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Sharing Broadband Cable Modem (Windows XP/Win98)
Self Vanity

Posted on 01/07/2002 3:54:52 PM PST by SamAdams76

Okay, I just spent the whole afternoon pulling out my hair. I figure there's got to be some Freepers out there with some XP/Cable Modem experience so maybe you can save me some aggravation when I tackle the problem some other day (I've had enough for today).

First, some background. Over the Christmas holiday, I got a new Windows XP system and I gave my old Win98 system to the kids. I bought a cheap 5-port hub, a couple of patch cables, threw a NIC (network interface card) in the Win98 system and using the Windows XP Network Setup Wizard, I was done in about 15 minutes (my new system has a NIC built into the motherboard). The XP Network wizard even created a floppy that I used to configure my old system to see the network - it was that brainless.

It was great to be networked. I shared out the ZIP drive on my old system so I could use it with the new system. I shared the printer off my new system to the old system. I even shared out the dial-up ISP connection so that both computers could be online at the same time. It was great to not have to compete for internet time with my kids, but it was s-l-o-w sharing a 56k connection between two computers.

So I finally gave in and called up AT&T Broadband to have a cable modem installed. Over the phone they asked me if I had my own cable modem and NIC. Stupid me said no, I didn't have the cable modem but I did have a NIC.

Well they came today to install the cable while I was at work. I came home early to test it out. It was phenomenal, incredibly fast! I downloaded a 2.8MB file in 15 seconds where before it would take me 15-20 minutes. But I noticed to my dismay that they had unplugged my hub so I had no more network. There was no place on the cable modem to plug in a patch cable. Not that it would have mattered. For they took over my NIC and configured it to be part of their network.

For the hell of it, I tried plugging the cable modem into the hub. I was able to still access the Internet with my new computer. But my old computer couldn't even see the network, never mind share the connection.

I think I have it figured out. I need to get another NIC card and install it on my new system. I will then use the Networking Wizard to connect my two computers just as before. But will I be able to share the cable connection on the old computer? If anybody has had to deal with this before, I would appreciate some advice.

I'm a little upset with AT&T for not telling me that they were going to be disconnecting my home network when I told them I had a NIC. Otherwise I would have had them bring their own NIC. But what's done is done. At least I have a fast internet connection. And it is incredibly fast. It runs streaming video, the online radio stations sound awesome and when I need to download a program or large file, it is done in seconds!


TOPICS: Miscellaneous; Your Opinion/Questions
KEYWORDS: techindex
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1 posted on 01/07/2002 3:54:53 PM PST by SamAdams76
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To: SamAdams76
Bring back the 5 port hub and get a Linksys Cable/DSL router.
2 posted on 01/07/2002 4:00:46 PM PST by Mixer
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To: SamAdams76
get a Linksys cablemodem switch to serve as both a firewall and to plug into your hub (or you can hook into directly, if you still wanted to purchase more NICs for each computer).
3 posted on 01/07/2002 4:01:03 PM PST by Steven W.
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To: SamAdams76
for 80 bucks or so you can get a linksys 4 port router/switch that you can plug into there and share your cable connection. That way you don't have to leave the computer on. It also acts as sort of a firewall. Can even get logs from the router to tell where the kiddies are surfing. They are a breeze to setup and work well. At least its something to consider in the future.

Noslrac

4 posted on 01/07/2002 4:05:23 PM PST by Noslrac
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To: Steven W.
Man i was too slow, but it does seem like there is a wealth of linksys users.

Noslrac

5 posted on 01/07/2002 4:06:16 PM PST by Noslrac
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To: Mixer
Don't even need the hub if they get the Linksys Cable/DSL router. The one we used had the uplink for connecting to the cable modem and 4 (or 5) ports on it. Just need the additional NICs for the other machines.
6 posted on 01/07/2002 4:09:46 PM PST by Tennessee_Bob
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To: Noslrac
I had to get one, too... sharing dsl on my home network was easy with the router... it's nice to be able to enjoy quality family time as we all surf the internet at the same time... I just got an email from my wife in the other room, as a matter of fact... Sometimes, we even 'chat'. ;0)
7 posted on 01/07/2002 4:10:06 PM PST by Chad Fairbanks
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Comment #8 Removed by Moderator

To: Noslrac
Ditto that. A router is better than a hub. Mine works great, share Cable Modem between 2 computers. The only thing a person may be concerned about is whether their Broadband ISP will allow multiple IP addresses. Mine allows up to 3. I understand that some want more money and may only offer one unless you pay for more. You might look into this. (Responding to originator)
9 posted on 01/07/2002 4:10:19 PM PST by lmr
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To: SamAdams76
What everybody else said.....

BEFSR41 - EtherFast® Cable/DSL Router with 4-Port Switch

10 posted on 01/07/2002 4:10:45 PM PST by Leroy S. Mort
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To: Steven W., Mixer
That Linksys cable router you guys pointed out to me looks like a great piece of equipment. This doesn't replace my cable modem, does it? Does it allow me to connect the other PC and do file-and-print sharing?

Also, AT&T mentioned something about paying an extra $9.95 a month to hook up another computer. I'm assuming that if I provide my own equipment, I can share the one cable connection I am paying for like I did with the dial-up ISP.

11 posted on 01/07/2002 4:12:51 PM PST by SamAdams76
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To: SamAdams76
I'm not sure what's going on in your situation but if there was a cat5 cable from the cable modem to your NIC and it worked and you then tried to plug it into your hub and it didn't work what's wrong is that you need to have a different cable.
When you connect a computer's network card to a hub you can use a "straight through" cable which means the 1&2 and 3&6 pairs in the cable just go straight through the cable. If you need to connect two NICs or two hubs together you need to use a crossover cable where the 1&2 go to the 3&6 spots.
Most hubs, however, have a crossover port or some button on there that will do it for you. Give that a shot.
To find out if your cable is straight through or crossover take a look at the ends and read off from left to right what colors (and stripes) they are.
12 posted on 01/07/2002 4:13:34 PM PST by lelio
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To: SamAdams76
If you go to at and t website and go to the home networking you can buy the linksys etherfast cable dsl router for a bout 40 bucks which is much much cheaper than the 70 I paid for it before I knew.

Att doesnt supprot networks so thats up to you its not hard(for me)and you don't have the wife tell you to get off freerepublic!

13 posted on 01/07/2002 4:13:59 PM PST by hoosierboy
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Comment #14 Removed by Moderator

Comment #15 Removed by Moderator

To: SamAdams76
I believe you might want to establish a "router" firewall boundary between the cable modem and the private network at your home. You would do that with a Zyxel Prestige 310 or something like that. It is a $100 box that you can easily configure to handle the login diaglogue with the cable ISP. Basically you plug the cable modem into the Zyxel router. You then plug the Zyxel router/firewall into the 5 port hub that you bought. Zyxel has an easy to follow configuration scheme to setup the most common configuration and share it among your household pc's. I would recommend buying it direct from Zyxel and you will save some bucks. Outside will cost you about $139. You never wnat to have your PC directly connected to anything like the internet.. attacks are only a matter of time so your files and information are very vulnerable. Using something like a Zyxel router/firewall you will be able to establish what is called a NAT interface basically it keeps your internal network private while providing access to the external world using one IP address provided by your ISP.
16 posted on 01/07/2002 4:17:15 PM PST by gobinosh
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To: SamAdams76
This will take a little more research, but I think it will work. If you let the first NIC go to the cable modem, then add a second NIC to the new computer and hook THAT to the hub...I believe XP has builtin functionality to let you share the modem. I'm sorry I don't know for sure, but I have done nothing but Unix for 2 years.

The computer will act as a firewall/router. The problem is you need to have a unique IP address on each machine, and your cable modem only gives you one. So you do it like this:


Cable Modem-----------216.24.23.244
                       XP MACHINE
                      10.1.1.1-----HUB------Win 98 Machine
                                            10.1.1.2
The 10.1.1.1 and 10.1.1.2 addresses get masqueraded and appear to the outside world as both coming from 216.24.33.244 (or whatever IP address you get from the cable company).
17 posted on 01/07/2002 4:17:56 PM PST by wienerdog.com
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To: lmr
The only thing a person may be concerned about is whether their Broadband ISP will allow multiple IP addresses. Mine allows up to 3. I understand that some want more money and may only offer one unless you pay for more. You might look into this. (Responding to originator)

I just checked and it says that AT&T will allow up to 3 additional IP addresses for $9.95 a month.

Now if I get the Linksys router that everybody here is touting, do I need to get a second NIC for my main PC? Or can I just plug the cable modem into the router and plug my second PC into the router?

Also, if I get the second NIC card for my main computer and set up a network independent of the cable modem, can I share the connection or do I still need to fork over the $9.95? If so, I might as well do it right and get the Linksys router. My wife's going to kill me when she finds out I have to spend even MORE money!

18 posted on 01/07/2002 4:18:20 PM PST by SamAdams76
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To: SamAdams76
Also, AT&T mentioned something about paying an extra $9.95 a month to hook up another computer.
Tell em to shove it. I believe that Linksys modem / router does NAT (Network Address Translation) where it takes all your internal IP address (like 10.x or 192.168.x) and mangles them into your real internet IPs when it goes out to your ISP.
There is no easy way for them to tell that you're doing this and there isn't anything illegal about it either. What they want to do is just get some more money out of you, its like the newspaper company saying that you have to pay them twice as your family reads the morning paper as well.
19 posted on 01/07/2002 4:18:23 PM PST by lelio
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To: SlickWillard
Well???
20 posted on 01/07/2002 4:18:23 PM PST by KayEyeDoubleDee
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To: SamAdams76
Also, AT&T mentioned something about paying an extra $9.95 a month to hook up another computer. I'm assuming that if I provide my own equipment, I can share the one cable connection I am paying for like I did with the dial-up ISP.

There's no extra charge for using a router. It's just like the hub you had, except the cable modem also plugs into it so the other computers on your network can share the connection and also communicate with each other.

21 posted on 01/07/2002 4:18:25 PM PST by Leroy S. Mort
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To: SamAdams76
See if a Linksys BEFSR41 will do the job for you. It is $79.95 at Fry's website www.outpost.com. Also see http://www.linksys.com/products/product.asp?prid=20&grid=5 and http://www.linksys.com/products/group.asp?grid=23.

For another vendor see http://www.netgear.com/product_view.asp?xrp=4&yrp=12&zrp=55 and http://www.netgear.com/categories.asp?xrp=4&yrp=12.

22 posted on 01/07/2002 4:19:10 PM PST by fleur-de-lis
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To: SamAdams76
Also, AT&T mentioned something about paying an extra $9.95 a month to hook up another computer

I don't pay it and most people here on their network I am sure don"t pay it either. With the router you can have as many as 4 people share the connection. you can add an uplink and add more users too.

23 posted on 01/07/2002 4:20:08 PM PST by hoosierboy
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To: SamAdams76
I have no personal knowledge, but a computer geek who sets up home networks for friends says that Linksys is indeed the solution to most problems, plus their website supposedly explains things.

I have to connect a PC and MAC to a DSL. The MAC is on an airport, but the darn airport has no plug for the PC. I'll deal with it when I get the time.

24 posted on 01/07/2002 4:20:54 PM PST by Hagrid
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To: SamAdams76
I just checked and it says that AT&T will allow up to 3 additional IP addresses for $9.95 a month.

No, no, no! You only need ONE IP address when using the Linksys router. Connect up to 253 computers to it if you wish. You still only pay for ONE IP number.

25 posted on 01/07/2002 4:21:07 PM PST by Leroy S. Mort
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To: SamAdams76
I agree with the advice on getting the router from linksys. I use one myself and have been very happy with it. I use it to link three home computers to the internet using one cable modem. Now I'll tell you what your problem is.

The cable company assigns an IP address to each user, in your case to the computer hooked to the cable modem. If you want to use more than one computer you'll need either a hub or a router. If you get a hub, then the cable company will assign an IP address to each computer. I did this with my old setup and each additional IP address was about 10 bucks a month. If you go with the router, the cable company assigns an IP address to the router and the router further assigns additional addresses to each computer. My cable company doesn't know, doesn't care, and doesn't charge extra for additional computers hanging off a router. Probably yours won't either. You'll probably have to notify the cable company before installing the new router so they'll recognize it and allow it on their net and you'll probably have to tell them what you're doing so you'll find out if there are additional charges.

The bottom line. You'll either have to get additional IPs from the cable company or get a router. Get the router. BTW, if you get the router you don't need a software firewall. If you stick with the hub, you'll need to get a firewall. ZoneAlarm lets you download theirs for free for personal use. Do a web search and you'll find their home page. It's free. Either way you should visit their website to learn about hardware and software firewalls.

BTW, welcome to the world of high speed access. No need to bitch about lots of threads with lots of pictures. You made a good choice.

26 posted on 01/07/2002 4:22:41 PM PST by DugwayDuke
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To: SamAdams76
http://www.computers4sure.com/linksys/store/att_wired.asp

Here is the link to buy the router for 43 bucks

27 posted on 01/07/2002 4:23:28 PM PST by hoosierboy
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To: Leroy S. Mort
Linksys has a real simple TECH HELPER presentation that shows you exactly how to hook it up.
28 posted on 01/07/2002 4:24:41 PM PST by Leroy S. Mort
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To: lelio
Actually my XP computer did work when I plugged the cable modem into the hub (and attached a patch cable from the hub to the XP PC). It was the Win98 computer that didn't work even though a known good patch cable was connected to the hub. I know why, because the NIC card on the XP computer was reconfigured by AT&T for their network while my Win98 still had the original 192.168.0.208 address, obviously installed by the XP networking wizard.

I suppose I would need to get a compatible IP address from AT&T to join their network but I'll need to pay the $9.95. I don't like that solution because I will be doing file-and-printer sharing between the PCs, and with the cable modem plugged in the hub, I am essentially putting my home network on AT&T's local subnet.

29 posted on 01/07/2002 4:27:05 PM PST by SamAdams76
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To: DugwayDuke
You'll probably have to notify the cable company before installing the new router so they'll recognize it and allow it on their net and you'll probably have to tell them what you're doing so you'll find out if there are additional charges.

Not necessary with the LinkSys. ATT recognizes the MAC address of the NIC in the computer they originally installed to. When you set up the router, you just "clone" this address to it, plug in the cable modem, and bob's your uncle.

30 posted on 01/07/2002 4:28:09 PM PST by Leroy S. Mort
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To: hoosierboy
Dittos to what everyone says about the Linksys (and of course there are some other comparable products out there, but I have a Linksys and it just plain old works).

Here is the extra piece of advice though. Your mileage may vary, but my cable company registers MAC addresses on their system. What does that mean? It basically means it "remembers" which NIC card its cable modem was talking to when things were initially set up. You might think, for example that you could pull out one NIC card and put in another and that things would work fine, or replace one computer with another, or for that matter interpose the Linksys router. In some cases, maybe you can, but in the case of my cable operator you very definitely cannot.

Fortunately Linksys offers a way around this problem by "cloning" the Mac Address. In this way you allow the Linksys to spoof the cable operators network and make the network think that it is really the original device that was registered with the network.

The Mac Address Cloning window can be found under the "advanced" secion of the Linksys web config utility. A Mac address looks like 12:ab:89:4a:54
(i.e. 6 pairs of hex digits). You can get the address that your cable operator is expecting by issuing the command

ipconfig /all

on the machine that is currently connected to the network. Then you clone this mac address displayed as the "physical address" onto your linksys router and presto, you are done. This doesn't cause any problems on the network, and I have used this trick any number of times and it always, always works.

No need to do this if you can interpose the linksys router and things work OK, but if they don't this is worth doing. The other thing to keep in mind is that whenever you change your network connections, you should power all devices down (cable modem, linksys, all PCs) and then power them on in order i.e cable modem first, then linksys, and finally all PCs.

31 posted on 01/07/2002 4:34:54 PM PST by 2 Kool 2 Be 4-Gotten
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To: SamAdams76
Not to add just ANOTHER voice to the Linksys router chorus, but trust me - that's the way to go. I haven't seen the Sygate software route discussed, but I've done that and didn't like it at all. If you try to use one of the computers on the network as a host, you'll have a few problems: 1) more complicated network setup; 2) less security; 3) more headache; when your computer locks up (not if, but WHEN in Windows), anybody else on the network loses their connection; 4) less reliability. My Linksys has been up 24/7 for about six months, and I only had to reset it ONCE. There's also a free router program that runs in Linux ("Freesco") that only requires a system with a network card and a floppy drive, but I never got the damn thing to work. I had a crummy old system sitting in the corner that I thought would be perfect for it, too...
32 posted on 01/07/2002 4:34:55 PM PST by kezekiel
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To: Leroy S. Mort
I've had my Linksys BFR141 router for 18 months. We had three computers going on our home network. Then my sons left for college so my daughter suddenly had access to one of our two library computers whenever she wanted and no longer needed a space-hogging desk in her room for the third computer, so we closed that down.

But it is still nice to have DSL access from both of two computers. I love that router.

33 posted on 01/07/2002 4:36:12 PM PST by Thud
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To: KayEyeDoubleDee
Linksys is probably the easiest solution. Plus, it puts a hardware layer between you and the bad guys [if you put two NICs in the XP box, one of them is exposed].
34 posted on 01/07/2002 4:36:49 PM PST by SlickWillard
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To: kezekiel
I'm not sure about that program you mentioned for linux, but I'm happy with my linux box and 2 NICs running Netfilter (aka iptables the update to ipchains). Course I do this for a living and can configure it all day (and I have) so I wouldn't recommend it to everyone.
Another benefit of getting a NAT router is that it also acts as a primitive firewall that doesn't allow new outbound connections in. So you won't have to worry about someone trying to connect to your SMB (file sharing) port unless you allow it through the router.
35 posted on 01/07/2002 4:38:11 PM PST by lelio
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To: SamAdams76
Get the Netgear as is post #15. Real computer equipment comes in metal boxes with square corners - Really real computer equipment is rackmount. You plug the Netgear into the cable modem, your computers into the Netgear. Fix the address of your primary machine at 192.168.0.2 and the rest set at .3, .4, .5, etc. You could just use the dhcp that the router provides but specific port forwarding from the outside only works on the first machine so you're better off fixing the addresses. Bingo, you're on. You use one dynamically assigned address from the cable modem on the external side of the router so the cable company won't squeeze you. The router is always on so you don't lose your dynamically assigned address when you turn your computer off for a few days.
36 posted on 01/07/2002 4:38:18 PM PST by agitator
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To: SamAdams76
"(my new system has a NIC built into the motherboard)"

Mistake number one. I do not recommend any built in stuff like sound cards network cards, etc. Too many bad experiences.

I don't know 98/or XP, but can't you use TCP/IP for broadband and NetBEUI for local? It's been a while since I've done any networks.

37 posted on 01/07/2002 4:39:12 PM PST by Looking4Truth
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To: Leroy S. Mort
Not necessary with the LinkSys. ATT recognizes the MAC address of the NIC in the computer they originally installed to. When you set up the router, you just "clone" this address to it, plug in the cable modem, and bob's your uncle.

You just answered the question I was about to ask. Thank you! I know the cable company took the MAC address of the NIC on my XP computer. I was worried that if I got a router, I'd have to change the configuration through AT&T and get charged more money.

I will go to CompUSA tomorrow and look for this Linksys router. Otherwise I'll get it online. Thanks for all the help!

38 posted on 01/07/2002 4:39:50 PM PST by SamAdams76
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To: SamAdams76
The router is good bet, but have you tried this first?

If it still won't work, then I'd look into the Internet Settings for the 98 machine, to manually tell it to look at the LAN for the internet. But the use of a router is always the best bet.
39 posted on 01/07/2002 4:43:29 PM PST by Cultural Jihad
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To: SamAdams76
CompUSA tomorrow and look for this Linksys router.

CompUSA also sells a cable modem for $150. If you own your own modem you pay AT&T $10 a month less. It pays for itself in 15 months.

40 posted on 01/07/2002 4:46:22 PM PST by Cultural Jihad
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To: SamAdams76
You've gotten a lot of good advice. If you have trouble finding the LinkSys, the NetGear stuff is just as good. The trick is to find one with NAT capability.

I'm on Time-Warner Cable and I currently don't have the linksys box, I'm just using 1 system and ZoneAlarm for a firewall. I bring various laptops home from work and noticed the MAC issue.

I've found that if I just turn off the modem for about 5 minutes it 'forgets' the MAC address and will happily work with the next laptop (or router) I plug in.

41 posted on 01/07/2002 4:48:28 PM PST by TC Rider
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To: Cultural Jihad
Yes, I did that a bunch of times this afternoon. And my Win98 machine is configured for internet on the LAN (it was working fine when I had a shared dial-up connection).

I think I'll bite the bullet and go with the router. I like the idea of "cloning" the MAC address to the router. That should do it and provide a nice firewall in the process.

42 posted on 01/07/2002 4:49:31 PM PST by SamAdams76
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To: Looking4Truth
I don't know 98/or XP, but can't you use TCP/IP for broadband and NetBEUI for local? It's been a while since I've done any networks.

I think the best solution is to run both protocols. Use TCP/IP for the internet connection on both machines, and netbeui for the local networking (file and printer sharing). This keeps the SMB protocols isolated from the internet traffic. Just watch your protocol bindings, and don't let it enable NetBT.

43 posted on 01/07/2002 4:53:26 PM PST by tacticalogic
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To: SamAdams76
There are a few routers out there that would work fine, but I got my Linksys running in about two minutes.

It is also a 4 port switch, which is better than a hub - with a switch, each computer has full LAN bandwidth (100 Mbps), while with a hub, all the computers in the network have to share the 100 Mbps among them. (In practice, it doesn't matter much, especially in sharing a broadband connection, but switches now are so cheap its a no brainer.)

What took me longer to get working was getting our computers to see each other. I had to fiddle with the firewalls (ZoneAlarm and Norton Internet Security, which have different methods of allowing local network access - ZoneAlarm is easier to configure), and got things running, but then as I looked into it more, I found out that the Linksys router gives each computer IP addresses that are basically invisible to the rest of the Internet. (Check out ShieldsUp at grc.com after setting things up and you'll see what I mean.)

Broadband and a router are the way to go. I'll never go back to dialup.

44 posted on 01/07/2002 4:55:21 PM PST by michaelt
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To: TC Rider
I've found that if I just turn off the modem for about 5 minutes it 'forgets' the MAC address and will happily work with the next laptop (or router) I plug in.
That's cuz the modem arps out for the mapping between IP address and MAC every so often. It shouldn't be 5 minutes, more like every 30 seconds though. That's a configurable option and they might of bumped it up to that high for some strange reason.
45 posted on 01/07/2002 4:56:18 PM PST by lelio
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To: michaelt; SamAdams76
An important point: XP's built-in software firewall would prevent your 98 from seeing XP. It's made for just a standalone system.
46 posted on 01/07/2002 4:57:44 PM PST by Cultural Jihad
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To: Cultural Jihad
An important point: XP's built-in software firewall would prevent your 98 from seeing XP. It's made for just a standalone system.

Thanks, I was not aware of that. However, I don't think it was the problem today as the main problem was that AT&T reconfigured my NIC for their network, making Win98 unable to communicate with it. Would this have ramifications when I install the router. Should I uninstall the XP firewall before installing the router?

47 posted on 01/07/2002 5:06:23 PM PST by SamAdams76
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To: Leroy S. Mort
Does the one ip address work for a Linksys "WIRELESS" set up? I was planning on buying a Linksys wireless system tomorrow for my two pcs and a laptop.
48 posted on 01/07/2002 5:07:46 PM PST by PISANO
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To: SamAdams76
Should I uninstall the XP firewall before installing the router?

Well, it's part of the OS as I understand it. By 'uninstall' if you mean 'turn it off' then I'd say yes.

49 posted on 01/07/2002 5:08:20 PM PST by Cultural Jihad
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To: Bisesi
Got a page for the Linksys wireless product? In all likelyhood it is just a bridge that allows you go to from a wireless computer to a LAN. I don't think it is a router, which is what you want.
50 posted on 01/07/2002 5:10:00 PM PST by lelio
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