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NASA Gets A Good Look At Mars Soil And A True Puzzle
Chicago Tribune/Yahoo ^ | 1-7-2004 | Jeremy Manier

Posted on 01/07/2004 3:41:30 PM PST by blam

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To: SamAdams76
We landed on the moon? What proof do you have?
151 posted on 01/08/2004 7:08:13 AM PST by Armed Civilian ("Extremism in defense of liberty is no vice, moderation in pursuit of justice is no virtue.")
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To: Frank_Discussion
I think either is likely correct in chemistry terms.

Universal solvent. Vey series. Stay back 50ft. No smoking.
152 posted on 01/08/2004 7:41:25 AM PST by Professional Engineer (The meek can have the Earth. I want the stars.)
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To: Armed Civilian
We could throw stones, er Moon Rocks, at the theory, right.
153 posted on 01/08/2004 7:42:59 AM PST by Professional Engineer (The meek can have the Earth. I want the stars.)
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To: Professional Engineer
Exactly, that's what my MK-ultra secret training tells me. I have moon rocks. They are right here with my secret pictures of oswald.
154 posted on 01/08/2004 7:53:34 AM PST by Armed Civilian ("Extremism in defense of liberty is no vice, moderation in pursuit of justice is no virtue.")
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To: SamAdams76
Everybody is making fun of Mars. This is serious!

Of course it's series. I for one am enjoying the heck out of it. I'd like to visit in my lifetime. Likelyhood of that is low, but I still wanna go.

155 posted on 01/08/2004 7:56:44 AM PST by Professional Engineer (The meek can have the Earth. I want the stars.)
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To: Professional Engineer
"I'd like to visit in my lifetime. Likelyhood of that is low, but I still wanna go."

You probably won't make it...'Spider-Boy' has a chance though.

156 posted on 01/08/2004 8:06:08 AM PST by blam
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To: blam
That's why I'm trying to make sure he is well grounded in science etc, very young.

I'd REALLY like to go to the Moon, but don't expect that either.

Pay It Forward works well for our kids.
157 posted on 01/08/2004 8:14:24 AM PST by Professional Engineer (The meek can have the Earth. I want the stars.)
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To: Professional Engineer
"That's why I'm trying to make sure he is well grounded in science etc, very young."

Yup, start'em young. Worked for me. My son, 'charge carrier,' (only child) has a PhD in physics and is working for a space related company in SOCAL. But, he probably won't make it to space either.

158 posted on 01/08/2004 8:27:19 AM PST by blam
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To: blam
You too. Desert Rat has a son who just received an Aerospace Engineering degree.
159 posted on 01/08/2004 8:38:55 AM PST by Professional Engineer (The meek can have the Earth. I want the stars.)
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To: Eaker
Ping to read later
160 posted on 01/08/2004 8:39:12 AM PST by Eaker (Place your clothes and weapons where you can find them in the dark. - Lazarus Long)
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To: blam
Click pic for a laugh

161 posted on 01/08/2004 8:45:56 AM PST by evets (I am the frito bandito)
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To: Mad Dawgg
Get the NASA channel, no Brittany none of the time!

Then you'd have missed this.

162 posted on 01/08/2004 9:00:30 AM PST by ASA Vet (Don't ask me, I'm a AFQT group VI.)
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To: Thumper1960
The Rover struck sub-soil oil!

/ wishful thinking.

Maybe not so far-fetched as you might think. I learned right here on FR some months ago about a theory by the physicist Thomas Gold, of pulsar fame, that says something like: petroleum may not be the decomposed remnants of prehistoric dinosaurs, as most people believe, but a more fundamental byproduct of the breakdown of heavy elements like uranium, with the help of some unknown biological process. When uranium decays, some of the nucleus of the uranium atom comes off in pieces larger than a single hydrogen atom, which is a single proton and an electron. The pieces might be multiple protons and neutrons, which are essentially heavier elements like helium and carbon. Carbon and hydrogen combine to form methane, which is basically natural gas. (Did you know that commercial helium for balloons and such comes from natural gas sources?) Well, with the help of the heretofor unknown biological process, the methane is combined with other methane and hydrogen to form more complex hydrocarbons, what we call petroleum.

To take the line of thinking a little further, since the earth has heavy elements within the crust, then it is likely that mars also has heavy elements within its crust. The same physical processes would occur, meaning that methane is very probably present in the martian crust somewhere. My first thought on reading the original post was "oil." How much would you bet that Dr. Gold is not contemplating the same thing right now?

163 posted on 01/08/2004 9:05:55 AM PST by webheart (Citizen's Grammar Patrol)
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To: asb3pe
..."perhaps any remaining iron in the "iron oxide suface material" is slightly magnetized. If you've ever played with iron filings and a magnet, I think you'll know where I'm coming from..."


164 posted on 01/08/2004 10:37:49 PM PST by MissCalico
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To: evets
To: blam
I just found this on a recent photo from the rover and it is not something I put together. It is from the Panoramic Camera taken on Sol 008:


To: blam
Also, check out this piece of pipe from the first pancam image:



165 posted on 01/11/2004 8:59:26 PM PST by FireTrack
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To: blam
Clearly this soil has all the properties of plasticine or damp clay. I just can't imagine how this could be without some sort of liquid in it. What could this liquid be at such a low temperature? My guess is water with some sort of antifreeze.

This antifreeze could be from an inorganic source, but there is a much more exciting possibility. The soil could contain bacteria that produces antifreeze chemicals. This is a trick used by life on earth, and just about the only way life could exist on mars. We know that mars has ice, soil and both light, and chemicals that can be used to create energy (such as volcanic sulphur). The only problem for life is making the water liquid.

The most primitive life we could imagine, at these temperatures, would have the effect of turning ice and energy rich chemical bearing soil into clay. The chemicals are used to power the creation of antifreeze, which melts the water. The water dissolves the chemicals, so that the life can process them, to create more life and more antifreeze. And so it goes. This life might be so primitive it doesn't even have cell walls! With hindsight, this is what we should have been looking for.

166 posted on 02/03/2004 1:34:37 PM PST by BlameTheEx
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