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The fantasy is over, we must partition Iraq and get out now (a view from the thames)
The Sunday Times (London) ^ | 5/21/2006 | Simon Jenkins

Posted on 05/21/2006 4:51:33 AM PDT by FerdieMurphy

We should not have gone to Iraq because going to Iraq implied staying and staying implied leaving. Now begins the leaving, and it will be bloody. All else is an illusion.

This weekend another Iraqi government, the third in three years, entered office under American guns in Baghdad’s green zone. Ibrahim al-Jaafari gives way to Nouri al-Maliki, though neither the defence nor internal security posts are filled. These are posts that matter, with their murky unofficial links to police, militias and Baghdad death squads.

The reason they are unfilled is that post-withdrawal Iraq is already up and running. Power has seeped away from the coalition and its still puppet ministers. It has moved out onto the streets of Baghdad and Basra — and into the morgues.

The jungle drums can read the signs. The British are back in helmets and tanks in the south, the Americans are back bombing and strafing villages in the west. The coalition has lost any ability to guarantee security to the Iraqi people, who must look elsewhere. In Iraq, optimism may always be a virtue but it has become fantasy.

This place is a failed state. There is no rule of law. Murder is unpunished. No foreigner dares to move except by air. Any Iraqi risks his life working away from home — and women risk their lives working at all. Interpreters wear balaclavas. Vendetta killings come not daily but hourly, measured only by body counts. Professionals are decamping to Jordan in greater numbers even than under Saddam. Water, power and petrol supplies are also worse.

At the end of this month Tony Blair flies to Washington to discuss with George W Bush how to escape. What was to be a neocon beacon of democratic stability has become a hell-hole of anarchy. Iraq is no longer just a mistake: it is the outcome of an intellectual and moral catastrophe from which the image of western democracy will take a generation to recover.

Bush and Blair have been shielded from this truth by years of sycophantic briefing, but they cannot be shielded from opinion polls. The war is overwhelmingly unpopular on both sides of the Atlantic. Since both leaders are planning their departures, they are frantic to have the incubus removed from their shoulders. Iraq policy is a matter of dates.

The best moment to withdraw was when the Pentagon originally intended, in June 2003, leaving Ahmed Chalabi to fight things out with the Shi’ite clerics after Saddam’s downfall. But the urge to “rebuild a nation” got the better of Bush and Blair. Another window was in December 2003, then June 2004, then December 2005, “drop dead” dates when control might have been handed over to whichever majority leader was ascendant. Another date is now, with a new government in place.

A crucial illusion of American and British policy is that the occupation is somehow maintaining the integrity of the state and its government. It is not. It is undermining both. In truth there is no state and coalition troops are merely squatting in camps dotted across the landscape, emerging occasionally to kill or get killed.

There are two consequences of each refusal to leave. First, the troops offer an ever more inviting target for insurgency and a magnet for anti-western guerrillas from across the region. This in turn boosts the militias as alternative power networks and encourages politicians to back them rather than the army. Second, each postponement of withdrawal undermines the independence and self-reliance of the current Iraqi leader. The American failure to entrench Ayad Allawi as a new Baghdad strongman last year and leave him to fend for himself was not democracy but stupidity.

Miliki’s position even within the Shi’ite majority depends on his appeasing the Mahdist gangs and the Iran-backed Badr Brigades linked to Ayatollah al-Sistani. The one certainty is that the presence of American power at his elbow will weaken, not strengthen, his credibility as a nationalist leader.

Washington and London still do not hear the message, that their occupation is hugely unpopular among Iraqis, except for those VIPs whose lives literally depend on it.

Withdrawal becomes harder with each postponement. Those with a vested interest in occupation are more entrenched. Bases are enlarged, contracts let, corruption extended. For the past year British and American policy has been rooted in the concept of “orderly transition” to a new Iraqi army, the latest version of Vietnamisation. Over the course of 2005-06 American and British troops were to be replaced by new army and police units. Last October the mooted date for this was May 2006. Such dates are meaningless when an occupier has lost initiative to anarchy.

The “new Iraqi army” strategy might have been plausible had the old army been reformed and a new nexus of power and loyalty established in Baghdad. That option has long gone. Despite quantities of training and equipment, an Iraqi army deployable nationwide is blind optimism. (Its officers dare not even drive home in uniform). Local troops are unreliable outside their home district simply because they are never going to outgun the militias. Soldiers can be brave as lions, but why kill fellow Iraqis and provoke revenge when the occupiers will soon be gone?

Police are more important to local security than soldiers, and they have everywhere distanced themselves from the occupation. The only peace in Iraq is where local police are in league with whatever power structure, clerical or criminal, is locally dominant. Battles in the south are largely between Mahdist and Badr gangs and their offshoots. These fights will be resolved only when one or other emerges as dominant. The coalition has not the remotest leverage over this.

In much of Iraq everything points to a looming conflict between Shi’ites and Sunnis. To all who know these people, this is an utter tragedy, brought on by the coalition’s continued presence and its failure to establish order. All recent experience of such conflict, whether in Ulster, Palestine, Sudan or Yugoslavia, sees it resolved into population movement and ethnic cleansing. This is now proceeding bloodily in and round Baghdad. It will bring an awful residue of ghost districts, refugee camps, revenge attacks and safe havens. In Yugoslavia the solution, abetted by western intervention, was partition. In Iraq America began the same process by guaranteeing de facto autonomy to Kurdistan. That logic must now be followed to its conclusion. Partition was always the most likely outcome. This view is at last gaining traction in Washington, advocated by Joe Biden, the Senate foreign relations chairman.

A template is offered by the constitution negotiated a year ago by Zalmay Khalilzad, Washington’s Baghdad proconsul, and approved by the voters. Its chapter five allows any of Iraq’s 18 provinces to be grouped into regions, each with an allotted share of oil revenue and an option of assuming responsibility for legislation and “organising internal forces . . . police, security and regional guards”.

This could not be more specific. Provincial governors in Sunni and Shi’ite regions may vote themselves, individually or collectively, a similar autonomy to that enjoyed by the Kurds. It is clear that this will embrace formal and informal military and police units. Dreadful problems would remain, including the governance of Baghdad and of the mixed areas bordering Kurdistan. But at least there is a constitutional framework for decentralisation such that military responsibility can be handed over to new regional commanders. That could begin at once if coalition forces can bear to surrender their bases. The alternative is an eternity of the present stasis.

In southern Iraq the British have already handed three provinces over to local forces, obeying the old Arabist maxim: find the nearest strongman and give him guns. What the Americans do in central Iraq is their decision. American troops are desperate to leave, though what happens to a dozen gigantic bases is beyond imagining (perhaps they will become refugee camps).

This is in part Britain’s war and that part should be Britain’s to end. Iraq is no longer about nation building or democracy spreading or reputation enhancing. It is about getting out in the best possible order. The route is mapped in the Khalilzad constitution. The endgame of yet another western intervention will be yet another partition. But at least the sooner the better.


TOPICS: Editorial; Foreign Affairs; News/Current Events; Politics/Elections; United Kingdom; War on Terror
KEYWORDS: iraq; surrendermonkeys; ukwantsout
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This weekend another Iraqi government, the third in three years, entered office under American guns in Baghdad’s green zone.
1 posted on 05/21/2006 4:51:37 AM PDT by FerdieMurphy
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To: FerdieMurphy
Just what we really need here -- another opinion.

How many nations has the author built?

2 posted on 05/21/2006 4:56:08 AM PDT by Ed_in_NJ (Who killed Suzanne Coleman?)
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To: FerdieMurphy
This weekend another Iraqi government, the third in three years, entered office under American guns in Baghdad’s green zone.

This bizarre spin (the previous "governments" were intended to be temporary as means of chosing the one longterm government) is all I need to read before moving on.

3 posted on 05/21/2006 4:56:36 AM PDT by Darkwolf377 (Kowtowing to the Bush haters ends now)
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To: FerdieMurphy
That has got to be the most cliche filled ignorant pile of nonsense I have read today.
4 posted on 05/21/2006 4:58:13 AM PDT by Harmless Teddy Bear (I am only an evil INTERN. I am still learning.)
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To: FerdieMurphy

Echoing the advise of "Plugs" Biden? Not a very good move. Leftist critics have never been satisfied, or right about anything. Even if we had rolled into Baghdad and found Hussein on top of a pile of chemical munitions, reading a love letter from OBL......they'd still be parroting the same lines.


5 posted on 05/21/2006 4:58:25 AM PDT by edpc
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To: edpc

advise = advice


6 posted on 05/21/2006 5:01:42 AM PDT by edpc
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To: FerdieMurphy

Partition would cause a civil war. The Sunni areas don't have much oil.


7 posted on 05/21/2006 5:02:11 AM PDT by Paleo Conservative
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To: FerdieMurphy

"Simon Jenkins" doesn't SOUND French, but hey - what's in a name?


8 posted on 05/21/2006 5:03:51 AM PDT by mkjessup (The Shah doesn't look so bad now, eh? But nooo, Jimmah said the Ayatollah was a 'godly' man.)
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To: Paleo Conservative

"....would cause a civil war."

And that is a bad thing?


9 posted on 05/21/2006 5:04:16 AM PDT by dakine
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To: FerdieMurphy
These Brits have a strange view of what's war and what's just normal life in a rough neighborhood.

The killing rate in Iraq is barely that found in the residential areas of DC.

There are other American cities with higher rates of killing, and when you get into such third-world vacation spots as Lagos, Nigeria, downtown Baghdad is seen for the peaceful respite that it really is.

10 posted on 05/21/2006 5:04:17 AM PDT by muawiyah (-)
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To: Darkwolf377
This bizarre spin (the previous "governments" were intended to be temporary as means of chosing the one longterm government) is all I need to read before moving on.

Well, more than that, perhaps he ought to review the immediate post WWII Italian political history, extending right up to 1994.  Seemed like they had a new government every five minutes.

11 posted on 05/21/2006 5:04:35 AM PDT by Racehorse (Where your treasure is, there will your heart be also.)
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To: Racehorse
post WWII Italian political history, extending right up to 1994. Seemed like they had a new government every five minutes.

Great point. In 1999 I met an Italian woman who was amused by how Americans complained about their government. She said something to the effect of "Our government, not the party but the government itself, has changed every three years since World War II, you don't know how good you have it."

She may have been exagerrating (or I'm misremembering) but her point was clear.

Even if this is an exagerration, I guess this writer wishes we'd bailed on Italy after WWII.

12 posted on 05/21/2006 5:07:40 AM PDT by Darkwolf377 (Kowtowing to the Bush haters ends now)
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To: FerdieMurphy
In much of Iraq everything points to a looming conflict between Shi’ites and Sunnis.

'Tis an ill wind that blows no good.

13 posted on 05/21/2006 5:10:54 AM PDT by neutrino (Globalization is the economic treason that dare not speak its name.(173))
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To: FerdieMurphy

I for one felt that it was a mistake to try to "nation build." I did however, support the invasion and still do. I always thought that they had no ability really to build a democracy in Iraq (the people are backwards). I felt that we should turn it over to the tribes and get out and if the country was partitioned that would be the best of all worlds for everyone concerned. That being said, I feel that the Iraq's are doing better then I thought they would be doing. It is really time to take a good look at Iraq and see what is going down. It may be worth while to stay and it may be best to get out. But, the worst thing to do is make it look like we are being chased out.


14 posted on 05/21/2006 5:12:00 AM PDT by bilhosty
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To: FerdieMurphy

Simon Jenkins is and always was, an idiot.


15 posted on 05/21/2006 5:15:58 AM PDT by plenipotentiary
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To: dakine

Depends on who wins.


16 posted on 05/21/2006 5:17:28 AM PDT by Paleo Conservative
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To: bilhosty

Try this: Without our "nation building" Iraq would now be annexed to Iran.


17 posted on 05/21/2006 5:17:42 AM PDT by rightazrain (OK, who put a "Stop Payment" on my reality check?)
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To: Darkwolf377
She may have been exagerrating (or I'm misremembering) but her point was clear.

Actually, she was being conservative.  On average, the governments lasted something like eleven months.

Not only were there numerous political parties, but numerous contending factions within the parties, and contending factions within the factions.  By comparison, Iraq is as steady as the Rock of Gibraltar. :-)

Plus, people might remember Italy has had its share of internal terrorism, death and mayhem.

18 posted on 05/21/2006 5:20:09 AM PDT by Racehorse (Where your treasure is, there will your heart be also.)
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To: FerdieMurphy
This weekend another Iraqi government, the third in three years, entered office under American guns in Baghdad’s green zone.

That got the ol' BS detector pegging off the scale. I couldn't resist reading more of it, but none of it surprised me.

This article would make great cat litter box or birdcage liner.

19 posted on 05/21/2006 5:20:33 AM PDT by Allegra (My Tagline is Humblegunner Approved)
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To: Allegra

Our cats deserve better litter!


20 posted on 05/21/2006 5:21:30 AM PDT by MEG33 (GOD BLESS OUR ARMED FORCES)
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To: FerdieMurphy
This weekend another Iraqi government, the third in three years,

It's in accordance with a plan known well in advance. It's not a sign of turmoil but a sign of progress.

21 posted on 05/21/2006 5:23:20 AM PDT by Tribune7
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To: FerdieMurphy
This place is a failed state. There is no rule of law. Murder is unpunished.

Sounds like parts of the U.K.

22 posted on 05/21/2006 5:24:22 AM PDT by Tribune7
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To: rightazrain

"Try this: Without our "nation building" Iraq would now be annexed to Iran."

Try this, one way to get out of Iraq with out looking weak is to go through Iran.


23 posted on 05/21/2006 5:26:23 AM PDT by bilhosty
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To: bilhosty
(the people are backwards).

They really aren't so much backwards. They've just been isolated off of the global market for a long time during the sanctions. They're getting pretty good at picking up current global trade practices now. When I first came here, they were doing things in such an old-fashioned, somewhat unprofessional manner, but they have been enthusiastic learners.

I was also surprised to see the level of education among many of the Iraqis. Like any society, they have their class system, but there are some very bright educated people here and those types are not a rarity.

24 posted on 05/21/2006 5:29:51 AM PDT by Allegra (My Tagline is Humblegunner Approved)
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To: FerdieMurphy
The endgame of yet another western intervention will be yet another partition.

What about the beginning game? (ie. the cobbling together of an artificial country by the European Powers at the time?)

25 posted on 05/21/2006 5:35:05 AM PDT by DoctorMichael (The Fourth Estate is a Fifth Column!!!!!!!!!)
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To: FerdieMurphy

Simon Jenkins, advancing his solution of abandoning Iraq so it can be turned into another Cambodian killing field so that Jenkins can then write articles blaming it all on Bush.
The Vietnam war still looms large in the thoughts and minds of leftists like Jenkins. They have not had an original idea since 1970. It's all cut and run. After all, they reason, it worked well in Cambodia so why won't it work just as well in Iraq?
Jenkins is just another elitist fool.


26 posted on 05/21/2006 5:50:20 AM PDT by finnigan2
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To: bilhosty
Hmmm... I humbly disagree that the Iraqi people are backwards. They live their lives they way they have always done it - up until now, they've known no other way. Who ever has the most guns and followers gets to be in charge. Everyone else acquiesces and tries to keep to themselves. They are actually very humble, respectful and reverent people their daily lives are centered on their religion. The average citizen would no sooner hurt someone than watch a porno movie. Now that they have tasted capitalism, however - there will be no turning back. There in lies the fear of the radical Islamists. If capitalism thrives in the cradle of humanity - it will surely spread. The Islam fundamentalists believe that to be the root of all evil, since their lives will then be centered on making money opposed to their religion. So, this is way bigger than building a nation. The question is; can their be democracy without capitalism?
27 posted on 05/21/2006 5:52:01 AM PDT by Army MP Retired (Freedom Isn't Free)
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To: Ed_in_NJ
Just what we really need here -- another opinion.

This was my opinion back before this war started. It is inevitable that civil war occur without a dictator, benevolent or otherwise, to hold them together by bribe and fear. It is obvious to me that this will be another of those modern wars where there is no surrender and, thus, no finality.

28 posted on 05/21/2006 5:52:25 AM PDT by Glenn (Annoy a BushBot...Think for yourself.)
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To: Glenn

There is no civil war in Iraq.


29 posted on 05/21/2006 5:58:10 AM PDT by RedRover
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To: Glenn
It is inevitable that civil war occur without a dictator, benevolent or otherwise, to hold them together by bribe and fear. It is obvious to me that this will be another of those modern wars where there is no surrender and, thus, no finality.

It sure doesn't look like that from where I sit.

And despite the media calling for it every chanve they get, there is no sign of civil war here.

30 posted on 05/21/2006 6:01:18 AM PDT by Allegra (My Tagline is Humblegunner Approved)
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To: RedRover
There is no civil war in Iraq.

Did I say there was?

31 posted on 05/21/2006 6:05:51 AM PDT by Glenn (Annoy a BushBot...Think for yourself.)
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To: FerdieMurphy

That's the English answer to everything...partition...look at what these goof-ball did to india...no thanks!


32 posted on 05/21/2006 6:07:07 AM PDT by USMMA_83 (Tantra is my fetish ;))
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To: Darkwolf377

The first one we made, the second one the Iraqis made and the third one the Iraqi people voted for.

and faster then Germany and Japan formed new governments too.


33 posted on 05/21/2006 6:10:50 AM PDT by usmcobra (Marines out of uniform might as well be nude, since they can no longer be recognized as Marines.)
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To: USMMA_83
Yeah - but it worked for the Israeli / Palestinian issue... no, wait - never mind.
34 posted on 05/21/2006 6:12:12 AM PDT by Army MP Retired (Freedom Isn't Free)
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To: Allegra

Articles like this really bug. The liberal arrogant condescension that somehow these "benighted" peoples are only fit to live under a despot is disgusting. For liberals in long established democracies or republics, not of their making (although they are trying to diamantle them)to sneer at attempts to build a government as some sort of cutesy dress-up game is disgusting.

Look at our current congress, how well do you think they would do if they had to start from scratch, write a constitution and establish a government? If that doesn't scare you...


35 posted on 05/21/2006 6:12:15 AM PDT by Tijeras_Slim
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To: Tijeras_Slim
This elitist writer shows his ignorance right off the bat. He bemoans this being the third government in three years, but that's all according to plan. They're pretty much on a schedule that was laid out around the time the coalition turned the country back over to the Iraqis in mid '04.

The media wants so badly for this whole thing to fail, but it's just not showing any signs of doing so. I'm sure this is very frustrating for the poor little Marxists.

36 posted on 05/21/2006 6:28:51 AM PDT by Allegra (My Tagline is Humblegunner Approved)
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To: FerdieMurphy
Absolute and total insanity without even a basic clue about ground truth in Iraq. This would be the stupidest of all possible moves. It would eliminate any support for the Coalition and drive Iraqs to join the Terrorists. It would be doing exactly what the Terrorists want us to do. Basically it would legitimate every accusation from the Terrorists about Western Imperialism and "the New Crusades". Only a complete clueless fool could think this bit of insanity was a good idea.
37 posted on 05/21/2006 6:32:45 AM PDT by MNJohnnie (Conservative, The simple fact about DC is this . "There is more work to do"...)
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To: FerdieMurphy

"we must partition Iraq and get out now"

Excuse me, Simon. But who are you? The Iraqis will decide if they want to partition their country.


38 posted on 05/21/2006 6:37:36 AM PDT by nuconvert ([there's a lot of bad people in the pistachio business])
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To: MNJohnnie; FerdieMurphy
The whole article is riddled with fiction. I daresay that this guy is even more bold and blatant in his outright lies than is CNN.

And that's going some.

39 posted on 05/21/2006 6:38:36 AM PDT by Allegra (My Tagline is Humblegunner Approved)
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To: Glenn
"Glenn (Annoy a BushBot...Think for yourself.) "

Take you own advice. Instead of mindlessly regurgitating what your favorite clueless Radio Host Mike Savage tells you to think about Iraq, try actually finding out even one basic fact about Iraq. Your post was so far removed from reality one has to wonder why you wasted our time with it. You clearly know absolutely NOTHING about Iraq and should refrain from posting on the topic. In fact, you love for thugs and bully boys seems to indicate you have a complete ignorance of History. Eventually your thug get kicked out and you support comes back to bite you on the butt. That is what happened in Iran. We have been paying the price for this utterly stupid "Stablity over progress" thinking for almost 30 years now
40 posted on 05/21/2006 6:40:20 AM PDT by MNJohnnie (Conservative, The simple fact about DC is this . "There is more work to do"...)
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To: MNJohnnie
We have been paying the price for this utterly stupid "Stablity over progress" thinking for almost 30 years now

What, in Bush's plan, do you see that will prevent the inevitable warring of religious factions in the next 30 years? When (if) the US leaves Iraq, the thugs will come. Greed is eternal. Religious animus is eternal. Iran is the perfect example. They had a chance at democracy and they failed. Which color will you be wearing if news reports are correct?

41 posted on 05/21/2006 6:47:12 AM PDT by Glenn (Annoy a BushBot...Think for yourself.)
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To: Glenn
First off, let's get one thing real clear. News reports, as concern Iraq, are not correct and have rarely ever been correct since this thing began. News reports are so removed from the truth, it's pathetic.

Troops will eventually draw down to well below combat levels, but the U.S. will maintain a military presence in Iraq for years to come.

After all, we still have bases in Germany, Japan, Italy and Korea. Iraq will join that list.

42 posted on 05/21/2006 7:02:11 AM PDT by Allegra (My Tagline is Humblegunner Approved)
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To: Glenn

If you meant that a civil war is inevitable SOMEDAY, then you're just mindlessly carping.


43 posted on 05/21/2006 7:05:42 AM PDT by RedRover (Annoy a Bush-Hater...Ask for Logic)
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To: RedRover
then you're just mindlessly carping

As are you if you believe the opposite.

44 posted on 05/21/2006 7:06:51 AM PDT by Glenn (Annoy a BushBot...Think for yourself.)
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To: Glenn
Don't waste our time merely repeating what Mike Savage tells you to think. The people on this thread either have direct contacts in Iraq, background in Military and International Relations, or are actually in Iraq. Most of the posters on this thread actually know what they are talking about instead of merely regurgitating what a ignorant Radio Jock tells them to think. You would be wise to turn off the Radio and listen to them.
45 posted on 05/21/2006 7:11:10 AM PDT by MNJohnnie (Conservative, The simple fact about DC is this . "There is more work to do"...)
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To: Army MP Retired

"Hmmm... I humbly disagree that the Iraqi people are backwards. They live their lives they way they have always done it - up until now, they've known no other way"

In otherwards they are backwards. Arab society collectivley is poor, corrupt ackwards given towards violence and fanatcism. Some have worked there way out of that but many have not. They are the most dysfunctinal culture on earth. As I said they are doing better then I expected. But, I would really take a good look at things if I was in the administration and utilize all of the inteligence that they have before I would in.


46 posted on 05/21/2006 7:12:13 AM PDT by bilhosty
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To: MNJohnnie
Don't waste our time merely repeating what Mike Savage tells you to think.

As a defie, I have a little trouble listening to anyone these days.

One of us will be right and the other wrong. We'll see.

47 posted on 05/21/2006 7:30:05 AM PDT by Glenn (Annoy a BushBot...Think for yourself.)
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To: FerdieMurphy

This is an interesting switch. Now we have an Englishman steal Joe Biden-Biden's ideas. Nothing new under the sun, I guess.


48 posted on 05/21/2006 7:33:22 AM PDT by jmaroneps37 (John Spencer: Fighting to save America from Hillary Clinton..)
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To: Darkwolf377

More cut-and-run nonsense, I see.


49 posted on 05/21/2006 7:58:09 AM PDT by rdb3 (Honey, you keep that up and it's whatever you want it to be. --Family Guy)
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To: Tribune7
This place is a failed state. There is no rule of law. Murder is unpunished.

"Sounds like parts of the U.K."

And which parts would that be?

50 posted on 05/21/2006 8:03:47 AM PDT by Churchillspirit (Anaheim Angels - 2002 World Series Champions)
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