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China rounds up, beats mourners for deposed leader Zhao: witnesses
Yahoo News ^ | Thu Jan 27, 6:40 AM ET | AFP

Posted on 01/27/2005 1:31:34 PM PST by .cnI redruM

BEIJING (AFP) - China has detained dozens of people, some of whom have been severely beaten, for trying to mark the death of former leader Zhao Ziyang, witnesses said.

The allegations came as the government intensified security to prevent mourners attending Saturday's funeral in Beijing for Zhao, the former Communist Party secretary general purged for opposing the 1989 military crackdown on the Tiananmen democracy movement.

At least three people, including a woman in her 70s, were punched and manhandled by police officers outside the government offices which receive complaints in the Chinese capital, witnesses said.

They were among some 60 people who pinned white paper flowers to their clothes, a traditional Chinese symbol of mourning, said a bystander who took pictures of the beatings and posted them on overseas websites.

"A man from Henan province was beaten badly. His left eyeball looked like it was beaten out of its socket and he had a one inch cut to his right eye," said the man who requested anonymity.

"An elderly woman from Shandong province was beaten to a point where she couldn't move and a man from Hunan province was also beaten," he said.

Police shouted at the petitioners that Zhao, who spent nearly 16 years under house arrest until his death last week, was a "political criminal," the witness said.

"They said: 'Why are you commemorating him? You're clearly opposing the government. But the petitioners said 'We think differently. We think he's a good person."

Also last week, an estimated 80 to 90 petitioners were rounded up near Zhao's traditional courtyard home in Beijing for trying to get inside to pay respects and express condolences to his family, petitioners said.

"In our petitioners' hostel, all 10 people who went were detained and held from from 9 am to 11 pm," said Bai Shuhua, one of the 10.

"In the police station, they said 'You don't seek leaders who are alive, but insist on seeking dead leaders. How can the dead help you?" Bai said.

One of the petitioners, Liu Hongbo, was punched twice as he yelled "Zhao didn't do anything wrong," Bai said.

Zhao, prime minister and head of the Communist Party for much of the 1980s, died on January 17 at the age of 85.

The authorities fear his death and funeral on Saturday will be a rallying point for dissidents, petitioners and people dissatisfied with the government.

Zhao was purged for opposing the military crackdown on the 1989 Tiananmen Square pro-democracy protests in which hundreds, if not thousands, were killed.

China announced last week it would not hold memorial services for Zhao but only a "farewell activity for the body," which is effectively a funeral.

In China it is common practice for bodies to be cremated rather than buried.

But family members and the government have been in dispute over the official assessment of Zhao, the guest list and where his ashes should be placed.

These issues have yet to be resolved, a family friend told AFP, despite agreement on the date for the funeral.

"The official assessment is still under discussion," said the friend, who asked not to be identified.

Asked which government officials might attend to pay their respects, the friend said: "It is still unclear."

Diplomatic sources told AFP last week that Premier Wen Jiabao paid a secret visit to the man, who used to be his boss, two weeks before he died but there was no word on whether he would attend the funeral.

Wen was famously pictured standing next to Zhao on Tiananmen Square in the last photograph before he was purged and placed under house arrest.

The government labels Zhao a former official who made a "grave mistake" in his handling of the Tiananmen protests, while acknowledging his contributions towards economic reforms in the 1980s.

Zhao's family strongly objects to the words "grave mistake" being included in an official assessment of his legacy.

Such an assessment is normally agreed with the family before the funeral. A negative assessment could jeopardise the careers of the deceased's offspring within the party or the government, although most of Zhao's five children are in private business.


TOPICS: Extended News; Foreign Affairs; Front Page News; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: beatings; china; protests; repression; zhao
>>>>China announced last week it would not hold memorial services for Zhao but only a "farewell activity for the body," which is effectively a funeral.

Now that's how to write government propaganda! I admire someone who can cram that much BS into one sentence. lol!

1 posted on 01/27/2005 1:31:34 PM PST by .cnI redruM
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To: .cnI redruM

This reads like one of Hitlery Rodham-Stalins most cherished dreams. I bet she salivates hearing of such unbridled, ruthless government power.


2 posted on 01/27/2005 1:44:01 PM PST by MisterRepublican ("I must go. I must be elusive.")
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To: .cnI redruM

Where are the pictures at?


3 posted on 01/27/2005 1:56:10 PM PST by bahblahbah
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To: .cnI redruM
The soldiers should have had sponsors' patches on them, you know, like in auto racing where a driver's uniform has patches from STP, Champion Spark Plugs, etc. They [the Chinese police] are paid from taxes in China, and the tax revenues include proceeds from items coming over here on all those cargo ships. Guess what the sponsor patches would read: "Wal-Mart", "Home Depot", and "Consumers who save a buck by buying junk".

I know not everyone agrees, but China isn't going to become a free society by an infusion of green backs, and all the barrels of cash going over there are propping up a dictatorship and modernizing its military. The USSR was broken by letting its economy implode, but with the PRC we seem all on fire to transfuse it with billions of dollars of cash. Did we just lose the will to fight? At the least we should refuse to trade with any country that does not have a free press.

It used to be said that capitalists would sell the rope that they'd be hanged with. Now capitalists are falling all over themselves to get a piece of the huge billion + rope market and think that so long as they are the ones providing the rope that they'll never be hanged.
4 posted on 01/27/2005 2:02:55 PM PST by WmDonovan (http://www.geocities.com/thelawndaletimes)
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To: WmDonovan
The USSR was broken by letting its economy implode, but with the PRC we seem all on fire to transfuse it with billions of dollars of cash.

I doubt we want to renew the arms race, and try to outspend the Chinese, do we?

5 posted on 01/27/2005 2:06:00 PM PST by Pan_Yans Wife (" It is not true that life is one damn thing after another-it's one damn thing over and over." ESV)
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To: .cnI redruM; Pan_Yans Wife; TigerLikesRooster; Khurkris; Jet Jaguar; Coleus; AmericanInTokyo; ...

http://www.christusrex.org/www1/sdc/tiananmen.html


6 posted on 01/27/2005 2:11:45 PM PST by Do not dub me shapka broham ("Your influence counts...USE IT!" (Bob Grant)
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To: bahblahbah
Where are the pictures at?

Here

7 posted on 01/27/2005 2:22:59 PM PST by tallhappy (Juntos Podemos!)
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To: Pan_Yans Wife
"I doubt we want to renew the arms race, and try to outspend the Chinese, do we?"

Well, first of all they'd "outspend" us with the money we give them for the junk we import--and that can be stopped.

Secondly, are you proposing that we would have been better off to have sent money to the USSR for trinkets and toasters made in Siberian factories instead of isolating the USSR and letting it collapse on its own? If so we'd still be in an arms race with them.

Thirdly, not trading with someone should not precipitate an arms race by itself--did South Africa get into any arms races over the embargoes of the 1980's? A lack of trade does not cause arms races; a belligerent dictatorship can. And if no one has noticed, the Chinese seem to think they are in an arms race already.
8 posted on 01/27/2005 2:35:07 PM PST by WmDonovan (http://www.geocities.com/thelawndaletimes)
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To: WmDonovan
Secondly, are you proposing that we would have been better off to have sent money to the USSR for trinkets and toasters made in Siberian factories instead of isolating the USSR and letting it collapse on its own?

It's not the arms race that I am against, it is the economics of the race that interests me. We overspent them, driving their economy to the ground, which lead to the Soviet's collapse. I don't see us using the same tactic against the Chinese.

And yes, there the Chinese are acting like there is an arms race on. I just don't see how we could outspend them, when Congress is complaining about spending another 80 billion in Iraq. And our national deficit just keeps growing, without any cuts in spending.

9 posted on 01/27/2005 2:39:54 PM PST by Pan_Yans Wife (" It is not true that life is one damn thing after another-it's one damn thing over and over." ESV)
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To: .cnI redruM; All

It nice to know that Chinese govt is still up to old tricks

Why we doing business with China govt???


10 posted on 01/27/2005 3:27:59 PM PST by SevenofNine ("Not everybody , in it, for truth, justice, and the American way,"=Det Lennie Briscoe)
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To: .cnI redruM

"We will encourage reform in other governments by making clear that success in our relations will require the decent treatment of their own people." --President George Bush

Well, he said it. Here is where the rubber meets the road. I wonder if the Chinese Communists' brutality will be held against them by this administration.


11 posted on 01/27/2005 3:54:37 PM PST by Irish Rose ("And I learned with little labour/to love my fellow-man, and hate my next-door neighbor...")
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To: SevenofNine
"Why we doing business with China govt???"

Because it's profitable. That's basically it.

12 posted on 01/27/2005 4:00:08 PM PST by Imal (Let us trim our hair in accordance with Socialist lifestyle.)
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To: .cnI redruM

But isn't China nice and peaceful? This must be a lie about our friends in China!


13 posted on 01/27/2005 4:16:44 PM PST by PeterFinn (Why is it that people who know the least know it the loudest?)
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To: tallhappy

Could it be that the cadres are making the same mistake with
Zhao that they made with Hu Yaobang?


14 posted on 01/27/2005 4:17:34 PM PST by tet68 ( " We would not die in that man's company, that fears his fellowship to die with us...." Henry V.)
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To: Pan_Yans Wife

"I doubt we want to renew the arms race, and try to outspend the Chinese, do we?"

No, the point is that the USA should not be enriching China so it may become a more potent adversary than it already is.


15 posted on 01/27/2005 4:17:54 PM PST by PeterFinn (Why is it that people who know the least know it the loudest?)
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To: .cnI redruM

"At least three people, including a woman in her 70s, were punched and manhandled by police officers outside the government offices which receive complaints in the Chinese capital, witnesses said."

Freaking heroes.


16 posted on 01/27/2005 4:26:34 PM PST by PeterFinn (Why is it that people who know the least know it the loudest?)
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To: SevenofNine

"Why we doing business with China govt???"

*Anything* in the PRC is the Chinese Government. There is an illusion of private business - but those businesses can be seized at will by the Party. Their laws are little more than window dressing becuase, as we see here, their laws do not apply to the government. Just to the governed.

Wanna free China? Send guns.


17 posted on 01/27/2005 4:34:54 PM PST by PeterFinn (Why is it that people who know the least know it the loudest?)
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To: .cnI redruM

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1330038/posts

Hu says China is peaceful.

Hahahahahahahaha!!!!


18 posted on 01/27/2005 4:55:17 PM PST by PeterFinn (Why is it that people who know the least know it the loudest?)
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To: tallhappy; TigerLikesRooster; risk

Is there any way you can post those pictures on here? As you might have guessed I can't open the site over here.

TIA


19 posted on 01/28/2005 1:11:18 AM PST by Dr. Marten
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To: Dr. Marten

See the other thread

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1330031/posts

And, I think the photos have made the wires now. I saw one in Taipei Times


20 posted on 01/28/2005 7:41:56 AM PST by tallhappy (Juntos Podemos!)
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To: tallhappy

Thanks, I'll give it a look.


21 posted on 01/28/2005 3:56:50 PM PST by Dr. Marten
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