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Professor Works To Unravel Mysteries Of Khipu: Colored, Knotted Strings Used By The Ancient Incas
Science Daily ^ | 1-5-2004 | University At Buffalo

Posted on 01/05/2004 9:13:02 AM PST by blam

Source: University At Buffalo
Date: 2004-01-05

Professor Works To Unravel Mysteries Of Khipu: Colored, Knotted Strings Used By The Ancient Incas

BUFFALO, N.Y. -- Although the ancient Inca are renowned for their highly organized society and extraordinary skill in working with gold, stone and pottery, few are familiar with the khipu -- an elaborate system of colored, knotted strings that many researchers believe to be primarily mnemonic in nature, like a rosary -- that was used by the ancient conquerors to record census, tribute, genealogies and calendrical information. Because the Inca didn't employ a recognizable system of writing, researchers like Galen Brokaw, assistant professor in the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures in the University at Buffalo's College of Arts and Sciences, have focused on the khipu as a way to further illuminate Inca history and culture. Brokaw doesn't adhere to the strict view held by some researchers that the khipu is solely mnemonic in nature, instead maintaining the possibility that these intricate specimens are historiographic in nature.

Deciphering the mysteries of the khipu, which consists of a primary cord from which hang pendants of cords, depends upon researchers discovering a Rosetta Stone of sorts that would allow them to decode the meaning of the cords and knots.

Cord color and the direction of twist and ply of yarn appear to denote specific meanings, but whether or not the devices recorded more than statistical or mathematical information, such as poetry or language, remains elusive to researchers, says Brokaw. He does believe, however, that some of the specimens -- about 600 khipu survive in museums or private collections -- do appear to be non-numerical.

The khipu didn't originate with the Inca, explains Brokaw. Even today, he adds, Andean shepherds can be seen using a form of khipu to record information about their flocks.

"There's a certain kind of mystery about it that's intriguing," Brokaw says, noting that while there is a tendency among some researchers to overly romanticize the khipu as some kind of writing system, he believes -- after reading the indigenous texts comprised, in part, of biographies of Inca kings -- that it's easy to see how the khipu might have represented more complex, discursive structures than being simply records of tribute.

In fact, Brokaw says the first step in understanding the khipu is "to recognize that it was linked to genres of Andean discourse, powerful discursive paradigms" that were retained by the indigenous chroniclers in the organizational structure they employed in writing down the lineage of the Inca kings. While these chroniclers wrote in the language of their Spanish conquerors, the discursive paradigms Brokaw refers to "do not simply dissolve and disappear when translated into Spanish," he says. One chronicler in particular, he points out, attributes the principal source of all his information to the khipu.

"One of the questions that colonial chroniclers attempted to answer about the khipu was whether or not it constituted writing, and much of the debate today centers around the same issue. Based on a selective and literal interpretation of colonial sources and a limited understanding of archaeological specimens, many scholars have argued that the khipu was not writing, but rather a mnemonic device similar to a rosary," says Brokaw in his paper "The Poetics of Khipu Historiography: Felipe Guaman Poma de Ayala and the Khipukamayuqs from Pacariqtambo," published recently in Latin American Research Review. Guaman Poma, writing around the beginning of the 17th century, is one of the Andean chroniclers who relied on khipu as his primary source of information.

The numerical aspect of many of the khipu differs from Western numbering systems in that Andean societies used and viewed numeration as a way to define and organize themselves, as well as a way to achieve balance in all aspects of life -- from the aesthetic to emotional and material concerns, explains Brokaw in "Khipu Numeracy and Alphabetic Literacy in the Andes," published in Colonial Latin American Review. Brokaw writes that the "complete decimal unit of 10, for example, is also a metaphor for the basic social groups called ayllus.

"Furthermore, many colonial chronicles describe a decimal-based system used in the organization, administration and record keeping of the Inca empire, and the model of fives also is evident in the historical and geographical paradigms of Andean sociopolitics," he explains.

Brokaw argues that Guaman Poma's work is shaped not only by European conventions of text, but also by an Andean conception of historical discourse. It is that Andean-influenced discourse, or poetics, that is shaping the Spanish chronicle of Inca kings that Brokaw believes establishes "an implicit link" between it and the khipu as its physical representation -- indeed, as some type of text in and of itself.

Brokaw's research is funded by a fellowship from the American Council of Learned Societies. He is working on a book about the subject, titled "Reading, Writing and Arithmetic: The Andean Khipu and its Transcriptions."


TOPICS: News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: ancient; artifacts; epigraphyandlanguage; godsgravesglyphs; history; incas; khipu; knots; mysteries; professor; quipu; unravel

1 posted on 01/05/2004 9:13:03 AM PST by blam
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To: farmfriend
Ping.
2 posted on 01/05/2004 9:13:30 AM PST by blam
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To: blam; *Gods, Graves, Glyphs; abner; Alas Babylon!; Andyman; annyokie; bd476; BiffWondercat; ...
Gods, Graves, Glyphs
List for articles regarding early civilizations , life of all forms, - dinosaurs - etc.

Let me know if you wish to be added or removed from this ping list.

3 posted on 01/05/2004 9:15:50 AM PST by farmfriend ( Isaiah 55:10,11)
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To: All
Rank Location Receipts Donors/Avg Freepers/Avg Monthlies
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Thanks for donating to Free Republic!

Move your locale up the leaderboard!

4 posted on 01/05/2004 9:16:07 AM PST by Support Free Republic (Hi Mom! Hi Dad!)
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To: blam
For an interesting take on this, see INCA GOLD by Clive Cussler ...


5 posted on 01/05/2004 9:18:24 AM PST by BlueLancer (Der Elite Møøsenspåånkængrüppen ØberKømmååndø (EMØØK))
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To: blam
Professor should be ordered into sensitivity training. Anyone knows that they are now referred to as "strings of color" not colored strings.
6 posted on 01/05/2004 9:18:57 AM PST by N. Theknow (Be a glowworm, a glowworm's never glum, cuz how can you be grumpy when the sun shines out your bum.)
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To: blam
Maybe they just liked pretty-colored strings.
7 posted on 01/05/2004 9:20:17 AM PST by trebb
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To: blam
I thought that Khipu were primarily an accounting method similar to a abacus but with a permanent record. Tie so many knots in strings that represent placeholders. For example a khipu with six knots in the first string and two in the second would represent 26 llamas. (It was more complex than that, but that is just an example.)

I distinctly recal seeing a program where an Peruvian shepherd demonstrated his khipu accounting system and a Peruvian shopkeeper demonstrated its use as an inventory device.
8 posted on 01/05/2004 9:21:59 AM PST by Swordmaker
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To: blam
read later.
9 posted on 01/05/2004 9:27:09 AM PST by NotQuiteCricket (~the FlexStand(tm) made it to TV today, & I'm happy)
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To: Swordmaker
I distinctly recal seeing a program where an Peruvian shepherd demonstrated his khipu accounting system and a Peruvian shopkeeper demonstrated its use as an inventory device.

Enron used a similar accounting system.

10 posted on 01/05/2004 9:29:59 AM PST by Blue Screen of Death (,/i)
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To: blam
Why don't they just ask all those people who claimed they were reincarnated?

You know the type. The ones that always claimed they were ancient royalty instead of someone who swept the stables.
11 posted on 01/05/2004 9:35:37 AM PST by Shooter 2.5 (Don't punch holes in the lifeboat)
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To: blam
Based on a selective and literal interpretation of colonial sources and a limited understanding of archaeological specimens, many scholars have argued that the khipu was not writing, but rather a mnemonic device similar to a rosary

Errr, so is all writing and so are all symbols.

Writing is just ink squigles (to use an obsolete euphemisim ;)

We (or other intelligence entities that are able to postulate the context in which our symbols are created and used) are the ones who breath life and meaning into these symbols -- the conundrum is that this meaning is a floating crap game and is continously changing, and the "context" which we think we are agreeing on is an illusion -- there are at least subtle and often profound differences in the way we actually interpret words and symbols -- we just THINK we are "communicating with each other" with great precision...

12 posted on 01/05/2004 9:41:36 AM PST by chilepepper (The map is not the territory -- Alfred Korzybski)
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To: blam
It is interesting to me that they were in contact with a culture with a written language but didn't even "borrow" it for their own uses. In other areas of the world this was common (ie: Pali and Chinese use in South and Southeast Asia / Chinese in Korea and Japan)
13 posted on 01/05/2004 9:42:57 AM PST by JimSEA
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To: blam
In fact, Brokaw says the first step in understanding the khipu is "to recognize that it was linked to genres of Andean discourse, powerful discursive paradigms"

I though Postmodernism was dead. "Genres of discourse" -- I gotta pick some of that up at the store. It's on the shelf next to the "discursive paradigms".

14 posted on 01/05/2004 9:57:02 AM PST by ClearCase_guy (France delenda est)
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To: ClearCase_guy
"Genres of discourse" -- I gotta pick some of that up at the store. It's on the shelf next to the "discursive paradigms".

You'll find them both in the Obfuscation Department.

15 posted on 01/05/2004 1:04:48 PM PST by Mackey (The very atmosphere of firearms everywhere restrains evil interference... —George Washington)
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To: Professional Engineer
ping
16 posted on 01/05/2004 8:13:53 PM PST by msdrby (US Veterans: All give some, but some give all.)
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To: blam
"Every day, in every way, I am better and better."
17 posted on 01/05/2004 8:43:24 PM PST by Old Professer
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To: blam
How many of my tax dollars are going to this lamness?
18 posted on 01/05/2004 8:46:15 PM PST by Duckdog (If it wasn't for NASCAR my TV would have gone out the window years ago!)
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To: Mackey; ClearCase_guy
You'll find them both in the Obfuscation Department.

Doesn't Professor Cornel West head that department?

19 posted on 01/05/2004 8:55:47 PM PST by Bernard Marx ("Do what you are afraid to do." Anonymous.)
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To: chilepepper
Errr, so is all writing and so are all symbols.

Yes, but to what degree can mathematical formulae convey the sorts of meanings Shakespeare did in his sonnets? Or vice versa? Having read Korzybski I think I know where you're coming from, but there are ways of comprehending to some degree the meanings that attached to a certain context if there are enough clues. The contemporary use of quipu compared with historical examples might be enough to open some interesting historical windows.

I'm not saying we'll truly understand the shades of meaning intended by the weavers but this kind of research is important if it can cast new light on the Inca and other cultures like the Nazca.

20 posted on 01/05/2004 9:18:35 PM PST by Bernard Marx ("Do what you are afraid to do." Anonymous.)
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To: Bernard Marx
My point is simply that we communicate to an extent less than we believe (but we are the most communicative species none-the-less).

In particular, not understanding that communication is far less "mathematical" then we assume (even if a Real Academia de Espana goes to great lengths to describe the precise meaning of words in Spanish, for example) gives rise directly to intolerance IMHO since in someones personal or cultural context, things seem to be so obvious that how could an infidel not see what one sees?

What I take away from Korzybski is an extreme warning that we assume too much when we describe our individual and collective contexts to each other, and this leads to errors in understanding both gross and subtle...

21 posted on 01/06/2004 6:33:28 AM PST by chilepepper (The map is not the territory -- Alfred Korzybski)
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To: chilepepper
What I take away from Korzybski is an extreme warning that we assume too much when we describe our individual and collective contexts to each other, and this leads to errors in understanding both gross and subtle...

Me too. Having worked professionally in communications fields over a long time span I've often been glad I had his warnings. It saved much grief, knowing in advance that using the word "tree," for instance, doesn't mean much to anyone else unless I specify the type of tree, size, location, whether it's spring, summer, fall or winter in the case of deciduous species, etc. Language is very imprecise, and even specifying all those things people always add their own subjective connotations as you point out -- just read FR for plentiful examples, LOL.

Unlike some other posters to this thread, though, I think it's important to try to decipher as much meaning as possible from past cultures, including whatever can be learned from quipu. We should never be so arrogant in our modernity (or is it post-modernity?) as to think our predecessors can't teach us anything. Ultimately you're right, of course: we'll never completely understand any historical communications, even our own, in their exact cultural context.

22 posted on 01/06/2004 9:00:28 AM PST by Bernard Marx ("Do what you are afraid to do." Anonymous.)
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To: Bernard Marx
I violently agree!

I find trying to decipher ancient cultures one of the ways out of the imprecision Korzybski warns about. As resourceful as humans are, it never ceases to amaze me that scholars are actually able to advance at all in understanding ancient cultures... i think it gets down to the nitty gritty of what really distinguishes this species, its ability to imagine and hence create a context, however tentative, in ones mind, of something that is either long ago or far away...

23 posted on 01/06/2004 10:13:09 AM PST by chilepepper (The map is not the territory -- Alfred Korzybski)
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24 posted on 08/11/2005 10:57:29 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (Down with Dhimmicrats! I last updated by FR profile on Tuesday, May 10, 2005.)
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To: blam

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25 posted on 11/27/2009 8:44:33 PM PST by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/__Since Jan 3, 2004__Profile updated Monday, January 12, 2009)
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