February 21, 2007!


90 posted on 02/21/2007 8:59:59 AM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Gophack

I was wondering if non-Catholics could recieve the blessed ashes today as well. I searched on the internet & found a website from the Georgia Tech Catholic Center. It says, “Since the imposition of Ashes is a Sacramental, non-Catholics may also recieve Blessed Ashes.” If you would like to check this website out ourself, it is “http://cyberbuzz.gatech.edu/catholic/tidings/1999/0214.html";


91 posted on 02/06/2008 12:56:45 PM PST by MeganL
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To: Salvation
Here's wishing everyone blessings as the Lenten season begins.
92 posted on 02/06/2008 1:00:56 PM PST by Ciexyz
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To: Salvation

BTTT!


93 posted on 02/24/2009 3:56:08 PM PST by Salvation ( †With God all things are possible.†)
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