Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

Virginia Reporter Fired Over Fabrications
AP/chicagotribune ^ | May 27, 2006

Posted on 05/28/2006 8:02:52 AM PDT by ncountylee

RICHMOND, Va. -- The Richmond Times-Dispatch said Saturday it fired a reporter for fabricating part of a story and has begun investigating his other work.

Paul Bradley, 51, who worked in the newspaper's northern Virginia bureau, was dismissed Friday, the newspaper reported.

The article, published May 17, was intended to gather reaction in Herndon to President Bush's speech on immigration.

Bradley's fabrications, the Times-Dispatch said, included an interview that did not occur with the director of a center for day laborers and the misrepresentation that he had visited the center by using a Herndon dateline.

Managing editor Louise C. Seals said the director of the center alerted the newspaper to the fabrications.

"What I did was wrong and an indefensible journalistic sin," Bradley said in a statement e-mailed to The Associated Press. "I cut corners to put some color into a story and I am now paying a dear price."

Bradley apologized to readers but said "the punishment far exceeds the crime."

A description in the story of 50 workers sitting at picnic tables waiting for work was taken from The Washington Post, the Richmond paper said.

In his statement, Bradley said the offending material amounted to two paragraphs in a 22-paragraph story. He also denied using Post material to describe the job center.

(Excerpt) Read more at chicagotribune.com ...


TOPICS: Crime/Corruption; Culture/Society; News/Current Events; US: Virginia
KEYWORDS: ccrm; credibility; danblather; fabrication; fired; herndon; mediabias; medialies; msmwoes; rtd; virginia
Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-5051-68 next last

1 posted on 05/28/2006 8:02:53 AM PDT by ncountylee
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: ncountylee

: )


2 posted on 05/28/2006 8:03:20 AM PDT by Flavius (Qui desiderat pacem, praeparet bellum)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: ncountylee

Taking his punishment as one would expect from a liberal....whining.


3 posted on 05/28/2006 8:03:30 AM PDT by ncountylee (Dead terrorists smell like victory)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: ncountylee

'Journalistic standards' is becoming more of an oxymoron every minute.


4 posted on 05/28/2006 8:04:37 AM PDT by atomicpossum (Replies must follow approved guidelines or you will be kill-filed without appeal.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: ncountylee

"What I did was wrong and an indefensible journalistic sin,"
"the punishment far exceeds the crime."

Girly boy.


5 posted on 05/28/2006 8:05:36 AM PDT by bkepley
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: ncountylee

"I only cheated a little bit. It was almost nothing."


6 posted on 05/28/2006 8:08:35 AM PDT by CAWats (And I will make no distinction between terrorists and the democrats.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: ncountylee; Timesink; martin_fierro; reformed_democrat; Loyalist; =Intervention=; PianoMan; GOPJ; ..
"What I did was wrong and an indefensible journalistic sin," Bradley said in a statement e-mailed to The Associated Press. "I [got caught] cut corners to put some color into a story and I am now paying a dear price."

There!

Media shenanigans ~ping~.

7 posted on 05/28/2006 8:12:40 AM PDT by ForGod'sSake (ABCNNBCBS: An enemy at the gates is less formidable, for he is known and carries his banner openly.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: ncountylee
"I cut corners to put some color into a story and I am now paying a dear price." Bradley apologized to readers but said "the punishment far exceeds the crime."

To a leftist, all that is necessary is "WHERE HIS HEART LIES and that HE IS SORRY." So ANY punishement would be considered too extreme.

Wait awhile and his abuse as a child will enter the arena of excuses, if that fails he could always try to come out of the closet and cry 'homophobia'.

8 posted on 05/28/2006 8:14:14 AM PDT by PISANO (We will not tire......We will not falter.......We will NOT FAIL!!! .........GW Bush [Oct 2001])
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: ncountylee
A description in the story of 50 workers sitting at picnic tables waiting for work was taken from The Washington Post, the Richmond paper said.

In his statement, Bradley said the offending material amounted to two paragraphs in a 22-paragraph story. He also denied using Post material to describe the job center.

The paper says it was plagiarism, he says it's fabricated "color". Which was it?

9 posted on 05/28/2006 8:15:03 AM PDT by DejaJude (Admiral Clark said, "Our mantra today is life, liberty and the pursuit of those who threaten it!")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: ncountylee
"What I did was wrong and an indefensible journalistic sin," Bradley said in a statement e-mailed to The Associated Press. "I cut corners to put some color into a story and I am now paying a dear price."

Yeah, and what's so different between what he did and what most other journalists do weekly for the nation's leading print papers?

10 posted on 05/28/2006 8:16:33 AM PDT by Fruitbat
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: ncountylee


NOT FAIR!!! I GOT CAUGHT!!!!!

11 posted on 05/28/2006 8:18:58 AM PDT by SandRat (Duty, Honor, Country. What else needs to be said?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: bkepley
"What I did was wrong and an indefensible journalistic sin,"

"the punishment far exceeds the crime."

What else would you do with someone in journalism that commits an indefensible sin but fire them?

12 posted on 05/28/2006 8:20:07 AM PDT by DejaJude (Admiral Clark said, "Our mantra today is life, liberty and the pursuit of those who threaten it!")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: Fruitbat

He was stupid. He named a specific source who was able to drop a dime and state ..."he never talked to me." National MSM would use unnamed source and still be on agenda and working.


13 posted on 05/28/2006 8:20:54 AM PDT by ncountylee (Dead terrorists smell like victory)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: Fruitbat

Only that it's policy with them and they get away with it.


14 posted on 05/28/2006 8:21:21 AM PDT by ChildOfThe60s (If you can remember the 60s...you weren't really there.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: ncountylee

More "fake but accurate" reporting? CBS led the way!


15 posted on 05/28/2006 8:22:28 AM PDT by FreedomPoster (Guns themselves are fairly robust; their chief enemies are rust and politicians) (NRA)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: ncountylee; abb; Liz; martin_fierro; george76

Thanks for posting this.

Does anyone have the article with his lies?

99 % of the lying Marxist pseudo journalists would be fired if their bosses enforced a no BS/lying/spinning policy on stories about GW and his cabinet members.

The Jason Blair syndrome runs deep in the dinosaur fish wraps.


16 posted on 05/28/2006 8:25:26 AM PDT by Grampa Dave (There's a dwindling market for Marxist homosexual lunatic wet dreams posing as journalism)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: ForGod'sSake

Thanks for the ping. Lunatic liberals pretending to be reporters are not able to document what really happens when it comes to President Bush.


17 posted on 05/28/2006 8:26:42 AM PDT by Grampa Dave (There's a dwindling market for Marxist homosexual lunatic wet dreams posing as journalism)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

To: ncountylee

I have so many stories about dealing with the press, (including dating for 2 years a woman who went from TV reporter to having her own (with co-hosts) local morning TV show to local news anchor). These people are shockingly unconcerned with actual facts. It's all about what will get THEM (the reporters) the lead stories, headlines, etc.


18 posted on 05/28/2006 8:35:33 AM PDT by Paddlefish ("Why should I have to WORK for everything?! It's like saying I don't deserve it!")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: ncountylee

To our readers

Richmond Times-Dispatch May 27, 2006


A Times-Dispatch article published May 17 about the reaction in Herndon to President Bush's speech on immigration reported a fabricated interview and portrayed a scene at a job center there as though the reporter had visited it. He had not.

Northern Virginia bureau reporter Paul Bradley did not interview Bill Threlkeld, site director for Project Hope and Harmony, as reported in the article.

Bradley interviewed the other sources quoted in the story but did not go to the town that day, as the dateline led readers to believe.

A sentence in the story that described 50 workers sitting at picnic tables waiting for work was taken from a Washington Post story reporting on the town election this month. A job center for immigrants was a major issue in the election.

Also, the pavilion that the story described as protecting the workers from the elements has been planned but not built.

Bradley was dismissed yesterday as a Times-Dispatch employee. A further examination will continue with an outside consultant reviewing his work over recent years.

Integrity is a core value at The Times-Dispatch, and anything less in gathering and reporting the news is unacceptable.

The Editors


19 posted on 05/28/2006 8:35:37 AM PDT by ncountylee (Dead terrorists smell like victory)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Grampa Dave
Abstract:

"I thought it was a waste of time," said George Taplin, head of the local chapter of the Minuteman Civil Defense Corps, a group dedicated to curbing illegal immigration. "I think the speech was given mainly to get [Bush]'s political base back on board." On that point, Taplin agrees with Mukit Hossain, an immigrant activist who helped set up the day-labor center in Herndon. Taplin's group also is adamant about not granting illegal immigrants amnesty. People like [Walter Tejada] said deporting all of the nation's 12 million illegal immigrants just isn't practical.

20 posted on 05/28/2006 8:39:12 AM PDT by ncountylee (Dead terrorists smell like victory)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 16 | View Replies]

To: ncountylee

Great point! Silly me. : )


21 posted on 05/28/2006 8:50:04 AM PDT by Fruitbat
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 13 | View Replies]

To: ForGod'sSake

.....Bradley apologized to readers but said "the punishment far exceeds the crime.".....

Well, what is an appropriate punishment for journalistic malfeasance?

Firing seems minor. Black listing is getting closer to the mark. A web site listing the offenders like the ones for sexual deviants might also be a good idea.

As a matter of fact, I have the server space if we can develop a list.


22 posted on 05/28/2006 8:55:26 AM PDT by bert (K.E. N.P. Slay Pinch)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

To: ncountylee

If CNN fired reporters for fabricating stories, they wouldn't have any reporters left.


23 posted on 05/28/2006 8:56:53 AM PDT by Allegra (Finbar for Texas Governor!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: ncountylee

I fervently hope these liberal agenda driven propagandists keep this stuff up. It merely continues to drive any cinder of credibility they may have had further into the cesspool where they belong.

The MSM thinks they are winning the propaganda war during this presidency. They may well be but at a tremendously huge cost to their credibility.

It has been utterly incredible the amount of outright bias, false stories and overt propaganda that has been displayed these past 6 years by a totally corrupt MSM.


24 posted on 05/28/2006 8:59:38 AM PDT by headstamp (Nothing lasts forever, Unless it does.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: bert
As a matter of fact, I have the server space if we can develop a list.

It would have to be a LOT of server space. The New York Times listing alone would probably take up one gig. ;-)

25 posted on 05/28/2006 8:59:38 AM PDT by Allegra (Finbar for Texas Governor!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 22 | View Replies]

To: DejaJude
What else would you do with someone in journalism that commits an indefensible sin but fire them?

A one-week paid suspension?

26 posted on 05/28/2006 9:01:53 AM PDT by CAWats (And I will make no distinction between terrorists and the democrats.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 12 | View Replies]

To: atomicpossum
Here is the best statement I know of.....

Ethics code: Gannett Newspaper Division Principals of Ethical Conduct

Author: Gannett Newspaper Division
Published: July 09, 1999
Last Updated: July 09, 1999
Printer-friendly version

GANNETT NEWSPAPER DIVISION

I. PRINCIPLES OF ETHICAL CONDUCT FOR NEWSROOMS



WE ARE COMMITTED TO:

Seeking and reporting the truth in a truthful way

  • We will dedicate ourselves to reporting the news accurately, thoroughly and in context.
  • We will be honest in the way we gather, report and present news.
  • We will be persistent in the pursuit of the whole story.
  • We will keep our word.
  • We will hold factual information in opinion columns and editorials to the same standards of accuracy as news stories.
  • We will seek to gain sufficient understanding of the communities, individuals and stories we cover to provide an informed account of activities.

Serving the public interest

  • We will uphold First Amendment principles to serve the democratic process.
  • We will be vigilant watchdogs of government and institutions that affect the public.
  • We will provide the news and information that people need to function as effective citizens.
  • We will seek solutions as well as expose problems and wrongdoing.
  • We will provide a public forum for diverse people and views.
  • We will reflect and encourage understanding of the diverse segments of our community.
  • We will provide editorial and community leadership.
  • We will seek to promote understanding of complex issues.

Exercising fair play

  • We will treat people with dignity, respect and compassion.
  • We will correct errors promptly.
  • We will strive to include all sides relevant to a story and not take sides in news coverage.
  • We will explain to readers our journalistic processes.
  • We will give particular attention to fairness in relations with people unaccustomed to dealing with the press.
  • We will use unnamed sources as the sole basis for published information only as a last resort and under specific procedures that best serve the public’s right to know.
  • We will be accessible to readers.

Maintaining independence

  • We will remain free of outside interests, investments or business relationships that may compromise the credibility of our news report.
  • We will maintain an impartial, arm’s length relationship with anyone seeking to influence the news.
  • We will avoid potential conflicts of interest and eliminate inappropriate influence on content.
  • We will be free of improper obligations to news sources, newsmakers and advertisers.
  • We will differentiate advertising from news.

Acting with integrity

  • We will act honorably and ethically in dealing with news sources, the public and our colleagues.
  • We will obey the law.
  • We will observe common standards of decency.
  • We will take responsibility for our decisions and consider the possible consequences of our actions.
  • We will be conscientious in observing these Principles.
  • We will always try to do the right thing.

II. PROTECTING THE PRINCIPLES


No statement of principles and procedures can envision every circumstance that may be faced in the course of covering the news. As in the United States Constitution, fundamental principles sometimes conflict. Thus, these recommended practices cannot establish standards of performance for journalists in every situation.

Careful judgment and common sense should be applied to make the decisions that best serve the public interest and result in the greatest good. In such instances, journalists should not act unilaterally. The best decisions are obtained after open-minded consultations with appropriate colleagues and superiors – augmented, when necessary, by the advice of dispassionate outside parties, such as experts, lawyers, ethicists, or others whose views in confidence may provide clarity in sorting out issues.

Here are some recommended practices to follow to protect the Principles. This list is not all-inclusive. There may be additional practices – implicit in the Principles or determined within individual newsrooms – that will further ensure credible and responsible journalism.

Ensuring the Truth Principle

"Seeking and reporting the truth in a truthful way" includes, specifically:

  • We will not lie.
  • We will not misstate our identities or intentions.
  • We will not fabricate.
  • We will not plagiarize.
  • We will not alter photographs to mislead readers.
  • We will not intentionally slant the news.

Using unnamed sources

The use of unnamed sources in published stories should be rare and only for important news. Whenever possible, reporters should seek to confirm news on the record. If the use of unnamed sources is required:

  • Use as sources only people who are in a position to know.
  • Corroborate information from an unnamed source through another source or sources and/or by documentary information. Rare exceptions must be approved by the editor.
  • Inform sources that reporters will disclose sources to at least one editor. Editors will be bound by the same promise of confidentiality to sources as are reporters.
  • Hold editors as well as reporters accountable when unnamed sources are used. When a significant story to be published relies on a source who will not be named, it is the responsibility of the senior news executive to confirm the identity of the source and to review the information provided. This may require the editor to meet the source.
  • Make clear to the reporters and to sources that agreements of confidentiality are between the newspaper and the sources, not just between the reporter and the sources. The newspaper will honor its agreements with sources. Reporters should make every effort to clear such confidentiality agreements with the editors first. Promises of confidentiality made by reporters to sources will not be overridden by the editors; however, editors may choose not to use the material obtained in this fashion.
  • Do not allow unnamed sources to take cheap shots in stories. It is unfair and unprofessional.
  • Expect reporters and editors to seek to understand the motivations of a source and take those into account in evaluating the fairness and truthfulness of the information provided.
  • Make clear to sources the level of confidentiality agreed to. This does not mean each option must be discussed with the source, but each party should understand the agreement. Among the options are:
    1. The newspaper will not name them in the article;
    2. The newspaper will not name them unless a court compels the newspaper to do so;
    3. The newspaper will not name them under any circumstances.
All sources should be informed that the newspaper will not honor confidentiality if the sources have lied or misled the newspaper.
  • Make sure both sides understand what is being agreed to. For example:
    1. Statements may be quoted directly or indirectly and will be attributed to the source. This is sometimes referred to as "on the record."
    2. The information may be used in the story but not attributed to the source. This is sometimes referred to as "not for attribution" or "for background."
    3. The information will not be used in the story unless obtained elsewhere and attributed to someone else. This is sometimes referred to as "off the record."
  • Describe an unnamed source’s identity as fully as possible (without revealing that identity) to help readers evaluate the credibility of what the source has said or provided.
  • Do not make promises you do not intend to fulfill or may not be able to fulfill.
  • Do not threaten sources.

Handling the wires

These Principles are intended to provide front-line guidance for locally generated material. Wire-service material already has been edited professionally. Gannett News Service observes these same Principles. The Associated Press has its own standards for the use of unnamed sources. Other wire-service standards may be lower. Additional scrutiny often is required, and further editing is encouraged. Ultimately, an editor must make a sound judgment about how to reconcile conflicts between wire-service and local-newsroom practices. Whenever possible, these Principles should prevail.

Being fair

Because of timeliness or unavailability, it is not always possible to include a response from the subject of an accusation in a news story. Nevertheless:

  • We should make a good-faith effort to seek appropriate comment from the person (or organization) before publication.
  • When that is not feasible, we should be receptive to requests for a response or try to seek a response for a follow-up story.
  • Letters to the editor also may provide an appropriate means for reply.
Some public records will identify persons accused of wrongdoing. Publication of denials is not necessary in such circumstances.

Being independent

"Maintaining independence" helps establish the impartiality of news coverage. To clarify two points:

  • News staff members are encouraged to be involved in worthwhile community activities, so long as this does not compromise the credibility of news coverage.
  • When unavoidable personal or business interests could compromise the newspaper’s credibility, such potential conflicts must be disclosed to one’s superior and, if relevant, to readers.

Conducting investigative reporting

Aggressive, hard-hitting reporting is honorable and often courageous in fulfilling the press’ First Amendment responsibilities, and it is encouraged. Investigative reporting by its nature raises issues not ordinarily faced in routine reporting. Here are some suggested procedures to follow when undertaking investigative reporting:

  • Involve more than one editor at the early stages and in the editing of the stories.
  • Question continually the premise of the stories and revise accordingly.
  • Follow the practices outlined in the use of sources.
  • Document the information in stories to the satisfaction of the senior editor.
  • Have a "fresh read" by an editor who has not seen the material as you near publication. Encourage the editor to read it skeptically, then listen carefully to and heed questions raised about clarity, accuracy and relevance.
  • Make certain that care, accuracy and fairness are exercised in headlines, photographs, presentation and overall tone.
  • Evaluate legal and ethical issues fully, involving appropriate colleagues, superiors, lawyers or dispassionate outside parties in the editorial process. (For example, it may be helpful to have a technical story reviewed by a scientist for accuracy, or have financial descriptions assessed by an accountant, or consult an ethicist or respected outside editor on an ethical issue.)
  • Be careful about trading information with sources or authorities, particularly if it could lead to an impression that you are working in concert against an individual or entity.

Editing skeptically

Editors are the gatekeepers who determine what will be published and what will not be. Their responsibility is to question and scrutinize, even when it is uncomfortable to do so. Here are some suggested practices that editors can follow:

  • Take special care to understand the facts and context of the story.
  • Guard against assumptions and preconceived notions – including their own.
  • Ensure time and resources for sound editing. Nothing should be printed that has not been reviewed by someone else. When feasible, at least two editors should see stories before publication. Complex or controversial stories may require even more careful scrutiny.
  • Consider involving an in-house skeptic on major stories – a contrarian who can play the role of devil’s advocate.
  • Challenge conventional wisdom.
  • Heed their "gut instinct." Don’t publish a story if it doesn’t feel right. Check it further.
  • Consider what may be missing from the story.
  • Consider how others – especially antagonists or skeptical readers – may view the story. What questions would they ask? What parts would they think are unfair? Will they believe it?
  • Be especially careful of stories that portray individuals purely as villains or heroes.
  • Beware of stories that reach conclusions based on speculation or a pattern of facts.
  • Protect against being manipulated by advocates and special interests.
  • Consider these questions: "How do you know? How can you be sure? Where is the evidence? Who is the source? How does he or she know? What is the supporting documentation?"
  • Watch carefully for red flags that give reason to be skeptical of news-gathering or editing conduct.
  • Don’t be stampeded by deadlines, unrealistic competitive concerns or peer pressure.

Ensuring accuracy

Dedication to the truth means accuracy itself is an ethical issue. Each news person has the responsibility to strive for accuracy at each step of the process.

  • Be aware that information attributed to a source may not be factually correct.
  • Be sure the person quoted is in a position to know.
  • Be especially careful with technical terms, statistics, mathematical computations, crowd estimates and poll results.
  • Consider going over all or portions of an especially complicated story with primary sources or with outside experts. However, do not surrender editorial control.
  • Don’t make assumptions. Don’t guess at facts or spellings. Asking the person next to you is not "verification" – he or she could be wrong too.
  • Improve note taking. Consider backing up your notes with a tape recorder when ethically and legally appropriate.
  • Be wary of newspaper library clippings, which may contain uncorrected errors.
  • Develop checklists of troublesome or frequently used names, streets, titles, etc.
  • Understand the community and subject matter. Develop expertise in areas of specialized reporting.
  • Reread stories carefully after writing, watching especially for errors of context and balance as well as for spelling and other basic mistakes.
  • Use care in writing headlines. Do not stretch beyond the facts of the story.
  • Follow a simple rule on the copy desk to double-check the accuracy of headlines: "Find the headline in the story." (For example, if the headline says, "Three die in crash," go to the story and count the dead and be certain they died in the crash.)
  • Consider using "accuracy checks" as an affirmative way to search out errors and monitor accuracy. (Accuracy checks are a process by which published stories are sent to sources or experts asking for comment on accuracy, fairness or other aspects.)

Correcting errors

When errors occur, the newspaper has an ethical obligation to correct the record and minimize harm.

  • Errors should be corrected promptly. But first, a determination must be made that the fact indeed was in error and that the correction itself is fully accurate.
  • Errors should be corrected with sufficient prominence that readers who saw the original error are likely to see the correction. This is a matter of the editor’s judgment.
  • Although it is wise to avoid repeating the error in the correction, the correction should have sufficient context that readers will understand exactly what is being corrected.
  • Errors of nuance, context or tone may require clarifications, editor’s notes, editor’s columns or letters to the editor.
  • When the newspaper disagrees with a news subject about whether a story contained an error, editors should consider offering the aggrieved party an opportunity to express his or her view in a letter to the editor.
  • Corrections should be reviewed before publication by a senior editor who was not directly involved in the error. The editor should determine if special handling or outside counsel are required.
  • Errors should be corrected whether or not they are called to the attention of the newspaper by someone outside the newsroom.
  • Factual errors should be corrected in most cases even if the subject of the error does not want it to be corrected. The rationale for this is rooted in the Truth Principle. It is the newspaper’s duty to provide accurate information to readers. An exception may be made – at the behest of the subject – when the correction of a relatively minor mistake would result in public ridicule or greater harm than the original error.
  • Newsroom staffers should be receptive to complaints about inaccuracies and follow up on them.
  • Newsroom staffers have a responsibility to alert the appropriate editor if they become aware of a possible error in the newspaper.


III. REINFORCING THE PRINCIPLES


Communicating standards

Editors have a responsibility to communicate these Principles to newsroom staff members and to the public. They should:

  • Ensure that sound hiring practices are followed to build a staff of ethical and responsible journalists. Such practices include making reference checks and conducting sufficient interviewing and testing to draw reasonable conclusions about the individual’s personal standards.
  • Provide prospective hires with a copy of these Principles and make acceptance of them a condition of employment.
  • Conduct staff training at least annually in the Principles of Ethical Conduct.
  • Require staff members at the time of hire and each year thereafter to sign a statement acknowledging that they have read the Principles of Ethical Conduct and will raise any questions about them with their editors.
  • Communicate these Principles to the public periodically.

Being accountable

Because these Principles embody the highest standards of professional conduct, the Gannett Newspaper Division is committed to their adherence. They have been put in writing specifically so that members of every Gannett Newspaper Division newsroom know what the Division stands for and what is expected of them. The public will know, too.


27 posted on 05/28/2006 9:03:32 AM PDT by bert (K.E. N.P. Slay Pinch)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: bert

Just EXCELLENT ideas(but gawrsh, would it take a while to compose)! Gotta have a catchy name for the list; "Registered Media Offenders"??? "Jayson Blair Hall of Shame"???


28 posted on 05/28/2006 9:04:23 AM PDT by ForGod'sSake (ABCNNBCBS: An enemy at the gates is less formidable, for he is known and carries his banner openly.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 22 | View Replies]

To: ncountylee

Is CBS hiring? There might be a bright future for him there.


29 posted on 05/28/2006 9:08:26 AM PDT by csvset ("It was like the hand of God slapping down and smashing everything." ~ JDAM delivery for Taliban)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Allegra

.....It would have to be a LOT of server space......

I think we can handle it....

http://www.fairpress.org


30 posted on 05/28/2006 9:08:26 AM PDT by bert (K.E. N.P. Slay Pinch)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 25 | View Replies]

To: CAWats
>>>Bradley said the offending material amounted to two paragraphs in a 22-paragraph story. <<<

Hey, cut the guy some slack....his distortions and lies amounted to less than 10% of the entire story.

He was far more accurate than the standard for journalists in the mainstream of American thought today.

Put him up for a Putlizer

31 posted on 05/28/2006 9:09:53 AM PDT by HardStarboard (Hey, march some more - its helping get the wall built!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: ForGod'sSake
"Registered Media Offenders"???
"Jayson Blair Hall of Shame"???

"A Bunch of Scumbag Leftist Liars"?

32 posted on 05/28/2006 9:14:46 AM PDT by Allegra (Finbar for Texas Governor!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 28 | View Replies]

To: ncountylee

The punishment perfectly fit the offense.


33 posted on 05/28/2006 9:14:54 AM PDT by em2vn
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: ncountylee

There'll be more bogus info coming from the left, especially ones that portray the pubby party as being heartless and not compassionate of their fellow person, completely disregarding the fact that illegals are criminals.


34 posted on 05/28/2006 9:16:17 AM PDT by lilylangtree
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: ncountylee

I'm shocked, shocked to find the MSM lying.
Now, did you hear that the Iraqi PM is OK with Irans Nuclear program?


35 posted on 05/28/2006 9:20:02 AM PDT by mikeybaby (long time lurker)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 19 | View Replies]

To: FreedomPoster

It sure does seem like there are a lot of people getting caught in faked stories. I wonder if there is an increase in this kind of thing happening or just an increase of getting caught.


36 posted on 05/28/2006 9:20:46 AM PDT by Dutch Boy
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 15 | View Replies]

To: Grampa Dave
The Jason Blair syndrome....

One for the books alright---Freud would have loved this cast of characters---Pinch, Punch and Jayson. LOL.

37 posted on 05/28/2006 9:22:03 AM PDT by Liz (The US Constitution is intended to protect the people from the government.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 16 | View Replies]

To: Allegra; bert
"A Bunch of Scumbag Leftist Liars"?

Well, at least it's accurate ;^)

"Media Fakes and Flakes"???

38 posted on 05/28/2006 9:23:20 AM PDT by ForGod'sSake (ABCNNBCBS: An enemy at the gates is less formidable, for he is known and carries his banner openly.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 32 | View Replies]

To: ncountylee

Golly Gee Whiz,this kind of thing will put him in solid for a gig at The New York Slimes!!!!!!!!!


39 posted on 05/28/2006 9:24:50 AM PDT by bandleader
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: ncountylee

Liberal? Liar? This is news?


40 posted on 05/28/2006 9:31:05 AM PDT by pabianice
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Dutch Boy

I say the latter. There are more of us watching, and coordinating info. Not that long ago, a guy in Northern Virginia would have been unlikely to see an article in a Richmond paper. Now, with the Internet, that isolation is gone.


41 posted on 05/28/2006 9:33:42 AM PDT by FreedomPoster (Guns themselves are fairly robust; their chief enemies are rust and politicians) (NRA)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 36 | View Replies]

To: pabianice
Liberal? Liar? This is news?

No but caught and fired is news.

42 posted on 05/28/2006 9:34:19 AM PDT by ncountylee (Dead terrorists smell like victory)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 40 | View Replies]

To: ncountylee; Grampa Dave; Liz; weegee
Thanks for posting the actual lie.

Tried finding it on the "Wayback Machine" but -- wouldn't you know -- the RTD has blocked archiving of its site.

43 posted on 05/28/2006 10:00:56 AM PDT by martin_fierro (< |:)~)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 20 | View Replies]

To: Grampa Dave

do I really have to say it ???


44 posted on 05/28/2006 10:02:33 AM PDT by george76 (Ward Churchill : Fake Indian, Fake Scholarship, and Fake Art)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 16 | View Replies]

To our readers
Richmond Times-Dispatch
Saturday, May 27, 2006


A Times-Dispatch article published May 17 about the reaction in Herndon to President Bush's speech on immigration reported a fabricated interview and portrayed a scene at a job center there as though the reporter had visited it. He had not.

Northern Virginia bureau reporter Paul Bradley did not interview Bill Threlkeld, site director for Project Hope and Harmony, as reported in the article.

Bradley interviewed the other sources quoted in the story but did not go to the town that day, as the dateline led readers to believe.

A sentence in the story that described 50 workers sitting at picnic tables waiting for work was taken from a Washington Post story reporting on the town election this month. A job center for immigrants was a major issue in the election.

Also, the pavilion that the story described as protecting the workers from the elements has been planned but not built.

* snip * (Required Excerpt)

http://www.timesdispatch.com/servlet/Satellite?pagename=RTD%2FMGArticle%2FRTD_BasicArticle&%09s=1045855934842&c=MGArticle&cid=1137836374556&path=%21news


45 posted on 05/28/2006 10:45:16 AM PDT by Ligeia (Help unseat Jim Moran: http://www.tomodonoghue.com/about.html)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Paddlefish
These people are shockingly unconcerned with actual facts. It's all about what will get THEM (the reporters) the lead stories, headlines, etc.

A little too broad of a brush there.......I was in local radio news both as reporter and anchor, and more often than not, particularly in smaller markets and especially in radio and TV, it is all about what the SALES department will get, not the reporters.

I remember at one station getting an irate phone call from a major advertiser about a story I ran. he told me he would pull all his advertising and get me fired if I ran the story again. In that case, thankfully the account exec was a former newsman himself and came to bat for me with the sales manager, who wanted me fired for airing the story, and general manager. The story was about how the advertiser had just been busted for fraud and I got it from the local police.

At another station, while I was getting chewed out by the local Fire Chief, an AP editor called screaming at me for the same reason as the Fire Chief, releasing the name of the victim of a fatal fire before officials. I didn't do it...the general manager/owner of the station had called it into AP and gave my name for the byline as I had been a reporter on scene...something he should have known better than to have done, not only because he had been in radio, including news, for more than 20 years, but he was a fire Chief himself in a nearby town and his company had also responded to it.

So, all I ask is that all local reporters, or even national ones, not get painted with the same broad brush. There are times when it is really not the fault of the reporter.

46 posted on 05/28/2006 11:03:39 AM PDT by Gabz (Proud to be a WalMartian --- beep)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 18 | View Replies]

To: bert

The Principals of Ethical Conduct from Gannett is excellent..........it's just a shame that most of their newspapers do NOT adhere to it.


47 posted on 05/28/2006 11:24:09 AM PDT by Gabz (Proud to be a WalMartian --- beep)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 27 | View Replies]

To: Gabz
A little too broad of a brush there

Quite true. I guess the point I was poorly making was how shocked I was (and am) at the way the "talent" looks for the stuff that will get them on the air (hopefully with priority), get headlines, etc. With my ex-girlfriend and her co-producers/reporters, everything was about getting airtime. And these were possibly the least informed people in the world. Admission on my part: My girlfriend was a gorgeous state "scholarship" pageant winner (yes, that is the Miss America pageant) who probably couldn't name the last 4 presidents. She couldn't hold an intelligent conversation with any informed person on any subject, and she really didn't have any interest in doing so. But turn on the TV camera and she was an entirely different person, and she appeared as a well-informed person who understood everything. The camera (and crowds) loved her, but individuals who got to know her hated her. So what does this say about me????

48 posted on 05/28/2006 12:44:49 PM PDT by Paddlefish ("Why should I have to WORK for everything?! It's like saying I don't deserve it!")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 46 | View Replies]

To: Paddlefish
So what does this say about me????

That you've matured..............as she is your EX-girlfriend.

But your point regarding "talent" is very well taken. I have seen a definite shift in "ethics" over the past 20 years.

A timely case in point.

The media has/had been screaming about the blackout of them being able to get onto Dover Air Force Base when the remains of our fallen servicemen and women are brought home to US soil. One of the loudest in the area was one of the local daily newspapers.

What they failed to remember is the disgraceful behavior of their own reporters and photographers at that base following the bombing of the Marine barracks in Beirut. I know because that was when I was a reporter for the local radio station and I was there, more than once. Including once when the arrival of the plane was delayed and not only was I on assignment for my local station, but also for the network we were affiliated with.

My big chance for national exposure.....I never got it, because the network was unhappy that I heeded the request of the Military to leave the families be....they (network) wnated to know how the families felt about the delays and didn't care what the Military said about talking to the families.

That kind of thing bothered me to no end, and that is why I got out of that end of it 20 years ago. As did many of the folks in radio and TV I worked with back in the 80s.

49 posted on 05/28/2006 1:33:09 PM PDT by Gabz (Proud to be a WalMartian --- beep)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 48 | View Replies]

To: martin_fierro; Grampa Dave

Not archived, eh?

Too bad they never figured astute FReepers would be ahead of their game.


50 posted on 05/28/2006 5:27:15 PM PDT by Liz (The US Constitution is intended to protect the people from the government.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 43 | View Replies]


Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-5051-68 next last

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson