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Nonsense, nonsense, nonsense: the myths about high oil prices
The Sunday Telegraph ^ | April 30, 2006 | Niall Ferguson

Posted on 04/30/2006 12:55:20 AM PDT by MadIvan

The British call it petrol, Americans prefer gasoline. But whatever you call it, prices at the pump are soaring. Last week gas hit $3 a gallon in some parts of the United States. To which British motorists can only reply: Diddums.

Driving down the M40 on Friday, I passed petrol stations selling regular unleaded at 97.9 pence per litre. That works out at $6.62 a gallon. If a British outlet offered petrol at American prices - 44 pence a litre - there would be a queue from Beaconsfield to Birmingham.

It's no great mystery why the British shell out more than double what Americans pay to fill up their cars. For years the United Kingdom has levied much higher taxes on fossil fuels than the United States. So if British motorists want to blame someone for the high cost of motoring, they know where to start.

Of course, it's not Gordon Brown's fault that the underlying price of petrol has risen steeply since he came into office. Crude oil futures hit a record price of $75 a barrel last week. That's six times the price that producers were asking back in December 1998.

So who's to blame for higher oil prices? This week, we have heard nearly all the usual suspects fingered, along with some new ones. "We are dealing not just with normal supply and demand economics," Lord Browne, the chief executive of BP explained in an interview. "Financial activity in the oil markets" was driving prices up, one of his colleagues explained, a thinly-veiled reference to hedge funds.

American politicians offered a less subtle story. Leading Democrats blamed President Bush for being too "cosy with the oil industry". Those who previously argued that the Bush administration invaded Iraq to make oil cheap now argue that it was in fact, er, to make oil dear.

The Chancellor? The hedge funds? The oil companies? I'm surprised someone hasn't yet blamed the Deputy Prime Minister, John Prescott, who famously keeps two Jaguars - one (it now turns out) for each of the women in his life.

This blame game is a farce. The price of fuel is high precisely because of "supply and demand economics", as Lord Browne knows only too well. Global demand for oil has risen by around 40 per cent in the past 20 years. As so often in world economic affairs these days, a crucial role is being played by China. In the last five years, the G7 countries have accounted for just 15 per cent of the growth in global demand; China has accounted for twice that.

Soaring demand is coinciding with stagnant supply. Global refining capacity has scarcely grown and took a big knock from last year's hurricanes. Meanwhile, political instability in some of the world's principal oil producing countries - Iraq, Nigeria and Venezuela - has made commodity traders and intelligent investors legitimately pessimistic about future supply. And let's not forget the possibility of US air strikes against Iran. It's hardly "speculation" to bid up the price of oil futures. Only a fool is "short oil" these days.

Could we be about to relive the 1970s, which was the last time oil prices were this high relative to other consumer prices? The good news is that, thanks to increased efficiency and reduced industry, the G7 economies are much less oil-dependent than they were back in the days of kipper ties and bell-bottoms. Nor are high oil prices likely to bring back the stagflation - low growth plus high inflation - we saw in those dreary days.

Some analysts even argue that high oil prices are good, on the principle that they send a signal to producers and consumers that it is time to seek new sources of energy. But this is another piece of nonsense.

There are two problems with high oil prices. The first is political: they enrich the wrong people. "Naturally Iran is happy," the Iranian oil minister was quoted as saying by al-Jazeera last week. "High prices make any supplier happy." Well, anything that makes the regime in Teheran happy is bad in my book.

But the much more serious problem is environmental. Here, I have to dissent from the fashionably contrarian view that global warming isn't happening or doesn't matter. For 400,000 years, the world's atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide (CO2) fluctuated between 180 and 280 parts per million (ppm). Last year it reached 380 ppm. The evidence that global temperatures are rising as a result is incontrovertible. True, no one knows exactly what the effects on the world's climate may be. But, once again, only a fool thinks there will be no effects.

The trouble is that high oil prices are not a signal to mankind to do anything about CO2 emissions. On the contrary, they are as much a signal for oil companies to exploit hitherto non-viable deposits of hydrocarbons, such as Canada's tar sands. At the same time, high oil prices do not deter people from buying gas-guzzling cars. Indeed, the demand for Sports Utility Vehicles like the monstrous Hummer seems to be (as economists say) "price-inelastic". Better-off Americans are still buying Hummers even with gas at $3 a gallon.

It's easy to see why. If you drive as much as Americans do - it's a big country and people commute long distances to work - you want to be comfortable on the road. The SUV is in fact a kind of hybrid - part vehicle, part living room. Unfortunately, the market is only as far-sighted as consumers. If people don't believe that global warming will affect their lives - and polls show that they don't - then the risk of climate change simply isn't priced in.

So what is to be done? Is there a better way to propel ourselves around than sucking oil out of the ground, refining it and setting it alight in internal combustion engines? The answer is yes.

I've often agreed with Homer Simpson that alcohol is the solution to (as well as the cause of) most of life's problems. In this case, alcohol really is the answer - to be precise, the form of alcohol known as ethanol, which is distilled from plants such as sugar cane.

Unnoticed in the northern hemisphere, one country is pioneering a transportation revolution by switching from petrol to ethanol. That country is Brazil. Today, ethanol accounts for 40 per cent of all automobile fuel in Brazil, while 80 per cent of new Brazilian cars are flexible-fuel cars that can run on either petrol or ethanol.

In theory, such "biomass" fuels - derived from carbohydrates not hydrocarbons - could replace nearly all of the world's oil-based transportation fuels. There would be some environmental costs to such a switch, no doubt, but it would radically curtail CO2 emissions.

What's preventing the northern hemisphere from following Brazil's lead? The answer is not so much Big Oil - though American oil companies have fought tooth and nail against the introduction of ethanol, even as a fuel additive - as Small Agriculture. To protect northern farmers, huge tariffs are currently imposed on imports of Brazilian-produced ethanol by both the United States and the European Union.

Yet not even a world of perfect free trade would convert humanity to more prudent forms of propulsion. Tax incentives are also needed to encourage people to buy flexible-fuel cars.

And if you want to know how to pay for those tax breaks, just ask Gordon Brown. British-style taxation of gasoline won't stop Americans from driving Hummers. But it could help finance a transition to the car of the future: Green Hummers that run on booze.


TOPICS: Editorial; Foreign Affairs; Government; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: energy; gasprices; myth; oil; oilprice; uk; us
Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
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I disagree with him on two points:

I don't believe in global warming.

I think petrodiesel, then a transition to biodiesel, is the answer.

Regards, Ivan

The Sietch Banner

1 posted on 04/30/2006 12:55:26 AM PDT by MadIvan
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To: Deetes; Barset; fanfan; LadyofShalott; Tolik; mtngrl@vrwc; pax_et_bonum; Alkhin; agrace; ...

Ping!


2 posted on 04/30/2006 12:55:48 AM PDT by MadIvan (I aim to misbehave.)
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To: MadIvan

"To which British motorists can only reply: Diddums."

And Americans can, in turn, reply:

Well... don't want to get banned, so let's stop there.


3 posted on 04/30/2006 1:20:56 AM PDT by Jack Hammer
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To: MadIvan
The SUV is in fact a kind of hybrid - part vehicle, part living room.

I don't care who you are - that's funny!

4 posted on 04/30/2006 1:58:18 AM PDT by Slings and Arrows (Rachel Corrie's not dead - she's taking a CAT nap.)
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Limbaugh says we aren't paying a lot for gas. So it must be true.


5 posted on 04/30/2006 2:00:38 AM PDT by KneelBeforeZod (I have five dollars for each of you)
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To: MadIvan

Actually ethanol my be an answer, but in fuel cells. Already have them in small ones, but it will be a while before they are scaled up.

Another is Nuclear power. Solar panels. All good, but the problem with all of them is it just reduces demand for oil and therefor, reduces price so it is more affordable and cheaper than the alternatives.

So do we do as the Brits and increase taxes on it to reduce demand? That would put more money in the US pocket and less in Iran's and SA.


6 posted on 04/30/2006 2:21:41 AM PDT by KeyWest (Help stamp out taglines!)
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To: Slings and Arrows

Yep that's funny. I drive an SUV to help speed up the consumption of gas. We won't stop using it until it's gone. Necessity being the mother of invention, when we need a new energy source we'll get one. I watched a movie about a promising new alternative called energon....


7 posted on 04/30/2006 2:34:43 AM PDT by grantgarvey
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To: MadIvan; All
I have been covering, ( Or, as Seamole calls it...-backhoe's pseudoblog--... ) pseudo-blogging, this issue for years, so allow me to drop out of Lurk & Link mode for a rare bit of commentary-- we all need to get serious about our dependency on foreign sources of energy, and use our own resources.

Our consumer-based economy is driven by and dependent upon readily-available, reliable energy-- choke that off, and we'll all be back to using one rotary dial phone in the dining room, watching one TV in the living room, and driving one car per family-- probably a Hudson Hornet or a Nash Metropolitan...

We need to

1) end the nonsensical ban on offshore drilling off California and Florida--read & weep:
Castro Plans to Drill 45 Miles from US Shores, But We Can't

2) build a lot of next-generation nuclear power plants, not just for electricity, but for any process requiring heat, power, or steam.
And if we replaced our existing nuclear plants with
this one there would be significant benefits.

3) end Jimmy Carter's idiotic ban on recycling nuclear waste, and reprocess the stuff rather than fighting over where to bury it. Europe has done this for decades.-- what to do with spent nuclear fuel? Answer here: http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1468321/posts?page=50#50 hattip:  Mike (former Navy Nuclear Engineer)

4) use the 300-500 years worth of coal we have on our own land, using the new clean-coal technology.
-Clean Coal Centre--

5) and finally, there's nothing wrong with conservation, we should all practice it- but you can't conserve your way out of a shortage. Nor is there anything wrong with "alternative" energy sources- except they don't supply the vast ( not to mention readily-available ) amounts of power we need at a price competitive to more conventional sources. Then again, there is this to ponder:
Energy From the Gulf Stream
http://www.energy.gatech.edu/presentations/mhoover.pdf

We do need to get serious about this before we get strangled by a bunch of petty thieves and dictators who don't like us much.

My tongue-in-cheek collection of energy-related links:

Sticker Shock-$3 a gallon gas? Click the picture:

And kindly note, and note well-- the first reply to this post ( when gas was $1.45 a gallon ) was derisive... so, who's laughing now?




8 posted on 04/30/2006 2:42:16 AM PDT by backhoe (Just an Old Keyboard Cowboy, Ridin' the Trakball into the Dawn of Information)
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To: KeyWest; backhoe

Has anyone here looked at the numbers?

Can we grow enough ethanol to fuel all the cars in the US?

Basically burning ethanol is using solar power.

I find it hard to believe that we can. It is also seasonal. And last but not least it uses a lot of water.


9 posted on 04/30/2006 3:19:58 AM PDT by DB ()
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To: DB
Has anyone here looked at the numbers?

From my links:

http://www.instapundit.com/
ALTERNATIVE-FUEL-O-RAMA: Popular Mechanics crunches the numbers on various alt-energy schemes.

10 posted on 04/30/2006 3:27:07 AM PDT by backhoe (Just an Old Keyboard Cowboy, Ridin' the Trakball into the Dawn of Information)
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To: MadIvan
Driving down the M40 on Friday, I passed petrol stations selling regular unleaded at 97.9 pence per litre. That works out at $6.62 a gallon.

What is he using? British math? There are less than 4 litres per gallon. That means that "petrol, my dear diddums" is less than $4/gallon.

11 posted on 04/30/2006 3:48:16 AM PDT by raybbr
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To: MadIvan
If the oil companies are making approx. 19 cents a gallon (and they made billions) and the government is making almost 50 cents a gallon in taxes...
Why aren't Americans upset with the insane profits that the government is making.
I guess I just don't understand. The angst seems misdirected.
12 posted on 04/30/2006 3:51:20 AM PDT by philman_36
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To: raybbr; MadIvan
What is he using? British math? There are less than 4 litres per gallon. That means that "petrol, my dear diddums" is less than $4/gallon.

OOOOPPPPPSSSS! 97.6 pence!

You Brits got to change that - it sounds too much like pennies. :)

(After a long run through the woods the oxygen was trapped in my legs slowing down my brain.)

13 posted on 04/30/2006 3:59:34 AM PDT by raybbr
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To: raybbr

pence are worth more than pennies.


14 posted on 04/30/2006 3:59:56 AM PDT by palmer (Money problems do not come from a lack of money, but from living an excessive, unrealistic lifestyle)
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To: raybbr

Oops, late again.


15 posted on 04/30/2006 4:00:38 AM PDT by palmer (Money problems do not come from a lack of money, but from living an excessive, unrealistic lifestyle)
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To: MadIvan
While booze and hummers have a long history of association, they can be deadly on the highway.

ANWR (Alaska) was purchased for its oil -- time we followed through on the idea.

16 posted on 04/30/2006 4:01:00 AM PDT by Ed_in_NJ (Who killed Suzanne Coleman?)
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To: MadIvan
The price of fuel is high precisely because of "supply and demand economics", as Lord Browne knows only too well. Global demand for oil has risen by around 40 per cent in the past 20 years.

Would an economic model suggest that, since the price has increased sixfold in the last eight years, the supply should have declined sixfold during the same period? I don't buy the argument that global demand is driving prices up without a significant reduction in supply......

17 posted on 04/30/2006 4:04:21 AM PDT by eeriegeno
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To: DB

Interesting.

Look at the graph in post #28 on your 2004 thread (NYMEX Oil Futures). That graph is two years old but accurately predicted our $75/barrel high from last week.

In other words we had 2+ years warning of this impending "crisis". Two years to shape policy and prepare. Or not.

Apparently the price of gas isn't dear enough. Yet...


18 posted on 04/30/2006 4:54:21 AM PDT by rockrr (Never argue with a man who buys ammo in bulk...)
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To: MadIvan
The evidence that global temperatures are rising as a result is incontrovertible.

The author cites that the historic levels of CO2 have been 180 to 280 PPM, notes that they are currently 380 PPM, and points to that as incontrovertible proof. Sure lets me know why he's a journalist and not a scientist.

A couple of simple points, the first being the most obvious:

Correlation is not causation.

Nobody's proved that there IS a variation in the temperatures yet to my satisfaction.

And you're seeing more and more climate scientists breaking ranks with the global warming theory.

19 posted on 04/30/2006 5:08:10 AM PDT by Hardastarboard (Why isn't there an "NRA" for the rest of my rights?)
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To: raybbr
What is he using? British math? There are less than 4 litres per gallon. That means that "petrol, my dear diddums" is less than $4/gallon.

I think that 97.9 pence is a portion of the British pound which when converted to dollars would account for the $6 + per gallon amount.

20 posted on 04/30/2006 5:13:06 AM PDT by USS Alaska (Nuke the terrorist savages - In Honor of Standing Wolf)
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To: backhoe

There is natural gas off the Massachusetts coast. It is the same field that extends north off Maine and into Canada. The Canadians drill, tap, and pipe the gas south to the US. Now, if fat, drunk, girl killing Ted Kennedy can stop a wind farm off his fambly compound in Hyannisport, what chance do you think offshore gas wells have? FAT CHANCE.


21 posted on 04/30/2006 5:26:36 AM PDT by Leisler (Not all Muslims are terrorists, but all terrorists are Muslim.)
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To: philman_36
If the oil companies are making approx. 19 cents a gallon (and they made billions) and the government is making almost 50 cents a gallon in taxes...

The oil company profit per gallon is actually about 9 cents a gallon which makes your point even more poignant.

22 posted on 04/30/2006 5:34:10 AM PDT by facedown (Armed in the Heartland)
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To: palmer

Liters are bigger than quarts.


23 posted on 04/30/2006 5:52:12 AM PDT by arthurus (Better to fight them OVER THERE than here.)
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To: MadIvan

Environmentalists decry the destruction of the rainforests, yet they advocate wholescale destruction of the rainforests in Brazil so sugar cane can be planted to supply ethanol for the world.


24 posted on 04/30/2006 5:53:45 AM PDT by randita
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To: raybbr

3.66 Liters per gallon means a gallon costs 3.66 X 97.6 pence = 3.57 british pounds.

Exchange rate = 6.52 US Dollars


25 posted on 04/30/2006 6:04:41 AM PDT by montomike (If you didn't find this funny and were offended...have a riot.)
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To: MadIvan; Ernest_at_the_Beach

Everyone knows supply and demand is a myth -- not a law -- designed by capitalist and their political lapdogs to oppress the workers.

[rimshot!]

I disagree that petroleum and other hydrocarbons are "fossil fuels".

Over 40 per cent of new vehicles sold in Europe are diesel.


26 posted on 04/30/2006 6:06:59 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: Hardastarboard
When it comes to "Global Warming" there's a lot of sloppy speech going on. Are we talking about increases in average global temperatures. Are we assuming that these both exist AND are caused by increasing atmospheric CO2 levels. Are we further assuming that increasing atmospheric CO2 levels are principally increased by human activity such as the use of fossil fuels. Are we further assuming that individual transportation is the prime user of fossil fuels. Is the hypothesis that if we quit driving gasoline powered automobiles the world will cool?
Seems like there's a whole raft of "ifs" and assuming going on.
27 posted on 04/30/2006 6:10:05 AM PDT by picti
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To: MadIvan
That works out at $6.62 a gallon.

And that works out to about $3.50 per gallon you Brits are paying for your failed Socialist system!

28 posted on 04/30/2006 6:41:57 AM PDT by Thermalseeker
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To: raybbr

97.9 pence is not the same as 97.9 CENTS....


29 posted on 04/30/2006 6:54:06 AM PDT by TheBattman (Islam (and liberalism)- the cult of Satan and a Cancer on Society)
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To: philman_36

"If the oil companies are making approx. 19 cents a gallon"

This is not quite right. They make 8.2 cents per gallon!


30 posted on 04/30/2006 7:00:30 AM PDT by JLGALT (Get ready - Lock and Load!)
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To: MadIvan

The writer lost me when he went into his Enviral Whacko Global Warming Mindset. He obviously never drives out of London. If he did, he would see the big Range Rovers and Lexus SUVs all over the express roads, regular roads and country lanes. Even in London, the BBC cop tv shows have a lot of Range Rovers and Lexus Suvs throughout any part of a show that is out on the streets.


31 posted on 04/30/2006 7:51:55 AM PDT by Grampa Dave (There's a dwindling market for Marxist homosexual lunatic wet dreams posing as journalism)
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To: KneelBeforeZod

"Limbaugh says we aren't paying a lot for gas. So it must be true."

Inflation adjusted we are paying less per gallon of gas than we were in 1970.


32 posted on 04/30/2006 8:09:44 AM PDT by jwh_Denver (Illegal immigration 24/7, the GOP ain't making it 24/7, Oil 24/7)
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To: MadIvan
WAKE UP AMERICA! WE ARE A LAND OF PLENTY ( WITH PLENTY OF OIL) AND OUR GOVERNMENT IS TAKING US DOWN THE EUROPEAN PATH. WE NEED NEW REFINERIES NOW AND ENOUGH OF THIS ONE WORLD BS!
33 posted on 04/30/2006 8:12:20 AM PDT by jetson (throne)
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To: backhoe

good one!


34 posted on 04/30/2006 8:40:35 AM PDT by sgtyork (Prove to us that you can enforce the borders first.)
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To: MadIvan

Most Americans don't buy oil as traded on the commodity exchanges. They buy some refined oil products. Eventually we will see $3 gasoline as essentially free, and that day could be soon or it could be in ten years, somewhere in there. Oil is one of the great bargains on earth. Electricity is another. Water and air will also eventually be seen as bargains on earth, especially if we ever get to the moon to stay, and to Mars.


35 posted on 04/30/2006 8:46:17 AM PDT by RightWhale (Off touch and out of base)
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To: MadIvan
I disagree with him on two points:

I'll add a third: You don't need to drive a gas hog to be comfy.

36 posted on 04/30/2006 8:48:43 AM PDT by mewzilla (Property must be secured or liberty cannot exist. John Adams)
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To: raybbr
You're never gonna live that pence thing down. You're gonna be PENCEBOY from now on.

;^)

37 posted on 04/30/2006 8:52:16 AM PDT by wizardoz (Penceboy! Penceboy!)
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To: Thermalseeker
"And that works out to about $3.50 per gallon you Brits are paying for your failed Socialist system!"

Gas in all,of Europe has ALWAYS been much higher then in the US.
In Slovakia, the price is about $5.00 per gallon (40 sk per ltr)
I have a friend who is managing director of an Italian oil company, building 40 stations in Slovakia.
I often ask him about the business.
He tells me that they are loosing money on every ltr. that they sell. Naturally, he expects that to change, but he does not know when.
38 posted on 04/30/2006 9:01:27 AM PDT by AlexW (Reporting from Bratislava, Slovakia)
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To: MadIvan
Sugar cane does not grow everywhere. When there is an economically viable cellulose-to sugar-to alcohol conversion [so that sawdust, grasses, wood shavings and the like could be used as a feed], then ethanol could become the answer. Imagine a paper shredder-cum-still at the office. You shred a report from last year, the contraption hums and wheezes - and there is a pint of vodka coming out. Everyone happy.
39 posted on 04/30/2006 9:13:34 AM PDT by GSlob
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To: AlexW
He tells me that they are loosing money on every ltr. that they sell. Naturally, he expects that to change, but he does not know when.

LOL. This guy would have a great future in american politics.

40 posted on 04/30/2006 9:17:18 AM PDT by 11Bush
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To: MadIvan
I think petrodiesel, then a transition to biodiesel, is the answer.

I may have a conflict of interest here (I am managing editor of an agricultural trade magazine these days) but I agree. I've seen figures that indicate that we could not convert to ethanol or any significant mix of ethanol even if we converteds all our arable land to corn. On the other hand, you can make diesel out of almost anything that has plenty of carbon. Here's a post from a blog I contribute to occasionally:

Alternatve energy news from NRO Online, just for a chuckle

RENEWABLE ENERGY BREAKTHROUGH! [Cosmo ]

Important news! Don't let the mainstream media censor it:

 

A German inventor says he's found a way to make cheap diesel fuel out of dead cats.

Dr Christian Koch, 55, from Kleinhartmannsdorf, said his method uses old tyres, weeds and animal cadavers.

They are heated up to 300 Celsius to filter out hydrocarbon which is then turned into diesel by a catalytic converter.

He said the resulting "high quality bio-diesel" costs just 15 pence per litre.

Koch said the cadaver of a fully grown cat can produce 2.5 litres of fuel - meaning around 20 cats are needed for a full tank.

He said: "I tank my car with my own diesel mixture and have driven it for 105,000 miles without any problems."

Annelise Krauss of the Dresden Animal Protection Association blasted Koch's new diesel though, saying: "This is as bad as experimenting on animals."

 

_________________________________________________________ Of course, Annalise Kraus shows just how dumb you have to be to be a hardcore animal rights activist. The moron apparently doesn't even know that dead things don't experience pain.
41 posted on 04/30/2006 9:29:14 AM PDT by Mr. Silverback (TRY JESUS. If you don't like Him, the devil will always take you back.)
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To: GSlob
Imagine a paper shredder-cum-still at the office

I tried imagining it. The image was disturbing. ;?)

42 posted on 04/30/2006 9:32:49 AM PDT by listenhillary (The original Contract with America - The U.S. Constitution)
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To: Slings and Arrows
The SUV is in fact a kind of hybrid - part vehicle, part living room.

I don't care who you are - that's funny!

When my bro-in-law bought a Hummer, I walked into the family Christmas party and announced in my parade ground voice, "Attention to the owner of the tan house, license number A123456, parked in our lot. Your lights are on."

43 posted on 04/30/2006 9:32:58 AM PDT by Mr. Silverback (TRY JESUS. If you don't like Him, the devil will always take you back.)
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To: 11Bush
"LOL. This guy would have a great future in american politics."

I looked up my notes from this week.
He makes 70 Euros per 1000 ltrs ( about 40 cents per gallon)
That is GROSS profit. From that comes ALL expenses of transportation, and cost of operating the stations.
In Austria, just a few km from here, they gross 90 Euro per 1000 ltrs. We can assume that they might make a net of maybe 10 Euro per 1000 ltrs of gas.
44 posted on 04/30/2006 9:37:50 AM PDT by AlexW (Reporting from Bratislava, Slovakia)
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To: listenhillary
"Imagine a paper shredder-cum-still at the office
I tried imagining it. The image was disturbing. ;?)"
Well, maybe it should have the built-in chiller and a vending machine tied into it, so that vodka comes out chilled and one could get a pickle or a sandwich as well. But that would be a luxury model.
45 posted on 04/30/2006 9:39:04 AM PDT by GSlob
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To: KneelBeforeZod
We are not paying much compared to the Carter oil crisis, and to reach the equivalent, crude would have to be at $90 per barrel.

We are not paying diddly compared to Europe, as this article points out.

The oil companies are making 9 cents a gallon in profit on gas.

Sure sounds to me like Limbaugh is right. We are at or near the top of the high demand/low supply wave, and we will soon start down toward the high demand/high supply trough. The wavelength on these cycles is about 25 years.

46 posted on 04/30/2006 9:40:32 AM PDT by Mr. Silverback (TRY JESUS. If you don't like Him, the devil will always take you back.)
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To: MadIvan

I have an innate talent for solving several problems simultaneously. With all the drunk-driving laws, I do all my drinking at home, thus saving on gas.


47 posted on 04/30/2006 9:41:34 AM PDT by P.O.E.
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To: KeyWest

No, taxing is not the solution.


48 posted on 04/30/2006 9:41:34 AM PDT by Mr. Silverback (TRY JESUS. If you don't like Him, the devil will always take you back.)
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To: backhoe
And kindly note, and note well-- the first reply to this post ( when gas was $1.45 a gallon ) was derisive... so, who's laughing now?

Not I! Your points are excellent.

49 posted on 04/30/2006 9:44:50 AM PDT by Mr. Silverback (TRY JESUS. If you don't like Him, the devil will always take you back.)
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To: All

And I thought the real reason of the high gas costs was to put the mindset of the US into believing its all Irans fault and that if we go to war with Iran, invade and topple the regime like we did in Iraq the price of fuel will magically go back down.

I guess I must still be eating stupid food.


50 posted on 04/30/2006 9:51:59 AM PDT by Eye of Unk
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