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National Museum of the American Indian a stunning showcase of history and culture
The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette ^ | Tuesday, September 21, 2004 | Karen MacPherson

Posted on 09/21/2004 12:14:18 PM PDT by Willie Green

WASHINGTON, D.C. -- The National Museum of the American Indian opens today, a spectacular symbol of the cultural and political renaissance of the nation's "first people."

With its sinewy limestone facade and prime spot on the National Mall, the 254,000-square-foot museum is a visually stunning showcase of 10,000 years of American Indian art, history and culture.

More than 500 years after Indians' first, often disastrous contacts with Europeans -- and just a half-century after Congress passed a law trying to "terminate" tribes -- the museum offers American Indians "a prominent place of honor on the nation's front lawn," said W. Richard West, the museum's founding director.

(Excerpt) Read more at post-gazette.com ...


TOPICS: Culture/Society; Government; US: District of Columbia
KEYWORDS: americanindians; archaeology; arealbeeberstuner; clovis; ggg; godsgravesglyphs; history; indians; museum; nativeamericans; preclovis; precolumbian; redskins; smithsonian
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Related local interest article: Westmoreland County archaeological site offers clues to region's past
1 posted on 09/21/2004 12:14:23 PM PDT by Willie Green
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To: blam; martin_fierro

ping


2 posted on 09/21/2004 12:15:00 PM PDT by Willie Green (Go Alan Go!!!)
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To: Willie Green
"It's a tribute to the first Americans, a tribute that's long overdue,"

Way overdue. Amen.

It should be a wonderful day. Can't wait to see it.

3 posted on 09/21/2004 12:28:37 PM PDT by KiloLima ("...I have seen the character of a great nation: decent, and idealistic and strong." - GWB, 9-2-04)
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To: Willie Green
The exhibition offers a revised history of Indians from the Indian point of view, noting the stark losses of American Indians to disease, poverty, racism, war and oppression.

The exhibit includes a brief, hard-hitting video, starring American Indian actor Floyd Flavel, that warns viewers that the exhibition "may fly in the face of what you've learned" about American Indians from movies, television and even textbooks.

I can see the political correctness coming a mile away...

Before Indians were running casinos and selling cigarettes tax-free in North America, they were a stone-age people before the "pale face" came. They had not learned to domesticate animals (except dogs), they had no written language, they used only stone tools and they had not even yet invented the wheel.

They had never seen a horse, a metal knife, a cart or a plow.

They also commonly practiced slavery, genocide and cannibalism against other tribes. No matter how many times you watch "Dances with Wolves" and "Pocahontas," it will not change these facts.

In terms of population percentage loss, the worst war we ever fought was King Philip's War in 1675. King Philip was an indian chief (also known as Metacomet) who attacked to oust white settlers from New England. The Indians burned down/destroyed twelve of ninety Puritan towns and attacked forty others (including Providence). The Colonists' population was small in 1688 and a good percentage of that population was killed in the war (with about 1000 slain out of a population of 52,000, this death rate was nearly twice that of the Civil War and more than seven times that of World War II). The Indians lost the war.

The Indians sided with the French in the French And Indian War (1753). The indians lost the war.

The Indians sided with the British in the Revolution. The indians lost the war.

The Indians sided with the British again in the War of 1812. The indians lost the war.

As the Americans moved west, fighting was constant on both sides. The indians lost everytime.

4 posted on 09/21/2004 12:30:51 PM PDT by 2banana (They want to die for Islam and we want to kill them)
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To: 2banana
You can also bet the murder, infanticide, rape, slavery, torture for entertainment, cannibalism, human sacrifice, gross environmental misuse, and mistreatment of animals will also never be shown....

More a Kerry and Ratheresque view of reality....

Whites of course will be shown with all their mistakes and sins....no problemo with that...

imo
5 posted on 09/21/2004 12:37:15 PM PDT by joesnuffy
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To: KiloLima

The problem with the Smithsonian is that they include Mexican Indians, South American Indians, and Canadian Indians as "American" Indian history. Those groups have nothing to do with American Indians!


6 posted on 09/21/2004 12:42:57 PM PDT by kaktuskid
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To: joesnuffy; 2banana

Why don't you visit the museum and then report?

Yes, we know the tribes were killing and enslaving one another, did grisly scalpings and all. Still, there could be something to learn at the museum. Why not?


7 posted on 09/21/2004 12:45:18 PM PDT by KiloLima ("...I have seen the character of a great nation: decent, and idealistic and strong." - GWB, 9-2-04)
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To: kaktuskid

Well, it's all North America and they were here before Canada, U.S. and Mexico. Nations such as the Crow and the Objibway extend across what is now our northern border.


8 posted on 09/21/2004 12:55:06 PM PDT by KiloLima ("...I have seen the character of a great nation: decent, and idealistic and strong." - GWB, 9-2-04)
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To: Willie Green
I can't wait to see the museum myself.

By the way, the Provincial Museum in Edmonton, Alberta, has a absolutely outstanding exhibit concerning native North Americans. It tells the story from the ice age when the first people arrived in North America, until the present: http://www.pma.edmonton.ab.ca/gallery/peoples/info.htm

9 posted on 09/21/2004 1:05:34 PM PDT by megatherium
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To: kaktuskid

"The problem with the Smithsonian is that they include Mexican Indians, South American Indians, and Canadian Indians as "American" Indian history. Those groups have nothing to do with American Indians!"




Uh, last I heard both Canada and Mexico are part of North America. Maybe I didn't get the news.


10 posted on 09/21/2004 1:13:11 PM PDT by MineralMan (godless atheist)
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To: MineralMan

The quote of Dr. David "Bad Eagle" Yeagley-

"The Smithsonian just opened the new Museum of the American Indian. I utterly dispute the title.

It is the museum of indigenous peoples of the Western Hemisphere, or the Americas. It is not an American Indian museum, but only in part.

Our established historical name, American Indian, is being again swindled from us, usurped by political correctness and racism. It is anti-white, anti-European racism to attempt to associate all peoples of the Americas as one group.

We are not. We are independent peoples, with different native languages, different religions, different cultures.

I completely protest the name of this museum, and its purpose.

Ernest Steven, president of the National Indian Gaming Association said yesterday (in Washington DC) one third of the money for the museum was donated by the Oneida Nation, the Mashantucket-Pequote (Negro club), and the Mohegan Sun casinos, alone. This was approximately $96 million.

Shall we talk about Indian health? Education? Heating bills?

I shall write more on my protest later."


11 posted on 09/21/2004 1:23:30 PM PDT by kaktuskid
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To: Willie Green
Some exhibits you won't see:

"The Wheel"
"The Written Alphabet"
"Metal Tools"
"Indian Industry"
"Rights are for Everybody"
"Indian Literature"

12 posted on 09/21/2004 1:28:25 PM PDT by Cogadh na Sith (--Scots Gaelic: 'War or Peace'--)
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To: kaktuskid

"I completely protest the name of this museum, and its purpose.
"

OK, that's fine. You're welcome to protest.

But America encompasses more than just the USA. As I said, Canada and Mexico are both part of North America.


13 posted on 09/21/2004 1:38:07 PM PDT by MineralMan (godless atheist)
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To: Chad Fairbanks; fish hawk; Harmless Teddy Bear; Bad Eagle

Ping!!!


14 posted on 09/21/2004 1:39:29 PM PDT by DaughterOfAnIwoJimaVet (God bless Senator Zell Miller.)
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To: megatherium
I can't wait to see the museum myself.

I'm with you.

15 posted on 09/21/2004 1:42:41 PM PDT by DaughterOfAnIwoJimaVet (God bless Senator Zell Miller.)
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To: DaughterOfAnIwoJimaVet

Remember kennewick Man


16 posted on 09/21/2004 1:44:02 PM PDT by WashStateGirl
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To: DaughterOfAnIwoJimaVet

Remember Kennewick Man!


17 posted on 09/21/2004 1:45:48 PM PDT by WashStateGirl
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To: Cogadh na Sith

I have one thing to say to you:

"Tatonka".


18 posted on 09/21/2004 1:50:57 PM PDT by Jonathan
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Comment #19 Removed by Moderator

To: AroundTheWorldTraveler
And let us not forget the Apache scouts who worked with the US Army to help hunt down Geronimo. And who ended up being rounded up and shipped off to prison in Florida in gratitude.

People around here paint with a very broad brush.

20 posted on 09/21/2004 2:25:21 PM PDT by Harmless Teddy Bear (There is no Chaos. Only very complicated Order. (Presenting Lady Snuggles of the Lethal Yew in PJ's!)
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To: Willie Green

politically correct blather. Unfortuante as if this type of mueseum was done with truth as the prime objective, it would be quite illuminating.


21 posted on 09/21/2004 2:28:09 PM PDT by KantianBurke (Am back but just for a short while)
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To: KiloLima
It should be a wonderful day. Can't wait to see it.

Dirtgirl (Apache, Yaqui and Maya ancestry) and Dirtdoggie (Malamute and lord knows what else ancestry) went down to DC for the opening festivities today, as Dirtboy (not a drop of Indian blood in his veins) was stuck at work...

22 posted on 09/21/2004 2:28:32 PM PDT by dirtboy (Kerry could have left 'Nam within a week if Purple Hearts were awarded for shots to the foot.)
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To: Willie Green


"Three inaugural exhibitions further explore the culture, history and spirituality of American Indians. Each of the exhibits focuses on eight different tribes, who have collaborated with museum officials and helped choose objects from the museum's collection to tell their stories."

Why is Indian spirituality ok, but not something like the
ten commandments?

"In the exhibit, visitors learn that the Hupa tribe of California believes that when people die they go to a place where they dance forever. "So when we pray, we ask them to come back and dance with us," Hupa leader Mervin George Sr. states in a quotation on the exhibition wall."

Prayer is schools is outlawed, but prayer in the museum is
ok.


23 posted on 09/21/2004 2:31:16 PM PDT by joelazcr
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To: dirtboy

Hey, can't wait for the report of this festive day!!

However, although Malamute is not one of the indigenous nations of this great land, it is one of my favorite canine breeds.

And, dirtboy, both of us are stuck at work but not working. For shame!


24 posted on 09/21/2004 2:51:32 PM PDT by KiloLima ("...I have seen the character of a great nation: decent, and idealistic and strong." - GWB, 9-2-04)
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To: KantianBurke

Well, at least you spelled "illuminating" correctly...


25 posted on 09/21/2004 2:53:25 PM PDT by KiloLima ("...I have seen the character of a great nation: decent, and idealistic and strong." - GWB, 9-2-04)
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To: Harmless Teddy Bear

And then there were the Navajo code talkers. . . vital to victory in WWII.


26 posted on 09/21/2004 2:54:55 PM PDT by KiloLima ("...I have seen the character of a great nation: decent, and idealistic and strong." - GWB, 9-2-04)
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To: Harmless Teddy Bear

Or the Navajo Code Talkers in WWII ...


27 posted on 09/21/2004 2:56:03 PM PDT by tanknetter
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Comment #28 Removed by Moderator

To: AroundTheWorldTraveler

Beautiful. Thank you. Look at that body language. Warrior spirit.


29 posted on 09/21/2004 3:12:44 PM PDT by KiloLima ("...I have seen the character of a great nation: decent, and idealistic and strong." - GWB, 9-2-04)
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Comment #30 Removed by Moderator

To: 2banana
They had never seen a horse, a metal knife, a cart or a plow.

What did we need horses and carts for? We had Canoes, which made a lot of sense, since most of our trade routes were waterways...

They also commonly practiced slavery, genocide and cannibalism against other tribes.

Hmmm... gee. So did many other cultures - including whites. Explain to me how that is relevant?

The Indians sided with the French in the French And Indian War (1753). The indians lost the war.

You make it sound like "Indians" is an all-encompassing thing. As if ALL indian tribes were the same - same language, same culture, same alliances etc... Maybe in your world they are all the same but in that land that we call reality, we find that in actuallity, some tribes were allied with the French, some were Allied with the British. So, you were wrong in that blanket statement.

The Indians sided with the British in the Revolution. The indians lost the war.

Well, considering you were wrong about the alliances during the French and Indian Wars, maybe you'd like to take a moment and rethink this position? This was an issue that was responsible for the breakdown in the Iroqious Confederacy - some tribes sided with the British, and some sided with the Colonials. Oops.

The Indians sided with the British again in the War of 1812. The indians lost the war.

Again - define "The Indians" because I doubt every single indian, nor even close to a majority, sided with teh British during that war. Post proof.

As the Americans moved west, fighting was constant on both sides. The indians lost everytime.

Really? I seem to recall several very prominent instances where the U.S. Army had their asses handed to them by Indians. care to comment?

Now, before you go spouting off biased half-truths, outright lies, and misconseptions about "The Indians", perhaps it would be better if you knew what you were talking about?

31 posted on 09/21/2004 3:52:59 PM PDT by Chad Fairbanks (How do you ask a hamster to be the last hamster to die for a mistake?)
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To: AroundTheWorldTraveler

I think if people really looked at the numbers, they'd find that American Indians have not only served this nation - before ever having citizenship, and before ever having the right to vote etc.. - but have served this nation in unbelievable numbers, whether it was as code-talkers, scouts, infantrymen, sailors, Marines, etc...

So what if 500 years ago we didn't have what Europeans would consider a "Written Language" - we had something more precious than that. While the colonists were living under the bootheel of oppression by their Royal British Masters, we Iroqouis were enjoying the fruits of a constitutionally-based representative government... But, since we didn't have "The Wheel", we ain't s**t... ;0)


32 posted on 09/21/2004 3:59:44 PM PDT by Chad Fairbanks (How do you ask a hamster to be the last hamster to die for a mistake?)
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To: Chad Fairbanks; 2banana
So, you were wrong in that blanket statement.

Yeah, a pox on your blanket, 2banana!

33 posted on 09/21/2004 4:07:41 PM PDT by KiloLima ("...I have seen the character of a great nation: decent, and idealistic and strong." - GWB, 9-2-04)
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To: KiloLima; 2banana

Sorry if I'm sounding grouchy - I'm just tired of people using the phrase "The Indians", as if we were all the same, and that what applies to one automatically applies to the other... Nothing is ever that simple.

By the way, 2banana? If you ever get a chance, take a look at the Constitution of the Iroqouis Confederacy - it's well over 500 years old (pre-contact) and is an incredible system - especially for a bunch of stone-agers... ;0)


34 posted on 09/21/2004 4:11:34 PM PDT by Chad Fairbanks (How do you ask a hamster to be the last hamster to die for a mistake?)
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To: 2banana
So what's your point? Just about everyone here knows that the Indians lost the war. That was then. This is now. They are getting compensated for their loses with your money. The Casinos are doing just fine.

It's hard to read your post without seeing just a little if not a lot of prejudice. Read what you wrote and think about it.

35 posted on 09/21/2004 4:29:29 PM PDT by fish hawk
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To: Chad Fairbanks

You don't sound grouchy. I was just teasing you about the "blanket statement."

I'm all for the truth. See my previous posts.


36 posted on 09/21/2004 4:30:09 PM PDT by KiloLima ("...I have seen the character of a great nation: decent, and idealistic and strong." - GWB, 9-2-04)
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Comment #37 Removed by Moderator

To: Chad Fairbanks
So what if 500 years ago we didn't have what Europeans would consider a "Written Language"

Actually the "written language" of Europe was borrowed from Babylon. They did not "develop" it.

On the other hand the tribes of the Americas developed three distinct methods of record keeping, The wampum belts of North America, the hieroglyphics of the Mayan and the quipu of the Inca.

The funniest part was the "had never seen a horse". And Europeans had never seen llama's or turkey or buffalo. What does that have to do with anything?

38 posted on 09/21/2004 5:37:18 PM PDT by Harmless Teddy Bear (There is no Chaos. Only very complicated Order. (Presenting Lady Snuggles of the Lethal Yew in PJ's!)
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To: Harmless Teddy Bear

Beats the heck outta me LOL... I guess some people will come up with anything they can use as an excuse to feel superior to others. It's a natural human tendency, like breathing.

Like, how I believe the Iroquois were superior to everyone else (and don't sic yer gramma on me, either, as I'd hate to have to eat her... oh, wait we don't do that anymore...)


39 posted on 09/21/2004 5:41:31 PM PDT by Chad Fairbanks (How do you ask a hamster to be the last hamster to die for a mistake?)
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To: 2banana; All

I have a lot of respect for you, 2banana, because I've read your posts.

However, this particular issue is near and dear to my heart and I have to say something.

I'm very glad there is an exhibition devoted to Native Americans. They had, and have, so much to offer but so often we're deaf to what they have to say.

"As the Americans moved west, fighting was constant on both sides. The indians lost everytime."

You're right about that--but the Indians lost b/c the whites had guns. Period. Guns will beat bow & arrow every time.

The Native Americans, the Indians, the First Nations, whatever name we choose to call them --they had, and have, a very proud and beautiful history from which I am grateful to learn.

As a matter of fact, I just spent last week in New Jersey, learning tracking from a man who learned from the Apache scouts (www.trackerschool.com). I met people from all over the place, including plenty of military.

Yes, in the past, there was plenty of brutality--on both sides. Just read about the Sand Creek massacre in Colorado.

I am glad every day that I was born in the United States. And yes, things happened the way that they had to have happened, for the best. I do believe that, because I have faith in the U.S.

But that doesn't mean that we didn't lose something special in refusing to listen and learn to what Native Americans and their traditions have to say.

Okay, enough already--I'll shut up now. :) Take care, everyone. Goodnight.


40 posted on 09/21/2004 5:49:27 PM PDT by proud American in Canada (Oh, by the way -- thanks for the Internet, Al!)
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To: megatherium
...the first people arrived in North America,...

Kennewick, Kennewick, Kennewick...

That's not to take away from peoples that were able to establish a surviving culture.

41 posted on 09/21/2004 5:52:45 PM PDT by Calvin Locke
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To: Chad Fairbanks

"If you ever get a chance, take a look at the Constitution of the Iroqouis Confederacy - it's well over 500 years old (pre-contact) and is an incredible system - especially for a bunch of stone-agers"

I don't doubt that at all. :)

A bunch of stone-agers... Riiighttt....;)

Hmmm, well put a few whites in the middle of the forest in a survival situation, and put one Lipan Apache in the middle of the forest. No freaking contest as to who would win. :)


42 posted on 09/21/2004 5:54:53 PM PDT by proud American in Canada (Oh, by the way -- thanks for the Internet, Al!)
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To: Chad Fairbanks

btw, Chad, I hope you could tell, but just in case, I want to say, I was agreeing with you. ;)


43 posted on 09/21/2004 5:57:20 PM PDT by proud American in Canada (Oh, by the way -- thanks for the Internet, Al!)
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To: proud American in Canada

Pssst... Most stopped using primitive weapons within a very short time after contact - between the Dutch, the Spanish, the French, and the English, it was like guns grew on trees LOL

(Much to Gen. george Armstrong Custer's dismay heh heh heh)


44 posted on 09/21/2004 5:58:25 PM PDT by Chad Fairbanks (How do you ask a hamster to be the last hamster to die for a mistake?)
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To: Chad Fairbanks
I believe you. We have all become civilized.

Ok, not me but I am defiantly a throwback so I don't count.

Should we bring up that one of our great contributions was the idea of bathing regularly?

There is a reason that American hygiene differers so markedly from European...

Also that with only a couple of exceptions we did not believe in human sacrifice? We may have had our enemies for dinner but we did not sacrifice our children. Pre Christian Europe can not say that. All by our little selves we figured out that that was a bad thing to do.

45 posted on 09/21/2004 5:58:36 PM PDT by Harmless Teddy Bear (There is no Chaos. Only very complicated Order. (Presenting Lady Snuggles of the Lethal Yew in PJ's!)
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To: Chad Fairbanks

"(Much to Gen. george Armstrong Custer's dismay heh heh heh)"

LOL! "seriesly!"

In fact, my beeber is now totally stuned for the evening, whatever that means, I'm just kind of going with the flow. :) I saw the original post but still can't really figure it out.

Okay, goodnight Chad, and everyone else. :)


46 posted on 09/21/2004 6:05:01 PM PDT by proud American in Canada (Oh, by the way -- thanks for the Internet, Al!)
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To: proud American in Canada

Oh, I understood. I mean, I don't deny that my people may have at some point engaged in ceremonial cannibalism at some point in the past, but that practice ended with the Confederacy (Iroquoian, not southern) - It sure caused a lot of consternation in our neighbors, though. But, if it kept them afraid and well-behaved, great!

I also don't deny that my people were a pretty aggressive group who may have on many occasions engaged in the wholesale slaughter of other people. But, no one ever said war was a walk in the park...

We Had a system of government (which was pretty darn advanced), a well-trained military, well-documented agricultural practices, trade, art, language etc...

Not much different than whites, really. Just a different environment, and lacking the benefits of other civilizations around us - no Arabs, no Asians, or anyone else to influence and bring about changes... The people of Europe had all that (and that was a good thing)...


47 posted on 09/21/2004 6:07:00 PM PDT by Chad Fairbanks (How do you ask a hamster to be the last hamster to die for a mistake?)
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To: Chad Fairbanks
Be sure that I will be there to correct you if you ever try to make out like you were a bunch of tree hugging cute and fuzzy bunnies.

It would be an insult to have lost to a herd of bunnies. :^)

48 posted on 09/21/2004 6:17:03 PM PDT by Harmless Teddy Bear (There is no Chaos. Only very complicated Order. (Presenting Lady Snuggles of the Lethal Yew in PJ's!)
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To: Chad Fairbanks

"no one ever said war was a walk in the park."

Very, very well said.

Chad, if you have the chance, try to go to Tom Brown's tracker school.

I mean, I am a huge "mutt" -- my parents & and grandparents were Swedish, Czech, German, Jewish, Native American -- who knows and really ... who cares?

Last week was one of the most amazing experiences I've ever had. Tom learned from a Lipan Apache scout and he's doing his best to pass on the tradition.

If anyone wants to learn the old ways, I highly recommend this school. It was a life-changing experience for me.


49 posted on 09/21/2004 6:19:52 PM PDT by proud American in Canada (Oh, by the way -- thanks for the Internet, Al!)
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To: Calvin Locke
megatherium: the first people arrived in North America

Calvin Locke: Kennewick, Kennewick, Kennewick...

I'm not up on paleoanthropology, but I thought Kennewick man was 9 thousand years old; the Clovis people showed up 11 thousand years ago. But you're right, I gather there's some evidence of earlier peoples. Can you imagine being here back then, on a pristine continent with sabertooth tigers, mammoths and giant ground sloths roaming around?

50 posted on 09/21/2004 7:47:41 PM PDT by megatherium
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