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Ancient Site Reveals Stories Of Sacrificed Horses
Xinhuanet/China View/China Daily ^ | 8-24-2005

Posted on 08/24/2005 4:26:47 PM PDT by blam

Ancient site reveals stories of sacrificed horses

www.chinaview.cn 2005-08-24 14:15:53

BEIJING, Aug. 24 -- A trip to Zibo might leave you with the similar impression as to a trip to Xi'an, especially when you visit the relics of horses buried for sacrifice.

Zibo, in east China's Shandong Province, is the location of the state of Qi's capital in the Spring and Autumn Period (770-476 BC). During this period, five feudal lords were able to gain control over the other states, with Duke Huan of Qi the head of the five.

The difference between the horse buried for sacrifice in Zibo and the terracotta warriors and horses in Xi'an of Shaanxi Province is that the horses in Zibo were live horses, killed especially for sacrifice.

The site of sacrificed horses was found in the village of Yatou in the 1960s, where many tombs of the Qi's emperors and aristocracies are still visibly seen on the plain.

In the No 5 tomb, 145 sacrificed horses on the northern side of the tomb were unearthed. And in 1972, on the western side of the tomb, 83 more buried horses were found.

According to the investigation by archaeologists, the sacrificed horses were buried on the eastern, western and northern sides of the tomb, and there might be upwards of 600 horses in total, although most of them have not been unearthed now due to consideration of difficult conservation.

The buried horses were young and middle-aged horses aged from 5 to 7.

According to archaeologists' speculation, these horses were fed with a lot of alcohol and fell into unconsciousness. Then they were beaten to death on the head with some heavy tools. It can be seen from the horses' broken skulls now.

The horses were arranged into two lines and laid on one side in the posture of running with their chins up. It seems that they are ready to rush into a war at any time once the battle drums are beaten.

Standing in front of the graves and seeing the line-up of horse skeletons, it is possible to get a sense of the tumultuous atmosphere of the time, with the sounds of battle drums and the screams of soldiers.

The horse, in China's history, was both a tool of agricultural production and a military object.

The number of war chariots was a major index to measure a country's competitiveness.

If a war chariot driven by four horses was considered as one unit, a country with more than 1,000 such units would be regarded as a powerful state at that time.

In the vault, there were buried about 600 strong horses, which could equip 150 battle vehicles, equivalent to the total armament of a small country at that time.

So it can be concluded just from the large number of sacrificed horses that Qi, in the Spring and Autumn Period, was a leading state with strong economic and military power.

As archaeologists discovered, Duke Jing of Qi, the owner of the No 5 tomb, was the 25th emperor of Qi. He held the post for 58 years, the longest term of rule in Qi's history.

Historical records show that Duke Jing had an infatuation with horses. He employed many people to feed and train his beloved horses in his palace.

When a favourite horse died, the horses' raisers would also be killed and buried together with the horses for sacrifice. It was brutal, but it proves the important role of horses at that time.

(Source: China Daily)


TOPICS: News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: agriculture; ancient; animalhusbandry; animalsacrifice; china; dietandcuisine; domestication; godsgravesglyphs; helixmakemineadouble; history; horses; huntergatherers; reveals; sacrificed; site; stories

1 posted on 08/24/2005 4:26:49 PM PDT by blam
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To: SunkenCiv

GGG Ping.


2 posted on 08/24/2005 4:27:20 PM PDT by blam
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To: blam

This was done to appease the typhoon gods who were continually directing storms to his location.


3 posted on 08/24/2005 4:29:21 PM PDT by Dog Gone
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To: blam
Heavenly Horses
4 posted on 08/24/2005 4:30:17 PM PDT by blam
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To: blam

They Shot Horses, Didn't They?


5 posted on 08/24/2005 4:32:20 PM PDT by martin_fierro (</silly>)
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To: blam
"When a favourite horse died, the horses' raisers would also be killed and buried together with the horses for sacrifice. It was brutal, but it proves the important role of horses at that time.

Who in their right mind would want
to go into that line of work?

6 posted on 08/24/2005 4:36:20 PM PDT by StormEye
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To: blam
You are a Texan and I am from Utah, where are the wild Mustangs from Asia.
7 posted on 08/24/2005 4:52:34 PM PDT by Little Bill (A 37%'r, a Red Spot on a Blue State, rats are evil.)
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To: blam
Stories Of Sacrificed Horses

Wonder if they had to also be virgin horses?

8 posted on 08/24/2005 5:14:07 PM PDT by Michael.SF. ('That was the gift the president gave us, the gift of happiness, of being together,' Cindy Sheehan")
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To: blam

The archaeologists who conjectured about this were not horsemen. I can't imagine how anybody could get horses to take "a lot of alcohol," enough to make them nearly unconscious. You can get some horses to occasionally drink a bottle of beer, but not "a lot of alcohol" as the article suggests.


9 posted on 08/24/2005 8:41:36 PM PDT by Fairview
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To: blam; FairOpinion; Ernest_at_the_Beach; StayAt HomeMother; 24Karet; 3AngelaD; asp1; ...
Thanks Blam.

To all -- please ping me to other topics which are appropriate for the GGG list. Thanks.
Please FREEPMAIL me if you want on or off the
"Gods, Graves, Glyphs" PING list or GGG weekly digest
-- Archaeology/Anthropology/Ancient Cultures/Artifacts/Antiquities, etc.
Gods, Graves, Glyphs (alpha order)

10 posted on 08/24/2005 9:55:45 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (Down with Dhimmicrats! I last updated by FR profile on Sunday, August 14, 2005.)
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"According to archaeologists' speculation, these horses were fed with a lot of alcohol and fell into unconsciousness. Then they were beaten to death on the head with some heavy tools. It can be seen from the horses' broken skulls now."

Sounds like a bunch of real horse-lovers. Not a fetishistic cult of horse-killers. Not at all.


11 posted on 08/24/2005 9:58:48 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (Down with Dhimmicrats! I last updated by FR profile on Sunday, August 14, 2005.)
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To: Fairview

"You can get some horses to occasionally drink a bottle of beer, but not "a lot of alcohol" as the article suggests."

When I was a kid, we had a quarter-horse named Dutchess. She would drink beer whenever she could get it. My dad and some of his buddies had a keg one day, and she drank half of it before they realized they were drunker than she was, but not as drunk as they wanted to be, and wouldn't get that way if they kept giving her beer. I could buy it quite easily. Especially if you had "fortified" beer.


12 posted on 08/24/2005 10:17:11 PM PDT by Old Student (WRM, MSgt, USAF (Ret.))
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13 posted on 04/11/2006 1:02:09 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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