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Infectious prions found in deer meat
The Denver Post ^ | Jan. 27, 2006 | Katy Human

Posted on 01/27/2006 9:35:14 AM PST by girlangler

Infectious prions found in deer meat Research finds the matter, which causes chronic wasting disease, in muscle. It had been thought to be only in nervous-system tissue. By Katy Human Denver Post Staff Writer

A person who eats venison could swallow the proteins shown to cause a deadly brain disease in deer, elk and moose, researchers reported today.

Their article in the journal Science represents the first time scientists have found the proteins that cause the affliction, chronic wasting disease, in the meat and muscle of deer.

Previously, it had been found only in the brain, spinal and lymph tissues. Health officials have long reassured hunters they would not be exposed to the disease as long as they did not touch or eat those parts.

A Colorado expert on the disease said the discovery doesn't necessarily mean that Colorado hunters should change their practices or that venison eaters should change their habits.

There's still no evidence that a person has caught a brain disease by eating a sick deer, said the expert, Mike Miller, a veterinarian with the Colorado Division of Wildlife.

In the Science article, Colorado and Kentucky scientists said they had found "significant" amounts of disease-causing prion proteins in the hamstring muscle of deer dying from chronic wasting disease.

When injected into laboratory mouse brains, the muscle tissue caused wasting disease.

"People who are handling or consuming deer meat are going to be at risk to consuming prions," said Glenn Telling, a molecular biologist at the University of Kentucky and co-author of the study.

Scientists still don't know whether the deer prions can sicken people, Telling said, but the finding "raises the stakes."

Prions that cause a similar disease - mad cow - have never been found in cow muscle tissue.

Even so, a few people who ate mad-cow-infected beef have caught and died of a deadly brain disease, called variant Creutzfeldt-Jacob.

"People are more likely to

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run a risk of exposure to chronic wasting disease proteins" through deer meat than they are to ingest mad-cow proteins by eating beef, Telling said. "It's clearly there in the meat, but in very small quantities," said Miller, also a co-author of the new paper.

"We've been saying for 10, 11 years now, 'Don't consume deer or elk that appear to be sick,"' Miller said. "If anything, this confirms that our standing recommendations are appropriate."

John Pape, an epidemiologist with the state health department, agreed.

He just submitted a paper showing that the incidence of Creutzfeldt-Jacob disease in Colorado is no higher than it is elsewhere, even in places without chronic wasting disease.

"We can't exclude that possibility, that a rare (human) case could occur, but it's certainly not occurring at a high rate," Pape said.

The new study suggests that experts can monitor the incidence of chronic wasting disease by taking muscle samples from wild animals, Telling said.

Previously, the only reliable tests for the disease involved killing deer, elk or moose to test brain, lymph or spinal tissue.

Staff writer Katy Human can be reached at 303-820-1910 or khuman@denverpost.com.


TOPICS: Culture/Society; Miscellaneous; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: cwd; deer; disease; hunting; prions
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1 posted on 01/27/2006 9:35:15 AM PST by girlangler
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To: girlangler; Diana in Wisconsin; billhilly; proud_yank; SJackson

FYI Ping.


2 posted on 01/27/2006 9:38:49 AM PST by girlangler (I'd rather be fishing)
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To: girlangler

This is why many were laughing when I was at an animal ID seminar. The government wants all livestock electronicaly marked for ID and tracking of many of the diseases that wildlife carries. Your herd shows signs and is removed, but infectious wildlife stays.


3 posted on 01/27/2006 9:39:29 AM PST by barj
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To: barj

Yes and you probably also know that the deer and the antelope frequently graze amoung the cattle on the range!


4 posted on 01/27/2006 9:48:34 AM PST by Pylot
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To: Pylot

They don't just graze, but I've seen the deer and the antelope play, and seldom was heard a discouraging word.

Sounds almost like King's I have a dream speach.

I have a dream that one day deer and antelopes will clasp hooves and sing in the words . . .


5 posted on 01/27/2006 9:52:27 AM PST by barj
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To: girlangler
When injected into laboratory mouse brains, the muscle tissue caused wasting disease.

The only conclusion that I can draw from this is to quit injecting hamstring muscle into our brains. No mention of backstrap, but I will immediately quit injecting it into my brain.

6 posted on 01/27/2006 9:53:00 AM PST by ARealMothersSonForever
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To: Pylot

yes but do the animal rights people feed the wildlife with supplemental feed in the winter?


7 posted on 01/27/2006 9:53:31 AM PST by jrd
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To: girlangler

Prions have not been shown to be infectious yet. They are suspected to be infectious - hence the name (proteinaceous infectious particle or Prion) but their mechanisms of action and reproduction are unknown.

There's enough bad, nay appalling science in virology without making up more infectious particles without proof.


8 posted on 01/27/2006 9:55:13 AM PST by agere_contra
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To: girlangler

That's it, no more venison for me!..............


9 posted on 01/27/2006 10:02:14 AM PST by Red Badger (...I will bless them that bless thee and those who curse thee I will turn into Liberals..........)
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To: Red Badger

Scary


10 posted on 01/27/2006 10:04:59 AM PST by outofhere2
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To: outofhere2

Isn't a Prion that new car from Honda?...........


11 posted on 01/27/2006 10:06:37 AM PST by Red Badger (...I will bless them that bless thee and those who curse thee I will turn into Liberals..........)
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To: girlangler
This is why I prefer oriental food. None of that "red" meat for me:


12 posted on 01/27/2006 10:07:42 AM PST by P-Marlowe
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To: girlangler
A prion is nothing more than a malformed protein, and is not harmful unless it happens to be close enough in morphology to a human protein. That's the good news. The bad news is that a lot of them are.

Venison. It's what's for dinner.

13 posted on 01/27/2006 10:07:52 AM PST by Billthedrill
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To: girlangler
As far as I know, the prion link is still not widely accepted as the vector for CWD. The prions have been found in beef, cow milk and other places as well. Still, CJD is very rare in humans, so the simple presence of prions is not necessarily an indicator of risk for consumption.
14 posted on 01/27/2006 10:10:07 AM PST by TChris ("Unless you act, you're going to lose your world." - Mark Steyn)
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To: Petronski

ping


15 posted on 01/27/2006 10:10:46 AM PST by cyborg (I just love that man.)
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To: Billthedrill

I've got a back strap defrosting right now!


16 posted on 01/27/2006 10:13:58 AM PST by Roccus
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To: girlangler
Koch's Postulates have been fulfilled in this particular case. There are nerves in every muscle of the animal's body and if CWD follows neural tissue it is logical that the muscle will have the prions. Any animal that I even suspect has been around a prion infected animal(CWD, BSE, Scrapie) will not make it to my table if at all possible.
17 posted on 01/27/2006 10:27:41 AM PST by vetvetdoug
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To: girlangler

I'm forwarding this to a childhood friend who loves deer meat.


18 posted on 01/27/2006 10:29:07 AM PST by lilylangtree
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To: jrd
yes but do the animal rights people feed the wildlife with supplemental feed in the winter?

You may have answered one of my questions. If the animal can only be infected by eating another infected animal (or by injecting tissue from an infected animal into their brains) then how did the wild population get it? If it's *common* in wildlife with only supplemental feed, then I fear our meat supply is probably in worse shape than I ever imagined. We may be in real trouble.

19 posted on 01/27/2006 10:32:43 AM PST by Marie (Support the Troops. Slap a hippy.)
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To: lilylangtree

There a number of very suspicious cases of transmission to humans but the links are not definitive enough to be called proven. Here is link to the best study done on the cases carried out by the CDC.

http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/EID/vol10no6/03-1082.htm


20 posted on 01/27/2006 10:32:48 AM PST by JustDoItAlways
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To: TChris; All

I posted this just because I thought the article was interesting, and I wanted the opinion of fellow freepers. I am NOT anti-hunting or anti venison, in fact I love both.

Appreciate all the comments.


21 posted on 01/27/2006 10:34:07 AM PST by girlangler (I'd rather be fishing)
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To: TChris
Still, CJD is very rare in humans, so the simple presence of prions is not necessarily an indicator of risk for consumption.

But, does *every* person who has CJD have prions? That would be enough of a link for me.

22 posted on 01/27/2006 10:34:07 AM PST by Marie (Support the Troops. Slap a hippy.)
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To: girlangler

Scary as hell. I know they found CWD in Wisconsin. No reported cases in Michigan yet, thank God.


23 posted on 01/27/2006 10:35:09 AM PST by Dan from Michigan ("What does a guy have to do to get fired around here?" - Darryl Rogers, former Lions Coach)
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To: barj

I went to one of those meetings last night.
It's about government control.
Animal health is just one of the excuses they use to fool the city folk into backing them.
EVERY TIME a government employee tells you it's for your health, safety, and childen's future, he's about to rob you.


24 posted on 01/27/2006 10:39:22 AM PST by FreedomFarmer (Beyond the sidewalks, past the pavement, in the real America.)
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To: FreedomFarmer

It is interesting how enthusiastic gov employees are about this program (Lots of job security). It is also interesting to note the look on their faces when someone vehemently opposes them.


25 posted on 01/27/2006 10:44:46 AM PST by barj
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To: jrd

That may be where the animals caught the wasting disease in the first place?? At least we are sure that the animal rights activists do have holes in their heads!


26 posted on 01/27/2006 10:48:07 AM PST by Pylot
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To: Pylot

remember the gun control groups want to do away with guns all over...if you make the big game unsafe to eat you can do away with guns!...


27 posted on 01/27/2006 11:03:54 AM PST by jrd
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To: jrd

Very nice dot connecting.


28 posted on 01/27/2006 11:24:54 AM PST by Roccus
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To: Billthedrill; girlangler

"Venison. It's what's for dinner."

Aw! Ya beat me to it. I'm having a late lunch today because I'm running behind. Venison Fajitas! They're awesome.

We live near a CWD zone, but have tested our deer for years, just to be safe. And then, we butcher our own so there's never been so much as a nick to the spinal cord.


29 posted on 01/27/2006 12:03:25 PM PST by Diana in Wisconsin (Save The Earth. It's The Only Planet With Chocolate.)
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To: Iowa Granny; Ladysmith; Diana in Wisconsin; JLO; sergeantdave; damncat; MozartLover; ...

If you'd like to be on or off this new (maybe) Upper Midwest (WI, IA, MN, MI, and anyone else) list, largely rural issues, please FR mail me. And ping me is you see articles of interest.


30 posted on 01/27/2006 1:26:27 PM PST by SJackson (elected members of Hamas: businesspeople, professionals, not terrorists. Scott McClellan)
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To: girlangler

Hmmm must also be at the butcher shop that also custom cuts and packages venison during the extended gun and bow seasons
in WI as well...

Regular cuts of beef,pork,lamb might also be infected...


31 posted on 01/27/2006 1:30:39 PM PST by joesnuffy (A camel once bit our sister.. but we knew what to do.. we gathered rocks and squashed her!)
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To: girlangler
How unpleasant. I read a book by Charles Pelligrino, DUST, that went into some detail about prion based diseases like this. It was pretty gruesome.
32 posted on 01/27/2006 1:33:20 PM PST by Centurion2000 ("Testosterone doesn't have to rule the world," - Az Democrat legislative idiot)
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To: girlangler

Well it hasn't been posted yet, so just to get it out of the way...


WE'RE DOOMED!

Now back to the tree stand.


33 posted on 01/27/2006 1:35:14 PM PST by Dr.Zoidberg (Mohammedism - Bringing you only the best of the 6th century for fourteen hundred years.)
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To: girlangler

Kuru in primates,Scrappie in sheep, Chronic Wasting disease in deer and elk,mad cow disease in cattle,Mink Encephalopathy,and Creutzfeldt-Jacob Disease (C-J disease)...all spongiform encephalitis




Here's another possiblity

Insecticide Causes Mad Cow Disease


by Fintan Dunne
Research by Kathy McMahon

Reprinted from eionews.com, email - news@eionews.com

Pharmaceutical interests in the UK are ignoring new scientific research that shows the insecticide used in the UK government's own warble-fly campaigns triggered the UK surge of 'Mad Cow' disease.

Latest experiments by Cambridge University prion specialist, David R. Brown, have shown that manganese bonds with prions. Other researchers work shows that prions in the bovine spine -- along which insecticides are applied -- can be damaged by ICI's Phosmet organophosphate(OP) insecticide -causing the disease.

British scientists have led the current theory that an infectious prion in bonemeal fed to cattle causes bovine spongiform disease (BSE).

Infectious prions are also claimed to cause new variant Creutzfeld-Jakob Disease (CJD) in humans -from ingesting beef. But the infectious prion theory serves to obscure a tragic chemical poisoning scandal behind the majority of BSE cases.

The new work proves that the prions can bond with manganese in animal feeds or mineral licks. These manganese prions cause the neurological degeneration seen in BSE. By a similar process, prions in human brains are damaged by lice lotions containing organophosphate. This can result in neurological diseases like CJD and Alzheimers -later in life.

Many might be surprised to hear that organophosphates were developed by Nazi chemists during the course World War Two,
as a chemical weapon nerve agent. One formulation of the insecticide -- Maneb, or Mancozeb -- actually contains manganese in addition to organophosphate.

The marginalized research has devestating financial implications for ICI. It would provide a firm basis for litigants -who could include CJD sufferers, farmers across the world and families of the many British farmers who committed suicide during this BSE debacle.

Phosmet organophosphate has been used at high doses in British warble fly campaigns. In 1996, ICI subsidiary Zeneca sold the phosmet patent to a PO Box company in Arizona called Gowan -just one week before the UK government admitted to a link between BSE and nvCJD.

The politically well-connected British pharmaceuticals group, ICI has the financial and political clout to block research into any cause other than the infective model. Indeed no substantive alternative research has been done. British BSE disease management and research bodies have taken decisions that do not seem guided by spirited scientific enquiry. Mysterious prions that jump species is the preferred research arena.

Scientist and organic farmer, Mark Purdey gave evidence to the UK BSE inquiry, that warble fly insecticide was the cause of the disease. The scientist wheeled out to rubbish Purdy's evidence -Dr. David Ray, later turned out to have been receiving funding from the insecticide manufacturer ICI.

A lobby group that includes Bayer, Monsanto, Novartis, Pfizer, Roche and Schering-Plough was behind the effort to discredit Purdey. In December 1999, the same David Ray was appointed to the UK Veterinary Products Committee (VPC) -a government body that licences animal medicines.

Purdey has been consistently denied even exploratory funding to extend his privately supported research. Yet the Purdey/Brown chemical poisoning model matches with the epidermiological spread of CJD clusters in humans. It also predicts the incidence of BSE-type diseases in animals. The accepted infectious model fits neither.

The pharmaceutical industry is all the more determined to hide the chemical source of BSE and CJD, because a spotlight on chemicals would expose the role the insecticides in Alzheimer's -- another neurodegenerative disease -- that might lead to claims which would dwarf those from BSE and CJD litigants. In fact, two leading brain researchers into CJD and Alzheimers have died in suspicious circumstances in recent years.

In the United States, the Environmental Protection Agency is already reviewing Phosmet's safety. The Centers for Disease Control in the US has recently conducted experiments on mice that confirm the organophosphate risk.

Not only is the EC beef slaughter campaign futile -because BSE disease is mostly non-infectious, but unless the underlying chemical cause is addressed, BSE will simply reappear from chemical causes. A new warble fly campaign is already underway in France using the organophosphate insecticide.

Of greater concern is that some lotions for scabies and head lice are now priming children and adults, for CJD and Alzheimers in later life.

Bonding The Prion

Cambridge University prion biochemist, David R. Brown is dismissive of the science behind the infectious model of BSE. He terms it "a very limited amount of science by a few assumed- reputable scientists." He insists there is "no evidence an infectious agent is present in either meat or milk."

"Simple tests on udder walls of cows -- which could easily detect an infectious prion -- have not been done, why I don't understand."

A number of researchers have found that organophosphate(OP) in systemic warble fly insecticide can deform the prion molecule, rendering it ineffective at buffering free radical effects in the body. Worse still, the prion is then partial to bond with manganese and become a 'rogue' prion. A chain reaction whereby rogue prions turn others to rogues also, can explain the bovine spongiform disease mechanism.

Brown showed how prion protein bonds benignly with copper, but lethally with manganese. Even natural variations in relative environmental availability of manganese versus copper can trigger prion degradation.

The CJD and BSE symptoms mirror 'manganese madness', an irreversible fatal neuro-psychiatric degenerative syndrome that plagued manganese miners in the first half of the last century

Shining a Light on Spongiform

Organic dairy farmer and peer-review-published independent scientist, Mark Purdey, says the accepted theory of transmission from BSE-infected cattle to human CJD -by bonemeal or meat, is dependent on a mutant prion that has never been isolated under the scientific protocol called Koch's postulates.

Purdey's insistence on sticking to the letter of this scientific law earned him the condemnation of UK officialdom when he first mooted his theory. But Purdey pointed to CJD clusters downwind of a British Phosmet production plant to back his case.

He gave evidence to the UK Government BSE inquiry and was supported by Conservative MP, Thessa Gorman. His views were discounted, but his subsequent research and the new Cambridge prion work have confirmed the alternative theory. Despite this, and the backing of a British peer, he is denied even exploratory funding.

Speaking from his rural English Somerset farm yesterday -as plans forge ahead for the European cattle cull, he asks:

"Why does CJD degeneration in humans begin in the retina, and why are CJD disease clusters found in high altitude locations?"

The question is rhetorical, and Purdey has an eye-opening answer. He argues that the prion molecule has a known natural role as a shock adsorber of damaging energy from ultraviolet rays and other oxidizing agents.

Once this prion defence system is rendered ineffective by organophosphates - for example in human head lice lotions, these oxidizing effects have an unmediated impact on tissues. Eventually, UV radiation damages the retina and oxidative stress destroys the brain tissues of CJD patients. This theory would expect to find higher CJD incidence in mountain regions -where UV radiation levels are elevated. That prediction holds true.

A similar but accelerated mechanism could be driving BSE. ICI's Phosmet organophosphate warble fly insecticide -applied on the backs of animals along the spinal column, similarly degrades prions. "Systemic versions of the insecticide are designed to make the entire cow carcass toxic to warble fly," explains Purdey. "Unfortunately it's toxic to prions too -especially those prions located just millimeters from the point of application."

The damaged prions are then ready to react with manganese in animal feed, or manganese sprayed on land or in mineral licks -to become the driving force of BSE neurodegeneration. Purdey says manganese-tipped prions set off lethal chain reactions that neurologically burn through the animal.

Chickens notoriously excrete most of the supplements fed to them -including manganese. And their manganese-rich excreta have been blended into cattle feed in the UK. Natural variations in the relative environmental availability of copper and manganese can also spur prion degeneration says Purdey.

From this research, any prudent person would conclude there is a significant risk attaching to the use of organophosphate in humans. Preparations for head lice and scabies are known to be overused in practice and might be priming users for CJ disease.

Purdey believes his bias for field work is the key to his success. He bemoans the "reductionism" of much lab-centered science. "I have traveled the world to investigate known clusters of spongiform disease -something mainstream researchers don't seem remotely interested in doing."

Since first postulating an environmental -rather than infectious- theory of spongiform diseases, Purdey has built evidence from around the world that explains and predicts the incidence in humans and animals: a cluster of CJD in Slovakia, Eastern Europe -around a manganese plant; Rocky Mountain deer with Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD), who were found to be eating pine needles rich in manganese; the futile slaughter of sheep in Cyprus -only for BSE to reemerge within years.

"The reappearance of BSE in Cyprus obviously points to an environmental cause," says Purdey, who is sanguine when reflecting on the condemnation of him by mainstream scientists.

"I suppose they have mortgages and kids who need to go to university," he muses. "Privately, some were agreeing with me, but then they would denounce me publicly. It was quite strange really."

The Money Trail

Critical scientists like Purdey are unlikely to prevail. The pharmaceutical industry holds most research purse strings, and would hardly energetically explore an avenue of research that could expose them to litigation for causing BSE. The official theory is lavishly funded, alternative theories rarely, if at all.

There are more explosive implications to his -and other's latest research. Purdey says similar organophosphate-induced protein deformation could also underlie Alzheimer's disease. If that were true, the litigation fallout would destroy some pharmaceutical giants, and a lot of very influential noses would be out of joint.

Disturbingly, Purdey and other brain researchers seem to have had an undue share of unfortunate accidents. Purdey's house was burned down and his lawyer who was working with him on Mad Cow Disease was driven off the road by another vehicle and subsequently died. The veterinarian on the case also died in a car crash -locally reported as: 'Mystery Vet Death Riddle.'

Dr. C. Bruton, a CJD specialist -- who had just produced a paper on a new strain of CJD -- was killed in a car crash before his work was announced to the public. Purdey speculates that Bruton might have known more than what was revealed in his last scientific paper.

In 1996, leading Alzheimer's researcher Tsunao Saitoh, 46 and his 13 -year-old daughter were killed in La Jolla, California, in what a Reuters report described as a "very professionally done" shooting.

What Alzheimer's Disease, Mad Cow Disease, and CJ Disease have in common, is abnormal brain proteins and a putative link to organophosphates. Even Gulf War syndrome among returning veterans has been attributed, in part to the insecticide. But the sidelined scientists' suspicions are still largely ignored.

In their favour at the moment, is a growing unease on the part of the public. As BSE forges on and Governments panic, Science may be out to lunch on BSE, compromised by bovine spongythinking myopathy.

Do Not Use Systemic Organophosphate Insecticides

Do NOT treat children with OP head lice products - they may cause CJD and Alzheimer's

Do NOT treat your pets with OP anti-flea products

Do NOT treat cattle or animals with OP products - they may cause BSE

Do NOT give manganese to cattle previously dosed with a systemic OP

The relative availability of the metals copper and manganese in you local environment is a major factor in BSE & CJD

Useful Links

EPA on Phosmet
BSE & CJD Researchers
Insecticides Classification
US Gov Pesticide resources

Dr. Mercola's Comment:

Fascinating information about the truly horrible things that pesticides can do and the travesty of Mad Cow Disease. Be sure to read the other article in this week's newsletter on this topic, which is entitled "Animal Pharm" and written by Mark Purdey himself, the originator of this theory.

Related Articles:

UK Recalls Polio Vaccine Over 'Mad Cow' Fears

"Animal Pharm" by Mark Purdey


34 posted on 01/27/2006 1:42:48 PM PST by joesnuffy (A camel once bit our sister.. but we knew what to do.. we gathered rocks and squashed her!)
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To: jrd

yes but do the animal rights people feed the wildlife with supplemental feed in the winter?

No the hunters take care of the extra feeding.


35 posted on 01/27/2006 1:42:49 PM PST by Faith-Hope
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To: Diana in Wisconsin
...have tested our deer for years...

More detail please.

36 posted on 01/27/2006 1:45:34 PM PST by LucyJo ("I have overcome the world." "Abide in Me." (John 16:33; 15:4)
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To: jrd
remember the gun control groups want to do away with guns all over...if you make the big game unsafe to eat you can do away with guns!...

It's incumbent upon us then to make the case that the reason the Founding Fathers affirmed our RKBA was so we possessed the ability to protect ourselves from gun grabbers and the elites for whom they front.

Hunting game animals never even entered the equation.

Without the 2nd Amendment in full effect, none of our other "rights" are worth the parchment on which they're printed.

37 posted on 01/27/2006 1:46:25 PM PST by Freebird Forever (If they're truly public servants, why do they live in the mansions?)
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To: ARealMothersSonForever

And no injecting into the penis either. Because "penis" and "chronic wasting disease" are two words that should've be used in the same sentance.


38 posted on 01/27/2006 1:51:59 PM PST by raygun
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To: raygun
"should've" = should never

I don't know how that happened, my mad cow must be acting up.

39 posted on 01/27/2006 1:54:50 PM PST by raygun
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To: Faith-Hope

I haven't deer hunted on the property here, just moved here last June.

I have put up some feeders and have had a blast watching the deer. I have a couple of big deer every day, and a lot of little ones. I've had as many as 12 at one time.

Since they are plentiful I plan to put at least one in my freezer next year. And I'll let my sister's grandson take one. We have a huge overpopulation of does. Of course I won't feed them next year when hunting them. It's illegal (and I wouldn't do it anyway, cause it's not sporting) to feed and hunt them.


40 posted on 01/27/2006 2:00:19 PM PST by girlangler (I'd rather be fishing)
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To: joesnuffy

Very interesting post. Thanks for putting it up.


41 posted on 01/27/2006 2:00:51 PM PST by Freebird Forever (If they're truly public servants, why do they live in the mansions?)
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To: joesnuffy
I thought organophosphates were a thing of the past.
Basically a nerve gas or agent.

Maneb is a fungicide isn't it?

I've been very careful concerning nerve tissue.
I either make my own ground meat or hand the butcher a cut of muscle meat and have him grind it.
Almost all prepackaged ground beef comes from large Midwestern plants.
These plants use wire wheels to clean a carcass. Often nicking the spinal cord, etc.

From the article it sounds like I may be taking precautions that are not aiding in preventing the problem. But I think I'll stick to my routine anyway.
42 posted on 01/27/2006 2:31:44 PM PST by Vinnie
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To: LucyJo

We leave their heads when we take them in to be tagged. The DNR will test them for free. They just need a sample of the brain or spinal cord fluid. The deer hangs in the shed for a few days, while we're awaiting the results. And if it has a really nice rack, we hang around and WAIT for the results, LOL!

The deer we harvest are on our own land. The nearest CWD deer are a few counties over, but we just want to stay ahead of this.

I don't consider testing our deer for CWD to be any more of a hassle than washing purchased fruits and vegetables well after they come home from the grocery store. I don't buy much 3/4 of the year because I do have a 1/4 acre organic garden and an orchard. It just makes sense to me all the way around, to be safe about your food, CWD or not. :)

(I'm not a freak about it; I have just gotten into the habit about being smart about what I feed myself and my family. The exceptions to that rule would be Cheetos and inexpensive beer, LOL!)


43 posted on 01/27/2006 2:43:02 PM PST by Diana in Wisconsin (Save The Earth. It's The Only Planet With Chocolate.)
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To: girlangler
Previously, it [infectious prions] had been found only in the brain, spinal and lymph tissues. Health officials have long reassured hunters they would not be exposed to the disease as long as they did not touch or eat those parts.

Oops. More guesswork in white coats.

44 posted on 01/27/2006 2:44:49 PM PST by Prince Charles
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To: Vinnie
I get my meat from the butcher. No question about that at all.

I remember having some venison once. At the annual canoe trip, one of the guys was grilling. I walked by beer in hand, and started chatting with him. He says, "these look like they're done. Wanna try one?" "Yeah, sure." So he skewers one of these complet mouthfull cubes of meat, sprikles some secret powder on it and hands it to me. "Mmmmm. Wow, that's good. What's the seasoning?" "Oh, secret. I could tell ya, but then I'd have to kill ya." "Mmmmm. Wow, this is really good, what is it? Buffalo?" "Venison." "Nah, get out of here, I hate venison. Mnmnmnmnmnmn, this is really good." "Want another one?" "Yeah, sure." (munch munch munch). "Hey, Ray! What's going on?" "Dude, this guy's got some outrageous beef here, you should try some." "Dude, I know this guy, he's probably feeding you some venison, or antelope or something." "No this is beef, and its really good!" "No, its venision, I shot it myself. Its venison." "Get out of here, venison is gamey, I hate it." "It all depends what the deer eat. I've been feeing 'em corn all year long. They eat that cedar, and it'll get gamey. They eat that cedar and you can marinate the meat all year long and it'll still be gamey. This is venison." "Hey, guys, what's going on?" "This guy's got some great meat here, you should try some." "What, is it venison? I hate venison." "No, you should try some, its really good. Later man." Heard as I was walking away: "Wow! This is really good..."

This from the guy who turned me onto freezing fish in blocks of water. You can pull the fish out of the freezer two years later and it'll be like the day you caught it. I do that with all seafood: smelt, shrimp, trout, salmon, flounder, swordfish, you name it (its in my freezer frozen solid in water).

Yeah, I don't like that chemical stuff in my meat either. I prefer to add that myself, basting with transmission fluid, or spraying the pan with some Raid or Orkin Black Flag if I'm so inclined, but I prefer the meat to be free of those kind of things when I bring it home.

45 posted on 01/27/2006 2:59:42 PM PST by raygun
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To: Diana in Wisconsin

Thanks, Diana, I only see the venison around here when hubby brings it to put in the freezer, after it has already been processed. We know the guy who does the processing.

Hubby says they rarely test the meat unless there is a report, or someone has seen a sick deer. We aren't in an area where there has been a great concern about it so far.

I was reading that the disease progresses at a pretty fast rate, and I'm guessing that symptoms manifest early, but I'd rather the deer be tested to know for sure. I'm in the "rather be safe than sorry" group.

I think you have a very smart "habit". :)

Know what you mean about the Cheetos, and the racks! LOL. The hunters here drive with the tailgates on their pickups down, and stop to show off before they skin them. My husband bagged the "trophy" rack in his club this year, so he'll enjoy that distinction until next deer season, at least. ha.


46 posted on 01/27/2006 4:49:32 PM PST by LucyJo ("I have overcome the world." "Abide in Me." (John 16:33; 15:4)
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To: girlangler
New fears about deer (chronic wasting disease) Check the link in comment 5 on that thread.
47 posted on 01/27/2006 5:02:20 PM PST by neverdem (May you be in heaven a half hour before the devil knows that you're dead.)
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To: girlangler
There's still no evidence that a person has caught a brain disease by eating a sick deer, said the expert, Mike Miller, a veterinarian with the Colorado Division of Wildlife.
48 posted on 01/27/2006 5:06:10 PM PST by Vision ("You guys are literally the cream of the crop of political analysis")
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To: Marie
If you are posting about CWD, the best evidence to date suggests transmission through saliva, feces. The active agent can live on in the environment for a time. Those in the know are not sure how CWD originated. It has been passing among deer, moose, elk.

An earlier poster said something about prions not being the "accepted" theory. I believe that is false and that the prion/protien? theory is accepted. There is another researcher that has been working on an alternative theory. I think, or I know, that more info is available from the Chronis Wasting Disease Alliance at CWD.org or something along those lines. Not hard to find.

But when one looks at a map of CWD and to see the geographical distances between outbreaks, one can wonder. Captive heards are blamed for the disease spread, though the evidence has not been 100%. I asked someone with a bit more knowledge if it could be possible for a spontaneous outbreak--he hadn't heard anything like that. I wondered is another migratory species carried it from zone to zone. Who knows?

49 posted on 01/27/2006 5:39:21 PM PST by Simo Hayha (An education is incomplete without instruction in the use of arms to defend oneself against harm.)
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To: vetvetdoug

I bet that has cut down on your roadkill BBQs!


50 posted on 01/27/2006 7:14:57 PM PST by razorback-bert
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