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The FReeper Foxhole Reviews Food Rationing on the Homefront during WWII - October 23rd, 2004
see educational sources

Posted on 10/22/2004 11:46:24 PM PDT by snippy_about_it



Lord,

Keep our Troops forever in Your care

Give them victory over the enemy...

Grant them a safe and swift return...

Bless those who mourn the lost.
.

FReepers from the Foxhole join in prayer
for all those serving their country at this time.



...................................................................................... ...........................................

U.S. Military History, Current Events and Veterans Issues

Where Duty, Honor and Country
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The FReeper Foxhole is dedicated to Veterans of our Nation's military forces and to others who are affected in their relationships with Veterans.

In the FReeper Foxhole, Veterans or their family members should feel free to address their specific circumstances or whatever issues concern them in an atmosphere of peace, understanding, brotherhood and support.

The FReeper Foxhole hopes to share with it's readers an open forum where we can learn about and discuss military history, military news and other topics of concern or interest to our readers be they Veteran's, Current Duty or anyone interested in what we have to offer.

If the Foxhole makes someone appreciate, even a little, what others have sacrificed for us, then it has accomplished one of it's missions.

We hope the Foxhole in some small way helps us to remember and honor those who came before us.

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Grocery Rationing on the Homefront






World War II had a great impact on daily life in America. Among the many new realities of the time were air-raid drills in schoolrooms, scrap-metal and rubber drives, and rationing of food and other goods imposed by the Office of Price Administration.

American women, who had been called to duty in the workforce and possibly also had spouses overseas, grappled with another new hardship: grocery shopping with ration stamps. This was no easy task.



Shoppers received stamps of different colors for different types of food—some good for thirty days, others valid a week at a time but could be held over until they expired the last week of the month—and point values of foods were subject to change, so planning at home often proved difficult.



Prudence Penny's Wartime Wisdom


Thankfully, shoppers were not without help. In 1943, the 128-page Coupon Cookery was published. Its author, Prudence Penny, counsels readers how to provide their families with “sound nutrition plus appetite-appeal within the bounds of Uncle Sam’s allowance.”


Prudence Penny’s Coupon Cookery, front cover.
Murray & Gee, Publishers: Hollywood, CA, 1943.
“An investment that will pay for itself many times over in money,
time, patience, nutrition value, and good meals!” —Museum Library.


The book, which sold for $1.50, contains a number of tongue-in-cheek illustrations featuring a perky-looking, apron-clad housewife, and patriotic poetry is peppered throughout. Its dedication begins, “To the housewives of America/ those soldiers, tried and true/ who are struggling on the homefront/ to serve good meals to you!” Good nutrition is presented as the ultimate patriotic statement, as is good cooking: “U. S. needs US strong!” “Wars may come and go, but real, red-blooded American Homemakers will put up a struggle to preserve that cherished custom of Good Eating!”


It may not be convenient
But we don't admit defeat
For in spite of War and Rationing
America must eat
It may take a deal of cunning
And a bit of laughter, too
To keep the meal-time pleasant
When the coupons are too few!


To cook “Good Meals, In Spite of It All” required a little magic. — Coupon Cookery, p. 21.


In addition to advice on organizing and “s-t-r-e-t-c-hing” ration points, Ms. Penny’s book includes tables for keeping track of different foods’ point values and hundreds of recipes designed to make the most of available ingredients—for example, “Pork Knuckles in Sour Cream,” “Liver Gems,” and “Hearty Lima Molds.” In the chapter “Prudent Tips and Penny Savers,” readers are reminded that tough cuts of meat can be made more enjoyable by long, slow cooking, and learn how to substitute baking powder for eggs. Coffee, which was strictly rationed, could be stretched by being mixed with Soyfee, an unrationed coffee substitute. And through it all, of course, readers were urged to turn in cans for scrap metal.




The extreme economies suggested by this book may seem to some as antiquated as its bright, booster-ish turns of phrase and old-fashioned recipes. But those who lived through World War II witnessed a unique period in American history—when civilians across thousands of miles were unified in their actions and struggles by a single purpose. Prudence Penny’s book is an intriguing and irreplaceable symbol of that era.

Story by
Alyssa Shirley Morein




FReeper Foxhole Armed Services Links




TOPICS: VetsCoR
KEYWORDS: freeperfoxhole; history; rationstamps; samsdayoff; veterans; victorygardens; wwii
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Other Food Rationing Tidbits



When nationwide food rationing was instituted in the spring of 1942, every New Jersey housewife became part of the World War II home front effort.



The ration book pictured here is for a five-year-old girl, Barbara Kellog, of Union City. Each member of the family was issued ration books, and it was the challenge of the homemaker to pool the stamps and plan the family's meals within the set limits.



Sugar, butter, coffee, and beef-steak were especially scarce and valued items. Home canning and the "victory garden" were added to the homemaker's concerns. Ration stamps became a type of currency, and lost ration books a major headache.


This 1943 Ration book (still loaded with stamps) was issued to Herbert Quance of Williams Street, Newark.




THE WAR YEARS:


World War II was great for both peanut butter and SPAM.

By the start of WWII, SPAM had sold 20,000 cans. However, sales boomed when the war started. SPAM was the perfect military food. It required no refrigeration and, packed in rectangular cans, could be easily and efficiently stored.

Furthermore, beef was rationed, while SPAM wasn't. It quickly became a staple in American homes.


Advertisements claimed, "Cold or hot, SPAM hits the spot!'"


SPAM even played a part in communist expansion—though probably unintentionally.

Nikita Kruschev credited SPAM with the survival of the Russian Army during WWII, saying, "Without SPAM, we wouldn't have been able to feed our army."



Peanut butter was a staple of the U.S. military during WWII. Food was rationed and meat—aside from SPAM—was scarce. Peanut butter provided an inexpensive, high protein alternative to meat for soldiers. Like SPAM, it did not require refrigeration and could be easily stored.

Both peanut butter and jelly were on military ration lists. Some food historians credit American G.I.s with the invention of the peanut butter and jelly sandwich.




Almost half of all vegetables grown in the United States in 1943 came from victory gardens.

WWII profoundly changed our nation and influenced almost every aspect of American life. The impact on gardening was compounded. From recreation to necessity, for those who remained on the home front rationing and shortages became a grim reality.



In 1941 the Agricultural Department informed the American public that if they wanted fresh fruits or vegetables in their kitchens, they should plant a "victory garden".

Average Americans, some of whom couldn't tell a trowel from a hoe, began dropping seeds in the ground. Combined with elbow grease, millions of small town backyards and city rooftops suddenly sprouted across the nation.



As of 1943 these “Sunday Gentleman Farmers” had created over twenty million victory gardens, producing a estimated eight million tons of food and nearly 50% of all the fresh vegetables consumed in the U.S.A.

While the organizers of the War Garden Commission were optimistic and looked forward confidently to the accomplishment of large results, they little dreamed that the war-garden movement would grow so rapidly. The war-garden idea struck a patriotic chord.

The American people answered the call to help win the war by producing food in their back yards with the same unanimity and enthusiasm they had shown in responding to each other appeal the country had made for service.



One reason for the prompt and eager response to the National War Garden Commission's appeal to "Sow the Seeds of Victory": was that immediately after the United States entered the war everybody was patriotically desirous of rendering help in some form.

Millions of people realized that they would never be able to take part as actual soldiers in the great task of overthrowing Prussian militarism. Because of this they wanted to take an active part in some effort which would show tangible results in the struggle for right and justice.



War gardening offered the opportunity. Although small home plots might not produce large amounts of food, such gardens made possible the saving of some of the wheat and meat and other foods which were needed by our army and which were practically the only kinds of food that could be shipped to our allies. Every pound of beef that could be saved through the growing of food at home, it was realized, would bring victory just so much nearer; and in fact, without food conservation, there was positive danger that the Central Powers would be able to have their way.



Snippy's note: I plan on covering Gasoline/Rubber rationing in another thread.



Today's Educational Sources and suggestions for further reading:

www.queensjournal.ca/articlephp/point-vol130/issue16/postscript/lead1 www.wrvmuseum.org/journal/journal_ftbr_0404.htm
1 posted on 10/22/2004 11:46:24 PM PDT by snippy_about_it
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To: shield; A Jovial Cad; Diva Betsy Ross; Americanwolf; CarolinaScout; Tax-chick; Don W; Poundstone; ..



"FALL IN" to the FReeper Foxhole!



Good Saturday Morning Everyone.


If you want to be added to our ping list, let us know.

If you'd like to drop us a note you can write to:

The Foxhole
19093 S. Beavercreek Rd. #188
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2 posted on 10/22/2004 11:47:30 PM PDT by snippy_about_it (Fall in --> The FReeper Foxhole. America's History. America's Soul.)
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To: All


Here are the recommended holiday mailing dates for military mail this year:

For military mail addressed TO APO and FPO addresses, the mailing dates are:

------

For military mail FROM APO and FPO addresses, the mailing dates are:

Thanks for the information StayAtHomeMother



Veterans for Constitution Restoration is a non-profit, non-partisan educational and grassroots activist organization.





Actively seeking volunteers to provide this valuable service to Veterans and their families.

Thanks to quietolong for providing this link.

UPDATED THROUGH APRIL 2004




The FReeper Foxhole. America's History. America's Soul

Click on Hagar for
"The FReeper Foxhole Compiled List of Daily Threads"

3 posted on 10/22/2004 11:48:53 PM PDT by snippy_about_it (Fall in --> The FReeper Foxhole. America's History. America's Soul.)
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To: snippy_about_it
Interesting topic, Snippy. Not something I ever went through but heard lots of stories about.

Good Night, Snippy

4 posted on 10/22/2004 11:52:21 PM PDT by SAMWolf (Vegetables are not food. Vegetables are what food eats)
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To: SAMWolf

Good night Sam.


5 posted on 10/22/2004 11:53:45 PM PDT by snippy_about_it (Fall in --> The FReeper Foxhole. America's History. America's Soul.)
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To: snippy_about_it; SAMWolf

Saturday Morning Bump for the Freeper Foxhole.

Regards

alfa6 ;>}


6 posted on 10/23/2004 12:09:22 AM PDT by alfa6 (He who hath, so hath who he)
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To: snippy_about_it
Good morning, snippy.

Very interesting article. Just an anecdotal tale regarding this, but after my grandfather was shipped out to fight in the Pacific my late grandmother, who was pregnant with my dad at the time, moved back to her parent's home along with her sister-in-law (my Great Aunt, who is still alive today). Together, they basically dug up my great-grandparent's backyard and planted a garden quite like the ones described in this story. The hardest thing to grow in the world, my grandmother told me once, was tomatoes in Missouri. They grew beans, turnips, carrots, and anything else that would grow in that rocky soil, apparently. And that was in the middle of a rather large-sized Midwestern city. Most of their neighbors did the same.
Anyway, just my mite. Excellent story, as usual.
7 posted on 10/23/2004 12:51:50 AM PDT by A Jovial Cad ("I had no shoes and I complained, until I saw a man who had no feet.")
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To: snippy_about_it

I noticed a historical inconsistency here.

While the Victory gardens etc. were a product of the Second world war, were the "bad guys" in WWII not the AXIS powers, while the enemy in WWI were the "Central Powers"?

Perhaps I'm being a bit anal-retentive, but both mis and dis information have their basis in fact.

Just an observation.


8 posted on 10/23/2004 1:00:51 AM PDT by Don W (God KNOWS!)
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To: SAMWolf; snippy_about_it
Good morning, SAM.

My parent's are currently in Mississippi touring the Vicksburg battlefield, and when I talked to my Dad tonight he told me that he had the privilege of standing on the very spot where General Grant oversaw a portion of the siege from a Union field tent. He described how it moved him--it gave him those historical "goosebumps" all of us aficionado's of the past feel at such moments. The study of duty & devotion to a cause always seems to come back to those intangible moments of clarity in such hallowed places; I was reminded of the recent reports on the tours of the Antietam battlefield y'all posted here in the FReeper Foxhole.

For all you and snippy do in this regard--reminding us all of our national historical identity--allow me to again say: Thank-you.
-AJC
9 posted on 10/23/2004 1:10:48 AM PDT by A Jovial Cad ("I had no shoes and I complained, until I saw a man who had no feet.")
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To: snippy_about_it
Tires were tremendously short. Rubber had not been stocked in preparation for the War as had manganese, chromium, tungsten, and other items. The powers that be, Roosevelt cronies, said all along that we will just recycle the old rubber when we need new. Turned out it could not be done. Obvious you cannot de-vulcanise. Bunch of Doofusses.

Pretty much tires were strictly black market, criminal activity, I recall being told. Always has been no shortage of crooks. They seem to vote Democrat, naturally!

Gasoline was available, farmers had excess, and others. Not criminal but tertiary vendors, as it were.

Food rations look adequate to me. No problems except for butter that I can see. Non hydrogenated lard is a good substitute. You can live on 90% spaghetti, vegetables, and Spam and be totally comfortable. Bored, sure.

In reality not all foods were actually available, not for sale in your area. Actually the ration is generous and could have been cut in half or quarter without causing suffering if you could get the unrationed foodstuffs. That would have caused a lot of complaining, though!

The ration after the war in Germany during the occupation, American Zone, was 800 calories per day for working adults. Much worse than that in Japan. These are real hunger levels.

10 posted on 10/23/2004 1:28:26 AM PDT by Iris7 ("The past is not over. It is not even the past." - William Faulkner (Quote from memory.))
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To: Don W
I wouldn't presume to speak for either snippy or SAM, but I find your point a mystifying one.

It strains at one innocuous phrase ("Central Powers") that was, technically, a correct appellation on this side of the pond at the time; the disintegration of the Treaty of Versailles was a British and French imbroglio, not an American one.
11 posted on 10/23/2004 1:30:48 AM PDT by A Jovial Cad ("I had no shoes and I complained, until I saw a man who had no feet.")
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To: snippy_about_it

Good morning, Snippy and everyone at the foxhole.


12 posted on 10/23/2004 3:04:56 AM PDT by E.G.C.
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To: snippy_about_it
Good morning Snippy.


13 posted on 10/23/2004 3:20:04 AM PDT by Aeronaut (This is no ordinary time. And George W. Bush is no ordinary leader." --George Pataki)
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To: snippy_about_it; SAMWolf; Professional Engineer; The Mayor; PhilDragoo; Matthew Paul; Samwise; ...

Good morning everyone.

14 posted on 10/23/2004 6:08:04 AM PDT by Soaring Feather (~Poetry is my forte.~)
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To: alfa6

Morning alfa6.


15 posted on 10/23/2004 6:31:06 AM PDT by SAMWolf (Vegetables are not food. Vegetables are what food eats)
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To: A Jovial Cad

Morning Jovial Cad.

Thanks for sharing your grandmothers experience with us.


16 posted on 10/23/2004 6:32:36 AM PDT by SAMWolf (Vegetables are not food. Vegetables are what food eats)
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To: Don W
were the "bad guys" in WWII not the AXIS powers, while the enemy in WWI were the "Central Powers"?

You're correct about the "bad guys" in the two World Wars.

Victory gardens were also planted in WWI and the section on Victory gardens is talking about WWI and WWII. We probably should have made the distinction between the two wars in the article.

Good catch.

17 posted on 10/23/2004 6:42:18 AM PDT by SAMWolf (Vegetables are not food. Vegetables are what food eats)
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To: A Jovial Cad

You're welcome Jovial Cad.

I've had those historical "goosebumps" quite a few times. Sure is good to know there are others out there who get them too.


18 posted on 10/23/2004 6:46:01 AM PDT by SAMWolf (Vegetables are not food. Vegetables are what food eats)
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To: Iris7

Morning Iris7.

Thanks for filling in more info on rationing. We're still paying the Federal excise tax on rubber every time we buy tires. Seems old taxes never go away, who would have thunk it. ;-)


19 posted on 10/23/2004 6:48:48 AM PDT by SAMWolf (Vegetables are not food. Vegetables are what food eats)
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To: E.G.C.

Morning E.G.C.

Just heard the 10 day forecast, 9 days of rain and 1 clearing, maybe.


20 posted on 10/23/2004 6:50:26 AM PDT by SAMWolf (Vegetables are not food. Vegetables are what food eats)
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To: Aeronaut

Morning Aeronaut


21 posted on 10/23/2004 6:51:02 AM PDT by SAMWolf (Vegetables are not food. Vegetables are what food eats)
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To: bentfeather

Hi Feather.


22 posted on 10/23/2004 6:51:13 AM PDT by SAMWolf (Vegetables are not food. Vegetables are what food eats)
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To: SAMWolf

Hi Sam.


23 posted on 10/23/2004 6:53:45 AM PDT by Aeronaut (This is no ordinary time. And George W. Bush is no ordinary leader." --George Pataki)
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To: snippy_about_it

I remember the coupons but also some kind of tokens which were red and kinda cardboard also separated like stamps. They may have been for meat. I associate them with my Mom,always a frugal shopper,in Baltimore. One time she was preocupied with shopping and I ran across a busy trolley car street to see a friend. Never did that again. Blackouts and Civil Defense wardens were commonplace. Our victory garden was not successful. A few radishes which is when I learned to eat them


24 posted on 10/23/2004 7:02:20 AM PDT by larryjohnson (USAF(Ret))
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To: SAMWolf; snippy_about_it
We had a near tragedy here at the computer yesterday. We had thunderstorms moving through the area.

Durning one of my Internet runs, a flash of lightning hit a telephone and lit up the phone in the living room.

It came near close to ruining our modem.

Thankfully no harm or foul and the modem and everything is working OK.

25 posted on 10/23/2004 7:08:54 AM PDT by E.G.C.
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To: snippy_about_it

On this Day In History


Birthdates which occurred on October 23:
1752 Nicolas Appert inventor (food canning, bouillon tablet)
1844 Louis Riel Manitoba, leader of insurrection of Metis
1905 Felix Bloch US physicist (Nobel 1952)
1906 Gertrude Ederle US, swimmer (Olympic-gold-1924)
1910 Hayden Rorke Brooklyn NY, actor (Dr Bellows-I Dream of Jeannie)
1917 Robert Bray Kalispell Mont, actor (Corey-Lassie, Stagecoach West)
1918 James Daly Wisc, actor (Medical Center)
1923 Frank Sutton Clarksville Tenn, actor (Sgt Carter-Gomer Pyle USMC)
1925 Johnny Carson Corning Iowa, comedian (Tonight Show, Who Do You Trust)
1927 Dezs” Gyarmati Hungary, water polo player (Olympic-gold-1956, 60, 64)
1931 Jim Bunning Phillies pitcher (perfect Game against Mets 1965)
1935 Chi Chi Rodriguez golfer (PGA Seniors-1987)
1938 John Heinz (Sen-R-Pa)
1940 Edison Pel‚ Brazil, soccer player extraordinaire (NY Cosmos)
1940 Jordan Christopher Youngston Oh, actor (Return of the 7)
1941 Greg Ridley bassist (Spooky Tooth-It's All About)
1942 Michael Crichton US novelist (Andromeda Strain, Congo, Looker)
1946 Miklos Nemeth Hungary, javelin thrower (Olympic-gold-1976)
1956 Dwight Yoakum country singer (If There Was a Way)
1959 "Weird Al" Yankovic parody singer (Eat It, UHF, Naked Gun)
1962 Doug Flute WFL/NFL QB (Generals, Bears, Patriots)



Deaths which occurred on October 23:
0042BC Marcus Junius Brutus, a leading conspirator in the assassination of Julius Caesar, commits suicide after his defeat at the Battle of Philippi [H]
1260 Koetoez, Turkish sultan of Egypt, murdered
1450 Juan de Capestrano, Italian saint, dies at 70
1903 Francis Ellingwood Abbot theologian (Scientific Theism), dies at 66
1935 Dutch Schultz [Arthur Flegenheimer], US gangster, murdered at 33
1935 Otto "Aba Daba" Berman, US gangster, murdered
1939 Zane Grey, US western writer (Spirit of the Border), dies at 67
1978 Mother Maybelle Carter country singer (Johnny Cash Show), dies at 69
1983 Jessica Savitch Margate NJ, newscaster (NBC Weekend), dies at 36
1983 Tamara Shayne actress, dies at 80 of a heart attack
1984 David Gorcey dead end kid actor, dies at 63 in a diabetic coma
1984 Oskar Werner actor, dies of a heart attack at 61
1994 Robert Lansing, actor (Twelve O'Clock High) dies of cancer at 66


Reported: MISSING in ACTION


NO ONE REPORTED MISSING TODAY!!!!



POW / MIA Data & Bios supplied by
the P.O.W. NETWORK. Skidmore, MO. USA.


On this day...
1668 Jews of Barbados forbidden to engage in retail trade
1679 Meal Tub Plot against James II of England
1690 Revolt in Haarlem, Holland after public ban on smoking
1775 Continental Congress approves resolution barring blacks from army
1783 Virginia emancipates slaves who fought for independence during the Revolutionary War
1790 Slaves revolt in Haiti (later suppressed)
1864 Battle of Westport, Missouri
1864 Union Gen Samuel R Curtis defeats Conf Gen Stirling Price
1871 Columbia & Sappho (US) beat Livonia (UK) in 3rd America's Cup
1876 New Orleans Mint reopens as an assay office
1884 1st world series OKed by AA, Providence (NL) beats NY Mets (AA) 6-0
1910 Blanche Scott became 1st woman solo a public airplane flight
1915 1st national horseshoe throwing championship (Kellerton, Iowa)
1915 25,000 women march in NYC, demanding right to vote
1917 1st Infantry division "Big Red One" shoots 1st US shot in WW I
1927 City of Netanya, Israel founded
1932 "Fred Allen Show" premieres on radio
1941 Walt Disney's "Dumbo" released
1942 During WW II, Britain launches major offensive at El Alamein, Egypt
1944 Soviet army invades Hungary
1946 UN General Assembly 2nd session convenes (1st NYC) (Flushing Meadows)
1947 NAACP petition on racism, "An Appeal to the World" presented to UN
1954 Britain, England, France & USSR agree to end occupation of Germany
1956 1st video recording on magnetic tape televised coast-to-coast
1956 Hungarian Revolution began
1956 Revolt against Stalinist policies began in Hungary
1957 1st test firing of Vanguard satellite launch vehicle, TV-3
1958 Soviet novelist Boris Pasternak, wins Nobel Prize for Literature
1958 USSR lends money to UAR to build Aswan High Dam
1962 USAF Major Robert A Rushworth takes X-15 to 40,800 m
1964 Japanese beat Russian for 1st Olympic Gold in woman's volleyball
1968 Kip Keino (Kenya) wins gold medal for 1,500m (3 min 34.9 sec)
1970 Gary Gabelich sets auto speed record 622.4 mph (1,002 kph)
1973 Nixon agrees to turn over White House tape recordings to Judge Sirica
1973 UN's revised International Telecommunication Convention adopted
1973 Yankee GM & pres Lee MacPhail named AL president
1977 Panamanians vote 2:1 to approve the new Canal treaties
1980 Soviet Premier Alexei Kosygin resigns, due to illness
1981 US national debt hits $1 trillion

1983 241 U.S. Marines and sailors in Lebanon were killed in a suicide truck-bombing at Beirut International Airport; a near-simultaneous attack on French forces killed 58 paratroopers.

1984 NBC airs BBC footage of Ethiopian famine
1984 STS 51-A launch vehicle moves to launch pad
1989 US 62nd manned space mission STS 34 (Atlantis 5) returns from space
1990 Iraq announces release of 330 French hostages
1991 Dr Jack Kevorkian's suicide machine kills 2 women
2000 Secretary of State Madeleine Albright held groundbreaking talks in North Korea with communist leader Kim Jong Il and attended a huge spectacle of 100,000 performers honoring her host.
2001 U.S.-led forces maintained their intense pressure on the Taliban, pounding positions around the Afghan capitol of Kabul and the militia's southern stronghold of Kandahar for the 17th consecutive day. Vice President Dick Cheney was given the International Republican Institute's 2001 Freedom Award. He promised the war against terrorism being waged in Afghanistan would be "relentless."


Holidays
Note: Some Holidays are only applicable on a given "day of the week"

Thailand : Chulalongkorn Day (1868)
US : United States Day
Afghanistan : Id-Qurban Day
National Dental Hygiene Week (Day 5)
National Mole Day
National Applejack Month!!
National Hobby Month.
Polish-American Heritage Month


Religious Observances
Ang, Orth, Luth : Comm of St James of Jerusalem, Brother of Jesus
RC : Mem, St John of Capistrano, patron of military chaplains (opt)
Jewish : Sh'mini Atz-8th day of Succoth


Religious History
4004 (BC) According to the sacred timeline worked out by Archbishop James Ussher, 73, "the heavens and the earth" were created on this date at 9:00 a.m. (GMT). Ussher's "Chronologies of he Old and New Testaments" was first published 1650-54.
1239 In England, the main cathedral at Wells (begun c.1186) was consecrated. The most striking interior feature of the cathedral are the inverted arches (14th century) by which the piers of the tower are strengthened.
1385 In Germany, the University of Heidelberg was founded under Pope Urban VI as a college of the Cistercian order. (Among its faculties today are theology, law, medicine and philosophy.)
1857 Delegates from eight states met in Nashville and organized the Southern Baptist Sunday School Union. The organization proved short-lived, when it was nullified by the onset of the American Civil War.
1871 Birth of Edgar J. Goodspeed, American Greek N.T. scholar. He taught at the University of Chicago 1898-1937. In 1931, he co-authored with JMP Smith "The Bible: An American Translation," better known today as "Smith and Goodspeed."

Source: William D. Blake. ALMANAC OF THE CHRISTIAN CHURCH. Minneapolis: Bethany House, 1987.


Thought for the day :
"It may be that all games are silly. But then, so are humans."


Childrens Impression of Love...
ON WHAT FALLING IN LOVE IS LIKE

"Like an avalanche where you have to run for your life." (Roger, 9)

"If falling in love is anything like learning how to spell, I don't want to do it. It takes too long." (Leo, 7)


Signs Your Cat is Overweight...
It's no longer safe to lift him without a barrow.


Handy Latin Phrases...
Fac ut vivas.

Get a life.


Redefining the English language
Abdicate (v.)
To give up all hope of ever having a flat stomach.


26 posted on 10/23/2004 7:17:17 AM PDT by Valin (Out Of My Mind; Back In Five Minutes)
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To: snippy_about_it

Good morning it's raining here in Memphis. Hubby has gone to get a hair cut and to VOTE for GW!


27 posted on 10/23/2004 7:51:35 AM PDT by GailA ( hanoi john, I'm for the death penalty for terrorist, before I impose a moratorium on it.)
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To: snippy_about_it
fyi, the LARGEST VICTORY GARDEN in the world was in Denton,TX during WW2.

it was planted/cultivated/harvested by the coeds of Texas State College for Women (now: Texas Women's University).

the college girls raised so many TONS of tomatoes & other vegetables in 1944 that there wasn't enough RAIL transport space to haul them to the canning plants! this was a HUGE operation.

btw, my mother STILL won't eat SPAM, duck,goose,lamb or mutton. she always says, "i ate more than my share of that stuff during the war".

free dixie,sw

28 posted on 10/23/2004 8:32:12 AM PDT by stand watie ( being a damnyankee is no better than being a racist. it is a LEARNED prejudice against dixie.)
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To: snippy_about_it
fyi, the LARGEST VICTORY GARDEN in the world was in Denton,TX during WW2.

it was planted/cultivated/harvested by the coeds of Texas State College for Women (now: Texas Women's University).

the college girls raised so many TONS of tomatoes & other vegetables in 1944 that there wasn't enough RAIL transport space to haul them to the canning plants! this was a HUGE operation.

btw, my mother STILL won't eat SPAM, duck,goose,lamb or mutton. she always says, "i ate more than my share of that stuff during the war".

free dixie,sw

29 posted on 10/23/2004 8:32:21 AM PDT by stand watie ( being a damnyankee is no better than being a racist. it is a LEARNED prejudice against dixie.)
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To: alfa6

Good morning alfa6.


30 posted on 10/23/2004 8:45:17 AM PDT by snippy_about_it (Fall in --> The FReeper Foxhole. America's History. America's Soul.)
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To: SAMWolf; Don W; A Jovial Cad
We probably should have made the distinction between the two wars in the article. Good catch.

Good morning guys. Actually I knew I had some WWI stuff in there when I added information in the 2nd post under the title "other food rationing tidbits". I was thinking of calling the thread "Food rationing during war time", but changed my mind since 95% of it was WWII. I should have had a line drawn to divide the "tidbits" but I didn't.

Don't worry about the 'correction', we appreciate that folks are reading the threads enough to catch them! :-)

31 posted on 10/23/2004 8:53:48 AM PDT by snippy_about_it (Fall in --> The FReeper Foxhole. America's History. America's Soul.)
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To: A Jovial Cad; snippy_about_it

I did admit to being somewhat anal about it. I had also forgotten about the Victory Gardens of WWI.

That's what happens when one is tired and testy.

Oh well, off to work I go


32 posted on 10/23/2004 9:04:43 AM PDT by Don W (God KNOWS!)
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To: snippy_about_it

Thanks for the ping ;o)


33 posted on 10/23/2004 9:06:26 AM PDT by shield (The Greatest Scientific Discoveries of the Century Reveal God!!!! by Dr. H. Ross, Astrophysicist)
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To: snippy_about_it; SAMWolf; All

October 23, 2004

Zealous For God

Read: 2 Kings 13:14-19

Epaphras . . . greets you, always laboring fervently for you in prayers . . . . I bear him witness that he has a great zeal for you. —Colossians 4:12-13

Bible In One Year: Jeremiah 1-2; 1 Timothy 3


We know little about Epaphras except that he was so concerned about the spiritual welfare of the people in Colosse that he is described as "laboring fervently . . . in prayers" for them (Colossians 4:12). When I was a pastor, I saw this kind of enthusiasm in the way new converts prayed and witnessed. But all too often, many of them gradually lost their zeal.

I believe it was King Joash's lack of enthusiasm that made Elisha so angry (2 Kings 13). The monarch had obeyed the dying prophet's command to shoot an arrow toward the east. He had heard Elisha's promise that God would bring his nation complete deliverance from Syria. Joash had obeyed the command to strike the ground with a bundle of arrows, which he did three times. So why did the prophet angrily tell him he should have struck the ground five or six times?

I believe it was because he felt Joash was following his instructions in a half-hearted manner. The king should have been far more enthusiastic in his response to God's wonderful message of victory over Israel's enemies.

The king's nonchalance cost him dearly. He won an incomplete victory. I wonder how many spiritual victories we forfeit because of our lack of zeal. —Herb Vander Lugt

Let us serve the Lord with gladness
And enthusiastic praise,
Telling all who do not know Him
Of His great and wondrous ways. —Sper

Godly zeal is love on fire.

34 posted on 10/23/2004 9:13:07 AM PDT by The Mayor (No one is hopeless whose hope is in God.)
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To: A Jovial Cad

Thank you AJC for sharing your family's story on planting a Victory Garden. Back then everyone chipped in with whatever they could to support the effort. Probably the most patriotic time in America.

My mother had to wait until she was 21 to enter the Navy so in the mean-time her and her girlfriends sewed buttons and embroidery on clothes for the troops.

I fear this country will never be that united again.


35 posted on 10/23/2004 9:32:22 AM PDT by snippy_about_it (Fall in --> The FReeper Foxhole. America's History. America's Soul.)
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To: A Jovial Cad
For all you and snippy do in this regard--reminding us all of our national historical identity--allow me to again say: Thank-you.

Thank you AJC for your kind words.

Mentioning Grant I was reminded of the picture of him that moved me the most. Although it is not at the height of his 'glory' and instead just a few weeks before his death, I think it reminds us of the 'humaness' of these great men of the Civil War on both sides and how real they were.


Howe, N.Y. "Gen. U.S. Grant writing his memoirs, Mount McGregor, June 27th, 1885." 1885 June 27. By Popular Demand: Portraits of the Presidents and First Ladies, 1789-Present, Library of Congress.

36 posted on 10/23/2004 9:47:44 AM PDT by snippy_about_it (Fall in --> The FReeper Foxhole. America's History. America's Soul.)
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To: Iris7
Obvious you cannot de-vulcanise. Bunch of Doofusses.

I have a thread I'm working on about the gas/rubber rationing. Lots of posters about the black market during those times.

My father used to tell us of growing up in a 'holler' during the depression in WVA and harvesting dandelions to add to the ruffage. Said they got a huge bag of sugar and flour once a month, had their own goats for milk and of course their own chickens. When war time rationing of food came around he was in the service but for those back home I expect it wasn't too much of a hardship for those who had lived through the depression. It just may have been worse for city folk. :-)

37 posted on 10/23/2004 9:55:22 AM PDT by snippy_about_it (Fall in --> The FReeper Foxhole. America's History. America's Soul.)
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To: E.G.C.

Good morning EGC.


38 posted on 10/23/2004 9:55:52 AM PDT by snippy_about_it (Fall in --> The FReeper Foxhole. America's History. America's Soul.)
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To: Aeronaut

Hi Aeronaut.


39 posted on 10/23/2004 9:56:07 AM PDT by snippy_about_it (Fall in --> The FReeper Foxhole. America's History. America's Soul.)
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To: bentfeather

Hey feather. You awake? LOL.

Still cloudy and cool. Sam says that's the outlook for the fall and winter here but promises it won't get near as cold as it did back east. :-)


40 posted on 10/23/2004 9:57:15 AM PDT by snippy_about_it (Fall in --> The FReeper Foxhole. America's History. America's Soul.)
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To: larryjohnson
Good memory larry. Thanks for sharing with us today. Here are some pics and history of those tokens:

By 1943 many of the common food items came under the rationing program, including butter, coffee, dairy products and some meats. Each item was assigned a certain number of ration points in addition to the monatery price. Grocery shoppers had red and blue food rationing stamps along with red and blue tokens that were given as change if your stamp's value was higher then the points required.

The red stamps and tokens were for meat and animal products and the blue stamps and tokens were for vegatable products like sugar. You couldn't substutute one color in place of the other. The stamps and tokens had to be paid just like the money for those items that were rationed. Shoppers could earn extra stamps by turning in their meat drippings and other fats for bomb production. Thus, shoppers looked not only at the price of an item, but how many rationing points or stamps they cost.


Close up of the red and blue OPA ration tokens and 1943 steel cents. The red tokens were used for purchasing meat, while the blue ones were used for processed foods. The steel cents were minted only in 1943 in an effort to save copper for use in making munitions.


41 posted on 10/23/2004 10:09:08 AM PDT by snippy_about_it (Fall in --> The FReeper Foxhole. America's History. America's Soul.)
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To: E.G.C.

Whoa! Good thing you weren't on the phone. I had my television ruined by lightning a few years back. It still worked but the color was ruined.


42 posted on 10/23/2004 10:10:13 AM PDT by snippy_about_it (Fall in --> The FReeper Foxhole. America's History. America's Soul.)
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To: Valin
1983 241 U.S. Marines and sailors in Lebanon were killed in a suicide truck-bombing at Beirut International Airport; a near-simultaneous attack on French forces killed 58 paratroopers.



43 posted on 10/23/2004 10:26:27 AM PDT by snippy_about_it (Fall in --> The FReeper Foxhole. America's History. America's Soul.)
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To: GailA

We cast our votes a couple days ago for W!


44 posted on 10/23/2004 10:27:07 AM PDT by snippy_about_it (Fall in --> The FReeper Foxhole. America's History. America's Soul.)
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To: stand watie
btw, my mother STILL won't eat SPAM

LOL. I don't blame her a bit!

Hugs.

45 posted on 10/23/2004 10:28:25 AM PDT by snippy_about_it (Fall in --> The FReeper Foxhole. America's History. America's Soul.)
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To: Don W; PAR35
LOL. That's okay, we're used to being corrected and we actually expect it. I get tired and testy snippy a lot lately because we are so busy with our paying jobs.

I need you guys to keep the threads straight for us!

46 posted on 10/23/2004 10:30:21 AM PDT by snippy_about_it (Fall in --> The FReeper Foxhole. America's History. America's Soul.)
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To: The Mayor
But all too often, many of them gradually lost their zeal.

Living gets in the way I'm afraid. Thanks for the gentle reminders.

47 posted on 10/23/2004 10:32:13 AM PDT by snippy_about_it (Fall in --> The FReeper Foxhole. America's History. America's Soul.)
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To: larryjohnson

Thanks for sharing your experiences, larryjohnson. I never heard about the tokens before.


48 posted on 10/23/2004 11:15:33 AM PDT by SAMWolf (Vegetables are not food. Vegetables are what food eats)
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To: E.G.C.
Thankfully no harm or foul and the modem and everything is working OK.

Thanks the Lord for small miracles. :-)

49 posted on 10/23/2004 11:16:13 AM PDT by SAMWolf (Vegetables are not food. Vegetables are what food eats)
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To: Valin
1983 241 U.S. Marines and sailors in Lebanon were killed in a suicide truck-bombing at Beirut International Airport; a near-simultaneous attack on French forces killed 58 paratroopers.



Rest in Peace

50 posted on 10/23/2004 11:23:54 AM PDT by SAMWolf (Vegetables are not food. Vegetables are what food eats)
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