Free Republic
Browse · Search
VetsCoR
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

The Freeper Foxhole enjoys a Lazy Sunday...The Charlie Ration Cookbook Sunday Jan 22, 2005
See educational Sources

Posted on 01/21/2006 8:08:51 PM PST by alfa6



Lord,

Keep our Troops forever in Your care

Give them victory over the enemy...

Grant them a safe and swift return...

Bless those who mourn the lost.
.

FReepers from the Foxhole join in prayer
for all those serving their country at this time.



...................................................................................... ...........................................

U.S. Military History, Current Events and Veterans Issues

Where Duty, Honor and Country
are acknowledged, affirmed and commemorated.

Our Mission:

The FReeper Foxhole is dedicated to Veterans of our Nation's military forces and to others who are affected in their relationships with Veterans.

In the FReeper Foxhole, Veterans or their family members should feel free to address their specific circumstances or whatever issues concern them in an atmosphere of peace, understanding, brotherhood and support.

The FReeper Foxhole hopes to share with it's readers an open forum where we can learn about and discuss military history, military news and other topics of concern or interest to our readers be they Veteran's, Current Duty or anyone interested in what we have to offer.

If the Foxhole makes someone appreciate, even a little, what others have sacrificed for us, then it has accomplished one of it's missions.

We hope the Foxhole in some small way helps us to remember and honor those who came before us.

To read previous Foxhole threads or
to add the Foxhole to your sidebar,
click on the books below.

The CHARLIE RATION COOKBOOK




OR HOW TO EAT WELL IN A FOXHOLE


During the Vietnam war Brig. Gen. Walter S. McIlhenny son of the 2nd company president of McIlhenny Company from his experiences with C-Rations as a soldier during WWII came up with the idea to send soldiers copies of the Charley Ration Cookbook filled with recipes for spicing up C-rations with Tabasco Pepper Sauce wrapped around two-ounce bottles of Tabasco Pepper Sauce along with a handful of a P-38 type can openers all in a waterproof canister. What follows will be a copy of the cookbook.























TOPICS: VetsCoR
KEYWORDS: food; freeperfoxhole; history; veterans
Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first previous 1-5051-100101-150151-173 last
To: alfa6; snippy_about_it; bentfeather; Samwise; Peanut Gallery; Wneighbor; Valin; Iris7; SAMWolf; ...
Good morning ladies and gents. Flag-o-Gram.


151 posted on 01/27/2006 5:53:05 AM PST by Professional Engineer (Remembering Grissom, White and Chaffee)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 150 | View Replies]

To: Professional Engineer

January 27, 2006

Fellow Workers

Read:
Exodus 17:1-6

We are God's fellow workers; you are God's field, you are God's building. —1 Corinthians 3:9

Bible In One Year: Exodus 16-18; Matthew 18:1-20

cover When it came time for Moses to strike the rock in the desert to get water for the thirsty Israelites, his part was very small—just strike the rock. Anyone in Israel could have done it. The main thing was what God was doing in the heart of the earth to provide a bountiful river of water.

But the two worked together: Moses before the people; God in the hidden depths of the earth. Moses and God were fellow workers.

There are always two agents in every fruitful work: willing workers and a faithful God. The human part is to do whatever God has asked us to do—strike the rock. God's work is to make the water flow.

Was Moses weighed down with anxiety that day as he approached the rock, thinking that he might fail? I doubt it. He had only to follow the Lord in obedience. God had promised to do the rest. And Moses had seen God work mighty miracles in the past.

Are you anxious about the task God has given you to do today? Do you believe that everything depends on you? Just strike the rock. God is working in secret to pour out rivers of water for every man, woman, and child. And when living waters begin to flow, praise Him.

Just do your part and He'll do His. —David Roper

As a fellow worker with the Lord,
Do the work He's given you today;
You will find His blessings all outpoured—
He will do His part if you obey. —Hess

"Apart from Me, you can do nothing." —Jesus

FOR FURTHER STUDY
What Can I Do With My Worry?

152 posted on 01/27/2006 5:53:54 AM PST by The Mayor ( As a child of God, prayer is kind of like calling home everyday.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 151 | View Replies]

To: alfa6; Valin; Iris7; All
Tragedy Strikes

On Jan. 27, 1967, tragedy struck the Apollo program when a flash fire occurred in Command Module 012 during a launch pad test of the Apollo/Saturn space vehicle being prepared for the first piloted flight, the AS-204 mission. Three astronauts, Lt. Col. Virgil I. Grissom, a veteran of Mercury and Gemini missions; Lt. Col. Edward H. White, the astronaut who had performed the first United States extravehicular activity during the Gemini program; and Lt. Cmdr. Roger B. Chaffee, an astronaut preparing for his first space flight, died in this tragic accident.

153 posted on 01/27/2006 5:54:30 AM PST by Professional Engineer (Remembering Grissom, White and Chaffee)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 150 | View Replies]

To: The Mayor

Howdy Sarge


154 posted on 01/27/2006 5:54:53 AM PST by Professional Engineer (Remembering Grissom, White and Chaffee)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 152 | View Replies]

To: Professional Engineer

Morning!


155 posted on 01/27/2006 5:57:07 AM PST by The Mayor ( As a child of God, prayer is kind of like calling home everyday.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 154 | View Replies]

To: Professional Engineer; SAMWolf; snippy_about_it; Peanut Gallery; alfa6; w_over_w; Valin; ...

TGIF! Morning everyone.

156 posted on 01/27/2006 6:20:32 AM PST by Soaring Feather (~www.proudpatriots.org~Supporting Our TROOPS~)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 151 | View Replies]

To: PAR35; SAMWolf
Roger that . . .

I'm no expert on the subject but perhaps the key word left out of the "FAQ" is "practical" or "successful" helicopter flight as noted below:

From Airscooter.com

It was not until Sikorsky came along that the first practical helicopter, the single rotor VS-300, came into existence. The VS-300 was first flown on 14 September 1939 with Sikorsky himself as the test pilot. The original VS-300 was powered by a 75 HP engine. The aircraft's body was nothing more than an open cockpit with a welded steel tubing frame.

From the History of The Helicopter

scroll down to Sept. 14, 1939

And from National Helicopter Museum, Stratford, Conn.

Indeed, the 15-year-old museum is the only institution in the country devoted solely to the helicopter. Igor Sikorsky made helicopter history when he developed the first practical, and then the first production, helicopters in Stratford.

SAM! Where the hell are you?

157 posted on 01/27/2006 7:58:48 AM PST by w_over_w (Teens seldom misquote, if fact, they repeat exactly what you shouldn't have said.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 147 | View Replies]

Comment #158 Removed by Moderator

To: vox_PL; snippy_about_it; bentfeather

oh dear...
bittygirl's new favorite game...

We call it 'baby slam dance.' She takes her baby doll and slams it onto the floor (or down the stairs) and then dances around to pick it up for more 'dancing.' Of course, as she does this she squeals with delight, in rhythm to her 'dance.'


159 posted on 01/27/2006 1:30:08 PM PST by Peanut Gallery
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 158 | View Replies]

To: Peanut Gallery
oh dear.


This child definitely needs tools. Trucks, earthmovers, etc. LOL
160 posted on 01/27/2006 2:30:44 PM PST by Soaring Feather (~www.proudpatriots.org~Supporting Our TROOPS~)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 159 | View Replies]

To: w_over_w; SAMWolf
The German machines 1939-1942 were probably as practical and as sucessful as the American machines. (The Russians used some of the German engineering in their post-war designs.) The 1936 FW-61 design was probably superior to the VS-300, and the FA-223 and FA-300 were also advanced machines. The FL-282 was competitive with anything the Americans put out in the war.

Do you think if we both begged, SAM would do a pre-1945 helicopter thread for us?

161 posted on 01/27/2006 4:21:45 PM PST by PAR35
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 157 | View Replies]

To: PAR35; SAMWolf
Do you think if we both begged, SAM would do a pre-1945 helicopter thread for us?

Well . . . first we need to find out if Sam is alive. Sam, are you out there?!?!? HELLO?!?!?

Personally, I'm not into begging, but I am into "bugging" and I think if we "bugged" the crap out of Sam he would capitulate. A pre-1945 helicopter thread is an excellent suggestion and it merits continually "bugging" Sam.

162 posted on 01/27/2006 4:53:49 PM PST by w_over_w (Teens seldom misquote, if fact, they repeat exactly what you shouldn't have said.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 161 | View Replies]

To: w_over_w

Looks like he hasn't posted since early on Tuesday.


163 posted on 01/27/2006 7:22:01 PM PST by PAR35
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 162 | View Replies]

To: Peanut Gallery

LOL. Oh dear!


164 posted on 01/27/2006 8:09:53 PM PST by snippy_about_it (Fall in --> The FReeper Foxhole. America's History. America's Soul.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 159 | View Replies]

To: w_over_w

That's a pretty fall scene.

xoxoxo


165 posted on 01/27/2006 8:12:12 PM PST by snippy_about_it (Fall in --> The FReeper Foxhole. America's History. America's Soul.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 146 | View Replies]

To: vox_PL; snippy_about_it; bentfeather; Samwise; Peanut Gallery; Wneighbor; Valin; alfa6; Iris7; ...
Good morning ladies and gents. Flag-o-Gram.

Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Marine Gen. Peter Pace meets with a Walter Reed patient between periods of the Washington Capitals and the St. Louis Blues game in Washington D.C. on Jan. 19, 2006. Gen. Pace are attending the game as part of the Capitals fourth “Salute to the Military Night” which is a night dedicated to honoring the servicemen and women who are serving in the defense of the United States of America.
Defense Dept. photo by U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. D. Myles Cullen

Count the oak leaf clusters size.

166 posted on 01/28/2006 8:21:50 AM PST by Professional Engineer (Remembering Grissom, White and Chaffee)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 158 | View Replies]

To: snippy_about_it

January 28, 2006

The Choice Is Ours

Read:
Colossians 3:1-17

Set your mind on things above. —Colossians 3:2

Bible In One Year: Exodus 19-20; Matthew 18:21-35

cover One summer afternoon I climbed a hill near my home. When I reached the top, I stretched out on the grass to relax.

Turning my head to one side, my eyes focused on some blades of grass within inches of my face. This short-range focus not only strained my eyes, but it blurred my view of anything beyond the end of my nose. So I began to adjust my focus, and then the distant city came into view instead. I found I could shift my sights from near to far at will. The choice was mine.

In today's Bible reading, the apostle Paul emphasized that followers of Christ need to keep eternity in view. He wrote, "Set your mind on things above, not on things on the earth" (Colossians 3:2). We can choose where to put our focus.

We can succumb to selfish, earthbound thoughts, blurring our view of anything beyond the end of our nose. Or we can gaze through this sinful scene and fix our attention on things above, where Christ is seated at God's right hand—and we with Him! Then, and only then, are we in a position to see what's most important in life.

Only the mind set on things above can say no to sin and yes to holiness. The choice is ours. —Joanie Yoder

Help me to watch and pray,
And on Thyself rely;
And let me ne'er my trust betray,
But press to realms on high. —Wesley

The only way to see life clearly is to focus on Christ.

FOR FURTHER STUDY
The Mind Of Christ

167 posted on 01/28/2006 8:40:42 AM PST by The Mayor ( As a child of God, prayer is kind of like calling home everyday.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 165 | View Replies]

To: snippy_about_it; SAMWolf; Iris7; Valin; PAR35; alfa6; U S Army EOD; Peanut Gallery; USMCBOMBGUY; ...
Morning Glory Folks~

Delaware Tourism Office
[Maybe they have scenic pictures of their state]

Delaware Facts and Trivia

Delaware was the first state to ratify the United States constitution. It did so on December 7, 1787.

Delaware shares a semi-circular border with Pennsylvania. The border was drawn at the time of the original land grants to William Penn from King Charles II and the Duke of York.

The nation's first scheduled steam railroad began in New Castle in 1831.

The United States battleship Delaware was commissioned in 1910.

Delaware is the only state without any National Park System units such as national parks, seashores, historic sites, battlefields, memorials, and monuments.

Delmar is popularized as the little town too big for one state. The community has the distinction of being located partly in Delaware and partly in Maryland.

The most historic site in Frederica is Barratt's Chapel east of town. The chapel is where the Methodist Church of America was organized in 1784.

Today about 500 descendants of the original Nanticoke Indians reside in Delaware. They celebrate their heritage each September with the Nanticoke Indian Pow Wow.

The log cabin originated in Finland. Finnish settlers arrived in Delaware in the mid-1600s and brought with them plans for the log cabin, one of the enduring symbols of the American pioneer. One of the cabins has been preserved and is on display at the Delaware Agricultural Museum in Dover.

John Dickinson was called the Penman of the Revolution for his writings on independence. His boyhood home is preserved in Dover.

Tradition holds the first time Betsy Ross's famous flag was flown was at the Battle of Cooch's Bridge. This historic site is located on route 4 in Newark.

The Blue Hen chicken is the official state bird. The hens were noted for their fighting ability. Delaware is sometimes referred to as the Blue Hen State.

The Lady Bug is Delaware's official state bug.

Eleven years after the landing of the English pilgrims the first white settlement was made on Delaware soil.

In 1785 Oliver Evans of Newport invented the automatic flour-milling machinery that revolutionized the industry.

"Our Delaware" is the official state song. The words are by George Hynson, music by William Brown.

In total area Delaware ranks 49th in the nation. It contains 1,982 square miles. It is 96 miles long and varies from 9 to 35 miles in width.

Ebright Road in New Castle County is the highest state elevation at 442 feet above sea level. The lowest elevation is along the coast at sea level.

Thomas Garret lost his entire fortune in his battle against slavery. He was sued by a Maryland slave owner and fined for aiding a black family in flight. Over his lifetime, Garrett reportedly helped more than 2,000 fugitive slaves move through Delaware, an important stop on the Underground Railroad.

Rehoboth Beach is the state's largest coastal resort town. Methodists who purchase the land for a summer camp and meeting place originally constructed it.

The 87-foot Fenwick Island Lighthouse was painted in 1880 for a total cost of about $5.00.

Twelve concrete observation towers along the coast were constructed during World War II to protect the state's coastal towns from German u-boat attacks.

Fisher's popcorn is a famous coastal caramel corn. It has been ordered from as far away as Vietnam and Indonesia.

The American holly is the official state tree. The tree can reach a maximum of 60 feet in height and a trunk diameter of 20 inches.

The peach blossom is Delaware's official state flower and has prompted Delaware's nickname as the peach state.

New Sweden was founded as a colony in 1638 and is recognized as the first permanent colony on Delaware soil.

Winterthur Museum, Garden and Library, six miles northwest of Wilmington features one of the world's finest naturalistic gardens.

Hagley Museum was originally the du Pont black powder manufactory, estate, and gardens.

The state's Coastal Heritage Greenway consists of a corridor of open space running along 90 miles of coast and spanning the area between Fox Point State Park and the state line at Fenwick Island.

Thousand Acre Marsh is the largest freshwater tidal wetland in northern Delaware. The Chesapeake and Delaware Canals border the marsh.

In 1812 Port Penn was considered the best port in Delaware.

Augustine Beach was named for Augustine Hermann. He was a Bohemian adventurer who mapped the Delmarva Peninsula and surrounding areas in the mid-1600s.

Odessa possesses one of the finest collections of late 18th- and early 19th-century architecture in the middle Atlantic region. The center of town is on the National Register of Historic Places and the entire town has been zoned as historic.

Barratt's Chapel is known as the Cradle of Methodism. It was built in 1780 and is the oldest surviving church built by and for Methodists in the United States.

The 80-food Great Dune is the state's highest. It is located at Cape Henlopen State Park in Lewes.

The Maryland/Delaware boundary and the Mason-Dixon Line divide Delmar. A double crown stone marker was erected in 1768 as the southern end of the only North-South portion of the Mason-Dixon line.

Horseshoe crabs may be viewed in large numbers up and down the Delaware shore in May. The crabs endure extremes of temperature and salinity. They can also go for a year without eating and have remained basically the same since the days of the dinosaur.

The Du Pont Laboratories first produced nylon at its plant in Seaford. This earned the town the distinction of being the Nylon Capital of the World.

In recognition of sportfishing's overall recreational and economic contributions to the state of Delaware and of the specific values of the weakfish (Cynoscion genus) as a game and food fish, the state Legislature adopted the weakfish as Delaware's State fish in 1981. This fish is also known as sea trout, gray trout, yellow mouth, yellow fin trout, squeteague, and tiderunner.

Colonial blue and buff are Delaware's official state colors.

Delaware was named for Lord de la Warr. He was the first governor of Virginia.

The sheaf of wheat, ear of corn, and the ox on the state seal symbolize the farming activities of early Delaware.

The Delaware Indians were one of the most advanced tribes of the eastern United States.

New Castle County includes the largest population and smallest area of Delaware's three counties.

Wilmington's Delaware History Center is housed in a renovated, art deco former Woolworth five-and-ten-cent store.

America's newest tall ship is ten stories high and 139 feet long. The recreation is the Kalmar Nyckel that landed on the Christina River in 1638.

Quaker merchant Thomas Garret is thought to be the model for a Quaker farmer in the novel, "Uncle Tom's Cabin." Garret and famed abolitionist Harriett Tubman worked closely with Delaware's anti-slavery forces.

The frying pan built in 1950 for use at the Delmarva Chicken Festival is 10 feet in diameter and holds 180 gallons of oil and 800 chicken quarters.

The Delaware Breakwater at Cape Henlopen State Park was the first structure of its kind in the western hemisphere.

The town of Milton was named after the English poet John Milton in 1807.

168 posted on 01/28/2006 8:40:57 AM PST by w_over_w (Teens seldom misquote, if fact, they repeat exactly what you shouldn't have said.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 165 | View Replies]

To: w_over_w

Nothing jumps out at me, so I'll take Delaware off.


169 posted on 01/28/2006 9:16:17 AM PST by PAR35
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 168 | View Replies]

To: w_over_w
America's newest tall ship is ten stories high and 139 feet long. The recreation is the Kalmar Nyckel that landed on the Christina River in 1638.

mmmm Tall Ships!

170 posted on 01/28/2006 9:55:35 AM PST by Professional Engineer (Remembering Grissom, White and Chaffee)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 168 | View Replies]

To: PAR35

Whew! I was thinking you would call them on that 10ft. frying pan.


171 posted on 01/28/2006 11:12:26 AM PST by w_over_w (Teens seldom misquote, if fact, they repeat exactly what you shouldn't have said.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 169 | View Replies]

To: w_over_w

http://www.state.de.us/sos/dpa/100/ourtraditions/A%20Delmarva%20Tradition.shtml

Now that you mention it, it doesn't look like 10' to me. Use the ladder as a guide, and it looks like it would come out closer to 8 feet. (Note that it is about a foot higher off the ground than the ladder).

In any event, the frying pan in question apparently was retired in about 1988.


172 posted on 01/28/2006 1:54:03 PM PST by PAR35
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 171 | View Replies]

To: PAR35

LOL! You're killin' me!


173 posted on 01/28/2006 2:35:14 PM PST by w_over_w (Teens seldom misquote, if fact, they repeat exactly what you shouldn't have said.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 172 | View Replies]


Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first previous 1-5051-100101-150151-173 last

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
VetsCoR
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson