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The New Inquisition: Spanish Inquisition does not live up to reputation of injustice
Cornell Review ^ | 1/31/02 | G. Quentin Mull

Posted on 10/09/2003 8:18:02 AM PDT by Aquinasfan

Since the epiphany of last September, we have heard countless comparisons between the murders by militant Mohammedans and various epochs of Western history, in a bizarre, masochistic, self-condemning attempt to extenuate the current jihad movement. Dominating the examples of a Western conduit for bloodthirsty religious fervor similar to that of the Osama Movement has been the Spanish Inquisition. Unfortunately for our media and this self-deprecating sequela, examination of the Spanish Inquisition reveals it to be none of the things it is alleged to be, but to be in fact the most just tribunal of its time.

The very word “Inquisition” (which actually comes from the verb ‘to inquire’) conjures up morbid notions of torture, lynch mobs, and oppressive totalitarian men in brown robes carrying out sadistic punishments for no proven cause. This is the image taught and depicted as an apodictic truth by mainstream society. Modern scholars, and a recent BBC expose, have found the truth to be quite to the contrary.

One must first realize why the Spanish Inquisition was founded. At the time (late 15th century), Spain was under attack by, believe it or not, Turkish Muslims set on their own jihad – as it turns out the Iberian Peninsula was also infringing on Muslim Holy Ground. False conversions to Christianity to avoid suspicion were common – producing converts who would later clandestinely aid their invading cohorts. The uprooting of these bogus conversions in an attempt to halt the invading Turks was the initial aim of the Spanish Inquisition.

Within this and all later purposes, the only persons the Spanish Inquisition had jurisdiction over were self-proclaimed Christians. Contrary to popular belief, the Inquisition could not, nor did, prosecute anyone for being Jewish or Islamic. In fact, one way to avoid the trial or punishment by the Inquisition was simply to say that you were not a Christian. One could believe whatever he or she cared to, as long as the person did not claim to be Christian.

A common vision of the Inquisition is a mob of ignoble churls throwing accusations at some poor widow for being a witch, as portrayed by Monty Python. William Thomas Walsh describes the purpose of the Inquisition as “…a judicial instrument of conformity, which would eliminate the caprice, the anger, and the misinformation of the mob.” This view as a stabilizing effect seems more founded, since the Inquisitors, who as Alphonsus Duran points outs “were university lawyers and not even always priests,” claimed that witchcraft was a figment of the imagination. No one could be tried or burnt for witchcraft under the Spanish Inquisition, however there were harsh punishments for false accusation. In contrast, as the BBC points out: in the 350 years of the Spanish Inquisition, only between 3,000 and 5,000 people were killed, while at the same time the rest of Europe burnt 150,000 women for witchcraft alone.

Some of the information used by the BBC came from the annals of the Catholic Church, which kept in-depth internal records of each case. Since these were internal, and hence secret (until recently), their veracity is held in high regard, as forgery would gain nothing.

These records give startling enlightenment with regards to the practice of torture, which was universal in the contemporary courts of Europe. Professor Stephen Haliczer of Northern University of Illinois found that the Spanish Inquisition used torture in only 2 percent of more than 7,000 cases studied, and never for more than 15 minutes. Less than 1 percent were tortured more than once, and he found no evidence that anyone was ever tortured more than twice. This during a time when damaging shrubs in a common garden was an offence punishable by death in England.

The dungeon-like, filthy jails of the Inquisition shown in movies such as “Man of La Mancha” are another fabricated slur against the Inquisition. Prof. Haliczer claims the Inquisition’s jails were superior to all other jails in Spain, and notes, “I found instances of prisoners in secular criminal courts blaspheming in order to get into the Inquisition prison.” This is a far cry from the Neanderthal brutality and insane religious fanaticism being alluded to by the media, let alone being analogous to Bin Laden, the Taliban and the Palestinian terror groups.

So if the Inquisition did not just go from town to town executing anyone accused of heresy, how did it operate? Here is the account given in Alphonsus Duran’s book “Why Apologize for the Spanish Inquisition,” with information provided by the BBC documentary: Upon coming into a district, the Inquisitors would announce a “period of grace.” During this time, anyone accused could freely repent, whereupon a penance would be given and the offender forgiven. After this the accused would appear before the court. At this time he would be given the incredible privilege of writing a list of all his enemies who might want to commit calumny against him, whose testimony would automatically be thrown out. At this point the trial would take place guided by strict procedures which were constantly reviewed and revised by the hierarchy. The defendant could seek the assistance of lawyers. A conviction needed the agreement of at least two witnesses (our courts only require one), and a judge thought to be biased could be rejected by the accused. If convicted, there were multiple levels of appeal available to the accused.

This strict and just method defies our inherited notions of the Spanish Inquisition, but the statistics collaborate this. The BBC research shows that more men and women were executed by the guillotine of the French Revolution in one day than by the Spanish Inquisition during the entire 16th century. In the vast majority of cases, an Inquisition ended in absolution, penance, or a warning – not an execution.

With the chimera of the monolithic, nefarious Spanish Inquisition now debunked, one might still raise the question as to whether it is acceptable to punish, and in particular execute, in the name of God at all; even when done in this comparatively just and benevolent manner.

Is it justifiable to kill for the good of a society or an institution (for a church is an institution, divinely ordered or not)? Our own penal code says yes. Timothy McVeigh can attest to that. If the institution is a church instead of a state, heresy becomes equivalent to treason. American law holds execution as the standard punishment for treason, so the “malodorous” and “fanatical” Inquisitors can not be vilified by our own standards. Would we be better off if Bin Laden and company had been sent to a Muslim Inquisition and made to recant or die, stopping him before he spread his evil ideology? The U.S. response in Afghanistan seems to allude to such a sentiment, making the pathos of the Inquisition more similar to our War on Terror than to the attack on America.


TOPICS: Catholic; Religion & Culture
KEYWORDS: catholiclist; spanishinquisition
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Everything you know about the Spanish Inquisition is a lie, even the stuff you learned from Monty Python.
1 posted on 10/09/2003 8:18:02 AM PDT by Aquinasfan
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To: *Catholic_list
Debunking the black legend. Source material from the BBC. Worth bookmarking.
2 posted on 10/09/2003 8:19:34 AM PDT by Aquinasfan (Isaiah 22:22, Rev 3:7, Mat 16:19)
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To: 1 spark
Thanks for the idea.
3 posted on 10/09/2003 8:20:28 AM PDT by Aquinasfan (Isaiah 22:22, Rev 3:7, Mat 16:19)
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4 posted on 10/09/2003 8:22:55 AM PDT by Support Free Republic (Your support keeps Free Republic going strong!)
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To: Aquinasfan
Everything you know about the Spanish Inquisition is a lie, even the stuff you learned from Monty Python.

Heresy! Next thing you'll be telling me is that I won’t need to know the unladen air speed of an African swallow!

5 posted on 10/09/2003 8:27:32 AM PDT by conservonator
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To: conservonator; Desdemona; cebadams; Gophack; WriteOn; Salvation; patent; Siobhan; Polycarp; ...
I have seen this BBC production. It was amazing. The historians they interview are not obviously Catholic or Christian, most of the Inquisition historians researching today are secularists.

Furthermore, the BBC production does an excellent job of explaining how the myth of the Spanish Inquisition arose in the first place. Anti-Spanish Protestants, mostly Lutherans, were master propagandists, printed and distributed copies of fabricated first-person accounts of Spanish Inquisition trials, and thus effectively whipped up sentiment against the Spanish crown. These propaganda pieces were the primary evidence that historians later used in constucting their accounts of the Inquisition (and most of those historians were Protestant). It was not until the late 1970's that the Vatican released the actual depositions from the Spanish Inquisitorial proceedings, and secular historians were literally SHOCKED by what they found. Strict, fair, and balanced procedures (relative to other courts of the day). Little use of torture, rarely were people handed over to criminal courts, and even more rarely did the state execute them for heresy(clerics have never executed or sentenced to execution, the purpose of the inquisition was to serve findings on heresy and blasphemy to civil courts to convict and sentence).

It is also important to remember differences between Continental and Anglo judicial practices. The English system is adversarial -- prosecutor, defense, neutral judge and jury. That is what we are accustomed to, but this sort of trial was never customary on the Continent. The Continental system, descending from Roman practices, was inquisitorial. The judge was investigator and prosecutor. Whence the practices of grace periods, investigations, etc. This was common stuff throughout the continent in secular affairs as well. It is foreign to English and Americans, but not obviously therefore unjust.

The conclusion of contemporary, historical research, carried out by secularists, is roughly this: the Spanish Inquisition was the most enlightened legal proceeding in Europe at the time.

These historians also openly admit that they really do not WANT to come to this conclusion. It shatters their image of an "oppressive medieval Church" from which Luther and Reason "set us free". The whole secularist, Enlightenment, historical self-conception is at stake in this research.

6 posted on 10/09/2003 11:01:50 AM PDT by pseudo-justin
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To: pseudo-justin
Has anyone done a study juxtaposing the Catholic office of the Inquisition with its protestant counterparts? Since the entire concept of the Inquisition and particularly the Spanish Inquisition has been used as a club against the Church, I would be interested in an objective study.

It would also be interesting to find out what some of the non-Catholic posters have to say about this BBC investigation.

7 posted on 10/09/2003 11:09:39 AM PDT by conservonator
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To: conservonator
The Protestant Inquisition
8 posted on 10/09/2003 11:18:32 AM PDT by pseudo-justin
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To: pseudo-justin
The conclusion of contemporary, historical research, carried out by secularists, is roughly this: the Spanish Inquisition was the most enlightened legal proceeding in Europe at the time.

These historians also openly admit that they really do not WANT to come to this conclusion. It shatters their image of an "oppressive medieval Church" from which Luther and Reason "set us free". The whole secularist, Enlightenment, historical self-conception is at stake in this research.

An indication of the success of this propaganda is the fact that most Catholics are unaware of the truth regarding the Inquisition.

It's also interesting to note that this information is difficult if not impossible to find on the BBC website. I went to their site and did a search on the Inquisition and what did I find? Stories including the usual propaganda. But I couldn't find the program containing scholarly information. I'm shocked. Shocked!

Maybe NPR will do a program soon that will set the record straight...

9 posted on 10/09/2003 12:16:04 PM PDT by Aquinasfan (Isaiah 22:22, Rev 3:7, Mat 16:19)
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To: conservonator
It would also be interesting to find out what some of the non-Catholic posters have to say about this BBC investigation.

It certainly would be. < /crickets chirping>

10 posted on 10/09/2003 12:17:32 PM PDT by Aquinasfan (Isaiah 22:22, Rev 3:7, Mat 16:19)
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To: Aquinasfan; presidio9; dubyaismypresident

11 posted on 10/09/2003 12:18:50 PM PDT by Chancellor Palpatine
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To: pseudo-justin
The Protestant Inquisition

Hmmm...

12 posted on 10/09/2003 12:19:45 PM PDT by Aquinasfan (Isaiah 22:22, Rev 3:7, Mat 16:19)
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To: Chancellor Palpatine
Kindly do me the favor of not pinging me into threads? Thanks so much.
13 posted on 10/09/2003 12:21:32 PM PDT by presidio9 (Countdown to 27 World Championships...)
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To: Chancellor Palpatine; Aquinasfan
Hey, it drove the Moors out of Spain. Sounds like a job well done to me.
14 posted on 10/09/2003 12:28:05 PM PDT by NeoCaveman (Dem's keep losing and losing and losing)
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To: dubyaismypresident
I know, but I can't see the word "inquisition" any more without thinking of that song.
15 posted on 10/09/2003 12:29:41 PM PDT by Chancellor Palpatine
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To: Chancellor Palpatine
It's a very funny song, from a very funny movie.
16 posted on 10/09/2003 12:30:38 PM PDT by NeoCaveman (Dem's keep losing and losing and losing)
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To: Aquinasfan
The further away we get from an event, the easier it is to rewrite history.
17 posted on 10/09/2003 12:55:00 PM PDT by aimhigh
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To: aimhigh
The further away we get from an event, the easier it is to rewrite history.

Yah, everyone knows that he BBC is a propaganda arm for the Vatican...

18 posted on 10/09/2003 1:03:16 PM PDT by conservonator (Aimhigher)
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To: Aquinasfan
Here is a Catholic Answers show concerning the Inquisition and the BBC documentary:

Link to Catholic Answers Radio Show on the Inquisition

As for the BBC video, I believe it is only available for purchase to Colleges and Universities. Someone needs to push to make the video more widely available.

19 posted on 10/09/2003 2:22:33 PM PDT by pseudo-justin
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To: conservonator
Heresy! Next thing you'll be telling me is that I won’t need to know the unladen air speed of an African swallow!

It will probably never come up, just don't forget your favorite color and you'll be fine.

20 posted on 10/09/2003 7:00:10 PM PDT by ventana
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To: Aquinasfan
You're welcome.

As i've already stated, you should have highlighted this section of Mull's article:

"Some of the information used by the BBC came from the annals of the Catholic Church, which kept in-depth internal records of each case. Since these were internal, and hence secret (until recently), their veracity is held in high regard, as forgery would gain nothing. "

"...their veracity is held in high regard, as forgery would gain nothing." CAN HE BE SERIOUS? Nah, the church would never cover up evil now, would she?

I've got to give Mull credit, tho, for admitting that church provided "some" of the information. Looks like it must be the stuff you did highlight.

21 posted on 10/09/2003 7:38:03 PM PDT by 1 spark
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To: Aquinasfan
Regarding your #12:

Every bit as evil and unGodly as any religious inquisition.

Christians (Catholic and Protestant) are horrified at the atrocities committed by the convert-the-world-to-Islam crowd...yet many deny, spin, shrug their shoulders, or justify the atrocities committed by those of their own faith.
22 posted on 10/09/2003 7:55:22 PM PDT by 1 spark
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To: Aquinasfan
For those interested, the November/December 1996 issue of Cathoic Dossier was dedicated to examining the Spanish Inquisition.
23 posted on 10/09/2003 9:48:47 PM PDT by TotusTuus (What happened to Polycarp?)
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To: Aquinasfan
"...the Inquisition’s jails were superior to all other jails in Spain, and notes, “I found instances of prisoners in secular criminal courts blaspheming in order to get into the Inquisition prison.”

This is a riot! "The Comfy Chair" and "The Soft Cushion" are closer to reality than to parody! ("...have you got all the stuffing at one end?").

24 posted on 10/09/2003 9:52:28 PM PDT by oprahstheantichrist
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To: Aquinasfan
Bumpus ad summum
25 posted on 10/10/2003 3:28:57 AM PDT by Dajjal
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To: oprahstheantichrist
This is a riot! "The Comfy Chair" and "The Soft Cushion" are closer to reality than to parody!

I have to admit, I love the Pythons. But there Inquisition stuff has done a lot of damage.

26 posted on 10/10/2003 5:02:14 AM PDT by Aquinasfan (Isaiah 22:22, Rev 3:7, Mat 16:19)
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To: 1 spark
"...their veracity is held in high regard, as forgery would gain nothing." CAN HE BE SERIOUS? Nah, the church would never cover up evil now, would she?

These were internal trial transcripts. To believe that these records were forged is like believing that the records of common criminal trials today are forged. Moreover, these transcripts only constituted part of the evidence examined by the scholars.

Additionally, why do you trust documented false accounts? It looks to me that you're fitting the evidence to your preconceived ideas, rather than pursuing the truth.

As pseudo-justin posted above:

Furthermore, the BBC production does an excellent job of explaining how the myth of the Spanish Inquisition arose in the first place. Anti-Spanish Protestants, mostly Lutherans, were master propagandists, printed and distributed copies of fabricated first-person accounts of Spanish Inquisition trials, and thus effectively whipped up sentiment against the Spanish crown. These propaganda pieces were the primary evidence that historians later used in constucting their accounts of the Inquisition (and most of those historians were Protestant).

This is documented.
27 posted on 10/10/2003 5:35:40 AM PDT by Aquinasfan (Isaiah 22:22, Rev 3:7, Mat 16:19)
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To: Aquinasfan
my reply here:

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/religion/996432/posts?page=34#34
28 posted on 10/15/2003 10:20:15 PM PDT by 1 spark
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To: Aquinasfan
I love the Pythons. But there Inquisition stuff has done a lot of damage.

To be honest, I've always thought of their sketch as anti-propaganda -- a parody of the standard depiction of sadistic zealots.

29 posted on 10/15/2003 10:36:35 PM PDT by Romulus
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To: Aquinasfan
The source of this is the "Cornell Review" a student paper at Cornell University. The writer, presumably a college student, is grossly misinformed.

All Jews (including some of my ancestors) were kicked out of Spain in 1492. Those who chose to remain were forced to pretend to be Christian (the "Marranos" or "Anusim"). One could not simply, as the author states, avoid persecution by stating that you were not a Christian. If you were an "out" Jew in Spain circa 1500, you'd be killed or exiled. So, to repeat:

Jews who feigned Christianity to avoid persecution got persecuted by the Inquisition.

Jews who admitted Judaism were killed or exiled.

Any questions?

30 posted on 10/23/2003 11:32:29 PM PDT by ChicagoHebrew
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To: ChicagoHebrew
Much of the factual information in this article was drawn from the scholarship represented in a BBC program regarding the Spanish Inquisition.

All Jews (including some of my ancestors) were kicked out of Spain in 1492.

As the last step in the 700 year effort to drive the Mohammedans out of Spain. The Spanish drove out the Mohammedans and, sadly, the Jews who lived under them. The desire to free the Iberian peninsula of Mohammedans should be understandable to Americans considering the events of 911.

A lengthier treatment here

In the Iberia of the reconquista a scenario of this kind presented a danger profoundly more serious than elsewhere. As the Christians slowly reestablished their hegemony over the peninsula - expressed in the two distinct political entities, Portugal and Spain - the potential antagonists of religious uniformity they were determined to impose were not indigenous eccentrics, as was the case in other European countries (bear in mind that the Protestant Reformation was at this moment still forty years in the future), but a conquered population linked by ties of race and religion to the Muslims living in the principalities of North Africa, which at Gibraltar lay only sixteen watery miles away. Even more ominous from the Spanish point of view was the fact that these so-called barbary states - the modern nations of Morocco, Algeria, and Tunisia - formed part of a vast imperial system established by the Muslim Turks, a system as powerful and menacing to western Europe as the Soviet bloc was conceived to be in our day. As the reconquista proceeded, therefore, and especially after Granada and the last remnant of Spanish Islam fell to the armies of Ferdinand and Isabella in 1492, policy-makers had to decide how to treat the Moors and the relatively small but influential Jewish community which, in marked contrast to what our century has witnessed, had flourished within a larger Islamic society. The Christian victors, fearful of Muslim sympathizers in their midst, offered no compromise: Moors and Jews had to accept baptism or face expulsion from the country now defined as entirely Catholic.

What this decision amounted to, of course, was a policy of forced conversion, something quite incompatible with traditional Catholic teaching. This fact was pointed out by several popes and numerous Spanish theologians over a long period, but the sentiment expressed by one of Ferdinand of Aragon's royal predecessors was the one that prevailed: "The enemies of the cross of Christ and violators of the Christian law are likewise our enemies and the enemies of our kingdom, and ought therefore to be dealt with as such."

Predictably, however, the stark choice between conformity and exile invited pretense and hypocrisy on the part of those dragooned into a faith not of their own choosing. The Jews and Moors who conformed rather than depart the land in which they and their ancestors had lived for hundreds of years did so with varying measures of reluctance, merging often into downright dissimulation. And this is precisely why the Inquisition was created by the Spanish monarchs: as the etymology of the word implies, the first task of this new judicial body was inquiry, specifically inquiry into the authenticity of the conversion of the Moors and Jews who had come under the sway of those monarchs.

But once again we must stress the chronological track, because the bloody reputation of the Spanish Inquisition - though it formally existed for more than three centuries - was earned during its first decade and a half, even before, that is, the capture of Granada. During this unhappy period perhaps as many as 2000 persons were burnt as heretics. Though this number is only a small fraction of what the Black Legend routinely alleged, it is nevertheless sobering enough. Almost all those executed were conversos or New Christians, converts, that is, from Judaism who were convicted of secretly practicing their former religion. It should be borne in mind that the Inquisition, as a church-court, had no jurisdiction over Moors and Jews as such. But, ironically, once such persons accepted baptism they became capable of heresy in the technical sense of the word. Thus the early savagery of the Spanish Inquisition contributes another chapter to the sad history of anti-Semitism, motivated on this occasion, however, more by politico-religious expediency than by racial hatred. It was in any event an enormous and unforgivable miscalculation. Far from constituting a danger to the nation, the Jewish conversos of previous decades had already been admirably blended into the larger community. As Professor William Monter has pointed out, the New Christians "represent the first known large-scale and long-term assimilation of Jews into any Christian society. Although the process included many painful adaptations, some severe backlash and even a decade of brutal persecution under the Inquisition, it ended with their general integration into Spanish society. Their descendants quietly flouted racist codes and contributed to the vibrant Catholicism of Golden Age Spain; St. Teresa of Avila was the granddaughter of a New Christian penanced by the Inquisition."

It seems as though the violence with which the Spanish Inquisition began its tenure exhausted or perhaps shamed it into a moderation which the purveyors of the Black Legend stonily ignore. But the facts cannot be gainsaid. During the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, when Spanish sovereignty extended from Italy to most of Latin America, on average less than three persons a year were executed by the Inquisition, which was formally constituted in all those places as well as at home. Or, to give the Spaniards the benefit of the doubt, perhaps as the bitter struggle of the reconquista gradually faded from their collective memory, even as the Muslim threat itself receded, they exercised a restraint consistent with their principles. However that may be, for my part I am glad there is no longer in existence an Inquisition that might have me arrested on the basis of charges lodged by persons unknown to me, as happened to St. Ignatius Loyola. Yet as one who has lived through most of a century in which cruelty and atrocity and oppression have reached a pitch, quantitatively and qualitatively, inconceivable to our ancestors - inconceivable even to Torquemada - I think a measure of discretion would be appropriate when bemoaning the wickedness of the Spanish Inquisition, more discretion anyway than that exercised by Poe and Dostoyevsky.


31 posted on 10/24/2003 4:59:31 AM PDT by Aquinasfan (Isaiah 22:22, Rev 3:7, Mat 16:19)
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To: Aquinasfan
Exactly how does this dispute what I said? The Jews were persecuted, period. It's hardly an excuse that they persecuted Muslims also.
32 posted on 10/24/2003 11:28:44 AM PDT by ChicagoHebrew
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To: ChicagoHebrew
Exactly how does this dispute what I said?

They weren't driven out of the country because they were Jews per se, but because they were seen, rightly or wrongly, as sympathetic to the Mohammedans.

33 posted on 10/24/2003 12:08:31 PM PDT by Aquinasfan (Isaiah 22:22, Rev 3:7, Mat 16:19)
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To: Aquinasfan
These were internal trial transcripts. To believe that these records were forged is like believing that the records of common criminal trials today are forged. Moreover, these transcripts only constituted part of the evidence examined by the schola

It's no good trying to explain the concept of "primary-sources" to the self-proclaimed amatuer historians since, people were stupid and didn't write anything down back then. They also didn't bathe, they believed the world was flat, and thought women had no souls.

34 posted on 06/15/2004 1:33:35 PM PDT by Pelayo
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To: Aquinasfan

Looks like they've let their domain lapse.


35 posted on 11/12/2006 5:58:24 PM PST by FreedomPoster (Guns themselves are fairly robust; their chief enemies are rust and politicians) (NRA)
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To: Aquinasfan

Bump for truth.


36 posted on 11/12/2006 8:05:47 PM PST by murphE (These are days when the Christian is expected to praise every creed but his own. --G.K. Chesterton)
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To: Aquinasfan; murphE
"Bump for truth."

fine.

" in the 350 years of the Spanish Inquisition, only between 3,000 and 5,000 people were killed, while at the same time the rest of Europe burnt 150,000 women for witchcraft alone."

Only... Well that's something to be real proud of! Praise God!

37 posted on 11/12/2006 8:22:37 PM PST by spunkets
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To: conservonator

Fact is that until recently the historians didn't have the documents.


38 posted on 11/12/2006 9:07:27 PM PST by RobbyS ( CHIRHO)
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To: pseudo-justin

Henry Kamen wrote a book on the subject. His sources and conclusions are much the same. The Inquisition had only one real bad patch, while Torquemada was Grand Inquisitor. That was when Ferdinand and Isabella were unifying the country.


39 posted on 11/12/2006 9:10:47 PM PST by RobbyS ( CHIRHO)
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To: Aquinasfan; xzins; blue-duncan
Everything you know about the Spanish Inquisition is a lie, even the stuff you learned from Monty Python.

I'm sorry but you are stomping on holy ground here. Monty Python? Not true? That sir, is blasphemy. Repent!

40 posted on 11/12/2006 9:39:10 PM PST by P-Marlowe (LPFOKETT GAHCOEEP-w/o*)
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To: pseudo-justin
The conclusion of contemporary, historical research, carried out by secularists, is roughly this: the Spanish Inquisition was the most enlightened legal proceeding in Europe at the time.

This should make headlines everywhere! < holding breath>

41 posted on 11/13/2006 4:55:41 AM PST by Aquinasfan (When you find "Sola Scriptura" in the Bible, let me know)
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To: FreedomPoster
Looks like they've let their domain lapse.

I found this, in a similar vein.

42 posted on 11/13/2006 4:58:35 AM PST by Aquinasfan (When you find "Sola Scriptura" in the Bible, let me know)
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To: P-Marlowe; Aquinasfan; xzins
If you want a really accurate history of the Inquisition see this authoritative guide.


43 posted on 11/13/2006 5:40:36 AM PST by blue-duncan
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To: Aquinasfan

bump for a later read


44 posted on 11/13/2006 9:22:49 AM PST by Patriotic1
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To: Aquinasfan
Oh, honestly. What a bunch of hooey. Does anyone really believe people would blasphemy simply so they could get into the Inquisition prisons because they had saunas and three squares a day???? Any one with a remote understanding of history knows this is simply a whitewash of history. Well, I guess anyone besides a Catholic.
45 posted on 11/14/2006 4:27:48 PM PST by HarleyD (Mat 19:11 But He said to them, Not all receive this word, except those to whom it is given.)
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To: HarleyD

Does anyone claim the saunas? They preferred the Inquisition because the king's prison was worse, that's all.


46 posted on 11/14/2006 4:42:23 PM PST by annalex
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To: Aquinasfan

In fact, the Holy Inquisition in this country is a bit overdue, in my opinion.


47 posted on 11/14/2006 4:43:11 PM PST by annalex
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To: Aquinasfan
A common vision of the Inquisition is a mob of ignoble churls throwing accusations at some poor widow for being a witch, as portrayed by Monty Python.

Historical inaccuracy! The witch sketch and the Spanish Inquisition sketch were two entirely different things! The former was in The Holy Grail and was pretty much their standard humor that everybody expected by then, but the latter, well, all I can say is that...




NOBODY expected the Spanish Inquisition!

48 posted on 11/14/2006 4:55:18 PM PST by Billthedrill
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To: HarleyD
Does anyone really believe people would blasphemy simply so they could get into the Inquisition prisons because they had saunas and three squares a day????

Yes, because it's documented, as is the Protestant "Black Myth." Remember, the BBC, and the secular historians who conducted the research, aren't generally known as friends of the Catholic Church.

49 posted on 11/14/2006 8:41:17 PM PST by Aquinasfan (When you find "Sola Scriptura" in the Bible, let me know)
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To: Aquinasfan
Yes, because it's documented, as is the Protestant "Black Myth."

Are you suggesting that some Protestant groups would actually spread falsehoods about the Church? Just shocking.

50 posted on 11/14/2006 8:54:51 PM PST by murphE (These are days when the Christian is expected to praise every creed but his own. --G.K. Chesterton)
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