Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

Thatís it, Uncle Sam: The author renounces his US citizenship
The Spectator (U.K.) ^ | 08/12/06 | Boris Johnson

Posted on 08/10/2006 7:25:32 AM PDT by Pokey78

Right. That’s it. Entre nous c’est terminé. After 42 happy years I am getting a divorce from America. From the very emerging of my childhood consciousness I have been aware that in the eyes of billions of people around the world I have won first prize in the lottery of life. I possess it, the thing competed for by everyone from Rupert Murdoch to the most desperate Mexican wetback, and I have it by simple dint of my nativity, on the Puerto Rican Health Scheme, in New York General Hospital, NY, NY.

I am entitled to an American passport. I must confess that this knowledge used vaguely to tinge my sense of identity. My brothers and sisters are British, and so are my parents, and I would like you to know that I am a loyal subject of Her Majesty, speak in an English accent, and for years I have travelled exclusively on a British passport. But my first passport was green, and when we landed at Dover or Heathrow I felt secretly cool to be the one to present his document to be stamped.

Mine were the credentials furnished by the most powerful nation on earth, and signed by former secretary of state Dean Rusk; and when the going has got tough in England it has sometimes crossed my mind that I could yet activate the Schwarzenegger option and flee to the land of opportunity, perhaps beginning as a short-order chef in Miami before winding up as Colorado senator and, inevitably, president.

Always glowing at the back of my mind has been the light from that unused escape hatch. Let’s face it, folks, we manage to endure so many of our earthly captivities by fantasising that we have somewhere a half-open door to another job, another career, another life, or indeed, if we are religious, a life of the world to come. The mere thought of that door is a consolation, even if, as things turn out, we never actually go through it.

Well, as of this week I slam that door shut, and in some indignation. It is not just that I no longer want an American passport. In fact, what I want is the right not to have an American passport, and it is that right, astoundingly, that the Americans are reluctant to give me.

Last Sunday lunchtime we were boarding a flight to Mexico, via Houston, Texas, and we presented six valid British passports. As soon as the Continental Airlines security guy saw my passport, he shook his head. ‘Were you born in New York?’ he asked. ‘Have you ever carried an American passport?’

Yes, I said, but it had long since expired. ‘I am afraid we have a problem,’ he said. ‘The US Immigration say you have to travel on an American passport if you want to enter the United States.’ B-but I’m British, I said, and my children chorused their agreement. Had the guy stuck around a moment longer, I would have told him how jolly British I was — but luckily for him he’d gone off in search of reinforcements.

When the ranking officer arrived, the story was the same. ‘I’m sorry, sir,’ he said, ‘but you’ll have to go to the US Embassy tomorrow morning and get a new American passport.’ But I don’t want an American passport, I said, inspiration striking me. I tell you what: I renounce my American citizenship. I disclaim it. I discard it.

‘That’s not good enough, sir,’ he said. ‘I need some official document saying that you are no longer American,’ and that, of course, is the point of this piece.

I make this formal, public, and, I hope, legally valid renunciation, because as a result of this moronic rule I had to ask my wife (who bore this latest cock-up with amazing good humour) to take the children on her own to Houston, and I then had to spend a stonking sum on another ticket. Because the Americans insisted I was American, and that it was only as an American that I could travel to America, America was the one country that I had to avoid.

So I circumnavigated America. I flew via Madrid, managing to beat the rest of my family to Mexico by 45 minutes; and yet I still seethe. It’s not just the stupidity of the rule that gets me. It’s the arrogance. What other country insists that because you can be one of its nationals, then you must be one of its nationals? Imagine if we told all British-born Americans that they could not arrive in this country except by use of a British passport. I haven’t seen anything so insanely possessive since the negotiations on the Common Fisheries Policy, when the Irish used to claim that the cod stocks of the Atlantic were still Irish in their fishy souls, even though they had long since emigrated to Portuguese waters.

As far as I can interpret the psychology of the rule, which has only been applied since 9/11, it is part of America’s new them-and-us mentality, the Manichaean division of the world into Americans and non-Americans, obliterating any category in between. Listen, buddy, the Americans seem to be saying. You got a right to be American? Then you do us the courtesy of travelling on the world’s number one passport when you come here. What you got to be ashamed of, boy?

Well, I love America. But I don’t like being pushed around and kicked off flights to what, after all, they claim is my home country. Condi, Mr Ambassador, whoever is in charge — I hereby renounce my birthright. Strike me off the list.

Consider me, as you put it, an ‘alien’. Even as I write these words I am conscious of the huge potential benefits my children will now never have. Of course, it is true that it is not all jam, carrying an American passport. You tend to be first overboard when your ship is hijacked by Arabs; but then these days the Brits walk the plank pretty soon, too; and think of the advantages, that priceless sense of civis Americanus sum; that the sanctity of your life is guaranteed by the hyperpower.

Compare America’s tigerish love of her children with the pitiless indifference we show to British passport-holders from Zimbabwe. The Americans would never allow me to be tried by an international court. The Americans would never let me be extradited to face trial in the UK, even if — particularly if — I was involved in IRA atrocities, while we supinely offer up our subjects without demanding any evidence whatsoever.

These blessings must now remain untested by me and my descendants, and I tender my resignation from the United States, with sadness, but in the knowledge that she is probably big enough to rub along without me. Goodbye and God bless, America.


TOPICS: Culture/Society; Editorial; Foreign Affairs; Government; News/Current Events; United Kingdom
KEYWORDS: bloodygit; blowhard; borisjohnson; doornobrearend; goodriddance; nowthatsanopus; vsign; weareinconsolablenot
Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first previous 1-5051-100101-150151-171 next last
To: Canard

The author is obviosly a leftist.


101 posted on 08/10/2006 9:38:37 AM PDT by wagglebee ("We are ready for the greatest achievements in the history of freedom." -- President Bush, 1/20/05)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 99 | View Replies]

To: wagglebee

Pretty much not, no.


102 posted on 08/10/2006 9:42:03 AM PDT by Canard
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 101 | View Replies]

To: wagglebee
It's like they somehow expect millions of letters to the editor begging them to stay.

You do know we are talking about a British man who lives in Britain? He's not Alec Baldwin, forever defiantly leaving America and wiping the dust off his feet. He is British and lives in Henley, and has done (as far as I know) for decades. Why should his British passport be invalided - in the eyes of American passport authorities - by the fact that he was born in America?

If Catherine Zeta Jones - born in Britain - were to visit her homeland, would she be held at customs like Boris? No. So why is it ok the other way around?

103 posted on 08/10/2006 9:45:21 AM PDT by agere_contra
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 98 | View Replies]

To: cyborg
or how about... Don't let the door hit ya where the good Lord split ya.

Awww . . . my baby's becoming a redneck!

104 posted on 08/10/2006 9:46:05 AM PDT by Petronski (Living His life abundantly.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 94 | View Replies]

To: Pokey78

Cute read. I'm just... not.... "feeling his pain".


105 posted on 08/10/2006 9:53:15 AM PDT by rennatdm
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Pokey78
For Boris:

Good Riddance! And don't come back! Not even on your knees...
106 posted on 08/10/2006 10:58:41 AM PDT by Old Student (WRM, MSgt, USAF(Ret.))
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: cripplecreek
"....that doesn't mean a thing. If he wants to renounce his citizenship he needs to do it legally and officially by way of the state department. I suspect he knows that already but hopes the reader doesn't."

If he's gotten it published this publicly, and widely, I suspect he'll find it quite valid. He may well find his name on another list, shortly, too.
107 posted on 08/10/2006 11:00:44 AM PDT by Old Student (WRM, MSgt, USAF(Ret.))
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 15 | View Replies]

To: Old Student
He may well find his name on another list, shortly, too.

The list of British people whose British passports are being denied due to the accident of their birth? That list?

108 posted on 08/10/2006 11:07:49 AM PDT by agere_contra
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 107 | View Replies]

To: Pokey78

I love FR, but the ability of people to post without reading or understanding the article leaves me speechless...


109 posted on 08/10/2006 11:09:07 AM PDT by GreenLanternCorps (The Solution to the GOP's Problems Isn't More Democrats!!!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: GreenLanternCorps

Man you said it.


110 posted on 08/10/2006 11:15:22 AM PDT by agere_contra
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 109 | View Replies]

To: Pokey78
Don't let the "escape hatch" hit you on the way out!
111 posted on 08/10/2006 11:17:23 AM PDT by Sensei Ern ((This tagline intentionally left blank.))
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Pokey78

Choke on a crumpet, ya poof!


112 posted on 08/10/2006 11:20:09 AM PDT by toddlintown (IT)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: agere_contra
I was thinking more like the "No Entry Under Any Circumstances" list. AKA the Terror Watch List.
113 posted on 08/10/2006 11:24:04 AM PDT by Old Student (WRM, MSgt, USAF(Ret.))
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 108 | View Replies]

To: Old Student

Yes, I get it, thanks. But why would a Conservative British MP be put on an Terrorist Watch List just because he was born in America? Is it because he has had to renounce his American Citizenship in order for American Customs to recognise the fact that he is a British citizen?

We don't do this in reverse. I gave an example previously of Catherine Zeta Jones. British-born: she had a British passport and now has an American one. We wouldn't force her to regain her British passport before allowing her to enter the country. We recognise American passports as belonging to friends and allies. So why do American customs not return the favour?


114 posted on 08/10/2006 11:35:06 AM PDT by agere_contra
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 113 | View Replies]

To: agere_contra

I'd love to know what percentage of people who have posted to this thread read beyond the headline of the article!


115 posted on 08/10/2006 11:48:00 AM PDT by Canard
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 114 | View Replies]

To: Old Student

Hmm, I hope my last post didn't come across as being snarky. There's been a lot of aggravating noise on this thread which has been making me punchy I guess. I'm going home now: no doubt this oddly mis-read article will reappear tomorrow.


116 posted on 08/10/2006 11:49:16 AM PDT by agere_contra
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 113 | View Replies]

To: agere_contra
"But why would a Conservative British MP be put on an Terrorist Watch List just because he was born in America?"

It's not because he was born in America, it's because he's become a British MP. IIRC, you cannot hold a position in a foreign government, and retain your US citizenship. If I did something like that, I'd also lose my military retirement check, as well. The one thing that would indicate that he did not INTEND to give up his US citizenship would be to maintain his US passport. If he didn't intend to maintain his US citizenship, he's supposed to renounce it in front a State Department official, but having done so publicly, in writing, is quite likely to have that effect anyway.

I don't mind people becoming so enamoured of a foreign country that they live there full time. I've got friends who do so in Germany and Britain, in point of fact. They also maintain their US passports, though. If I hadn't had children, I could have done so with the Republic of Turkey, myself. For that matter, I don't mind foreigners who want to reside here, as long as they follow the legal procedures to do so. However, if Mr. Johnson doesn't want us, we don't want him, either. At all.
117 posted on 08/10/2006 11:55:20 AM PDT by Old Student (WRM, MSgt, USAF(Ret.))
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 114 | View Replies]

To: Canard
I'd love to know what percentage of people who have posted to this thread read beyond the headline of the article!

It works out as 3.116 % :0)

I guess FReepers just got used to Baldwin, Moore, Streisand, Sarandon, and various gay journalists forswearing their homeland in print every few days. Boris Johnson's amiable goodbye to the kafka-esque American Passport office just seemed like more of the same, maybe. Anyway, good night to one and all.

118 posted on 08/10/2006 11:55:36 AM PDT by agere_contra
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 115 | View Replies]

To: Old Student

" It's not because he was born in America, it's because he's become a British MP."

That doesn't appear anywhere in the article and certainly isn't what Boris is saying that US customs said to him. He hasn't recently become an MP by the way, he was elected in 2001.

"you cannot hold a position in a foreign government, and retain your US citizenship"

Again, they didn't say he had to renounce his citizenship. They said that if he retained his US citizenship, he could not use his British passport to enter the US, despite the fact that he is British.



119 posted on 08/10/2006 12:01:31 PM PDT by Canard
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 117 | View Replies]

To: Restore

His departure raises the average IQ of two countries.


120 posted on 08/10/2006 12:04:55 PM PDT by mathurine (ua)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: Old Student
The one thing that would indicate that he did not INTEND to give up his US citizenship would be to maintain his US passport

But Sir, he didn't maintain it. Otherwise American customs would hardly have asked him to regain it. And nor was any of this about Boris Johnson being an awesome potentate of Her Majesty's Britannic Empire. American Customs didn't know he was a Member of Parliament when they stopped him.

This article was about the unusual "clinginess" of the technical definition of American citizenhood. Not about anything else. I can't see why 97% of posters to this thread are horribly affronted by Boris cutting his purely notional tie with America. He is not an American. He does not live there. Boris likes America and defends it in print - and in the article clearly regards it as the great hope of mankind - despite the inane quirks of its customs office..

Sorry, absolutely got to get home now

121 posted on 08/10/2006 12:07:58 PM PDT by agere_contra
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 117 | View Replies]

To: Canard
"Again, they didn't say he had to renounce his citizenship. They said that if he retained his US citizenship, he could not use his British passport to enter the US, despite the fact that he is British."

Except that he had a US passport, which he apparently allowed to lapse. If he has (or has had) a US passport, he's American, not British. If he's (by law) American, he needs a US passport to travel outside the country. If he doesn't want to get one, either he can forget entering the US on his British passport, or he can renounce his citizenship. Which will likely trigger his addition to the Terrorist Watch List, these days. The US recognizes dual citizenship, sort of, but does not recommend it, and if you want to maintain it, there are certain things you must do, like maintaining your US citizenship and visiting the US regularly. If you intend to maintain your US citizenship, you are not supposed to do anything that indicates you might intend to renounce it, either. Once upon a time, and not all that long ago, holding elected office or serving in a foreign military resulted in automatic loss of citizenship. This could even happen to those who did not hold dual citizenship, btw. It's still a factor in determining intention to renounce US citizenship.
122 posted on 08/10/2006 12:13:50 PM PDT by Old Student (WRM, MSgt, USAF(Ret.))
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 119 | View Replies]

To: agere_contra
"But Sir, he didn't maintain it. Otherwise American customs would hardly have asked him to regain it. "

See my post #122, which I was apparently composing when you posted. Have a good evening, FRiend. Sometime again!
123 posted on 08/10/2006 12:17:36 PM PDT by Old Student (WRM, MSgt, USAF(Ret.))
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 121 | View Replies]

To: Old Student
My take on the article is that he is British and happened to be born in New York.
I did not get the impression he has ever resided in the States, he even states at the beginning of the article though rather oddly he is an American citizen basically b accident of birth. I would safe it is a timing issue. I don't know why he had an American passport, but I would suspect with an American Birth certificate it was easier to get an American passport when he was a baby to go home to jolly old England.
I still don't understand the rule requiring entry under an American passport if you are entitled to another countries passport and choose to use the other passport.
124 posted on 08/10/2006 1:24:03 PM PDT by thinkthenpost
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 122 | View Replies]

To: Pokey78
In the words of Opera Man;

BYE BYE!!!!!!!!!!


125 posted on 08/10/2006 3:46:36 PM PDT by BerniesFriend
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: thinkthenpost
"I did not get the impression he has ever resided in the States, he even states at the beginning of the article though rather oddly he is an American citizen basically b accident of birth. "

If he was born here, and hasn't already renounced citizenship, he's an American citizen. By Law. If his parents were tourists or resident aliens, by the laws of Great Britain, he may also have citizenship there, but by our law, he is one of us. Period. I got the impression from the article that he's traveled here on an American passport before, and just failed to renew it, and that is why he was told he needed to renew if he wanted to reenter the US. A passport is only good for 7 years, unless they've changed since I last had one, a little over ten years ago.
126 posted on 08/10/2006 4:07:45 PM PDT by Old Student (WRM, MSgt, USAF(Ret.))
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 124 | View Replies]

To: Old Student

Another good reason why everyone should just have ONE citizenship.


127 posted on 08/10/2006 6:35:48 PM PDT by Democratshavenobrains
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 126 | View Replies]

To: Democratshavenobrains
My two oldest children were born in Germany. My family is of German descent. If I had wanted to, they could have been holders of dual citizenship. Didn't happen for several reasons:

1. They are Americans, just like their mama and daddy.
2. The more time I spent in Germany, the more I understood why my great'greatgrandfather left.
3. Why would anyone want to be anything else?

I'm not a sports fan, but this was a clear case of "slam dunk" if ever there was one.
128 posted on 08/10/2006 6:42:21 PM PDT by Old Student (WRM, MSgt, USAF(Ret.))
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 127 | View Replies]

To: Old Student
That does not address the requiring a person to travel to the United States with a State Department issued passport if they are also legally entitled to another countries passport. You seem to advocate citizenship documentation for international travel from your birth country only which may be fine, but currently is not the international standard. The State Department has even issued recommendations that if you can use another country's passport to do so rather than your American issued passport.
It just seems like a solution with little or no problem.
129 posted on 08/11/2006 8:15:05 AM PDT by thinkthenpost
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 126 | View Replies]

To: thinkthenpost

"The State Department has even issued recommendations that if you can use another country's passport to do so rather than your American issued passport."

Not when you're going to America, they don't. This guy was planning to travel to the USA. As a US citizen, with a British passport, because he let his US passport expire while he was outside the USA.

If you plan on going to Israel, and to Saudi Arabia, maybe using another country's passport for the trip to Israel might be a good idea (actually, it would be). But not to the US.


130 posted on 08/11/2006 10:12:44 AM PDT by Old Student (We have a name for the people who think indiscriminate killing is fine. They're called "The Bad Guys)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 129 | View Replies]

To: Old Student
"Not when you're going to America, they don't. This guy was planning to travel to the USA. As a US citizen, with a British passport, because he let his US passport expire while he was outside the USA."

Actually he was planning on landing in Houston and continuing to Mexico without leaving the airport and depending on how Houston Intercontinental is set up I would guess without leaving the International Terminal.

Again I ask why MUST he use an American passport, what is the reason for the rule?
131 posted on 08/11/2006 10:25:47 AM PDT by thinkthenpost
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 130 | View Replies]

To: thinkthenpost

It's a rule. What, you think I made it?


132 posted on 08/11/2006 10:35:25 AM PDT by Old Student (We have a name for the people who think indiscriminate killing is fine. They're called "The Bad Guys)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 131 | View Replies]

To: Old Student

Nothing was directed at you personally, you were the only person responding so the only person per getting posted, please see my first post on the thread # 75.

I hope you have a good weekend.


133 posted on 08/11/2006 10:47:13 AM PDT by thinkthenpost
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 132 | View Replies]

To: keithtoo
Americans don't name their kids Boris - this guy is a fraud.

Speaking as a "Boris" you couldn't be more wrong. I'm American through and through, and the other Boris can kiss my American A##.
134 posted on 08/11/2006 10:52:44 AM PDT by Kozak (Anti Shahada: " There is no God named Allah, and Muhammed is his False Prophet")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 12 | View Replies]

To: Pokey78

well, bye! Don't let the door hit your ass on the way out!


135 posted on 08/11/2006 10:53:42 AM PDT by lawgirl (She comes on like thunder and she's more right than rain)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: rightwingintelligentsia

LOL!!!

You wait! some moonbat is going to read this thread- and your post- and report to Cindy with a BRILLIANT plan to get her some MEDIA attention......


136 posted on 08/11/2006 10:56:22 AM PDT by eeevil conservative (JOHN BOLTON FOR PRESIDENT)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 13 | View Replies]

To: Kozak

I stand corrected.


137 posted on 08/11/2006 10:58:51 AM PDT by keithtoo (Israeli defense strategy "Cogito Ergo Boom!")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 134 | View Replies]

To: agere_contra

what?

He loves America?

I read the article....

If he LOVED America- he would recognize that the "passport" issue is there to PROTECT AMERICA- for starters....

Also- he would not be writing a public claim of wanting a divorce form America over THIS ONE ISSUE!

LOVING America is a lot more than enjoying her freedoms- the benefits of her capitalism- and lip service.

LOVING AMERICA is being EAGER to make sacrafices for her. For her strength, growth, and her survival.

He was trying to enter the US via plane and had passport issues. I'd like to see the part in the security manual that says- "If subject has a jolly British accent, by all means, ignore all laws and procedures. Buy the chap a brew."

He is a fraud, a liar, a whiner, and a PUTZ.......


138 posted on 08/11/2006 11:08:38 AM PDT by eeevil conservative (JOHN BOLTON FOR PRESIDENT)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 37 | View Replies]

To: Lazamataz

I don't think his 'divorce' request is 'just because'. It is obviously brought on by sillyness of reading his birthplace as taking precedence over the facts of citizenship on his passport.

Interesting piece. He is not derogatory in any way to our country, in fact he is complementary - he just points out a stupid process, or interpretation of ones birthplace in these post 9/11 times as taking precedence over the facts of ones nationality as professed in their passport. He makes a very good point in showing how stupid our immigration policy can be and often is.


139 posted on 08/11/2006 1:29:35 PM PDT by AgThorn (Bush is my president, but he needs to protect our borders. FIRST, before any talk of "Amnesty.")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: agere_contra

it appears that many people responding here have not read the article ... just want to throw rocks at his supposed un-american ranting, which it really isn't.


140 posted on 08/11/2006 1:30:26 PM PDT by AgThorn (Bush is my president, but he needs to protect our borders. FIRST, before any talk of "Amnesty.")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 37 | View Replies]

To: thinkthenpost

If he LOVES the USA (as he said), why did he let his passport expire from a country HE LOVES?

Sounds like he wants it both ways. He wants to be treated as an American, but he didn't go through the proper procedure to keep up his American passport.

He wants to live his life as if it isn't important to keep his American status current -- until he wants to enter the U.S. Then he says -- Opppps.


141 posted on 08/11/2006 1:32:59 PM PDT by i_dont_chat (I have the right to offend. You can take offense or not.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 131 | View Replies]

To: Pokey78
Who is Boris Johnson?

WTF should I care?

Does he have extra one-way tickets (send Sheehan with him)?

142 posted on 08/11/2006 1:33:28 PM PDT by lormand (Nuke the Islamic States, or kiss your @55 goodbye)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: agere_contra

I agree with you.


143 posted on 08/11/2006 1:39:54 PM PDT by DeuceTraveler (Freedom is a never ending struggle)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 37 | View Replies]

To: Pokey78; All
But my first passport was green, and when we landed at Dover or Heathrow I felt secretly cool to be the one to present his document to be stamped.
So he had one of those special edition green Ben Franklin passports some of my American friends complained about having (because a green USA passport was pretty uncommon and caused them to get detained in places they'd never seen it)?
Or did I miss something. Isn't the stereotype US passport always blue?
144 posted on 08/11/2006 1:40:43 PM PDT by freedom moose (has de cultivar el que sembres)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Pokey78

Fine, Boris. Go. Don't let the door hit you on the backside on the way out, you ingrate.


145 posted on 08/11/2006 2:03:51 PM PDT by Captain Rhino ( Dollars spent in India help a friend; dollars spent in China arm an enemy.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: eeevil conservative

"If he LOVED America- he would recognize that the "passport" issue is there to PROTECT AMERICA- for starters"

Explain? How is America endangered by allowing him to use his perfectly valid British passport? If he renounces his citizenship, why does it then become safe to allow him to use the same British passport again?

"Also- he would not be writing a public claim of wanting a divorce form America over THIS ONE ISSUE!"

He doesn't claim to 'want' a divorce, it is the only option which will allow him to use his British passport as a British citizen. If this was his desired outcome, I doubt Boris would have gone to the trouble of writing an article about it.


146 posted on 08/11/2006 2:20:58 PM PDT by Canard
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 138 | View Replies]

To: Canard

Boris is, believe it or not, a Conservative MP. He really seems to like himself.


147 posted on 08/11/2006 2:25:56 PM PDT by Mr. Lucky
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 146 | View Replies]

To: Pokey78
This 42 year old twit gets his feewings hurt so he renounces his citizenship?

He's got a pretty high opinion of himself. Good bye Boris.

148 posted on 08/11/2006 2:36:59 PM PDT by Toadman
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Toadman
I kinda feel like I'm just repeating my own and other posts now, but hey ho. No he isn't renouncing his citizenship because he got his feelings hurt. He is renouncing it because otherwise US immigration will not allow him to use his perfectly valid UK passport to enter the US as a UK citizen
149 posted on 08/11/2006 2:43:10 PM PDT by Canard
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 148 | View Replies]

To: Old Student
IIRC, you cannot hold a position in a foreign government, and retain your US citizenship.

Well, sort of. According to the State Department website, if you hold a non-policy level position in a foreign government, the State Department will presume that you don't intend to renounce your citizenship. But if you voluntarily hold a policy level position (like being a Member of Parliament), the presumption is that you intended to renounce your citizenship. I don't think you officially lose your citizenship, though, unless you file the necessary paperwork with an overseas consulate or some sort of administrative action is brought against you.

The United States is hardly the only country that requires its citizens to enter and leave the country using that country's passport, by the way.

Most U.S. airports don't have sterile international transit areas, like in Europe. Thus, people transiting from Europe to Mexico could theoretically leave the airport while en-route. Houston's new international terminals might be able to be set up as a sterile area, but currently isn't, since ICE regulations require visas for transit through a sterile area anyway.
150 posted on 08/11/2006 2:49:35 PM PDT by conservative in nyc
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 117 | View Replies]


Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first previous 1-5051-100101-150151-171 next last

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson