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An Enclosure Movement For Children (public schools)
The Oddyseus Group ^ | John Taylor Gatto

Posted on 09/14/2006 8:00:51 PM PDT by Clintonfatigued

The secret of American schooling is that it doesn’t teach the way children learn, and it isn’t supposed to; school was engineered to serve a concealed command economy and a deliberately re-stratified social order. It wasn’t made for the benefit of kids and families as those individuals and institutions would define their own needs. School is the first impression children get of organized society; like most first impressions, it is the lasting one. Life according to school is dull and stupid, only consumption promises relief: Coke, Big Macs, fashion jeans, that’s where real meaning is found, that is the classroom’s lesson, however indirectly delivered.

The decisive dynamics which make forced schooling poisonous to healthy human development aren’t hard to spot. Work in classrooms isn’t significant work; it fails to satisfy real needs pressing on the individual; it doesn’t answer real questions experience raises in the young mind; it doesn’t contribute to solving any problem encountered in actual life. The net effect of making all schoolwork external to individual longings, experiences, questions, and problems is to render the victim listless. This phenomenon has been well-understood at least since the time of the British enclosure movement which forced small farmers off their land into factory work. Growth and mastery come only to those who vigorously self-direct. Initiating, creating, doing, reflecting, freely associating, enjoying privacy—these are precisely what the structures of schooling are set up to prevent, on one pretext or another.

(Excerpt) Read more at johntaylorgatto.com ...


TOPICS: Culture/Society; Government
KEYWORDS: corporate; culturewars; education; educrats; pubicschools; publicschool; publikskoolz; schools; slavery
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1 posted on 09/14/2006 8:00:51 PM PDT by Clintonfatigued
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To: Tired of Taxes; DaveLoneRanger; Republicanprofessor; metmom; Aquinasfan; GSlob; luckystarmom; ...

Please read this article in its entirety. Of all of John Taylor Gatto's writings, this ranks among his best. I've never seen an article which states the personal destruction wrought upon kids by public education.


2 posted on 09/14/2006 8:05:09 PM PDT by Clintonfatigued (illegal aliens commit crimes that Americans won't commit)
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To: Clintonfatigued

Public schools are now for the purpose of keeping the neighbors' kids from competing with established businesses in the near future. Another method is to encourage immoral behaviors and wastes of time for others' kids but not for one's own. Public schools (and the divorce industry) are for the purpose of keeping working class families in their place--on the plantation.


3 posted on 09/14/2006 8:08:29 PM PDT by familyop ("G-d is on our side because he hates the Yanks." --St. Tuco, in the "Good, the Bad, and the Ugly")
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To: Clintonfatigued

read later


4 posted on 09/14/2006 8:08:44 PM PDT by LiteKeeper (Beware the secularization of America; the Islamization of Eurabia)
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To: Clintonfatigued

Some good things in the article. Quite a bit of nonsense too.


5 posted on 09/14/2006 8:08:46 PM PDT by ModelBreaker
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To: Clintonfatigued

Thanks for the ping. I'll read it tomorrow when I'm more coherent.


6 posted on 09/14/2006 8:13:30 PM PDT by metmom (Welfare was never meant to be a career choice.)
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To: ModelBreaker

Yeah, sure there is.


7 posted on 09/14/2006 8:14:26 PM PDT by Shimmer128 (KŻlia i ka nu`u.)
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To: Clintonfatigued
This might not seem (to some) to be related, at first. If so, have a second look and a second thought. Bill Gates and other top owners of Microsoft have also contributed much to efforts (Planned Parenthood, workplace feminism, inheritance tax, anti-Second-Amendment organizations,...) to break up the Joneses.

The following filed briefs in favor of "affirmative action" in the Michigan "Grutter v. Bollinger" (Michigan University) case. No one is pushing the corporations to do it. They started it, and they pay their own revenues to continue it.

3M
Abbott Laboratories
American Airlines
Ashland
Bank One
Boeing
Coca-Cola
Dow Chemical
E.I. Du Pont De Nemours
Eastman Kodak
Eli Lilly
Ernst & Young
Exelon
Fannie Mae
General Dynamics
General Mills
Intel
Johnson & Johnson
Kellogg
KPMG
Lucent Technologies
Microsoft
Mitsubishi
Nationwide Mutual Insurance
Nationwide Financial
Pfizer
PPG
Proctor & Gamble
Sara Lee
Steelcase
Texaco
TRW
United Airlines
General Motors Corporation (also an Adobe Acrobat PDF file)
8 posted on 09/14/2006 8:15:15 PM PDT by familyop (Essayons)
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To: Clintonfatigued

Thanks. An abundance of good points, imho.


9 posted on 09/14/2006 8:18:38 PM PDT by Quix (LET GOD ARISE AND HIS ENEMIES BE SCATTERED. LET ISRAEL CALL ON GOD AS THEIRS! & ISLAM FLUSH ITSELF)
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To: Clintonfatigued

Get the kids out of the publik skools now, if you love them. Give up the expensive vacations if you have to, the fancy homes. Put your kids first.

Gatto has it right. We've become a nation of imbeciles. Have you been around public schoolers lately??


10 posted on 09/14/2006 8:18:53 PM PDT by bluejean gal (There are 10 types of people in the world: those who understand binary and those who don't.)
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To: bluejean gal

Many parents aren't fully aware of the options they have. They went through public education, everyone they grew up with went through it, their parents went through it. As a result, they can't imagine that education can be done in any other way.

The next time a parent you know complains about how bad the schools are, let her know that there are other choices. As a friend once told me, instead of cursing the darkness, light a candle.


11 posted on 09/14/2006 8:24:21 PM PDT by Clintonfatigued (illegal aliens commit crimes that Americans won't commit)
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To: Clintonfatigued

Gatto's "Dumbing Us Down" finally convinced my husband that homeschooling was the answer to our son's education and safety. There were other reasons, but that book cemeted our decision. Critical thinking skills aren't taught in public (and most private) schools. The educators are far too busy with crowd control tactics and getting their students ready for the latest round of state mandated tests.

My son is in his second year at UCSD, studing computer science. While my son has a few issues with the way the university runs things, he is able to handle "indoctrination" tactics from some of the more far out professors better than most students his age or older.

John Taylor Gatto is an amazing author. His creative solutions must scare the elitist swine that want to control our children. Great stuff.


12 posted on 09/14/2006 8:27:41 PM PDT by demnomo
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To: demnomo

Congratulations on you and your son on his success!

What I like most about Gatto is his refusal to be confined to managed debate and willingness to stray from the beaten path and advocate solutions based on kids being taught in the way their minds work rather than labels or political factions.


13 posted on 09/14/2006 8:32:30 PM PDT by Clintonfatigued (illegal aliens commit crimes that Americans won't commit)
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To: Clintonfatigued
Heh heh...I attended kindergarten for two weeks before ditching it to explore the woods. The folks couldn't understand that I got everything they had to offer in ten days of finger-painting, baby talk condescension, enforced naps on mats, ridiculous concepts and enforced socialization. Hey, I was already reading encyclopedias because of so much downtime with pneumonia. I fell into line when they explained that it was the law - but I always resented grade school for wasting my valuable childhood time.

Home schooling consistently turns out better educated and more stable citizens than the sad institutions of mediocrity passing as public schools. They've become far worse since my time by replacing basic curriculum with theoretical "esteem-building", expulsion with social promotion and corporal punishment with forced medication.

And people wonder where these Eric Harris's and Dylon Kliebolds are coming from.
14 posted on 09/14/2006 8:42:37 PM PDT by NewRomeTacitus (Americans First.)
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To: Clintonfatigued
Atrocious garbage of an article. Public school is bad NOT BECAUSE it is public, and even NOT BECAUSE, or HOW, it is organized. The root of the trouble is that like a platoon marching at the speed of its slowest soldier, the slowest and dullest pupils [unless separated into a different education stream], slow everyone else down.
Here the homeschooling enjoys one very important privilege - a class of one student, i.e. perfectly homogeneous and segregated by ability student body. From the experience of [foreign] - admittedly elitist - schools which to a significant extent carried out the same segregation by ability, one could say that it is absolutely possible to achieve stunning results in a public school setting as well, since in it is possible to apply more resources than would be available to a single homeschooling family. Once upon a time and in a different realm I visited such a school, organized by university professors for their offspring. They had to open it to outsiders as a public school - and did so, as a school for the gifted on the basis of competitive admission by IQ.
If memory serves, I saw a class of maybe 35 students, age about 12-13, with minimal IQ of 140. Without pencil or paper, just in their heads, these kids were doing visualization exercises with things like 5- dimensional hypercube in its intersection with something else equally exotic. From what I've heard, from that class by now one could find maybe a dozen professors in major European universities, and a couple teaching in the Ivy league here.
Show me any home- or private- schooling advocate who would not be proud of such results. Thus it is not the organization [schedules, classes with breaks etc], nor per se the size of the class, but the quality of the student body. And one more point: when everyone around has IQ>140, it is almost impossible to coast against too strong a background. Thus competitive motivation.
15 posted on 09/14/2006 8:59:23 PM PDT by GSlob
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To: bluejean gal

"Have you been around public schoolers lately??"

Yes as a matter of fact I have and was pretty impressed.

What's your story?


16 posted on 09/14/2006 9:12:18 PM PDT by swmobuffalo (The only good terrorist is a dead terrorist.)
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To: 2Jedismom; Aggie Mama; agrace; Antoninus; bboop; blu; cgk; Clintonfatigued; ...
ANOTHER REASON TO HOMESCHOOL PING!

This ping list is for the "other" articles of interest to homeschoolers about education and public school. If you want on/off this list, please freepmail me. The main Homeschool Ping List by DaveLoneRanger handles the homeschool-specific articles.

17 posted on 09/14/2006 9:56:18 PM PDT by Tired of Taxes (That's taxes, not Texas. I have no beef with TX. NJ has the highest property taxes in the nation.)
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To: GSlob
The root of the trouble is that like a platoon marching at the speed of its slowest soldier, the slowest and dullest pupils [unless separated into a different education stream], slow everyone else down.

Some districts do separate the better students and place them in better schools. The problem is, with a school system based on the socialist model, other students with potential do become lost, stuck behind in the worse schools, as sometimes admission into the better schools comes down to pulling strings and the luck of the draw.

Privatizing education would put it all back into the hands of the parents. Then, if private companies wanted to recruit promising young students to work for them, they could offer scholarships or run their own schools to educate them. Competition would offer so many more options.

From what I've heard, from that class by now one could find maybe a dozen professors in major European universities, and a couple teaching in the Ivy league here.

Great. They're probably the ones spouting all the Leftist ideas. ;-)

18 posted on 09/14/2006 10:07:40 PM PDT by Tired of Taxes (That's taxes, not Texas. I have no beef with TX. NJ has the highest property taxes in the nation.)
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To: pesto

Ping!


19 posted on 09/14/2006 10:15:46 PM PDT by basil (Exercise your Second Amendment Rights--buy another gun today.)
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To: Clintonfatigued

BFLR


20 posted on 09/14/2006 10:17:06 PM PDT by cgk (I don't see myself as a conservative. I see myself as a religious, right-wing, wacko extremist.)
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To: Clintonfatigued

Great eye opening read. In any of his books does he say how the best way to "educate" kids is?


21 posted on 09/14/2006 11:50:57 PM PDT by jwh_Denver (I can't beat em but I ain't joining them either.)
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To: Tired of Taxes
"Great. They're probably the ones spouting all the Leftist ideas"
You could not be more wrong. Those I heard of are working in hard sciences. Workers' [or Aryan, or any other PC flavor du jour] physics or statistics is long out of fashion.
22 posted on 09/15/2006 12:07:52 AM PDT by GSlob
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To: GSlob

The scenario that you've described simply doesn't exist for the vast majority of Americans. It's in the realm of vouchers; not too bad of an idea in the theoretical sense, but not likely to be seen in reality.

You work with the tools you actually have. For the vast bulk of Americans means home education, private schools, or settling for the government schools.


23 posted on 09/15/2006 2:34:05 AM PDT by RKBA Democrat (Lord Jesus Christ, Son of God, have mercy on me, a sinner!)
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To: Born Conservative; kenth; CatoRenasci; Marie; PureSolace; Congressman Billybob; P.O.E.; cupcakes; ..

Education ping.

Let McVey, JamesP81, or me know if you want on or off this education ping list.


24 posted on 09/15/2006 4:04:21 AM PDT by Republicanprofessor
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To: bluejean gal
Have you been around public schoolers lately??

Yes, and they are great kids.

25 posted on 09/15/2006 5:20:00 AM PDT by fml
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To: GSlob
The root of the trouble is that like a platoon marching at the speed of its slowest soldier,

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

I dated a man who was a graduate of the Stuyvesant school in N.Y. It was a dreadful experience for him.

He was disgusted to death with the eternal competition and intensive speed with which new work was introduced. Along with this was the adulation he received from his parents, relatives, family friends, and neighbors that added to the pressure of expectations. Hey! He had a high IQ, and society demanded "production" from this IQ.

The amount on time required for school work consumed his life, and left no time for personal creativity. He was kid on a 4 year treadmill, and felt like a gerbil on an forced exercise wheel.

So...what happened when he finally was accepted to Case Western? Answer: He chose the easiest possible major. Philosophy. He then spent as much time in the computer labs working on and finishing other students computer projects. ( This was the early 70s when large stacks of cards were the norm.)

In his adult life he made a very successful career in computer programing, and ,,,,guess what? ,,,,he was nearly entirely self-taught in this field. ( So much for all that formal education!)

I did not marry this guy, because he bragged about how he deliberately set out to do as little as possible in college. I didn't want any future children of mind taught this.

So...what did my actual children do?

They were homeschooled. They entered college, by their own choice, at the ages of 13, 12, and 13. They took courses by their own volition. All finished their college generals and Calculus III by the age of 15.

The two younger were graduates of university with B.S. degrees in math at the age of 18. One of these recently finished a masters in math at the age of 20.

The oldest of the 3 is a highly accomplished athlete, and plans to make a career in coaching. He is studying business and accounting. Along with all of his training, worldwide travel, and a 2 year church mission in the Baltics ( returning home fluent in Russian), he will graduate from college at the age of his contemporaries.

All children play an instrument, are accomplished ballroom dancers, sing in their church and school choirs, have many good and wholesome friends, and are volunteers for their church.

This is the difference between hot-house raising of high IQ children, such as my old dating companion, and the more natural environment of the home that my children enjoyed.

In my opinion, homeschooling is the most natural and healthy environment to raise children to a educationally and emotionally secure adulthood. Yes, some children will need institutionalization. This is a shame. We need orphanages too, but no one is suggesting that it is the best way to raise a child.
26 posted on 09/15/2006 5:46:11 AM PDT by wintertime (Good ideas win! Why? Because people are not stupid)
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To: fml
Yes, and they are great kids.

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

I work in a busy health clinic, and I can instantly tell who it the institutionalized child, and who is the homeschooler.

Those children who are institutionalized for their education, dress in sexually provocative ways. The most telling difference is the 20 degree off-centered stare when spoken to by an adult. It is the monosyllabic grunts and mumbles to questions directed to them by those who are there to serve their health needs. Should I mention the tattoos, the dog collars, the butt cracks and pubic hairs peeping from their low slung jeans, the peircings, and unnatural hair colors? They have the dull eyes seen in gorillas in our local zoo.

The homeschoolers in contrast, speak openly with all who are around them, young and old. Their faces are bright and open. They speak in full sentences. They are curious about what we are doing, and ask cogent questions about the procedures. Their skin is free of tattoos and piercings. They have normal and beautiful hair, and their dress is modest but fashionable.

What a difference!
27 posted on 09/15/2006 5:54:36 AM PDT by wintertime (Good ideas win! Why? Because people are not stupid)
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To: Clintonfatigued

One of my best friends is a public school teacher. I'd get him to read this if I didn't think it would end the friendship.


28 posted on 09/15/2006 5:55:57 AM PDT by JamesP81 ("Never let your schooling interfere with your education" --Mark Twain)
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To: Tired of Taxes

Privatizing education would put it all back into the hands of the parents. Then, if private companies wanted to recruit promising young students to work for them,

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

At 15, my son moved from the community college to a local college. In the first semester, the college held a job fair. A local bank offered my son ( then 15) a **serious** job offer for a management position. He refused, and jokingly told the recruiter, "My mom would have to drive me!"

At 15, he could have DONE that job, and performed well!

In the past youth of that age did take on responsibilities of great magnitude. I am reminded of the young teen officer in the movie staring Robert Crowe, "Master and Commander". The fictional young man in that movie was essentially being "homeschooled" by the captain, the captain's friend, and the other members of the crew.


29 posted on 09/15/2006 6:06:05 AM PDT by wintertime (Good ideas win! Why? Because people are not stupid)
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To: RKBA Democrat

"The scenario that you've described simply doesn't exist for the vast majority of Americans."
Jedem das Seine. Not everyone needs it, and not everyone would be able to benefit from it, either. A somewhat similar scenario existed in American public schools about 100 years ago - witness all periodically re-published exam requirements for the high school entrance of that time. And the entrance exams imply the same selectivity - not everyone was admitted.


30 posted on 09/15/2006 6:13:49 AM PDT by GSlob
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To: wintertime

Your description had me laughing because it's very true. I saw a group of girls walking with an adult female--probably their mom--on the trail the other day. The girls all wore plaid shirts, long denim skirts, and bobby socks. They all had their hair neatly french braided. They looked like something out of the 1950's. It was so refreshing to see a group of young girls that didn't look like little tarts. This was during school hours so I figured this group was a homeschooled bunch.


31 posted on 09/15/2006 7:08:03 AM PDT by beaversmom
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To: Clintonfatigued

And yet, just a little more education from one source or another might have resulted in a correct spelling of "Odysseus" in the headline source. :)


32 posted on 09/15/2006 7:13:00 AM PDT by linda_22003
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To: Clintonfatigued

The article refers to kids "confined to environments of emotional neediness with nothing real to do." If that doesn't prepare them for life in the workforce, what will? :)


33 posted on 09/15/2006 7:15:01 AM PDT by linda_22003
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To: GSlob
You could not be more wrong. Those I heard of are working in hard sciences. Workers' [or Aryan, or any other PC flavor du jour] physics or statistics is long out of fashion.

Ok, I'll bite. What on earth is "workers' physics" or "Aryan physics"...?

I've met many intelligent Europeans who were very well-educated. And they were all Leftists (socialists), believing big government programs were the answer.

34 posted on 09/15/2006 7:22:26 AM PDT by Tired of Taxes (That's taxes, not Texas. I have no beef with TX. NJ has the highest property taxes in the nation.)
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To: wintertime

Wintertime,

You are so right. This morning, I was just thinking about this very topic: Our society has extended childhood into adulthood by virtue of extended school. As a result, everything in life has been pushed to a later age. Generally, we finish our education when we graduate college at age 22 or 23, and then we are just starting in our careers. So, we aren't financially stable until later, and we're marrying and starting families later. All because people go through school moving through each grade according only to specifically-designated age levels, thus they're held back.


35 posted on 09/15/2006 7:47:36 AM PDT by Tired of Taxes (That's taxes, not Texas. I have no beef with TX. NJ has the highest property taxes in the nation.)
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To: Clintonfatigued
I tend to self-educate myself quite a bit. I've learned a hundred times, literally, as much after leaving school as I did when I was in school.

They constantly say European schools are better than American schools. Ultimately, they're probably right. However, what they don't understand any more is this: good character, good judgment, and freedom are far superior to any amount of education.
36 posted on 09/15/2006 7:51:28 AM PDT by JamesP81 (The answer always lies with more freedom; not less)
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To: wintertime
In the past youth of that age did take on responsibilities of great magnitude. I am reminded of the young teen officer in the movie staring Robert Crowe, "Master and Commander". The fictional young man in that movie was essentially being "homeschooled" by the captain, the captain's friend, and the other members of the crew.

And lo and behold, he was an effective officer. David Farragut's story is actually similar in many ways. He went to sea as a young boy without a formal education and became the first Admiral in the US Navy, IIRC.
37 posted on 09/15/2006 7:53:45 AM PDT by JamesP81 (The answer always lies with more freedom; not less)
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To: Tired of Taxes

22 or 23? That's a little on the late side for graduating from college. I was 20, just a little on the early side.


38 posted on 09/15/2006 7:56:08 AM PDT by linda_22003
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To: wintertime
Right.

Only the bad parents send their kids to public schools. We all have tarts and abusers as kids, we don't know how to raise polite, conservative, smart, funny or nice kids.

The only good kids are raised by the wonderful bunch of selfless parents who don't trust themselves to be a better role model or a greater infuence to their children than some teachers (not to even consider the fact that there a a great deal of good teachers) for a few hours a day.

39 posted on 09/15/2006 7:56:19 AM PDT by fml
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To: All

I wonder how much support I'd get if I started a school that operated in the Socratic classical way. It would never be compulsory; attendance voluntary. And the real learning would occur by students who were willing to learn and taught themselves. With modern technology that Socrates didn't have access to (the Internet and air travel, for example) I think you could provide an environment that promoted civility, civic duty, self-reliance, good character, and excellent judgment. I wonder how much resources the NEA would expend trying to stop me?


40 posted on 09/15/2006 7:59:51 AM PDT by JamesP81 (The answer always lies with more freedom; not less)
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To: wintertime
At 15, he could have DONE that job, and performed well!

I hired my best employee when she was 18 and not out of high school yet. She decided she wanted to be homeschooled when she got to high school to avoid the social distractions.

While she's a little immature sometimes, she learns faster and works smarter than practically anyone else at the business. I'm lucky to have her.
41 posted on 09/15/2006 8:01:31 AM PDT by Shion (Jaded Southern Californian)
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To: linda_22003

After graduating high school at age 18 today, the students go on to a four-year college. Age 22 is correct. Age 23 if they're in a five-year program like a cooperative or an internship program.

Today, in most school districts, there's a very early birthday deadline that holds kids back a grade. In my district, a child cannot start Preschool unless he turns four by Oct. 1.

Both my oldest child and I have November birthdays. When I was a kid, I was allowed to start Kindergarten at age four turning five. He wouldn't have been allowed to start until he was five turning six. So, I graduated high school at age 17; he would graduate at age 18 if he were in school.

I have another child who misses the deadline by only nine days. And the school is strict about that deadline, too. Even if the school were more flexible, most parents adhere to the deadline, so your kid would be the youngest in his class. Maybe he can do the work, but will he socialize well with the older kids?

In some districts, they're moving the birthday deadline back into August!


42 posted on 09/15/2006 8:26:09 AM PDT by Tired of Taxes (That's taxes, not Texas. I have no beef with TX. NJ has the highest property taxes in the nation.)
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To: Clintonfatigued
I don't know if you can generalize, public school education varies from state to state, and often county to county. Unlike most european nations, we do not have a homogenous population in many states and cities, so teachers are having to use curriculuum that will speak to a host of cultures. Are there issues with public schooling...of course.

Standardizing the curriculuum is also NOT the answer. Offering MORE choices is. We've been lucky enough to have sent both of our kids to very child friendly private schools, my youngest has since left and gone on to public school. And so far we've been very pleased with her progress there as well.

43 posted on 09/15/2006 9:08:17 AM PDT by Katya (Homo Nosce Te Ipsum)
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To: jwh_Denver

One comment he made is "there is no one way th educate a child. The ways in which they learn are as varied as fingerprints."


44 posted on 09/15/2006 9:23:06 AM PDT by Clintonfatigued (illegal aliens commit crimes that Americans won't commit)
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To: Tired of Taxes
"What on earth is "workers' physics" or "Aryan physics"...? "
Well, Einstein's work was [in Germany of 1930's] regarded as "non-Aryan physics". Genetics, primitive as it was at the time, was for a while considered "bourgeois mendelism/morganism" in the Soviet Union of thucking memory. Instead the "proletarian Michurinite theory of heredity" was pushed. Here and now we have creationism in all its flavors. This is what is to be expected when an ideology tries to push itself where it does not belong - one gets PC science.
45 posted on 09/15/2006 9:23:25 AM PDT by GSlob
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To: GSlob
Once upon a time and in a different realm I visited such a school, organized by university professors for their offspring.

Every wonder why you had to frame this as a fairy tale? It's real hard to keep a gifted/talented program going in the public schools. It happens in University towns, or in places where most of the parents are engineers (we have large AT&T, J&J and other research sites close). It happens when parents are smart enough and rich enough to demand something better. Even then, its a continual political fight to keep these programs going.

46 posted on 09/15/2006 9:25:44 AM PDT by slowhandluke (It's hard work to be cynical enough in this age)
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To: wintertime
"I dated a man who was a graduate of the Stuyvesant school in N.Y. It was a dreadful experience for him."
Why then was he dating you if it was dreadful?
47 posted on 09/15/2006 9:30:51 AM PDT by GSlob
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To: Tired of Taxes

I guess that makes sense. I've never memorized that birthday-falls-in-x-part-of the year thing. I also skipped first grade when the teacher discovered I could already read, so I was spared too much time with those goofballs Dick and Jane, and their idiot sister Sally. Since my birthday is in June, I was sixteen when I graduated from high school.


48 posted on 09/15/2006 9:33:37 AM PDT by linda_22003
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To: GSlob

Good catch. No matter where or how we were educated, sentence construction means something.


49 posted on 09/15/2006 9:36:09 AM PDT by linda_22003
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To: fml

Are you feeling guilty?


50 posted on 09/15/2006 10:27:19 AM PDT by wintertime (Good ideas win! Why? Because people are not stupid)
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