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To: wyattearp
Several years back a major article was produced concerning academic fraud. Among other items discussed was Mendel's exclusion of any data that led to a different conclusion than the one he wanted.

His original data clearly showed the effect of "jumping genes". His final data made it look like it was all a case of dominant and recessive traits.

You might be able to find an article on the net by using "mendel" "cheating" "academic fraud" "beans" "genes"

90 posted on 08/16/2006 8:03:37 PM PDT by muawiyah
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To: muawiyah

I couldn't find any "major articles" any more recent than 1956 that even suggests what you are saying. Show me the "major article" that you are talking about. I did find this, having to do with a statistical analysis by Sir Ronald A. Fisher, which, if misunderstood, might lead to your conclusions.

"Fisher taught high school mathematics and physics from 1914 until 1919 while continuing his research in statistics and genetics. Fisher had evidenced a keen interest in evolutionary theory during his student days—he was a founder of the Cambridge University Eugenics Society—and he combined his training in statistics with his avocation for genetics. In particular, he published an important paper in 1918 in which he used powerful statistical tools to reconcile what had been apparent inconsistencies between Charles Darwin's ideas of natural selection and the recently rediscovered experiments of the Austrian botanist Gregor Mendel."


165 posted on 08/16/2006 9:41:43 PM PDT by wyattearp (Study! Study! Study! Or BONK, BONK, on the head!)
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