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Nepal King Sacks Government, Assumes Power
india-defence ^ | 1/2/2005 | NDTV, BBC, Reuters

Posted on 01/31/2005 10:52:47 PM PST by Srirangan

Source: NDTV

Tuesday, February 1, 2005 (Kathmandu):

Nepal's King Gyanendra today dismissed the Sher Bahadur Deuba government and assumed power in the Himalayan Kingdom.

The monarch has accused the Deuba government of failing to restore peace and conducting parliamentary elections in the country.

"I have decided to dissolve the government because it has failed to make necessary arrangements to hold elections by April," the King said in a televised address to the nation.

The King maintained that the Deuba government had failed to protect democracy and sovereignty of the people.

King Gyanendra had appointed Deuba as Prime minister last year and asked him to conduct parliamentary elections and hold peace talks with the Maoist rebels.

Earlier, the King had sacked Deuba in 2002 for failing to hold elections, but asked him to form the government last year as the rebels stepped up insurgency in the Himalayan kingdom.

Nepal king dismisses government

Nepal's King Gyanendra has announced on state television that he has sacked the government led by Sher Bahadur Deuba.

He said he was taking over direct power because the administration had failed to fulfil its mandate.

Mr Deuba had been reappointed Nepal's prime minister last June, two years after King Gyanendra sacked him for failing to contain a Maoist insurgency.

The rebels recently failed to respond to a 13 January deadline set by Mr Deuba to hold peace talks.

The Associated Press reports that soldiers have surrounded the prime minister's residence and the homes of other government leaders.

"I have decided to dissolve the government because it has failed to make necessary arrangements to hold elections by April and protect democracy, the sovereignty of the people and life and property," the king said in his announcement.

The BBC's Charles Haviland in Kathmandu says the announcement has plunged Nepal into uncertainty.

'Selfish'

"A new cabinet will be formed under my leadership," the king said.

"This will restore peace and effective democracy in this country within the next three years."

King Gyanendra also said the government had failed to restore peace with the Maoist rebels.

He accused the country's fractious political parties of behaving selfishly and of giving no thought to the Nepali people and the welfare of the country.

He himself, he added, was committed to democracy and multi-party rule.

Some 10,000 people have been killed in the nine-year-long Maoist insurgency.

Nepal King Sacks Government, Assumes Power

KATHMANDU (Reuters) - Nepali King Gyanendra sacked the government and assumed power himself Tuesday, saying the leadership had failed to hold elections or restore peace amid an escalating civil war with Maoist rebels.

Indian television channel NDTV said the king had taken power for the next three years and placed many politicians under house arrest.

"I have decided to dissolve the government because it has failed to make necessary arrangements to hold elections by April and promote democracy, the sovereignty of the people and life and property," the king said in an address on state radio.

Shortly afterwards telephone and mobile lines were apparently shut down in Kathmandu and communications links closed between the country and the rest of the world.

No further details were available.

The strategic Himalayan nation sandwiched between India and China is locked in a bitter three-way struggle among the king, the Maoist rebels and political parties who are often bitterly divided among themselves.

The king is often accused of overstepping his powers, and reappointed Prime Minister Sher Bahadur Deuba only last June, two years after sacking him for the same reasons he cited this time -- inability to tackle the long-standing revolt against the monarchy and failure to call an election.

In January, Deuba had promised to go ahead with the election despite the civil war and the refusal of the Maoists to come to peace talks by a Jan. 13 deadline.

But many members of Deuba's own cabinet were known to be unhappy with the election plan on grounds it was unrealistic in a country where the rebels control much of the countryside.

The rebels have been fighting since 1996 to replace the monarchy with a communist republic in a revolt that has cost around 11,000 lives.

The king himself had promised that elections would begin by the start of the Nepali new year in mid-April. Indian television said he accused political parties of factional fighting.

This is the fourth time the king has sacked a prime minister in less than three years. Nepal has had no parliament since 2002. Nepal is one of the world's poorest nations and its only Hindu kingdom. Many people still view the king as a reincarnation of the god Vishnu.

But the monarchy's reputation nosedived in 2001 when the crown prince, Dipendra, killed his father, the popular King Birendra, and several other royals in a palace massacre. He then turned the gun on himself.

Gyanendra was crowned king after the massacre, but has never been as popular as his brother Birendra.

Tens of thousands of tourists visit Nepal each year as it has eight of the world's 14 highest mountains, including Mount Everest.


TOPICS: Breaking News; Foreign Affairs; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: asia; democracy; india; nepal; south
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The king has since then promised to install a stable democracy in Nepal, and vowed to fight and end the Maoist rebellion.
1 posted on 01/31/2005 10:52:48 PM PST by Srirangan
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Attention all planets of the solar federation:

We have assumed control.

We have assumed control.


2 posted on 01/31/2005 11:02:29 PM PST by flashbunny (Every thought that enters my head requires its own vanity thread.)
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To: Srirangan; All

It kinda sad that King have assume power second time in three years

That tell you something about govt don't want reform or crackdown or unable crackdown on terrorist
They are terrorists


3 posted on 01/31/2005 11:08:51 PM PST by SevenofNine ("Not everybody , in it, for truth, justice, and the American way,"=Det Lennie Briscoe)
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To: ValerieUSA
the monarchy's reputation nosedived in 2001 when the crown prince, Dipendra, killed his father, the popular King Birendra, and several other royals in a palace massacre.

The steady decline of monarchy worldwide continues to baffle social scientists.
4 posted on 01/31/2005 11:09:42 PM PST by SunkenCiv (Ted "Kids, I Sunk the Honey" Kennedy is just a drunk who's never held a job (or had to).)
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To: Srirangan

It's good to be the King.


5 posted on 01/31/2005 11:13:23 PM PST by Pylon (R)
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To: Srirangan
This is so ridiculous , and it seems to happen every six months. The people of Nepal should sack this King , not the King sack the Government (again!). This man is very bad luck for Nepal , he himself does almost nothing to end the Maoist
rebellion , preferring instead to keep most of the RNA around him in Kathmandu , to protect his reign from overthrow.
And worst of all , if something should happen to Guyendra
his evil son Paras would ascend to the throne. Paras is something like a Lite version of Uday Hussein and this would be a tragedy for Nepal. DUMP the King! Declare a Republic , call home all Gurkha's and soundly defeat the Maoists once and for all. Demand that India cooperate in this effort and stop secretly aiding and abetting the Maoists out of fear of their own Maoists.
Nepal is a mess today and this illegitimate King only makes it worse.
6 posted on 01/31/2005 11:14:39 PM PST by injin
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To: injin

>> Demand that India cooperate in this effort and stop secretly
>> aiding and abetting the Maoists out of fear of their own
>> Maoists.

That's one of the most uninformed statements I've read. India co-operates fully with Nepal in ending the Maoist rebellion in Nepal and the Naxalite rebellion in some Indian provinces.

Maoism is the fruit of China, not India. And I don't see any South Asian country in a position to 'demand' something from India.


7 posted on 01/31/2005 11:36:08 PM PST by Srirangan
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To: Srirangan

Whole lotta "sacking" going on over there. :)
Thanks for sharing the news.


8 posted on 01/31/2005 11:47:18 PM PST by LayoutGuru2 (Triskaidekaphobia ? Never heard of it !)
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To: Srirangan
Here you are very incorrect
These Nepalese Maoist strictly resupply from India not China.
There has never been any indication that China is giving them any material supply , whereas many many Nepali Maoists have been arrested (and then often released) in India . They use Indian hospital facilities for their wounded routinely.The Nepali Maoists arms flow from arms dealers in Burma from as far away as Cambodia and also via the Tamil Tiger networks in Sri Lanka , all of these routes pass thru India.
Indian negotiations with the Naxalites basically amount to a
ceasefire truce , with no Naxalites being disarmed and none required to ceases their Maoist activities , only to stop shooting at the Indian Police and Javans. There are many direct links and solid contacts between the Nepalese Maoists
and their Naxal brethren , few of these links are being challenged in any meaningful way by Delhi. I wonder what Delhi tells the Nepali King when he comes begging to Delhi to "Please! do something...." as he did just last month ?
9 posted on 01/31/2005 11:50:34 PM PST by injin
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To: Molly Pitcher; Jemian; Mr. Mulliner; Gengis Khan

FYI


10 posted on 01/31/2005 11:54:01 PM PST by kayak (Have you prayed for your President today?)
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To: dighton; aculeus; general_re; BlueLancer; martin_fierro; Tijeras_Slim
But the monarchy's reputation nosedived in 2001 when the crown prince, Dipendra, killed his father, the popular King Birendra, and several other royals in a palace massacre. He then turned the gun on himself.

Nepalese astrologers failed to forsee royal nosedive ping.

11 posted on 01/31/2005 11:56:06 PM PST by Thinkin' Gal
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To: injin

Well I believe it is you who are incorrect. The Nepalese border with Uttaranchal, Uttar Pradesh are very strictly monitored and patrolled. These states border western Nepal, which is in grip of the Maoist violence.

India has its own Naxalite rebellion, the states affected are Bihar, Jharkand, Madhya Pradesh and Andhra Pradesh. Out of these states only Andhra Pradesh has a cease fire with the Naxalites. Geographically it would be impossible for the Naxalites in Andhra Pradesh to aid the Maoists in Nepal, as Andhra Pradesh lies in the far south of the country.

I do admit communism is a threat to the region, but it would be absurd to say India is supporting communism while India herself fights it. The mainstream communism in India has been democratized, and the rebel's make use of caste and ethnicity to fight democracy. But they too are fading away as prosperity and development reaches these people.

And make no mistake, China is the seed of all communism, especially the Maoist version of communism.


12 posted on 02/01/2005 12:06:06 AM PST by Srirangan
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To: Pylon

Its good to be King!
13 posted on 02/01/2005 12:10:01 AM PST by Khurkris (That sound you hear coming from over the horizon...thats me laughing.)
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To: Srirangan
Damn! My airline tickets to Nepal don't have me leaving Alabama until February 3, 2005. My plan was to arrive there and simply declare myself leader. You haven't heard the last of me Senor Gyanendra!
14 posted on 02/01/2005 12:16:25 AM PST by Jaysun (An "exit plan" would tell the terrorist how much longer to hang on.)
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To: SunkenCiv

I remember that palace revolt. It reminded me of something that might have happened in ancient Egyptian times - but with a modern twist.


15 posted on 02/01/2005 12:31:04 AM PST by ValerieUSA
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To: ValerieUSA

Just in...King Dipendra has resigned in order to pursue further activities with the Janjaweed Militia in Sudan.

The DNC just shipped John Kerry and Barbara Boxer over to Nepal to restore order.

Sen. Kerry was quoted on arrival at Katmandu airport, "It IS good to be the new king, but I hope one wouldn't lose their head over it."

The retiring lady from California commented, "This is all obviously a plot by Karl Rove, President Bush and Condi Rice. We'll do everything possible to restore democratic party rule here with some help from CBS, Harry Reid, the North Korean politburo and the heroic revolutionary people of the New York Times."


16 posted on 02/01/2005 12:47:47 AM PST by Bulgaricus (Allah, Allah in Free)
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To: SunkenCiv
The steady decline of monarchy worldwide continues to baffle social scientists.

gee I wonder why, they've been so succesful in the past, you know with playing landgrab and all that...

17 posted on 02/01/2005 12:50:01 AM PST by William of Orange (slow change may pull us apart...)
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To: Srirangan
Well I believe it is you who are incorrect. The Nepalese border with Uttaranchal, Uttar Pradesh are very strictly monitored and patrolled. These states border western Nepal, which is in grip of the Maoist violence.

It's a sieve....people and material flow in the cross border trucking and on foot , all along the Terei.

India has its own Naxalite rebellion, the states affected are Bihar, Jharkand, Madhya Pradesh and Andhra Pradesh.

From AP , up thru MP and Bihar anything can move , and does.
Same with across thru Assam . Any encounters can usually be settled with a few Rp. being offered to look the other way.

Out of these states only Andhra Pradesh has a cease fire with the Naxalites. Geographically it would be impossible for the Naxalites in Andhra Pradesh to aid the Maoists in Nepal, as Andhra Pradesh lies in the far south of the country.
Nothing is impossible for these terrorists. They have their networks and money makes them run , especially in India.

I do admit communism is a threat to the region, but it would be absurd to say India is supporting communism while India herself fights it. The mainstream communism in India has been democratized, and the rebel's make use of caste and ethnicity to fight democracy. But they too are fading away as prosperity and development reaches these people.

Here I absolutely hope you are right . India demonstrated that when her interests were directly challenged it could and would act against those other than in Kashmir , and that was in the combined OPs with Bhutan early last year . Very effective ! They need to do exactly the same with Nepal , but on a much bigger and sustained basis , with Gurkhas themselves leading the fight.

And make no mistake, China is the seed of all communism, especially the Maoist version of communism.

The 50's...the Nonaligned Movement ....arms from Moscow
to counter the Chinese pressure and influence...the Vietnam
War , the changing the name of the street that the US Embassy sits on...long long has India played paddy-cake with these commies and maoists. As they say in the States " the hens are comin home to roost"

To me it is so odd and crazy to see the Red Flag proudly walked in procession in Dehli and Kathmandu , when elsewhere in the world it has fallen into such disgrace. Are these people clueless? or do they just want to reinvent the wheel?
18 posted on 02/01/2005 12:52:21 AM PST by injin
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To: Srirangan
Earlier, the King had sacked Deuba in 2002 for failing to hold elections, but asked him to form the government last year as the rebels stepped up insurgency in the Himalayan kingdom.

Is this King Gyanendra or George Steinbrenner we're talking about here?

19 posted on 02/01/2005 1:53:29 AM PST by Imal (Saluting SPC Taylor Burk, a genuine hero and true American. d. 1/26/2005)
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To: kayak

Thanks for the ping.


20 posted on 02/01/2005 2:57:25 AM PST by Gengis Khan ("There is no glory in incomplete action." -- Gengis Khan)
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To: injin; Srirangan; Genghis Khan

Umm,have you ever heard of the (proposed) policies of the Maoists in Nepal??First it's the usual stuff of finishing off the Monarchy etc & then to distance Nepal from India.The Indian military has opened several lines of credit enabling the RNA to buy Advanced light helicopters,'Lancer' CAS choppers,artillery & other weapons.I find your logic of India abetting the Maoists in Nepal in order to protect itself bizarre to say the least.The Maoists in Nepal are ideologically affiliated to their buddies in Bihar-what makes you think they will stop with Nepal??The US,UK & India have all increased help to Nepal with the express purpose of weakening Chinese expansion to the region,with the UK having given money for 2 MI-17 choppers.

I once met an Indian evangelist working in Nepal who said that it is common knowledge there that the current king & his offspring,Paras engineered the assasinations of King Mahendra & his family in 2001 in order to assume power.Gyanendra was supposedly not in favour of greater democracy,which would dilute the monarchy's power.It was Mahendra,who under Indian pressure,established a democratic government in Nepal.Hence Gyanendra was seen by many intell agencies in India as being against New Delhi & therefore pro-Beijing.


21 posted on 02/01/2005 3:46:19 AM PST by sukhoi-30mki
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To: Srirangan



Democracy must be the current buzzword internationally.

I have been amazed at how many, and who began applying the term 'terrorists" to their enemies to justify themselves over the last couple of years.

Now we have the Monarch of a country who has just exercised the ultimate totalitarian authority by disolving everything and putting himself in charge, and claims he is doing so in the name of democracy.

It's all about the terminology. Sheesh.


22 posted on 02/01/2005 3:51:09 AM PST by contemplator
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To: Srirangan
King Gyanendra

Didn't Godzilla defeat Gyanendra?

23 posted on 02/01/2005 3:57:14 AM PST by rabidralph (Congratulations, Pres. Bush and VP Cheney!)
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To: Srirangan
what kind of king doesn't already have power? .... and why would he claim to want to institute a democracy? ... sounds like a xxxlinton appointee
24 posted on 02/01/2005 3:58:11 AM PST by InvisibleChurch (Look! Jimmy Carter! History's greatest monster!)
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To: flashbunny

Ah, a Rush fan! Love that album!


25 posted on 02/01/2005 3:59:06 AM PST by ovrtaxt (Go Howard Go!)
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To: Srirangan

This obviously biased Reuters story leads me to believe that th eking is the good guy in all this. Hopefully it plays out well.

Is India supporting him?


26 posted on 02/01/2005 4:01:27 AM PST by ovrtaxt (Go Howard Go!)
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To: SunkenCiv
The steady decline of monarchy worldwide continues to baffle social scientists.

Thankfully we can be pretty certain that it's just a bad phase which the world is going through, Monarchy is the most stable and most conservative form of government known to mankind (I would add, when combined with some form of wider representation as in the British constitution, it is also the best by far).

Also, what a surprise to see that communists oppose the Monarchy. But then anti-Monarchism is the most constant element of leftism.
27 posted on 02/01/2005 4:05:16 AM PST by tjwmason ("For he himself has said it, And it's greatly to his credit, That he is an Englishman!")
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To: ovrtaxt

India raises alarm, says it’s a setback to democracy

Reuters
Posted online: Tuesday, February 01, 2005 at 1626 hours IST
Updated: Tuesday, February 01, 2005 at 1637 hours IST

New Delhi, February 1: Nepali King Gyanendra's decision to sack the government and assume power was a setback to democracy and would benefit Maoist rebels fighting against the monarchy, India said on Tuesday.



New Delhi's criticism came hours after Gyanendra fired Prime Minister Sher Bahadur Deuba, declared a state of emergency and assumed power saying the leadership had failed to hold elections or restore peace shattered by an increasingly violent Maoist revolt.

"These developments constitute a serious setback to the cause of democracy in Nepal and cannot but be a cause of grave concern to India," an Indian foreign ministry statement said.

"The latest developments in Nepal bring the monarchy and the mainstream political parties in direct confrontation with each other," it said.

"This can only benefit the forces that not only wish to undermine democracy but the institution of monarchy as well," it said referring to the Maoists who have been fighting since 1996 to topple the monarchy and establish Communist rule.

India is Nepal's largest trading partner and the two countries have strong religious and cultural links. They also share an open border and tens of thousands of poor Nepalis work in India.


http://www.expressindia.com/fullstory.php?newsid=41473


28 posted on 02/01/2005 4:07:05 AM PST by sukhoi-30mki
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To: ovrtaxt

The King is seen as pro China, and till now has favoured peace and talks with Maoists, although he claimed to dismiss the democratic govt due to the "govt's failures" with regard to the Maoist insurgency.


29 posted on 02/01/2005 4:08:14 AM PST by Srirangan
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To: Srirangan

We have an individual like that here in America.

He is known as 'Howard Dean'.


30 posted on 02/01/2005 4:09:15 AM PST by ovrtaxt (Go Howard Go!)
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To: sukhoi-30mki

Wow, thanks for the quick info.


31 posted on 02/01/2005 4:13:53 AM PST by ovrtaxt (Go Howard Go!)
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To: Srirangan

All your Himalayan Kingdom are belong to us.


32 posted on 02/01/2005 5:01:04 AM PST by Rutles4Ever (This is my tagline.)
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To: Srirangan
Nepal's King Gyanendra ... assumed power in the Himalayan Kingdom.

When you ASSUME, you make and ASS of U and ME.

33 posted on 02/01/2005 5:10:08 AM PST by Lazamataz (Proudly Posting Without Reading the Article Since 1999!)
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To: tjwmason

I'm not too fond of Monarchism my own durned self.


34 posted on 02/01/2005 5:11:01 AM PST by Lazamataz (Proudly Posting Without Reading the Article Since 1999!)
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To: sukhoi-30mki; Srirangan; Genghis Khan; Khurkris; flashbunny; Thinkin' Gal

This is one of the few examples in history where the transition to a constitutional monarchy was probably an unwise decision.


35 posted on 02/01/2005 5:22:54 AM PST by Do not dub me shapka broham (Proud American chauvinist)
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To: Thinkin' Gal; dighton; general_re; BlueLancer; martin_fierro; Tijeras_Slim
But the monarchy's reputation nosedived in 2001 when the crown prince, Dipendra, killed his father, the popular King Birendra, and several other royals in a palace massacre.

Nepalese public opinion is notoriously fickle.

36 posted on 02/01/2005 5:45:37 AM PST by aculeus
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To: Do not dub me shapka broham; sukhoi-30mki; Srirangan; Genghis Khan; Khurkris
I met a few Maoists in Pokara in 1996, they were my hotel staff.

They were convinced that Maoism (Communism) was the only way to overturn the Rana monarchy, because "Nepal is a poor country" (a rationale I was to hear over and over again, even though it made no logical sense). They were a bit peeved and embarrassed when I reminded them that Communism had failed everywhere it had been tried. I checked out the next morning, not wanting to have my throat cut while sleeping.

But something I also heard again and again was the absolute and total corruption of the monarchy. According to the locals, they stole the trekking fees, visa fees, aid money, and virtually anything else they could get their hands on. Evidence was all around: everywhere in Nepal there are half-completed bridges, buildings, roads. Even if brand new (and supported by foreign aid) buildings and structures were falling apart due to shoddy construction and substandard materials (the rest going to the monarchical pocket).

It's also true (notoriously so) that Cambodia is or at least was supplying arms to the Maoists. After 1975 and then in 1979, Cambodia was awash in arms (AKs, M-16s, B-40s, grenades, mines) supplied by both the U.S. (pre-1975) and China (from 1975 to 1979). It was proved beyond mere anecdote that several Tamil restaurants in Phnom Penh were illicit arms depots supplying various South Asian insurgencies, notably the Tamil Tigers and the Nepali Maoists. The arms trade operated almost openly out of (for example) the "Rani" restaurant on Street 53 and also from another Tamil restaurant (name forgotten) on Street 130 directly across the street from Sharkey Bar.

Both restaurants had great Tamil food, by the way. You just had to ignore (or pretend you were ignoring) the constant stream of shady characters carrying Zero aluminum briefcases back and forth through the restaurant, filled with either heroin or bundles of Ben Franklins.
37 posted on 02/01/2005 5:46:04 AM PST by angkor
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To: injin; Srirangan; Khurkris
Simply because these Communist bandits are able to muster some marginal support among a small segment of the Indian peasantry proves nothing.

The government of India is doing everything within its capacity-and keep in mind, it has to concern itself with jihadi incursions into Kahmir, Qaeda agents being funneled into Bangladesh in order to support the insurgency there, and a host of other internal rebellions-to stop the Maoist terrorists from seizing control of Nepal.

They interdict arms shipments on a routine basis.

It is ludicrous to even suggest that the Indian government-even one controlled by the socialist Congress Party-would want a proxy government, established by PRC-inspired henchman, on their border.

38 posted on 02/01/2005 5:48:17 AM PST by Do not dub me shapka broham (Proud American chauvinist)
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To: SunkenCiv
Especially those in Australia.

:)

39 posted on 02/01/2005 5:50:54 AM PST by Do not dub me shapka broham (Proud American chauvinist)
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To: angkor; Happygal; Irish_Thatcherite
The Tamil insurgency-like the IRA violence that flared in Northern Ireland for over thirty years-is one that is fueled-almost exclusively-by illicit money flowing into that nation from the West.

By cutting off the funding source, you are effectively cutting off the oxygen supply that fuels the fire, which means that it will soon be extinguished.

These insurrections/terrorist campaigns are fueled almost exclusively by money and grievance. Once you have a government-as in the cases of the current Sinhalese government in Colombo, or the current British government at 10 Downing Street-that is willing to address the demands of the aggrieved minority in an honest manner, all you need to do is quell the flow of blood money into the center of the conflict.

40 posted on 02/01/2005 6:04:32 AM PST by Do not dub me shapka broham (Proud American chauvinist)
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To: Do not dub me shapka broham
Tamil insurgency ... fueled-almost exclusively-by illicit money flowing into that nation from the West.

I'm sure you know more about it than I, but in Phnom Penh the Tamil arms purchases were fueled by heroin, according to those who were paying attention to it.

$14,000 a kilo for scag, $75 for a good AK, $125 for an M-16, $5 for a hand grenade.

41 posted on 02/01/2005 6:14:23 AM PST by angkor
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To: angkor

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/1117363.stm


42 posted on 02/01/2005 6:26:36 AM PST by Do not dub me shapka broham (Proud American chauvinist)
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To: Srirangan

I love a good royal coup. As Mel Brooks said, "'S good to be the king!"


43 posted on 02/01/2005 6:54:46 AM PST by thag (Up armor this......)
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To: jb6; A. Pole; TapTheSource

Putin did less and is cursed more.


44 posted on 02/01/2005 7:16:05 AM PST by Destro (Know your enemy! Help fight Islamic terrorism by visiting johnathangaltfilms.com and jihadwatch.org)
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To: Destro
Putin can make a nice enemy to the neocons. Imagine if Putin had threatened to exterminate the US West Coast. Why he'd be enemy number one. Thank God it was only China that threatened that, our Most Favored Trading Partner and the recipient of neocon love. Proving once again, the neocons are traitors.
45 posted on 02/01/2005 7:37:18 AM PST by jb6 (Truth = Christ)
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To: jb6

My theory is that the neocons, being ex Trotskyite Communists, even though they have moved on from their Communist origins, have inherited the Trotskyite hostility to Russia - no matter what the issue or who is in charge.


46 posted on 02/01/2005 7:52:18 AM PST by Destro (Know your enemy! Help fight Islamic terrorism by visiting johnathangaltfilms.com and jihadwatch.org)
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To: Destro

http://www.freedomhouse.org/media/pressrel/122004.htm


47 posted on 02/01/2005 8:29:39 AM PST by Do not dub me shapka broham (Proud American chauvinist)
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To: Destro; jb6; A. Pole; familyop; DarkWaters; Askel5; Tailgunner Joe; blackminorcapullets; ...
Destro wrote: "Putin did less and is cursed more."

I say more power to the KING!!! He's locked in a life and death struggle with Maoist/Communist insurgency, no doubt sponsored by Red China. Besides, as far as I can tell, His Majesty has the right to disband the Deuba government under the Nepalese constitution. Putin, the KGB-president, gives aid and comfort to Communists the world over. The King of Nepal fights them. Big difference. For this, and other reasons, the King of Nepal gets my vote.
48 posted on 02/01/2005 8:32:58 AM PST by TapTheSource
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To: Do not dub me shapka broham; jb6
Freedom House is a front organization for the Council on Foreign Relations. Screw them.

http://www.freedomhouse.org/media/pressrel/101002.htm

49 posted on 02/01/2005 8:38:39 AM PST by Destro (Know your enemy! Help fight Islamic terrorism by visiting johnathangaltfilms.com and jihadwatch.org)
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To: Imal

Earlier, the King had sacked Deuba in 2002 for failing to hold elections, but asked him to form the government last year as the rebels stepped up insurgency in the Himalayan kingdom.

Is this King Gyanendra or George Steinbrenner we're talking about here?



LOL Your comment reminds me of an old NY State Lottery commercial

"If I win the lottery I'm going to buy a big league baseball team then hire one of the most successful managers in franchise history. Then when he wins too much I'll fire him. Then I'll hire him again until he starts winning. Then I'll fire him again. Then I'll hire him again. Then I'll fire him again. Then I'll hire him again. Then (commerical fades out with guy still yelling like Steinbrenner)


50 posted on 02/01/2005 8:41:21 AM PST by sully777 (our descendants will be enslaved by political expediency and expenditure)
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