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Abiotic Theory of Oil Formation
The Environmental Literacy Council ^

Posted on 06/09/2004 9:15:38 PM PDT by narses

There is an alternative theory about the formation of oil and gas deposits that could change estimates of potential future oil reserves. According to this theory, oil is not a fossil fuel at all, but was formed deep in the Earth's crust from inorganic materials. The theory was first proposed in the 1950s by Russian and Ukranian scientists. Based on the theory, successful exploratory drilling has been undertaken in the Caspian Sea region, Western Siberia, and the Dneiper-Donets Basin.

The prevailing explanation for the formation of oil and gas deposits is that they are the remains of plant and animal life that died millions of years ago and were compressed by heat and pressure over millions of years. Russian and Ukranian geologists argue that formation of oil deposits requires the high pressures only found in the deep mantle and that the hydrocarbon contents in sediments do not exhibit sufficient organic material to supply the enormous amounts of petroleum found in supergiant oil fields.

The abyssal, abiotic theory of oil formation has received more attention in the West recently because of the work of retired Cornell astronomy professor Thomas Gold, who is known for development of several theories that were initially dismissed, but eventually proven true, including the existence of neutron stars. He has also been wrong, however; he was a proponent of the "steady state" theory of the universe, which has since been discarded for the "Big Bang" theory. Gold's theory of oil formation, which he expounded recently in a book entitled The Deep Hot Biosphere, is that hydrogen and carbon, under high temperatures and pressures found in the mantle during the formation of the Earth, form hydrocarbon molecules which have gradually leaked up to the surface through cracks in rocks. The organic materials which are found in petroleum deposits are easily explained by the metabolism of bacteria which have been found in extreme environments similar to Earth's mantle. These hyperthermophiles, or bacteria which thrive in extreme environments, have been found in hydrothermal vents, at the bottom of volcanoes, and in places where scientists formerly believed life was not possible. Gold argues that the mantle contains vast numbers of these bacteria.

The abiogenic origin of petroleum deposits would explain some phenomena that are not currently understood, such as why petroleum deposits almost always contain biologically inert helium. Based on his theory, Gold persuaded the Swedish State Power Board to drill for oil in a rock that had been fractured by an ancient meteorite. It was a good test of his theory because the rock was not sedimentary and would not contain remains of plant or marine life. The drilling was successful, although not enough oil was found to make the field commercially viable. The abiotic theory, if true, could affect estimates of how much oil remains in the Earth's crust.

The abiogenic origin theory of oil formation is rejected by most geologists, who argue that the composition of hydrocarbons found in commercial oil fields have a low content of 13C isotopes, similar to that found in marine and terrestrial plants; whereas hydrocarbons from abiotic origins such as methane have a higher content of 13C isotopes. In an April 2002 letter published in the science journal Nature, Barbara Sherwood Lollar and her colleagues from the Stable Isotope Lab at the University of Toronto reported their analysis of the Kidd Creek mine in Ontario. An unusual ratio of 13C isotopes and the presence of helium provided evidence of hydrocarbons with abiotic origins, but they argued that commercial gas reservoirs do not contain large amounts of hydrocarbons with a similar signature. Gold and other geologists who argue that there are significant amounts of oil from abiotic origins maintain that as oil seeps up through the layers of Earth closer to the surface, it mixes with oil from biological origins, and takes on its characteristics.

The American Association of Petroleum Geologists has scheduled a conference in July 2004 to review the evidence supporting the theories about the formation of oil. For more about the abiotic theory of oil formation, visit these websites:

The Drilling and Development of the Oil and Gas Fields in the Dneiper-Donets Basin This paper, written by V.A. Krayushkin, T.I. Tchebanenko, V.P. Klochko, Ye.S. Dvoryanin, and J.F. Kenney, is presented by the Ukrainian Institute of Geological Sciences, the Russian Academy of Sciences, and the Gas Resources Corporation and describes the exploration drilling that has taken place in the Dnieper-Donets Basin in Ukraine. Earlier papers on this subject are also available through this website.

Wired Magazine: "Fuel's Paradise" In this July 2000 Wired magazine interview, contributing editor Oliver Morton talks with Thomas Gold about the theory of abiotic oil formation and his career.

Thomas Gold: "The Origin of Methane (and Oil) in the Crust of the Earth" This 1993 paper was published by USGS as a part of a collection called The Future of Energy Gases. Cornell University host's Dr.Gold's website, which presents this paper and others describing the abiotic theory of oil formation.

"Considerations about Recent Predictions of Impending Shortages of Petroleum Evaluated from the Perspective of Modern Petroleum" This article by J.F. Kenney of the Joint Institute of the Physics of the Earth was orginally published in the June 1996 edition of Energy World, a publication of the British Institute of Petroleum. Presented through the California State University Northridge website, this article argues that reports concerning the impending oil shortage are inaccurate.

Explorer: Abiogenic Gas Debate This article by correspondent David Brown was published in the November 2002 edition of Explorer, a publication of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists. Though the article is dated in references to upcoming events, the author presents a well rounded explanation of the debate surrounding gas origin theories.


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Culture/Society; Extended News; Foreign Affairs; Front Page News; Government; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: abiogenic; anwr; energy; oil; thomasgold
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1 posted on 06/09/2004 9:15:38 PM PDT by narses
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To: narses

This theory is rather old. Most geologists reject it as its predictions aren't often borne out. It doesn't explain the sulfur and nitrogen in oil nor why oil isn't found in the oldest rocks.


2 posted on 06/09/2004 9:20:06 PM PDT by Doctor Stochastic (Vegetabilisch = chaotisch is der Charakter der Modernen. - Friedrich Schlegel)
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To: Willie Green; freebilly; cardinal4; old school; StACase; sibbel; Servant of the 9; BushCountry; ...

Oil forever ping!


3 posted on 06/09/2004 9:20:45 PM PDT by narses (If you want ON or OFF my Catholic Ping List email me. +)
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To: Doctor Stochastic

Yep, it gets much more play here than it does in the scientific community; there really isn't much of a "debate."


4 posted on 06/09/2004 9:28:52 PM PDT by Strategerist
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To: narses
The Drilling & Development of the Oil & Gas Fields in the Dnieper-Donets Basin

The modern Russian-Ukrainian theory of deep, abiotic petroleum origins is by no means simply an academic proposition. After its first enunciation by N. A. Kudryavtsev in 1951, the modern theory was extensively debated and exhaustively tested. Significantly, the modern theory not only withstood all tests put to it, but also it settled many previously unresolved problems in petroleum science, such as that of the intrinsic component of optical activity observed in natural petroleum, and also it has demonstrated new patterns in petroleum, previously unrecognized, such as the paleonological and trace-element characteristics of reservoirs at different depths. Most importantly, the modern Russian-Ukrainian theory of deep, abiotic petroleum origins has played a central role in the transformation of Russia (then the U.S.S.R.) from being a “petroleum poor” entity in 1951 to the largest petroleum producing and exporting nation on Earth.
(http://www.gasresources.net/DDBflds2.htm)
DKK
5 posted on 06/09/2004 9:31:28 PM PDT by LifeTrek
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To: Doctor Stochastic

Dear Doctor,

You obviously do not know what you are talking about, nor do you comprehend what you read.

What do you think they are talking about in the above article, if not the "oldest rocks"? The well in question was drilled in precambrian granite. Rocks don't get much older than that.


6 posted on 06/09/2004 9:33:29 PM PDT by John Valentine ("The difference between stupidity and genius is that genius has its limits." - Albert Einstein)
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To: Doctor Stochastic

The American Association of Petroleum Geologists has scheduled a conference in July 2004 to review the evidence supporting the theories about the formation of oil.
DKK


7 posted on 06/09/2004 9:36:11 PM PDT by LifeTrek
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To: narses
Well, I've often wondered about this "fossil" oil theory my self. I mean, there would have had to have been and awful lot of dinosaurs to decay into the amount of oil that we know exists, not even counting what we have used in the past 100 years.

Of course, I often wonder where all my extra coat hangers come from too...I think socks are the embryonic form of a coat hanger, 'cause everytime I lose a sock in the dryer, I find more coat hangers around. Hummmmmm
8 posted on 06/09/2004 9:36:42 PM PDT by FrankR
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To: FrankR
Well, I've often wondered about this "fossil" oil theory my self. I mean, there would have had to have been and awful lot of dinosaurs to decay into the amount of oil that we know exists, not even counting what we have used in the past 100 years.

There are no dinosaurs, or land animals of any kind, in oil. It's sort of interesting how a myth so completely wrong is so widespread.

It's made out of microscopic dead marine algae. The biomass of marine algae is beyond belief. Actually, if all the oil that ever formed still existed, gas would be a penny a gallon; the overwhelming majority of it has been destroyed or escaped to the surface; the key thing is getting it trapped underground.

9 posted on 06/09/2004 9:42:48 PM PDT by Strategerist
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To: FrankR

I wonder why the dryer always gets blamed. How do we know it's not the washer or the hamper?


10 posted on 06/09/2004 9:46:59 PM PDT by TenthAmendmentChampion (Freepmail me if you'd like to read one of my Christian historical romance novels!)
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To: narses
The problem with discussions like this is, that in order to keep it in lay terms, there is always a mixture of different products as though they were one.

Lay people think of oil as that stuff in the Pennzoil can they buy at Jiffy Lube, when, in reality, that kind of oil does not exist below certain depths across the world, and that depth depends on the geothermal gradient which exists there.
At least, there has always been a definitive line proven by exploration.

Below those depths we find natural gas and condensate, which is a different product than oil.

11 posted on 06/09/2004 9:55:33 PM PDT by TexasCowboy (COB1)
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To: narses
If oil is made up of dead dinosaurs, how the heck did the poor defunct dinosaurs commute to work? And how did they fuel their Coleman stoves?

If this post upsets or irritates you, it's probably because you're jealous of my tagline!

12 posted on 06/09/2004 10:20:31 PM PDT by Dark Glasses and Corncob Pipe (14, 15, 16...whatever!)
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To: narses

I've been told by geologists that it exists, but getting to it would be difficult to do and cause problems later (like overpopulation, pollution, market power balance changes, etc.).


13 posted on 06/09/2004 10:56:08 PM PDT by familyop (Essayons)
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To: All
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1098993/posts
Oil At New Highs - Opinions wanted on synthetic oil
MSNBC ^ | 3-16-04 | Jason Rines
This seems like this could be our ace in the hole...
Anything into oil
Stephen den Beste on this process
Anything Into Oil
http://www.discover.com/issues/may-03/features/featoil/
http://www.changingworldtech.com/home.html

Potential oil supply refill?

The world has more oil not less

The Origin of Methane (and Oil) in the Crust of the Earth
Thomas Gold
U.S.G.S. Professional Paper 1570, The Future of Energy Gases, 1993

PETROLEUM RESERVES EVALUATED WITH MODERN PETROLEUM SCIENCE

Another Washington Post article here

Oil Fields' Free Refill - More oil than we thought (maybe)

14 posted on 06/09/2004 11:51:13 PM PDT by backhoe (-30-)
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To: FrankR

There was a science fiction short story many years ago with the premise that all those extra hangers, socks, etc. that accumulate are a form of mimicry by alien life forms, like a walking stick insect. Wish I could remember the author, Laumer, Leiber, Kornbluth, Sturgeon, hmmmmm...story had a somewhat sinister twist too, watch out for those spare socks!


15 posted on 06/10/2004 12:25:38 AM PDT by skepsel
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To: narses

It has huge policy implications.

If oil is finite, it makes sense to save our oil and get the middle east to pump their's.

However, if oil is replenishable or flows underneath the earth's surface, then we should pump like crazy.


16 posted on 06/10/2004 1:53:26 AM PDT by DannyTN
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To: Strategerist; All
You should know that there is a significant group of people here who, sadly, totally believe that T.Gold's theories on abiotic oil formation are the gospel truth. There have been several threads where some of the proponents of that THEORY have outrightly become acerbic to anyone who even says T.Gold might be wrong.

In fact T.Gold is considered a crackpot by many in the industry. The only thing that gives him some credibility is that he can say he was 'right' in the neutron star debate (although he does keep quiet about the things he has been wrong about).

Anyways, according to most estimates current world needs for oil will rise from 80 to 140 million barrels by 2035. It will be obvious by then if T.Gold's 'theories' will pan out as true or not.

I'd bet they are false.

Why? Well, there is something called the 'water cut.' That is when water pumped into oil wells to help in the extraction of oil, and when the oil is removed a certain portion of it is water. Most wells in M.E have been getting a higher water cut level as they pump more H2O to aid in oil extraction. How come oil is not 'seeping' up from the mantle and filling them up?

I am familiar with several oil wells in Texas and Oklahoma. How come those wells are not being 'filled up from below?'

I personally think that T.Gold studied one neutron star too many! And most in the petro-chemical industry concur.

17 posted on 06/10/2004 2:48:29 AM PDT by spetznaz (Nuclear missiles: The ultimate Phallic symbol.)
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To: TenthAmendmentChampion
I wonder why the dryer always gets blamed. How do we know it's not the washer or the hamper?

We are clearly guilty of appliance profiling.

18 posted on 06/10/2004 2:59:18 AM PDT by TN4Liberty (Life is a quagmire. Get used to it.)
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To: FrankR

((((PING))))


19 posted on 06/10/2004 3:08:25 AM PDT by southland
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To: Doctor Stochastic

What stupidity. We can create oil from organic garbage, lets see these bright boys create oil from rocks.


20 posted on 06/10/2004 4:00:08 AM PDT by American in Israel (A wise man's heart directs him to the right, but the foolish mans heart directs him toward the left.)
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To: Doctor Stochastic

Given the age of the Appalachians, how are the discoveries of oil at much greater depths than accessed by conventional drilling explained?


21 posted on 06/10/2004 4:18:36 AM PDT by meatloaf
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To: TenthAmendmentChampion
"I wonder why the dryer always gets blamed."

Well, the dryer is generally on the LEFT...(ahem).
22 posted on 06/10/2004 4:55:26 AM PDT by FrankR
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To: narses
The prevailing explanation for the formation of oil and gas deposits is that they are the remains of plant and animal life that died millions of years ago and were compressed by heat and pressure over millions of years.

Never thought much of this theory, although I don't have a better one. Maybe this guy does.

23 posted on 06/10/2004 5:06:39 AM PDT by Aquinasfan (Isaiah 22:22, Rev 3:7, Mat 16:19)
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To: narses; Swordmaker; All
The theory was first proposed in the 1950s by Russian and Ukranian scientists. Based on the theory, successful exploratory drilling has been undertaken in the Caspian Sea region, Western Siberia, and the Dneiper-Donets Basin.

I had the pleasure of reading a translation of the Russian Textbook "Exploration Geochemistry" [with a Preface written, which disagreed with the oil formation info, by Shell exploration types, out of California], curtesy of the largest LENDING Library on the Planet...the Ingersoll Branch of the Brooklyn Public Library.

Also read there the original "Power From the Wind", a book documenting the HUGE wind generating station on Grandpa's Knob in New England in the early 1940's.

24 posted on 06/10/2004 9:48:56 AM PDT by Lael (Patent Law...not a single Supreme Court Justice is qualified to take the PTO Bar Exam!)
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To: FrankR
lot of dinosaurs

That was the problem in the valve guide seals in my Chevy. Bits of dinosaur bones would get stuck in there and chew up the seal and next thing you know the Chevy is burning oil.

25 posted on 06/10/2004 9:52:34 AM PDT by RightWhale (Destroy the dark; restore the light)
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To: RightWhale
"Bits of dinosaur bones would get stuck in there and chew up the seal and next thing you know the Chevy is burning oil..."

...not to mention those teeth fouling up the oil pump...
26 posted on 06/10/2004 10:08:37 AM PDT by FrankR (You are enslaved only to the extent of the charity you receive...)
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To: skepsel
There was a science fiction short story many years ago with the premise that all those extra hangers, socks, etc. that accumulate are a form of mimicry by alien life forms

I remember that story. I believe the infant 'aliens' looked like paper clips, then grew into wire coat hangers, then became bikes as adults.

27 posted on 06/10/2004 12:06:58 PM PDT by yhwhsman ("Never give in--never, never, never, never, in nothing great or small..." -Sir Winston Churchill)
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To: spetznaz
In fact T.Gold is considered a crackpot by many in the industry.

Nobody that I've ever met in the industry believes this theory. We wouldn't plug wells if we did.

However, anyone who wants to purchase a well that we're about to plug is welcome to freepmail me. The buyer can then watch and wait for the well to magically refill.

28 posted on 06/10/2004 12:30:57 PM PDT by Dog Gone
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To: meatloaf
Given the age of the Appalachians, how are the discoveries of oil at much greater depths than accessed by conventional drilling explained?

I'm kinda curious what A has to do with B.

29 posted on 06/10/2004 12:35:03 PM PDT by dirtboy (John Kerry - Hillary without the fat ankles and the FBI files...)
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To: Strategerist
It's made out of microscopic dead marine algae. The biomass of marine algae is beyond belief.

Also land vegetation biomass and vegetation from swampy land areas. This (swamps) might have been very extensive back then. Swamps are full of algae and slimy vegetation.

30 posted on 06/10/2004 12:37:42 PM PDT by dennisw ("Allah FUBAR!")
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To: yhwhsman; skepsel
There was a science fiction short story many years ago with the premise that all those extra hangers, socks, etc. that accumulate are a form of mimicry by alien life forms ~ skepsel

I remember that story. I believe the infant 'aliens' looked like paper clips, then grew into wire coat hangers, then became bikes as adults. ~ yhwhsman

IIRC, the big question was why we weren't knee deep in coat hangers? What was eating the paper clips before they grew up? The title was something like "All the seas with oysters" from the analogy that we'd be able to walk across the pacific on oysters if all the larvae grew up.

The guy who was asking the question eventually ended up dead in a closet, with a coat hanger wrapped tightly around his neck.

*eyes shifting to my closet...*

31 posted on 06/10/2004 12:41:51 PM PDT by null and void (History is not a tale of self-restraint, and change is accelerating all the time.)
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To: skepsel

I think the story you mentioned was written by Philip K. Dick


32 posted on 06/10/2004 12:46:19 PM PDT by djf
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To: djf

Found it!

Or All the Seas with Oysters (short story 1958, novel 1962) by Avram Davidson

I read the short story, didn't even know there was a novel, will have to look it up...


33 posted on 06/10/2004 1:01:26 PM PDT by null and void (History is not a tale of self-restraint, and change is accelerating all the time.)
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To: null and void

I know Dick did write a short story where aliens of some type disguised themselves as common items like towels, etc. But they were hostile, and some guy gets strangled by them. The people end up leaving the planet, and can take nothing with them, so they run to the rocket ship totally nude.

At least they think it's their rocket ship...


34 posted on 06/10/2004 1:06:49 PM PDT by djf
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To: djf

Sounds a bit like Asimov's "Misbegotten Missionary" (aka "Green Patches")...


35 posted on 06/10/2004 1:11:01 PM PDT by null and void (History is not a tale of self-restraint, and change is accelerating all the time.)
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To: narses

bump


36 posted on 06/10/2004 1:14:19 PM PDT by VOA
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To: narses

I have always been skeptical that there could have beenenough dead dinosaurs and plants to account for so much Texas tea.


37 posted on 06/10/2004 1:20:26 PM PDT by MistrX
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To: LifeTrek; Doctor Stochastic

See http://www.aapg.org/explorer/2002/11nov/abiogenic.cfm


38 posted on 06/10/2004 2:43:21 PM PDT by narses (If you want ON or OFF my Catholic Ping List email me. +)
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To: FrankR

I know MY dryer is on the left. It never occurred to me what it was up to, though.


39 posted on 06/10/2004 7:22:31 PM PDT by TenthAmendmentChampion (Freepmail me if you'd like to read one of my Christian historical romance novels!)
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To: dirtboy

A lot of the Appalachians was eroded and went into the Gulf of Mexico and the Atlantic before man probably walked on two legs. Conventional drilling is accessing depths in the Appalachians that aren't touched in other areas of the US simply because of lot of the higher layers were gone long before us. Now we've learned that there's oil and gas at much deeper depths in the Appalachians.

If that holds true for the Appalachians, what about other areas?


40 posted on 06/10/2004 7:24:26 PM PDT by meatloaf
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To: FrankR
I mean, there would have had to have been and awful lot of dinosaurs to decay into the amount of oil that we know exists,

There were alot of dinosaurs, and the plants the herbevoires amoung them ate. However the other factor is that they, the dinosaurs and the plants, were around for a long, long time.

41 posted on 06/10/2004 11:39:11 PM PDT by El Gato (Federal Judges can twist the Constitution into anything.. Or so they think.)
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To: Dog Gone
However, anyone who wants to purchase a well that we're about to plug is welcome to freepmail me. The buyer can then watch and wait for the well to magically refill.

I think you are speaking to a strawman version of the theory. The theory is that if the oil is formed much deeper in the crust than we currently think, the oil fields we access today are the result of "leaks" from that larger resevoir. Leaks which could only take place under certain conditions. Some fields would be replenished, but most would not, having been "cut off" from their original source by geologic activty. There is also the issue of the speed of "refill" of those fields that do still have some commnection to the deeper resevoir.

I'm not saying Gold is correct, just that his theories may be being misrepresented and/or oversimplified.

42 posted on 06/10/2004 11:54:03 PM PDT by El Gato (Federal Judges can twist the Constitution into anything.. Or so they think.)
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To: El Gato
The truth of the matter is that oil varies in its chemical composition dramatically from field to field, and even within various reservoir formations which are stacked upon each other and separated by a few hundred or few thousand feet.

There is no communication between the stacked reservoirs and no reason whatsoever to think that the oil in these reservoirs originated from a common source of supply. Almost always we can identify the probable source rock for each reservoir, being an underlying shale. But that shale has given up all the oil it could and it migrated upward from the shale to the highest sealing trap the oil could find.

43 posted on 06/11/2004 12:41:39 PM PDT by Dog Gone
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To: narses

Fossil Fuels Made without Fossils
Similar reactions deep in the Earth may
churn out hydrocarbons from inorganic matter
By Gabe Romain
http://www.betterhumans.com/News/news.aspx?articleID=2004-09-13-3


44 posted on 11/30/2004 10:12:21 AM PST by SunkenCiv ("All I have seen teaches me trust the Creator for all I have not seen." -- Emerson)
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To: Doctor Stochastic

Yes, but it does provide an explanation as to why played out oil well suddenly become productive again.


45 posted on 11/30/2004 10:25:35 AM PST by Frumious Bandersnatch
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To: Frumious Bandersnatch
Yes, but it does provide an explanation as to why played out oil well suddenly become productive again.

So do conventional theories.

46 posted on 11/30/2004 6:53:04 PM PST by Doctor Stochastic (Vegetabilisch = chaotisch is der Charakter der Modernen. - Friedrich Schlegel)
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To: Doctor Stochastic
What then, does explain the prescence of sulfur?
47 posted on 11/30/2004 7:10:06 PM PST by Old Professer (The accidental trumps the purposeful in every endeavor attended by the incompetent.)
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To: Doctor Stochastic

Discovery of abundant, accessible hydrocarbons nearly everywhere in the solar system

Address:http://www.osti.gov/bridge/product.biblio.jsp?osti_id=245547

Abstract analysis of the data gathered during the Comet Halley encounter during 1987 resulted in a body of literature asserting that all comets contain substantial percentages of hydrocarbon solids. These solids appear to have a strong similarity to petrochemicals. Arguments are made that the amount of hydrocarbon material in the accessible comets of the inner Solar system can substantially exceed the known reserves of hydrocarbons on Earth.


48 posted on 11/30/2004 7:40:57 PM PST by PRUE (Prudence indeed dictates that governments should be changed when its time. We're long overdue.)
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To: Doctor Stochastic

This theory gets posted here every couple of months. It doesn't get less stupid.


49 posted on 11/30/2004 7:43:55 PM PST by Dog Gone
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To: Old Professer

Supposedly, sulfur (and nitrogen) come from proteins.


50 posted on 11/30/2004 7:53:52 PM PST by Doctor Stochastic (Vegetabilisch = chaotisch is der Charakter der Modernen. - Friedrich Schlegel)
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