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To: jerri
Well, see, that is why I need to understand what is going on. Some people can see them, and some can't. The engineer in me wants to know why.

May I ask what kind of firewall you are behind? Do you have inbound TCP ports 32,xxx blocked?

Thanks for the data point.

140 posted on 01/24/2005 2:46:51 PM PST by snopercod ( We as the people no longer truly believe in liberty, not as Americans did -- Dayfdd ab Hugh)
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To: snopercod

We use Cyberguard here in the office. I am not sure if we are blocking inbound ports. At home I use Norton and would never turn off my firewall. I can check from home whether or not I can see the pictures and get back to you.

Maybe your browser is blocking the pics.


143 posted on 01/24/2005 5:05:06 PM PST by jerri
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To: snopercod; fire_eye; Gigantor; jerri
Here's a better explanation of what I was trying to convey to you.  It's from GRC.com, a website for Gibson Research Corp.   The owner is Steve Gibson, a very well known computer GURU.   I've used his stuff for years (since the mid '80s)    He is very good!    He has a free testing service called 'Shields UP' that will test your computer's security and stealth mode.  I've linked to it below, along with an explanation of why you should run one of his tests (but do them all - it's quite revealing).

From:  ShieldsUP!

A web browser's request to a remote server may contain information about the user and the computer system running the browser. The composition of this information is dependent upon the specific browser and version, the browser's security settings, and even — in the case of cookies — the browser's history of previous contact with the remote server being queried.

A web browser's request headers might also be modified by the request's passage through some other agent such as a privacy filter which deliberately removes potentially revealing information, or a proxy server which might add headers to identify the client on whose behalf the proxy's request is being made.

Information such as cookies, the URL of the web page which contained the link that referred the browser to the remote server (potential privacy/tracking concerns there), the identity and version of the browser, and the format of information that can be accepted for the server's reply — and more — are all transmitted by the user's browser for every request. In some cases, the user's screen display resolution and color depth or the operating system and version being used is also included. It is important to recognize that the user's web browser can send any sort of information it chooses and the typical web-surfing user is none the wiser. In some situations, as mentioned above, intermediate Internet servers, such as transparent caching proxies, may process and forward the browser's request while appending their own data to the query; typically a "Via" or "Client" tag.

In other words, without firewalls, nats, etc., your browser automatically sends referrer information about the web page you are on to the server requesting it - this has nothing to do with FR.

One of the tests in 'Shields UP' is a port probe - it will tell you the status of your ports - open, closed, or stealth.  You can even probe specific ports.   Check it out.

148 posted on 01/24/2005 11:58:23 PM PST by RebelTex (Freedom is everyone's right - and everyone's responsibility!)
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