Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

A Trip Down Possumtrot Road
Special to Free Republic ^ | 21 October 2003 | John Armor (Congressman Billybob)

Posted on 10/21/2003 1:54:50 PM PDT by Congressman Billybob

Last week I drove down Possumtrot Road, deep in the Blue Ridge Mountains. It's in Yancey County, one of the most rural and least populated of North Carolina's 100 counties. Possumtrot Road is at an altitude of about 2,800 feet, but it is lined on both sides with rich bottom land. Much of that land lies fallow; many of the barns are falling to wrack and ruin. And thereon hangs a tale.

First, a touch of geology. The Blue Ridge is the southern section of the Appalachian Chain, formed about 250 million years ago when the tectonic plate that is now the Eastern Seaboard collided with another plate that is most of the rest of North America. When formed, these mountains were as high as the Rockies. But hundreds of millions of years of rain and snow and the encroachment of plants has reduced them to a maximum of 6,100 feet in altitude. And that has filled every one of the valleys with deep, rich, good soil; as the locals say, “You could stick a ruler in the ground and it would sprout.”

Couple that fertile soil with a relatively mild climate (given the altitude) and an annual rainfall that is slightly less than the 90 inches per year which is the minimum to define a tropical rain forest. The fields along Possumtrot Road ought to be burgeoning with crops in Summer and Fall; the barns should all be full in the Winter. Yet some are not. Why not?

Farms like these are quite different from the industrial farms of the Midwest. The high volume crops like wheat and corn make no sense here. The huge combines used to bring in such crops could never make it down the hairpin turns of Possumtrot Road. And if you could even get a combine into one of these fields, you could never turn it around. No, farms like these engage in truck farming. Low-volume, high-labor, high-value crops like tobacco, cabbage, beans and the like, are grown here.

The farmers of Yancey County are smarter than the Congress of the United States, as one quick example will establish. The farmers are smart enough to figure out when it costs more to get the crops in the ground, grow them, and bring them to market, than they will realize from the sale of those crops. Faced with that situation which threatens their livelihoods, the welfare of their families, and even their possession of their lands, they cut back in their crops, and go to subsistence farming – food for the family, and fodder for the livestock, a few pigs and cows, which also provide food for the family. As any businessman knows, and farmers are businessmen, in hard times the least you can do is minimize your losses.

Speaking of losses, Congress is in charge of the Social Security system. It is the financial equivalent of a huge but failing farm. There are quarrels about exactly when the current operation of Social Security will drive it into abject failure, but there is no doubt that time is steadily approaching. Year by year, the financial “crop” from Social Security is less and less able to sustain it for the future. And yet, year by year – and unlike the farmer of Yancey County – Congress plants the same crop, gets the same results, and does effectively nothing to cut the losses or change their behavior.

Everyone with any familiarity with rural communities knows what the farm families do to try to save their land, when times are tough. One or more of the adults “gets a job in town” to help ends meet, and pull the family through rough times. What are the options for that in Yancey County today?

On the way to Possumtrot Road, I passed a relatively new factory of a major international corporation. The chain link fence went not just around the perimeter of the property, but right across the access roads. There were no lights on and no cars in the parking lot. I won't mention the well-known name on that plant, because businesses take their names off their buildings when all is lost and they are abandoning that location. When their name is still up, presumably they are still trying. So I will cut them some slack. Suffice to say, it is a nationally recognized apparel manufacturer.

The single industry in North Carolina that has taken the greatest hit in the last generation is textiles. Many of the plants that manufacture textiles and many that produce clothing are shuttered all across the state. The world's largest manufacturer of denim, Cone Mills Corp., announced its bankruptcy two weeks ago in North Carolina, responding in part to the decision of Levi Strauss, which is based in California, to move all of its manufacturing operations out of the United States.

The unemployment rate in Yancey County is 14.0%. The option of members of farming families to “get a job in town” to help save the farm is closing down as manufacturing jobs are bleeding overseas, at the same time that foreign competition against agricultural products continues to grow. It's a double whammy.

Perhaps more than members of any other occupation, farmers know how to identify and work within given conditions. Soil, weather, the growth characteristics of crops and livestock – all these are givens that farmers since time immemorial have learned to deal with. But today there's a new set of givens. There are policies set in the board rooms of the giant agribusinesses, and of the giant international manufacturing firms, and in the halls of Congress, which are filled with “bottom line” people. For these people, if a penny more can be earned per dollar by moving jobs overseas, by buying agricultural products overseas, then that's the decision.

There is no room in these “bottom line” decisions for the lives lost as farmers die of despair, or sometimes even of suicide. There is no room for the loss of family farms, the breakup of families as the younger generation can no longer stay where they grew up. There is no room for a value to be placed on the need for willing and hard-working Americans to support themselves, their families, and their communities.

For sure, the products are still here. The supermarkets are filled with fruits, vegetables, meats, poultry – wherever they might come from. The giant discount stores are filled with clothes and other products, more and more of them bearing names of origins other than the United States.

Policies on international trade, policies on the strength of the American dollar, policies on borrowing and spending by the federal government – all these have become givens for the farmers along Possumtrot Road in Yancey County. And these farmers have no defense, no preparation against, the inexorable bleeding of their part of the American economy that flows from these policies.

Why did I take this trip down Possumtrot Road? It was part of my preparations to run for Congress from the 11th District of North Carolina. I'll skip for now any other mention of my efforts. Suffice to say, the only way to really know a subject is on the ground, up close and personal. That's why I headed my 12-year old Jeep north and east to Yancey County last week.

You who are reading this, even if you're in the heart of any of America's largest cities, are no more than hour away from your own Possumtrot Road. It's in one of the hundreds of thousands of small communities that dot the landscape of rural America. It's the kind of place that has only a single sign you might well not notice as you fly past an interstate exit at 65 miles per hour. It's on the “blue line” highways of America, in places that you'll never see unless you deliberately choose to go there. But it is real and it is important, as real and as important to America as the high rise apartment you might live in or the high rise building you might work in.

I urge you to choose such a destination, go there, and see what you will see. It just might give you a whole new perspective on the national and international policies of the federal government. If at all possible, I hope you will make your own trip into the Blue Ridge. It's breathtaking in the late Fall when the beech trees are a translucent yellow, the maples and oaks turn deep orange and brown, and the sumacs add a dominant red.

Robert Frost got it right in his poem, “The Road Not Taken,” in 1920.

“Two roads diverged in a wood, and I —
I took the one less traveled by,
And that has made all the difference.”

- 30 -

About the Author: John Armor is an author and columnist on politics and history. He currently has an Exploratory Committee to run for Congress.

- 30 -


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Constitution/Conservatism; Culture/Society; Extended News; Foreign Affairs; Free Republic; Government; Politics/Elections; US: North Carolina
KEYWORDS: agriculture; congressmanbillybob; electionuscongress; employmentlist; freetrade; internationaltrade; jobexports; northcarolina; textiles
This will be on several internet sites including ChronWatch, and may be on UPI. But, as usual, FR has it first. Enjoy.
1 posted on 10/21/2003 1:54:53 PM PDT by Congressman Billybob
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: Congressman Billybob
Excellent Congressman! I wish you well in your endeavors.
2 posted on 10/21/2003 2:03:21 PM PDT by 4CJ (Come along chihuahua, I want to hear you say yo quiero taco bell. - Nolu Chan, 28 Jul 2003)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Congressman Billybob
It's on the 'blue line' highways of America, in places that you'll never see unless you deliberately choose to go there. But it is real and it is important, as real and as important to America as the high rise apartment you might live in or the high rise building you might work in. I urge you to choose such a destination, go there, and see what you will see. It just might give you a whole new perspective on the national and international policies of the federal government.

P.S. If your legislative talents are even a fraction of you're writing and legal abilities, you'll be the finest legislator we've ever seen.

3 posted on 10/21/2003 2:13:19 PM PDT by 4CJ (Come along chihuahua, I want to hear you say yo quiero taco bell. - Nolu Chan, 28 Jul 2003)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Congressman Billybob
Absolutely fantastic article.

One of the things my wife and I cite when we're asked about being still married the fact that we're both the sort of folks who, during any given journey, will say "I wonder where that road goes?" and then go that way just to find out.

4 posted on 10/21/2003 2:26:32 PM PDT by George Smiley (Is the RKBA still a right if you have to get the government's permission before you can exercise it?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: 4ConservativeJustices
Great writing, Sir. While I was reading it I had flashbacks of growing up on a sharecropper farm in Arkansas. We never went hungry, that's about the best I can say about those times. Then towards the end I got mental images of the movie "Last of the Mohicans", what beautiful country that was where it was filmed.

I sat in the theatre after the movie to watch the credits, sure that the location would be Canada or Alaska. I was surprised that I had actually been enjoying scenery of the South.
5 posted on 10/21/2003 2:34:31 PM PDT by Howie
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: 4ConservativeJustices; Congressman Billybob
Oops, meant that for the writer!
6 posted on 10/21/2003 2:35:46 PM PDT by Howie
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: Congressman Billybob
"It's breathtaking in the late Fall when the beech trees are a translucent yellow, the maples and oaks turn deep orange and brown, and the sumacs add a dominant red."

This line reminds me of my childhood working on a towboat, clack-clacking up the Tennesee River, it truly was a sight to remember. Of all the rivers we worked we were all in agreement this was the most beautiful, with the Hickory, and other hardwoods turning to the colors of fall.

Gliding through the Shiloh Battle Ground park was an experience I will always remember. To heck with Europe I want to see America before I die! There is so much out there if one takes the time.

7 posted on 10/21/2003 2:44:41 PM PDT by Howie
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Howie
Your mention of The Last of the Mohicans reminded me to share a story with you. Almost ten years ago, I went to the Asheville Airport to bring home a friend of mine who was visiting from D.C.

We stopped to get sodas and crackers at a quick mart at Toxaway Dam, that's halfway between the Airport and my home. As we walked in the store, it was crowded with "local people" dressed in usual fashion. Then I noticed that these "locals" were wearing buckskin boots or shoes, and some of them were carrying flintlock rifles. We were surrounded by the extras from The Last of the Mohicans who were taking a break from shooting a scene on the bluffs above the Toxaway River.

There's actually a fairly active film industry in Western Carolina. And one documentary broadcast on Georgia Public Television was shot outside and inside my home. It was From my Grandmother's Grandmother to Me.

You're right. It is beautiful territory in these parts.

John / Billybob

8 posted on 10/21/2003 3:02:04 PM PDT by Congressman Billybob (www.ArmorforCongress.com Visit. Join. Help. Please.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: Congressman Billybob
I left Boston in 1976 for the hills of West Virginia.

One does well to leave ones own 'culture' and go to another ... and ask for directions .... even if you know where you're going.

Excellent observation CB.

9 posted on 10/21/2003 3:08:17 PM PDT by knarf (A place where anyone can learn anything ... especially that which promotes clear thinking.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Congressman Billybob
I enjoy your posts. I have family that lives near Mt Airy. Is that your district, if so I will encourage them to vote for you. Sorry we cannot, since we live in upstate SC.
10 posted on 10/21/2003 3:43:39 PM PDT by Babsig
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Congressman Billybob
Possumtrot

One of the names considered at the founding of the city we now know as Kansas City, MO.

At least that's what I heard on the trivia show "What Do You Know?".
11 posted on 10/21/2003 3:47:34 PM PDT by VOA
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Congressman Billybob
I like your type of campaigning...going where the people are and seeing the problems up close. You'll make the kind of Congressman that NC will be proud of. (I'm lucky to be surrounded by farms...cotton, wheat, horses, breeding cattle farms (manure smells don't bother LOL)...although close enough to drive to towns.

My children grew up working on surrounding farms in the summers and although they're now college graduates and in tech jobs, they have the highest respect for farmers, for they (kids) learned first hand the amount of work that goes into producing that good food they eat.)

12 posted on 10/21/2003 4:10:10 PM PDT by Carolinamom
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: carlo3b
"Country roads, take me home...."
13 posted on 10/21/2003 5:51:17 PM PDT by Howie
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 12 | View Replies]

To: Howie
Oops, meant that for the writer!

My posts are usually filled with typos, so I understood who you were replying to.

I have enjoyed reading Congressman Billybob's posts for a number of years, I only regret that I do not live in his state and cannot vote for him.

From what I can tell about the man, he has a deep love for this country, for the freedoms that our ancestors fought for, and for the protection of those freedoms. I've never met him personally, but he strikes me as a man pained by the attacks on those freedoms, whether they be from liberals or conservatives.

He strikes me a man who shares the vision of the founding fathers, and cherishes his family, his home and country, his spiritual beliefs, and his friends. He has a passion for true freedom and seems to revel in the majesties of the outdoors, the scenic vistas undespoiled, the beauty of nature and the land in which he is blessed to live. To me, anyone that he calls friend or neighbor is blessed.

14 posted on 10/22/2003 6:38:44 AM PDT by 4CJ (Come along chihuahua, I want to hear you say yo quiero taco bell. - Nolu Chan, 28 Jul 2003)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: Congressman Billybob; AAABEST; Ace2U; Alamo-Girl; Alas; amom; AndreaZingg; Anonymous2; ...
Rights, farms, environment ping.

Let me know if you wish to be added or removed from this list.
I don't get offended if you want to be removed.

For real time political chat - Radio Free Republic chat room
And you won't miss a thread on FR because e-bot will keep you informed.

15 posted on 10/22/2003 12:34:45 PM PDT by farmfriend ( Isaiah 55:10,11)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Congressman Billybob
There is no room in these “bottom line” decisions for the lives lost as farmers die of despair, or sometimes even of suicide. There is no room for the loss of family farms, the breakup of families as the younger generation can no longer stay where they grew up. There is no room for a value to be placed on the need for willing and hard-working Americans to support themselves, their families, and their communities.

Didn't you hear? "The Market" will provide an alternative for this. Everybody says so.

16 posted on 10/22/2003 12:46:06 PM PDT by r9etb
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: farmfriend
Oklahoma Agriculture Bump
17 posted on 10/22/2003 1:29:39 PM PDT by E.G.C.
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 15 | View Replies]

To: Congressman Billybob
BTTT
18 posted on 10/22/2003 1:47:35 PM PDT by hattend
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Congressman Billybob
Possums don't trot, Possums don't do nuthin 'cept lay there in the road dead but still grinning, like dying is lots of fun.
19 posted on 10/22/2003 2:48:33 PM PDT by F.J. Mitchell (The war on drugs is a tax-payer financed affirmative action program for drug dealers.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: rdb3; Khepera; elwoodp; MAKnight; condolinda; mafree; Trueblackman; FRlurker; Teacher317; ...
BillyBob's journey is relevant to all, regardless of race, but I ask you all to take a look at a well-written piece from one of our own.

Black conservative ping

If you want on (or off) of my black conservative ping list, please let me know via FREEPmail. (And no, you don't have to be black to be on the list!)

Extra warning: this is a high-volume ping list.

20 posted on 10/22/2003 2:48:46 PM PDT by mhking
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Congressman Billybob; dix; humblegunner; antivenom; bobbyd; eastforker; Flyer; Humidston; ...
Ping to a thoughtful read.
21 posted on 10/22/2003 3:59:28 PM PDT by Eaker (Amateurs built the Ark, professionals built the Titanic.............hmmmmmmmmm ;<)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: mhking
Thanks for the ping. I wish BillyBob great success in his campaign!
22 posted on 10/22/2003 5:13:57 PM PDT by WaterDragon
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 20 | View Replies]

To: mhking
Thanks for the ping. I wish BillyBob great success in his campaign!
23 posted on 10/22/2003 5:13:58 PM PDT by WaterDragon
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 20 | View Replies]

To: Congressman Billybob
Dang. As usual, your words are poetry.
24 posted on 10/22/2003 8:24:49 PM PDT by an amused spectator
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

Very, very eloquent. As an oldster now, and having grown up in hardscrabble rural America, a look forward is almost like a look back. "Things are tough and getting tougher" was a nightly refrain back then. Your Possum Trot was my Pea Ridge and we substitute Kentucky for North Carolina. In the end, there was a powerful resolve in our folks, and it usually ended in "we'll get by."

We need folks like you here in congress. I sure hope it works out that way for you, and for us.
25 posted on 10/22/2003 8:45:18 PM PDT by billhilly (If you're lurking here from DU, I trust this post will make you sick)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Howie
Howie, your "clack clacking" up the Tennessee River as a boy strikes me at the heart. Many days as a boy I stood on the bluffs in Hickman, Kentucky watching the towboats move massive numbers of barges up and down the river. One of the places I stood watching was behind the library, just across the street from the elementary school where I attended the earliest years of school. From the books checked out there I was familiar with many of the towns and cities along the Mississippi, the river that flowed beneath those bluffs.

Fifty or sixty miles east of there grew the massive dam that turned the Tennessee River into one of the country's largest lakes. I hope your boyhood, like mine, included passage through the locks at Kentucky Lake, outside Gilbertsville, Kentucky.
26 posted on 10/22/2003 9:22:27 PM PDT by billhilly (If you're lurking here from DU, I trust this post will make you sick)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

To: Congressman Billybob
Reading your work brings back some childhood memories - some good, some less than good.

It's well known, once a farm has been destroyed by adverse government and commerce policy, there's little chance of it ever returning or being replaced.

As you so eloquently point out, farmers can absorb and adjust from the occasional punch from bad weather or from bad crops, but the constant and increasing barrage from bad policy wreaks blow after blow that disheartens and destroys the inner hope one must have to farm.

In summary, not only are the policies hostile to the farm proper, but they're equally destructive of the farmer's hope for maintaining their standards, much less for better.

Commendations to you for a fine article, and best wishes for your bid to help lead this State.

Az
27 posted on 10/23/2003 6:22:56 AM PDT by azhenfud ("He who is always looking up seldom finds others' lost change...")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Congressman Billybob
This was beautiful. Thank you. And you're so right about there being Possumtrot Roads in every state. Here in rural Missouri, we're facing the most of the same problems. I wish we had someone running for Congress here who could speak about the problems as eloquently as you have.
28 posted on 10/23/2003 7:17:19 AM PDT by EagleMamaMT
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Congressman Billybob
If ya include the Black Mountains crosschain, and I think most do, that maximum would be 6684 feet.
29 posted on 10/23/2003 7:20:43 AM PDT by wattsmag2
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: wattsmag2
I was using the highest point on the Eastern Continental Divide, on the spine of the Great Smokies, as my reference point. My home is located on that Divide. The rain on one side of the roof flows to the Atlantic, via the Chatooga and Savanah Rivers. From the other side, it flows to the Gulf of Mexico, via the Little Tennessee and Mississippi Rivers.

John / Billybob

30 posted on 10/23/2003 8:12:26 AM PDT by Congressman Billybob (www.ArmorforCongress.com Visit. Join. Help. Please.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 29 | View Replies]

To: billhilly
I remember a double-lift lock along there, Wilson, or something like that. It had a 90 foot total lift that was spooky when you got to the top and looked down.
31 posted on 10/23/2003 8:44:52 AM PDT by Howie
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 26 | View Replies]

To: Congressman Billybob
When I was a boy the southern cotton farmers were in a crisis of over production. The feds stepped in and put limits on the acreage allowed per farmer.

A few in my neighborhood discovered soybeans. They were much easier to grow, requiring little labor. I suppose by now they are over-produced too.

It's too bad someone can't "discover" a new crop that is suited to small plots/farmers. Of course if someone discovers a NEED for tobacco other than snorting/smoking it that will solve most of the problem.
32 posted on 10/23/2003 9:15:09 AM PDT by Howie
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 30 | View Replies]

To: Congressman Billybob
I grew up on a small farm in Isle of Wight county in southeastern Virginia. The farm itself is located on part of the the Old Pine Tree Plantation, the majority of the Old timers have gone and have been replaced by their children who have become the Old Timers of which I am one now. Our farm house is located on the Blackwater River which forms a peninsula which helps even more to seculde it from all others. Hurricane Isabel caused an extreme amount of damage to the tree crop and we have been cutting trees from our excess road for almost a month and with the grace of God I hope to have the road open at the end of the day on Saturday. As we toll along with our work we always take time to see the beauty the old place displays each time I visit, it remainds me of a quote from the movie Gone with the Wind, " The earth is the only thing that is worth living for" the smell of the soil especialy this time of the year as it is harvest time for the peanuts and corn and soy beans. As the combines come in and gather the fruits of bounty the earth give us a smell which seems to bring out only the best in the people involved, they all are happy and glowing with pride for its at this time they tend to share even more openly with family friends and if you are lucky enough starngers from time to time. My youngest son has the same feelings about the simplicity of the farm from riding on the tractor to a simple walk along the swamp area and he really gets excited when he sees the wildlife right up close, his favorite is the Wild Turkeys, as they are so colorful and he knows when you see one you have become part of that animals day. Well I am long winded but I too enjoy a simpler time where beauty at this time of year in my area is worth each morning I get out of bed, I can hope that others enjoy the scenery in their areas during the wonderful fall season. I hope everyone takes time one afternoon and watch the sun go down, the sky is truly a HD plasma screen of color.
33 posted on 10/24/2003 6:09:11 AM PDT by cav68
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: cav68
Thank you very much for your heartfelt response to my article. Replies like yours have been among the most gratifying posts to my writing.

I agree with you about two specifics you mention. I live in the middle of an oak forest with substantial undergrowth. More than two dozen times this year, flocks of wild turkeys have come grazing on our lawn. At most, we had 19 of them at one time. (It would have made a turkey hunter's eyes roll back in his head.)

And, as for sunrises and sunsets -- when I rebuilt this old farmhouse I put ten windows at two levels in the master bedroom, all facing to the south, southeast, and southwest. In the winter, all the kalaidoscope (sp?) colors of the rising and setting sun are spread out on sky before the house, and painted across the foothills of the Blue Ridge up to 80 miles away. It is different every day, and as you say, it is always breath-taking.

Thanks for taking time to write of your experiences.

John / Billybob

34 posted on 10/24/2003 7:38:29 AM PDT by Congressman Billybob (www.ArmorforCongress.com Visit. Join. Help. Please.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 33 | View Replies]

To: Congressman Billybob
My friend's husband (they live in Carthage, NC) just lost his job about 3 weeks ago. Forwarded this article to them asking for their comments.
35 posted on 10/24/2003 12:40:13 PM PDT by lilylangtree
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: lilylangtree
Thank you for forwarding the article. I look foward to hearing the response.

And, how did you arrive at your screen name? I've been to Langtry, Texas, and I've read Lily's biography. LOL.

John / Billybob

36 posted on 10/24/2003 1:28:12 PM PDT by Congressman Billybob (www.ArmorforCongress.com Visit. Join. Help. Please.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 35 | View Replies]

To: Congressman Billybob
Excellent piece, thank you. Made me long for my childhood summers spent in N.C. at my grandparents. Your part of the state is truly a beautiful place.

I sent your ArmorforCongress website to a couple of cousins in the western part of the state.

I would like your opinion as to what can be done, or should be done, to keep jobs in America.

Thanks, and good luck to you in your upcoming endeavors.

37 posted on 10/24/2003 8:58:25 PM PDT by Oorang ( If guns are outlawed, can we use swords?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

Comment #38 Removed by Moderator

To: F.J. Mitchell
They're just playing....'possum.
39 posted on 11/07/2003 2:23:04 AM PST by Smokin' Joe
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 19 | View Replies]

To: Smokin' Joe
"They're just playing...'possum."

They are good at it too.
40 posted on 11/07/2003 10:17:42 AM PST by F.J. Mitchell (If you seen yourself as other people do, you'd laugh too.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 39 | View Replies]

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson