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Russian missiles on Polish border
Radio Polonia ^ | 31.05.2006 | Agnieszka Bielawska

Posted on 05/31/2006 9:27:24 AM PDT by lizol

Russian missiles on Polish border

31.05.2006

Several Russian anti ballistic missiles have been placed on the Belarus-Polish border.

Report by Agnieszka Bielawska

The arrival of the missiles to the 115 air defense brigade have made this unit twice as powerful as it was before. The nearness of the missiles to the Polish border has given rise for concern since Poland’s troublesome eastern neighbour, Belarus, has received a very modern and powerful defense tool.

Piotr Zochowski from the East European Studies center in Warsaw says the move was expected.

In line with the declaration last year made by the Russian defence ministry on modernization of the Belrus armed forces the deployment of the missiles completes the arrangement. The issue which in Poland can be speculated on is whether this country is in possession of equally modern equipment.

And according to reports Poland has no such powerful anti ballistic missiles. Thus the deployment of the S-300 on the Polish Belarus border is a challenge to Poland, says military expert Wojciech Luczak.

The range of the missiles reaches far beyond the Polish capital and they are good enough to destroy almost everything flying over Poland. In declarations the Belarus armed forces officials say that it is purely a defense system but in case of any crisis it can destroy the AWAX planes flying over Poland as part of the NATO air defense system.

Polish-Belarus relations have been chilly ever since the Belarus authorities accused this country of interfering into the internal affairs of Belarus and supporting the democratic opposition in that country. Additionally Poland’s EU and NATO membership have not been to the liking of Moscow. This recent appearance of the S-300 on the Belarus Polish border is a signal of the importance Russia and Belarus pay to the pact of joint air defense system says Piotr Zochowski.

In a truly propaganda manner Belarus and Russia have underlined the significance of the pact and related it to the alleged increase of security threats coming from Poland, due to this country’s acceptance of the offer for the F-16 fighters and the possible deployment of the US anti missile defense system so called Son of Star wars on Polish territory and the territories of other Central European states.

Wojciech Luczak compares the situation to the times when Cyprus and Greece planned to deploy anti ballistic missiles close to the Turkish border but underlines that the presence of the Russian S-300 close to the Polish border is not a threat rather a tough nut to crack for the Polish authorities.

I think it is a part of Moscow’s game with Poland using the Belarus assets and geographical position. It is not a threat to Poland but a challenge to Polish decision makers especially defense minister Radoslaw Sikorski. I think they are trying to put minister Sikorski in an awkward position.

The deployment of the S-300 wound up the deal on a joint Belarus Russian air defense system, and this year another deal is to be signed allowing free movement of planes between both states without any additional agreements or political decisions.


TOPICS: Foreign Affairs; News/Current Events; Russia
KEYWORDS: airdefence; belarus; missiles; poland; russia; s300
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1 posted on 05/31/2006 9:27:27 AM PDT by lizol
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To: George - the Other; Bernard; massfreeper; metmom; rzeznikj at stout; DesScorp; Hoodat; ...
Eastern European ping list


FRmail me to be added or removed from this Eastern European ping list

2 posted on 05/31/2006 9:27:57 AM PDT by lizol (Liberal - a man with his mind open ... at both ends)
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To: lizol

Don't fall for this trap. They want an outcry out of Poland. Ignore them.


3 posted on 05/31/2006 9:29:54 AM PDT by Romanov
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To: Romanov

Yep.

Poland should respond, "These are defensive missles, and we will not be attacking Russia, so we don't care. That said, Russia might think about a more needed deployment near China."


4 posted on 05/31/2006 9:32:48 AM PDT by MeanWestTexan (Many at FR would respond to Christ "Darn right, I'll cast the first stone!")
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To: MeanWestTexan

That they should. If Putin doesn't watch it he'll go down in history as the guy who lost the far Eastern district to China. As it stands Vladivostok is pert near Chinese (and Korean) now anyway. Advertisements to learn Chinese were nearly double the ones to learn English when I was there.


5 posted on 05/31/2006 9:34:42 AM PDT by Romanov
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To: lizol

Russia would be better off putting these defense systems on their border with China... or on their Southern border along the flight paths from Iran.


6 posted on 05/31/2006 9:37:53 AM PDT by coconutt2000 (NO MORE PEACE FOR OIL!!! DOWN WITH TYRANTS, TERRORISTS, AND TIMIDCRATS!!!! (3-T's For World Peace))
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To: All
S-300P (SA-10 Grumble)
7 posted on 05/31/2006 9:38:07 AM PDT by lizol (Liberal - a man with his mind open ... at both ends)
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To: coconutt2000

These systems are probably for Iran. They just don't want to sell them directly.


8 posted on 05/31/2006 9:40:02 AM PDT by Grzegorz 246
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To: Grzegorz 246

Put them somewhere where Muslims can steal them and sell them to Iran?

Hmm....


9 posted on 05/31/2006 9:43:02 AM PDT by coconutt2000 (NO MORE PEACE FOR OIL!!! DOWN WITH TYRANTS, TERRORISTS, AND TIMIDCRATS!!!! (3-T's For World Peace))
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To: Grzegorz 246
So I've read in today's "Rzeczpospolita".

And the author of the article was referring to the article published in the Russian magazin "Wzglad", which was referring to "Jane's Intelligence Digest".

http://www.rzeczpospolita.pl/gazeta/wydanie_060531/swiat/swiat_a_8.html
10 posted on 05/31/2006 9:45:52 AM PDT by lizol (Liberal - a man with his mind open ... at both ends)
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To: coconutt2000
It's not about stealing by Muslims.

Russian authorities know, that if they sold this equipment to Iran openly - such a move could ruin their relations with U.S.

But Russia and Belarus are friends. So no one should complain if Russia gives for free these air defense systems to a friend.

Belarus and Iran are also friends, both being autocracies, and anti-U.S. rogue states.

So the Russians can't help, if ungrateful Belorussians sell this generous gift to Iran (sarcasm)
11 posted on 05/31/2006 9:52:22 AM PDT by lizol (Liberal - a man with his mind open ... at both ends)
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To: lizol

I assume its to Protect Lukashenko from possible Polish-Nato Airstrike on his headquarters -:)))))

Or from the swarms of NATO spies flying over the Belarus (Sarcasm).



12 posted on 05/31/2006 10:00:45 AM PDT by sergey1973 (Russian American Political Blogger, Arm Chair Strategist)
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To: sergey1973

Damn, we've been preparing this invasion for several years and now all the effort and expenses are fu***d up! :-)))


13 posted on 05/31/2006 10:03:12 AM PDT by lizol (Liberal - a man with his mind open ... at both ends)
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To: lizol


They need to add this to, to make the point crystal clear.
14 posted on 05/31/2006 11:16:46 AM PDT by x5452
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To: lizol
I think it is a part of Moscow’s game with Poland using the Belarus assets and geographical position. It is not a threat to Poland but a challenge to Polish decision makers especially defense minister Radoslaw Sikorski. I think they are trying to put minister Sikorski in an awkward position.

Wrong. Belarus and Russia has a common air-defence system with a joint command. Those S-300 missiles are to secure the western approach to Russia and Belorus.

As simple as that. And nobody cares for the Minister Sikorski position. Frankly, I can't get why it may worsen.

15 posted on 05/31/2006 12:22:39 PM PDT by Freelance Warrior
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To: x5452
Yep, definitely. Especially having in mind this fragment.

In declarations the Belarus armed forces officials say that it is purely a defense system but in case of any crisis it can destroy the AWAX planes flying over Poland as part of the NATO air defense system.

But you still cheering Russo-Belorussian "struggle" against vicious NATO? Somehow I'm not surprised
16 posted on 05/31/2006 1:03:56 PM PDT by lizol (Liberal - a man with his mind open ... at both ends)
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To: x5452
Will you be happy when those S-300s shoot down aircrafts with this roundel? Over Poland, or over Iran, or over Syria


17 posted on 05/31/2006 1:08:23 PM PDT by lizol (Liberal - a man with his mind open ... at both ends)
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To: lizol

NATO on Clinton's orders bombed Serbia, killing Christians to advance the cause of Al Qaeda. It can hardly be taken for granted that everything Poles are doing in their airspace is either NATO related, or for the common good.

Poland, as you folk have well noted, has been nationalistics, and interventionalistic throughout the region and its good to have a check against the gross interventionalism Poland has been exhibiting before they do something crzy like act unilaterally outside of NATO to attack something and cause a war.


18 posted on 05/31/2006 1:09:41 PM PDT by x5452
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To: lizol

I'll be happy when Polish nationalists are realized for what they are; anti-Christian EU activists funding abortion in other nations out of ethnic hate.


19 posted on 05/31/2006 1:12:11 PM PDT by x5452
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To: x5452
Yes, I also think, that the situation of Brazilian rain-forests is getting worse, and worse every year.
20 posted on 05/31/2006 1:14:30 PM PDT by lizol (Liberal - a man with his mind open ... at both ends)
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To: lizol

The way you line up to defend Soros goons in East Europe I'm sure protecting the rain forests is another plank of your real party line.


21 posted on 05/31/2006 1:18:30 PM PDT by x5452
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To: x5452

I wouldn't agree with you, however I'd say, that King Salmon is the largest salmon in North America.


22 posted on 05/31/2006 1:23:13 PM PDT by lizol (Liberal - a man with his mind open ... at both ends)
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To: lizol

Of course you wouldn't agree with me; you're a Soros supporter, and I hate Soros and his third way socialism, as well as the billions he gives to promoting infanticide of east europeon babies.


23 posted on 05/31/2006 1:45:55 PM PDT by x5452
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To: x5452
I am not surprised that you prefer Lukashenko's Belarus over NATO, but after I read your stuff in that thread about Crimea I think that you should be locked in a room without corners.
24 posted on 05/31/2006 1:54:51 PM PDT by Grzegorz 246
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To: lizol

Yes, I saw that.

BTW Did you read the article about pedophiles... ?


25 posted on 05/31/2006 2:02:13 PM PDT by Grzegorz 246
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To: Grzegorz 246

I prefer sovereignty to Polish expansion, cut and dry.

Further if you'd like to deny history in Crimea and ukraine it is YOU who belongs in a little room (or Tsar's cannon), not I.


26 posted on 05/31/2006 2:04:24 PM PDT by x5452
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To: x5452

I'd rather say, that the largest train station in Europe - the Berlin Hauptbahnhof - opens in the German capital soon.


27 posted on 05/31/2006 2:30:35 PM PDT by lizol (Liberal - a man with his mind open ... at both ends)
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To: Grzegorz 246
Yeah, I've read that. Disgusting.
28 posted on 05/31/2006 2:31:25 PM PDT by lizol (Liberal - a man with his mind open ... at both ends)
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To: lizol

Hardly.

You'd rather countries like Ukraine stay poor with third way socialist economies, while Soros gives millions to kill off their children and promote homsexuality.


29 posted on 05/31/2006 3:26:48 PM PDT by x5452
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To: x5452
You support KGB Puti, who made Islam a state religion and legal abortion.
30 posted on 05/31/2006 3:32:17 PM PDT by Grzegorz 246
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To: x5452

Hmmmm.... Elephants are really amazing animals to see in their own environment. They are incredibly social creatures who have lasting memories, and can communicate over long distances through low range sound waves.


31 posted on 05/31/2006 3:36:18 PM PDT by lizol (Liberal - a man with his mind open ... at both ends)
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To: Grzegorz 246

Put doesn't give cash to abortion, Yushchneko does.
Yushchenko was a communist (as was the head of Ukraine's heretical schismatic KP church).
The economy has flourished and taxes have been slashed under Putin.
The economy has tanked in Ukraine, and Yushchenko has renationalized industries.

It's clear who the commie in the woodpile is.

Ukraine will remember when they kick this idiot to the curb, who suggested him in the first place.


32 posted on 05/31/2006 4:28:03 PM PDT by x5452
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To: lizol

What's of interest here is the anti social quality of rats.


33 posted on 05/31/2006 4:28:38 PM PDT by x5452
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To: x5452

Rats have nothing to do with this. I was talking about elephants.

Especially those pink ones, with huuuge, beautiful purple wings.


34 posted on 05/31/2006 4:39:08 PM PDT by lizol (Liberal - a man with his mind open ... at both ends)
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To: lizol

Take a look in the mirror and you'll see the connection to rats.


35 posted on 05/31/2006 5:03:42 PM PDT by x5452
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To: lizol; x5452
BuHuHaHa!

What's of interest here is the anti social quality of rats.

..........

I was talking about elephants. Especially those pink ones, with huuuge, beautiful purple wings.

It is wonderful that espechially you, x5452, are going back to your roots to reanimate the old Russian tradition of political Dadaism. All your comments are perfect Dada. Even better than those of Lizol because of your reference to your view of contemporary reality. This is high art. Just imagine your rats having a long proboscis and they will fit perfectly to Lizol's elephant.

Besides: If you should not know what Dadaism is: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dada

P.S. If you go to Chiracs "Centre Pompidou" you can sell yourself as a permanent installation that is declaiming Russian Dadaism. Since Lizol is a nice guy he probably send you some excellent Polish sausages that most Russians prefer to French escargots or grenouilles (frog legs).

36 posted on 05/31/2006 6:07:44 PM PDT by Atlantic Bridge (De omnibus dubitandum.)
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To: Atlantic Bridge

My problem is where Poland is sticking their Sausage in relation to Ukraine.

They should at least buy 'em dinner first.


37 posted on 05/31/2006 6:13:14 PM PDT by x5452
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To: x5452
At least unlike Puti, Yu doesn't support spread of Islam and didn't make It a state religion.
38 posted on 06/01/2006 12:09:00 AM PDT by Grzegorz 246
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To: x5452

"I'll be happy when Polish nationalists are realized for what they are; anti-Christian EU activists funding abortion in other nations out of ethnic hate."

You know, you are such a pollutant on any thread that has to do with Russia and her "neighbors", in particular Poland. Can't you go spew your emotional outbursts and vitriolic comments elsewhere? I'm so sick of your being against those countries that are our allies and friends now, such as Poland. Just because you love a Russian regime that is becoming more and more autocratic and slipping back into the old ways. Everything you accuse the neighboring countries of is what Russia is actually doing. You are totally half*ss backwards in all of your assessments, and therefore have no credibility. Most Freepers who read the threads you pop up on are onto you. You make yourself so obvious, and not in a good way.


39 posted on 06/01/2006 12:29:03 AM PDT by flaglady47
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To: lizol

But you still cheering Russo-Belorussian "struggle" against vicious NATO?==

NATO is military allience isn't it? So there are precausions to make. Just in case.

NATO already bombed Yugoslavia so it is not defensive allience but offensive.


40 posted on 06/01/2006 1:43:43 AM PDT by RusIvan
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To: RusIvan
Sure it is a military alliance.
Just like relations between Russia and Belarus have also military aspects - to counter NATO influence.

That's why it doesn't surprise me, that you - a Russian - are happy with deployment of those missiles. If I were a Russian I'd probably share your view.

But I'm a Pole, a citizen of a country, that is a member of the NATO alliance, being a faithful and crucial ally of U.S.

Within following 2-3 years Poland's new fleet of F-16s will become a crucial element of NATO defense system (which means U.S. too)- at least in this part of the world.
Pretty soon we may have American military installation on our ground too.

So these missiles installed in Belarus may be aimed at American aircrafts too. Of course if they are installed there at all, if they don't go to Iran actually.

In either case it may be considered as strange, that an American is cheering this situation.
41 posted on 06/01/2006 3:35:07 AM PDT by lizol (Liberal - a man with his mind open ... at both ends)
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To: flaglady47

Ha what an unemotional post.

Fact is Russia has been dispensing with Polish interventionalists since 'false dmitry'.

Poland backed bigot, and abortion money launderer Yushchnko in Ukraine, they could care less about morals as long as there's economic incentive for them.


42 posted on 06/01/2006 5:12:38 AM PDT by x5452
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To: flaglady47

http://www.house.gov/paul/congrec/congrec2004/cr120704.htm

HON. RON PAUL (Republican) OF TEXAS
BEFORE THE US HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS COMMITTEE
December 7, 2004

U.S. Hypocrisy in Ukraine

Mr. Chairman: President Bush said last week that, "Any election (in Ukraine), if there is one, ought to be free from any foreign influence." I agree with the president wholeheartedly. Unfortunately, it seems that several US government agencies saw things differently and sent US taxpayer dollars into Ukraine in an attempt to influence the outcome.

We do not know exactly how many millions - or tens of millions - of dollars the United States government spent on the presidential election in Ukraine. We do know that much of that money was targeted to assist one particular candidate, and that through a series of cut-out non-governmental organizations (NGOs) - both American and Ukrainian - millions of dollars ended up in support of the presidential candidate, Viktor Yushchenko.

Let me add that I do not think we should be supporting either of the candidates. While I am certainly no supporter of Viktor Yushchenko, I am not a supporter of his opponent, Viktor Yanukovich, either. Simply, it is none of our business who the Ukrainian people select to be their president. And, if they feel the vote was not fair, it is up to them to work it out.

How did this one-sided US funding in Ukraine come about? While I am afraid we may have seen only the tip of the iceberg, one part that we do know thus far is that the US government, through the US Agency for International Development (USAID), granted millions of dollars to the Poland-America-Ukraine Cooperation Initiative (PAUCI), which is administered by the US-based Freedom House.

PAUCI then sent US Government funds to numerous Ukrainian non-governmental organizations (NGOs). This would be bad enough and would in itself constitute meddling in the internal affairs of a sovereign nation. But, what is worse is that many of these grantee organizations in Ukraine are blatantly in favor of presidential candidate Viktor Yushchenko.

Consider the Ukrainian NGO International Centre for Policy Studies. It is an organization funded by the US Government through PAUCI, but on its website you will find that the front page in the English section features a prominent orange ribbon, the symbol of Yushchenko’s party and movement. Reading further on, we discover that this NGO was founded by George Soros’s Open Society Institute. And further on we can see that Viktor Yushchenko himself sits on the advisory board!

And this NGO is not the only one the US government funds that is openly supportive of Viktor Yushchenko. The Western Ukraine Regional Training Center, as another example, features a prominent USAID logo on one side of its website’s front page and an orange ribbon of the candidate Yushchenko’s party and movement on the other. By their proximity, the message to Ukrainian readers is clear: the US government supports Yushchenko.

The Center for Political and Law Reforms, another Ukrainian NGO funded by the US government, features a link at the top of its website’s front page to Viktor Yushchenko’s personal website. Yushchenko’s picture is at the top of this US government funded website.

This May, the Virginia-based private management consultancy Development Associates, Inc., was awarded $100 million by the US government “for strengthening national legislatures and other deliberative bodies worldwide.” According to the organization’s website, several million dollars from this went to Ukraine in advance of the elections.

As I have said, this may only be the tip of the iceberg. There may be many more such organizations involved in this twisted tale.

It is clear that a significant amount of US taxpayer dollars went to support one candidate in Ukraine. Recall how most of us felt when it became known that the Chinese government was trying to funnel campaign funding to a US presidential campaign. This foreign funding of American elections is rightly illegal. Yet, it appears that that is exactly what we are doing abroad. What we do not know, however, is just how much US government money was spent to influence the outcome of the Ukrainian election.

Dozens of organizations are granted funds under the PAUCI program alone, and this is only one of many programs that funneled dollars into Ukraine. We do not know how many millions of US taxpayer dollars the National Endowment for Democracy (NED) sent to Ukraine through NED’s National Democratic Institute and International Republican Institute. Nor do we know how many other efforts, overt or covert, have been made to support one candidate over the other in Ukraine.

That is what I find so disturbing: there are so many cut-out organizations and sub-grantees that we have no idea how much US government money was really spent on Ukraine, and most importantly how it was spent. Perhaps the several examples of blatant partisan support that we have been able to uncover are but an anomaly. I believe Congress and the American taxpayers have a right to know. I believe we urgently need an investigation by the Government Accounting Office into how much US government money was spent in Ukraine and exactly how it was spent. I would hope very much for the support of Chairman Hyde, Chairman Lugar, Deputy Assistant Secretary Tefft, and my colleagues on the Committee in this request.

President Bush is absolutely correct: elections in Ukraine should be free of foreign influence. It is our job here and now to discover just how far we have violated this very important principle, and to cease any funding of political candidates or campaigns henceforth.


43 posted on 06/01/2006 5:13:58 AM PDT by x5452
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To: lizol
Nobody cares. Since nobody is planning on limited rogue state nuclear strikes on Belarus, why would anybody care where they put defensive weapon systems?
44 posted on 06/01/2006 5:16:22 AM PDT by JasonC
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To: lizol

You're a citizen of a country that says it opposes abortion on one hand, and then backs the leader of a pro abortion NGO that gives millions to abortion clinics on the other.

You're a citizen of a country that says it opposes socialism on one hand, and then backs a former communist for president next door. One who tanked the economy, cheated in his election, has ties to anti-semitic groups, has since renationalized industries, and is rewriting names uninteligibly on ballots to disenfranchise voters.

With such an obvious disparity between what Poland SAYS it beleives and what it openly supports, anyone with sense would want to protect themselves against two-faced Polish interventionalism.


45 posted on 06/01/2006 5:18:39 AM PDT by x5452
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To: x5452

Well you got a nice little theory going there, so lets apply that 'foreign' concept to our own elections and send the commie leftist liberals back to their origins. I am so sure there is NOT one dime of 'commie' dollars put forth in any of our elections. sarcasm


46 posted on 06/01/2006 5:19:02 AM PDT by Just mythoughts
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To: flaglady47

http://www.cdi.org/russia/johnson/2006-69-31.cfm

March 21, 2006
He Was Born Skvortsov, on the Rolls He's Shpak
By Oksana Yablokova
Staff Writer
CHERNOVTSY, Ukraine -- Thousands of Ukrainians with Russian last names may not recognize their names on voters' rolls when they try to vote in parliamentary elections Sunday.

Their names have been translated into Ukrainian.

Central Elections Commission officials are urging regional officials to recheck the rolls, and lawmakers have taken steps to allow voters to challenge the spelling of their names in court. But opposition politicians are warning that many voters in the country's east and south could end up disenfranchised.

Taras Chernovil, the deputy campaign chief of the pro-Moscow Party of the Regions and a leading candidate, accused local election officials of intentionally making mistakes while translating voters' Russian names into Ukrainian.

Chernovil, a current lawmaker and No. 4 candidate on the Party of the Regions list, said mistakes had included changing Medvedev to Vedmidev and Skvortsov to Shpak. Skvorets and shpak mean "starling" in their respective languages.

The translations will make it impossible for people to vote because the names in their passports will not correspond with the ones on voters' rolls, he said in a recent interview while campaigning in Chernovtsy, in western Ukraine.

He said local election officials were following orders from the Central Elections Commission in Kiev.

Commission officials could not be reached for comment. But Tatyana Makridi, a spokeswoman for the ruling bloc, Our Ukraine, said regional and local administrations in the eastern and southern regions were responsible for the voters' rolls and any mistakes on them. "These are authorities who were elected under the previous regime before the 2004 [presidential] election," Makridi said.

She refused to comment on why it was necessary to translate Russian voters' names into Ukrainian, saying it was a question for the Central Elections Commission.

Critics say the effort to translate the rolls into Ukrainian is part of a so-called Ukrainization campaign aimed at strengthening national identity. The drive took off in earnest after President Viktor Yushchenko's Western-leaning team came to power in 2004 during the Orange Revolution. It has encountered fierce resistance in the eastern and southern regions, where most people speak Russian.

As part of the drive, parliament last year passed legislation that ordered television stations to run Russian-language shows and movies in Ukrainian. Russian-language schools have been closed, prompting a wave of protests last summer and fall in the Crimean Peninsula. Party of the Regions leader Viktor Yanukovych addressed a pro-Russian language rally of about 10,000 supporters in the Crimean city of Simferopol on Sunday.

Vasily Stoyakin, director of the Center for Political Marketing in Kiev, said translations of voters' rolls and the obligatory translation of Russian programs on television shows that the Ukrainization campaign has gotten out of hand. "This is a foolish campaign that can be characterized as one of Yushchenko's failures," Stoyakin said.

But Igor Popov, head of the Ukrainian Voters' Committee, a nongovernmental group, suggested that the translation mistakes on the rolls had nothing to do with the campaign. "This is an issue of the elections being poorly organized. These are not translations by people. The names were translated by a computer program," Popov said, adding that blocks of names had also fallen out of the rolls due to a failure by the computer program.

He estimated that 5 percent to 10 percent of all rolls were either incomplete or contained mistakes. "I personally had to go verify and correct my wife's name three times," he said.

Election officials have acknowledged problems with the rolls but insisted that they were working to correct them.

Yaroslav Davydovich, head of the Central Elections Commission, urged local officials earlier this month to check the rolls without waiting for voters to complain. "It is their responsibility," Davydovich said, Ukrainian news agencies reported.

Yushchenko has called on voters to check their names on voters' rolls in advance.

Also this month, the parliament approved amendments to the federal election law that will give voters the right to appeal mistakes made in their names in court up to three hours before polling stations close on election day.

Chernovil was skeptical that the legislation would help people vote on Sunday. "In this situation, courts won't be able to handle all the complaints," he said.

He also complained about entire apartment blocks and streets being excluded from voters' lists.

His Party of the Regions is expected to lead Sunday's elections with at least 27 percent of the vote, according to the latest poll released by Razumkov Center, a polling agency. Yushchenko's Our Ukraine is expected to place second, with 17 percent, while a bloc led by former Prime Minister Yulia Tymoshenko is expected to receive 13 percent.

However, it appears that the Party of the Regions will need need a coalition ally to form a majority in the new parliament, which under a 2004 constitutional reform will receive unprecedented powers, including the right to name the prime minister and most of the Cabinet.


47 posted on 06/01/2006 5:19:59 AM PDT by x5452
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To: lizol

That's why it doesn't surprise me, that you - a Russian - are happy with deployment of those missiles. If I were a Russian I'd probably share your view.==

I'm not happy the deployment. It is just squander th emoney which may be used elsewhere. BUT the precausions has to be make.

NATO proved that it is offensive allience. So Russia and especially nonnuclier Belorus has to have something to counterbalance growing polish threat.

I hope th eprices on oil and gas will rise further to let Poland pay for this countermeasures.

BTW those S-300 won't shoot no F-16s if they won't appear in skies over Belorus.


48 posted on 06/01/2006 5:40:15 AM PDT by RusIvan
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To: RusIvan

Happy, not happy - words don't matter here.

I mean, that you probably support this move as a Russian.

And some here support it too, being Americans.

Which I think is weird.


49 posted on 06/01/2006 5:57:04 AM PDT by lizol (Liberal - a man with his mind open ... at both ends)
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To: RusIvan

BTW - I think, that Poland has no ground to complain about this situation.

We simply must to purchase some counter measures.


50 posted on 06/01/2006 6:12:43 AM PDT by lizol (Liberal - a man with his mind open ... at both ends)
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