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IN WASHINGTON, IT'S ALWAYS THE YEAR OF THE RAT(ANN COULTER)
anncoulter.com ^ | Ann Coulter

Posted on 03/14/2007 3:44:52 PM PDT by kellynla

Democrats have leapt on reports of mold, rats and bureaucratic hurdles at Walter Reed Army Medical Center as further proof of President George Bush's failed war policies.

To the contrary, the problems at Walter Reed are further proof of the Democrats' failed domestic policies — to wit, the civil service rules that prevent government employees from ever being fired. (A policy that also may account for Robert Byrd's longevity as a U.S. senator.)

Thanks to the Democrats, government employees have the world's most complicated set of job protection rules outside of the old East Germany. Oddly enough, this has not led to a dynamic workforce in the nation's capital.

Noticeably, the problems at Walter Reed are not with the doctors or medical care. The problems are with basic maintenance at the facility. Unless U.S. Army generals are supposed to be spraying fungicide on the walls and crawling under beds to set rattraps, the slovenly conditions at Walter Reed are not their fault. The military is nominally in charge of Walter Reed, but — because of civil service rules put into place by Democrats — the maintenance crew can't be fired.


TOPICS: Constitution/Conservatism; Crime/Corruption; Editorial; Government; News/Current Events; Philosophy; Politics/Elections
KEYWORDS: anncoulter; coulter; mandatedincompetence; rats; socializedmedicine; unionsopranos; walterreed
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I didn't see this already posted...so here it is.
1 posted on 03/14/2007 3:45:01 PM PDT by kellynla
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To: jellybean
Pinging yet again....

Cheers,

knewshound

http://www.knewshound.blogspot.com/
2 posted on 03/14/2007 3:49:56 PM PDT by knews_hound (Sarcastically blogging since 2004.)
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To: kellynla

This is the same healthcare that HilaryCare was trying to sneak into us in her last Presidency.

Pray for W and Our Troops


3 posted on 03/14/2007 3:52:01 PM PDT by bray (Redeploy to Tehran)
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To: SandRat; freema

ping


4 posted on 03/14/2007 3:54:28 PM PDT by kellynla (Freedom of speech makes it easier to spot the idiots! Semper Fi!)
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To: knews_hound
:


Pamela Geller and Ann Coulter

5 posted on 03/14/2007 3:54:45 PM PDT by Stepan12 ( "We are all girlymen now." Conservative reaction to Ann Coulter's anti PC joke)
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To: kellynla

Good one!


6 posted on 03/14/2007 3:55:58 PM PDT by Past Your Eyes (Some people are too stupid to be ashamed.)
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To: kellynla
reporter described a rat jumping off the camera in the White House press briefing room in the middle of a press conference. (And a shrew sits right in the front!)

Oh, the woman is a master of sublety.

And not to hard to look at, either.

Ann.

Not the "shrew" in the front.

7 posted on 03/14/2007 3:57:57 PM PDT by OldSmaj (Death to islam. I am now and will always be, a sworn enemy of all things muslim.)
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To: kellynla

She makes some great points -- I'd been wondering about unions, work rules, etc. for the maintenance and cleaning staffs at Walter Reed because from the hysteria of the 'Rats and the DBM you'd think any military officer could have made changes as they wished -- but I'll bet that the work rules and union control were rather stifling, as Coulter asserts.....


8 posted on 03/14/2007 4:04:48 PM PDT by Enchante (Joe Wilson: "DUH...What do you mean there is uranium smuggling from DR Congo?")
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To: kellynla

I am not certain but my understanding was that the maintenece at Walter Reed is done by a private contractor.


9 posted on 03/14/2007 4:04:57 PM PDT by XRdsRev (New Jersey - Crossroads of the American Revolution)
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To: kellynla

Democrats have leapt on reports of mold, rats and bureaucratic hurdles at Walter Reed Army Medical Center as further proof of President George Bush's failed war policies.

To the contrary, the problems at Walter Reed are further proof of the Democrats' failed domestic policies – to wit, the civil service rules that prevent government employees from ever being fired (a policy that also may account for Robert Byrd's longevity as a U.S. senator).

Thanks to the Democrats, government employees have the world's most complicated set of job protection rules outside of the old East Germany. Oddly enough, this has not led to a dynamic workforce in the nation's capital.

Noticeably, the problems at Walter Reed are not with the doctors or medical care. The problems are with basic maintenance at the facility.

Unless U.S. Army generals are supposed to be spraying fungicide on the walls and crawling under beds to set rattraps, the slovenly conditions at Walter Reed are not their fault. The military is nominally in charge of Walter Reed, but – because of civil service rules put into place by Democrats – the maintenance crew can't be fired.

If the general "in charge" can't fire the people not doing their jobs, I don't know why he is being held responsible for them not doing their jobs.

You will find the exact same problems anyplace market forces have been artificially removed by the government and there is a total absence of incentives, competition, effective oversight, cost controls and so on. It's almost like a cause-and-effect thing.

The Washington Post could have done the same report on any government facility in the Washington, D.C., area.

In a typical story from the nation's capital, last year, a 38-year-old woman died at the hospital after her blood pressure dropped and a D.C. ambulance took 90 minutes to pick her up and take her to a hospital that was five minutes away. For 90 minutes, the 911 operator repeatedly assured the woman's sister that the ambulance was on its way.

You read these stories every few months in Washington.

New York Times reporter David Rosenbaum also died in Washington last year after being treated to the famed work ethic of the average government employee. Rosenbaum was mugged near his house and hit on the head with a pipe. A neighbor found him lying on the sidewalk and immediately called 911.

First, the ambulance got lost on the way to Rosenbaum. Then, instead of taking him to the closest emergency room, the ambulance took him to Howard University Hospital, nearly 30 minutes away, because one of the "emergency medical technicians" had personal business in the area.

Once he finally arrived at the hospital, Rosenbaum was left unattended on a gurney for 90 minutes because the "emergency medical technicians" had completely missed his head injury and listed him as "drunk" and "low priority."

Months later, the deputy mayor for public safety told the Washington Post that "to the best of his knowledge, no one involved in the incident had been fired."

No one has any authority over civil service employees in the nation's capital. Bush probably lives in terror of White House janitors. The White House bathroom could be flooding and he'd be told: "I'll get to you when I get to you. Listen, fella, you're fifth on my list. I'm not making any promises; just don't flush for the next week."

It's especially adorable how Democrats and the media are acting like these are the first rats ever sighted in the Washington, D.C., area. There are rats in the Capitol building. There are rats in the Washington Post building. Bush has seen rats. But let's leave Chuck Hagel out of this for now.

On "ABC News" last year, a CBS radio reporter described a rat jumping off the camera in the White House press briefing room in the middle of a press conference. (And a shrew sits right in the front!) The Washington Post called the White House press room – located between the residence and the Oval Office – "a broken-down, rat-infested fire trap." During David Gregory's stand-up report on MSNBC about the damage done to Republicans by conditions at Walter Reed, rats appeared to be scurrying on the ground behind him.

Instead of an investigative report on the problems at Walter Reed, how about an investigative report on what happens when the head of janitorial services at Walter Reed is told about the dirt, mold and rats at the facility? If it's before 2:30 in the afternoon and he's still at work and he hasn't taken a "sick day," a "vacation day," a "personal day" or a "mental health day," I predict the answer will be: "I'm on my break."

The Democrats' response is: We must pass even more stringent rules to ensure that all government employees get every single break so that public-sector unions will continue giving massive campaign donations to the Democrats.

This was, you will recall, the precise issue that led to a partisan battle over the Homeland Security bill a few years ago: Whether employees at an emergency terrorist response agency could be fired – as Republicans wanted – or if they would be subject to civil service rules and unfireable – as the Democrats wanted.

HELLO? HOMELAND SECURITY? THERE'S A BOMB IN THE WELL OF THE SENATE!

Sorry, not my job. Try the Department of Public Works.

When Republican Saxby Chambliss challenged Democrat Max Cleland in the 2002 Georgia Senate race, he ran an ad attacking Cleland for demanding civil service protections for workers at the Homeland Security Department. Naturally, Republicans were accused of hating veterans for mentioning Cleland's vote on the Homeland Security bill.

Now that the Democrats are once again pretending to give a damn about the troops by wailing about conditions at Walter Reed, how about some Republican – maybe Chambliss! – introduce a bill to remove civil service protections from employees at Walter Reed and all veterans' hospitals? You know, a bill that would actually address the problem.

And don't worry about the useless, slothful government employees who can only hold jobs from which they cannot be fired. We'll get them jobs at the EPA and Department of Education.


10 posted on 03/14/2007 4:11:12 PM PDT by Rummyfan (Iraq: it's not about Iraq anymore, it's about the USA!)
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To: kellynla

BAM!!!!

11 posted on 03/14/2007 4:17:53 PM PDT by Rummyfan (Iraq: it's not about Iraq anymore, it's about the USA!)
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To: Rummyfan

First, the ambulance got lost on the way to Rosenbaum. Then, instead of taking him to the closest emergency room, the ambulance took him to Howard University Hospital, nearly 30 minutes away, because one of the "emergency medical



I dont know who wrote this or where they picked up Rosenblum. I do know with red light and siren I can drive from one end of Washington to the other in 30 minutes. Howard University is just about in the center of town.


12 posted on 03/14/2007 4:20:42 PM PDT by sgtbono2002 (I will forgive Jane Fonda, when the Jews forgive Hitler.)
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To: Rummyfan
New York Times reporter David Rosenbaum also died in Washington last year after being treated to the famed work ethic of the average government employee. Rosenbaum was mugged near his house and hit on the head with a pipe. A neighbor found him lying on the sidewalk and immediately called 911.

First, the ambulance got lost on the way to Rosenbaum. Then, instead of taking him to the closest emergency room, the ambulance took him to Howard University Hospital, nearly 30 minutes away, because one of the "emergency medical technicians" had personal business in the area.

Once he finally arrived at the hospital, Rosenbaum was left unattended on a gurney for 90 minutes because the "emergency medical technicians" had completely missed his head injury and listed him as "drunk" and "low priority."

Months later, the deputy mayor for public safety told the Washington Post that "to the best of his knowledge, no one involved in the incident had been fired."

Who knew? Funny how not even the NYT made an issue of this. The District of Columbia: just about the highest crime rate in the nation, and wonderful civic services to boot!

13 posted on 03/14/2007 4:21:33 PM PDT by Rummyfan (Iraq: it's not about Iraq anymore, it's about the USA!)
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To: kellynla
Not a major point, but... The problems are with basic maintenance at the facility. Unless U.S. Army generals are supposed to be spraying fungicide on the walls and crawling under beds to set rattraps, the slovenly conditions at Walter Reed are not their fault.

Mold growth is not caused by failure to spray fungicide or to clean thoroughly. It's caused by moisture, usually from roof leaks or plumbing problems. The problem is apparently one of infrastructure deterioration.

14 posted on 03/14/2007 4:30:22 PM PDT by Sherman Logan (I didn't claw my way to the top of the food chain to be a vegetarian.)
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To: XRdsRev
You are right. Maintenance was contracted out last year. I disagree with Coulter on this. The commanding officer of the hospital has final responsibility for the condition of his facility. If it was in poor repair when he showed up, he should have noted the discrepancies to his superior and then started getting them fixed.

The bigger issue might be a facility that is on the BRAC list that nobody wants to spend money on finding itself filled to capacity with casualties.

The solution is also much simpler than the one DoD came up with. Instead of having a 45 day fact finding period to figure out what the problems are you get one O-5/O-6 medial corps officer, preferably a nurse, put them in charge of fixing the problems and give them the resources to do it. It's not rocket science.

15 posted on 03/14/2007 4:36:22 PM PDT by USNBandit (sarcasm engaged at all times)
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To: Sherman Logan
One of the ironies that I've seen while in the Naval Service is that I've never been in a Navy building that didn't have at least one leak in the roof.

It amazes me that we can operate submarines.

16 posted on 03/14/2007 4:39:07 PM PDT by USNBandit (sarcasm engaged at all times)
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To: kellynla
Mandated incompetence... made possible by the same people - who get this - accuse President Bush of "incompetence." Hypocrites!

"Show me just what Mohammed brought that was new, and there you will find things only evil and inhuman, such as his command to spread by the sword the faith he preached." - Manuel II Palelologus

17 posted on 03/14/2007 4:43:46 PM PDT by goldstategop (In Memory Of A Dearly Beloved Friend Who Lives In My Heart Forever)
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To: XRdsRev

"what happens when the head of janitorial services at Walter Reed is told about the dirt, mold and rats at the facility? If it's before 2:30 in the afternoon and he's still at work and he hasn't taken a "sick day," a "vacation day," a "personal day" or a "mental health day," I predict the answer will be: "I'm on my break."

By inferring that civil service protected government workers are to blame for the dirt and mold at Walter Reed, Ann is somewhat off the mark here. A quick check reveals that housekeeping services at Walter Reed have been handled by a private contractor since 2003.


18 posted on 03/14/2007 4:44:34 PM PDT by XRdsRev (New Jersey - Crossroads of the American Revolution)
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To: kellynla
Sorry, this one fell flat for me.

Note to republicans: Yes you are correct about government employees. So how about STOP creating yet more of them ala the Department of Homeland Harassment and the Department of Reeducation. Both abortions created and approved by republican presidents.
19 posted on 03/14/2007 4:47:07 PM PDT by samm1148 (Pennsylvania-They haven't taxed air--yet)
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To: kellynla
[... The military is nominally in charge of Walter Reed, but — because of civil service rules put into place by Democrats — the maintenance crew can't be fired. ..]

Unmentioned is 3rd party maintenance personal no doubt mostly democrats too.. The government workers UNION is a Political PARTY.. along with the contractors.. Obscenely incestuous.. Federal, State and local governments and contractors of all types are Socialism Central..

Federal State and local governments should be SHOT..
They are ridden with LICE.... and liberal diseases..

20 posted on 03/14/2007 4:52:35 PM PDT by hosepipe (CAUTION: This propaganda is laced with hyperbole)
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To: USNBandit

You know, I was wondering if there were
these kinds of problems at the Naval
Hospital in Bethesda.

Any insight?


21 posted on 03/14/2007 5:00:23 PM PDT by Dominnae ("An appeaser is one who feeds a crocodile hoping it will eat him last." -- Winston Churchill)
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To: samm1148
So how about STOP creating yet more of them ala the Department of Homeland Harassment and the Department of Reeducation. Both abortions created and approved by republican presidents.

*applause*

The last few years on FR have taught me that a sickening number of folks believe the State is only troublesome when the other team is in charge.

22 posted on 03/14/2007 5:03:21 PM PDT by Wormwood (Your Friendly Neighborhood Moderate)
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To: kellynla

....yeah, but are they FAGS...???


23 posted on 03/14/2007 5:05:18 PM PDT by JB in Whitefish
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To: Dominnae
From what I could tell of visiting Bethesda the facility seemed to be in good shape, but I've never been in the older end of the campus.

My understanding of the Walter Reed issue was that the problems were with the living quarters for patients receiving extended outpatient treatment.

24 posted on 03/14/2007 5:07:18 PM PDT by USNBandit (sarcasm engaged at all times)
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To: Rummyfan
How many Teamsters does it take to change a lightbulb?

Twelve!

Do you have a problem with that?
25 posted on 03/14/2007 5:16:40 PM PDT by Radix (Money is speech!)
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To: JB in Whitefish

http://www.dazbert.co.uk/sites/rudefood/index.php?page=food/faggots.htm

Is this what you mean?


26 posted on 03/14/2007 5:36:54 PM PDT by MisouriMule (Islam is a Death CULT.)
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To: Rummyfan

Thank you for posting the FULL TEXT of Ann's column!


27 posted on 03/14/2007 5:39:11 PM PDT by RonDog
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To: Stepan12
What a GREAT picture of Ann!
Here is another:


28 posted on 03/14/2007 5:46:38 PM PDT by RonDog
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To: samm1148

Wait, I thought the Dept. of (Re)Education was created during the Carter Administration?


29 posted on 03/14/2007 5:50:30 PM PDT by GOP_Raider (Hated by all NFL fans since 1990.)
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To: USNBandit

Right you may be....but who is in charge of the contractors? My bet it is some 250 pound civiliangovernmentunionshemaleemployee who shrugs and takes another bite out of their doughnut during their everythirtyminutecoffeebreak........


30 posted on 03/14/2007 6:22:36 PM PDT by Shamrock-DW
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To: USNBandit
Maintenance was contracted out last year.

Are you talking about janitorial, building maintenance (i.e., repairs) or both?

31 posted on 03/14/2007 6:24:53 PM PDT by Loyal Buckeye
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To: OldSmaj

She kicks liberal arse. Which is why they hate her so much. If a liberal had struck up that comment about Mitt Romney, would we have even heard about it???


32 posted on 03/14/2007 6:31:21 PM PDT by ABG(anybody but Gore) ("We're Living In A Twilight World..."- Swingout Sister)
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To: pookie18
"...Democrats have leapt on reports of mold, rats and bureaucratic hurdles at Walter Reed Army Medical Center as further proof of President George Bush's failed war policies.

To the contrary, the problems at Walter Reed are further proof of the Democrats' failed domestic policies – to wit, the civil service rules that prevent government employees from ever being fired (a policy that also may account for Robert Byrd's longevity as a U.S. senator)." - Ann Coulter
Also from pookie18's Today's Toons 3/13/07:


33 posted on 03/14/2007 6:33:38 PM PDT by RonDog
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To: kellynla

As always, Miss Coulter is precise, biting, and right on target.

What a great ability it is to see so clearly through all of the liberal nonsense.

She is an American treasure.


34 posted on 03/14/2007 6:52:37 PM PDT by Mpatl
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To: XRdsRev

"By inferring that civil service protected government workers are to blame for the dirt and mold at Walter Reed, Ann is somewhat off the mark here. A quick check reveals that housekeeping services at Walter Reed have been handled by a private contractor since 2003."

I think you mean "implying" rather than inferring. But to your point...

When Bush came in the Army began looking at contracting out some services at places like Walter Reed. After a review process that took FIVE YEARS and 7 MILLION DOLLARS, the first "independent contractors" just started coming in at the end of 2006.

But the Democrats put all sorts of limitations on them, such as only 200 government workers could be replaced at Walter Reed and the government workers had to offered the job first.

But I believe Coulter's basic point is NO ONE in DC works -- the entire workforce is a joke -- because of the civil service protections for 80% of the workforce.


35 posted on 03/14/2007 7:31:37 PM PDT by Sam Hill
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To: XRdsRev

I read elsewhere on FR that maintenance was contracted out last year, but it was only effective this year, and that half of the old maintenance staff quit during the interim, leaving the remaining government staff sorely understaffed, thus the deterioration. If this is true, then Ann is correct.


36 posted on 03/14/2007 7:38:59 PM PDT by rebel_yell2
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To: XRdsRev
Unions Hope Democrats Will Counter GOP Policy Changes

By Zachary A. Goldfarb
Special to The Washington Post
Monday, December 18, 2006; A23

As a member of the Democratic minority, Rep. Chris Van Hollen (Md.) fought a Bush administration policy that increasingly opened up federal jobs to private contracting.

Although he and colleagues had some success, Van Hollen said that when the 110th Congress takes over next month and the Democrats are in the majority, he will have greater ability to combat the administration's policies on federal employees. "It's had a demoralizing effect on the federal workforce," he said. "I do think now we're in a better position to fix things."

For the past six years, unions that represent most federal employees have argued that the Bush administration has been hostile to the needs of workers -- keeping pay raises low, trying to prevent employees from organizing in the departments of Defense and Homeland Security, and outsourcing government jobs to the private sector.

Now, the change in control of Congress gives unions much more powerful allies in the legislative branch. Democratic lawmakers pledge to work on issues of central concern to the unions, but the administration outlines other priorities for the workforce and disputes any notion it has not pursued a course beneficial to workers.

The election of Rep. Steny H. Hoyer (D-Md.) as majority leader is seen as a boon for federal workers. Hoyer, who will be the House's second most powerful figure, represents Southern Maryland's 5th Congressional District, home to thousands of government employees.

Hoyer said he will work to create a "more cooperative relationship with the White House" to ensure pay raises and to contain rising health premiums. While he praised several Republican colleagues, such as Rep. Thomas M. Davis III (Va.), outgoing chairman of the Government Reform Committee, Hoyer said: "Republicans made it much harder to ensure federal employees received fair and competitive annual pay adjustments. . . . They also did virtually nothing to help resist the White House effort to outsource federal jobs to private contractors."

John Gage, national president of the American Federation of Government Employees, said that as soon as the Bush administration came to power in 2001, it wiped out "our partnerships with agencies, and since that time our ability to sit down with the agencies and work out problems and differences has really declined." AFGE is the largest union of government employees, representing 700,000 federal and D.C. government workers.

With the new Congress, Gage said, "we're hoping not only we'll have more access to committees and Congress, but that word will get down to the political appointees in the departments."

Labor unions were a major source of support to Democrats in the midterm elections. The AFL-CIO spent roughly $40 million on a get-out-the-vote operation, and union members contributed substantial sums to Democratic candidates. Hoyer was not in a competitive race but received more than $300,000 in money from labor-affiliated political action committees.

Clay Johnson III, deputy director for management at the Office of Management and Budget, called labor's criticisms of the administration "rhetoric."

"The idea that management would be hostile to employees is just foreign to me," Johnson said. "Everybody's focused on what we can do that's smart and professional and effective, to make sure we have the best and most effective workforce possible."

Johnson said the administration's goal in its final two years is to strengthen a management system that rewards employees who perform exceptionally. "I believe that employees want to be respected. They want to be challenged. They want to be held accountable. They want to grow professionally," he said.

According to the unions, federal workers have more pressing needs.

"We expect the Democratic Congress to support the federal employees with regard to wages, health insurance and retirement," said Beth Moten, AFGE's legislative and political director. "We expect them to support federal bargaining rights, and we expect them to work for reforms so that federal workers don't lose their jobs because of procedures or political influence,"

No issue has been more divisive than "contracting out," the phrase critics use to describe the outsourcing of government jobs to private contractors. Unions have fought efforts to transfer jobs at Walter Reed Army Medical Center, the Internal Revenue Service and elsewhere. Colleen M. Kelley, national president of the National Treasury Employees Union, said one worrisome trend is the IRS's interest in using private debt-collection agencies. "There are going to be problems with taxpayer privacy," she said.

In 2003, the administration revised Circular A-76, which lays out the rules for job competitions, to direct agencies to evaluate whether more jobs could be privatized. The effort has faced stiff resistance on Capitol Hill. Democrats have argued that agencies are under pressure to privatize jobs that should be confined to government workers.

"I am not opposed to privatization, but if it occurs with federal jobs, then it must be legal and fair," said Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski (D-Md.), incoming chairman of the Appropriations subcommittee on commerce, justice and science, which will have authority over many of these issues. She also has many government employees as constituents.

The debate over privatization, among other disputes, is occurring against a backdrop of profound demographic change in the civil service. In the next 10 years, as much as 60 percent of the government's 1.8 million workers will become eligible to retire. "The long-term challenge for the federal government is to continue to attract the best and the brightest people. We've got to make sure we can replenish the federal workforce," Van Hollen said.

Unions Hope Democrats Will Counter GOP Policy Changes - washingtonpost.com
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/12/17/AR2006121700918.html?nav=rss_business/economy

37 posted on 03/14/2007 7:46:07 PM PDT by Sam Hill
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To: XRdsRev
Walter Reed to cut 200 jobs, outsource support work

Washington Business Journal - November 10, 2006
by Vandana Sinha

Walter Reed Army Medical Center plans to cut at least 200 jobs early next year in its drawn-out, bitterly contested effort to outsource more work to a private contractor.

The army hospital expects to turn over hundreds of jobs to Florida-based IAP Worldwide Services, whose representatives arrived on the hospital's D.C. campus for the first time this week to start the transition.

The move is part of a larger federal initiative to determine whether government agencies or private companies can do a better job at a lower price.

After five years of protests, employee appeals and congressional counterattacks, a $120 million five-year contract was awarded this January to IAP. Walter Reed is slated to be shut down by 2011 as part of the Defense Department's massive closing and realignment project.

While federal outsourcing isn't new, "the Bush administration has been more aggressive in outsourcing all nonessential services," says Ray Bjorklund, chief knowledge officer for FedSources, a McLean market research firm. "The concept is to go ahead and outsource that stuff so you can concentrate on the core mission."

The Army started a basewide review of Walter Reed in June 2000. The sweeping evaluation of more than 1,100 jobs finally narrowed its focus to an estimated 350 mostly blue-collar maintenance jobs.

IAP will assume much of the base's support work, including postal services, military police support, administration and budget support, network support, housing management, transportation functions, grounds maintenance, utility systems, heating and cooling services, hospital housekeeping, laundry service and warehouse operations.

IAP started the transition this week by surveying and inventorying base property, setting up its technology networks and interviewing for jobs.

Since the contract was awarded, some staffers have already left for new jobs. Army officials expect the exodus to continue, lowering the estimated layoff total to 200, according to a filing with the D.C. Department of Employment Services.

"As soon as this happens, everybody looks for another job," says Mark Jones, assistant to Joseph Whitaker, the Army deputy assistant for installations and housing. "Most people either take the move or find another job or are placed in priority placement."

IAP is required by federal law to first offer unfilled contract jobs to qualified government employees facing a pink slip, though it is not required to guarantee anyone a final slot.

"We will interview all existing personnel who apply for employment consideration," says Arlene Mellinger, a spokeswoman for IAP, whose majority owner and investor recently anointed former Treasury Secretary John Snow as its chairman.

Walter Reed is just a drop in the bucket for IAP. Last month, the company announced its bid to compete for a $50 billion Army contract to provide food and shelter for soldiers in Iraq and Afghanistan -- a contract long held by KBR, a Halliburton subsidiary that used to employ IAP's top two officers.

IAP has also won grounds and maintenance outsourcing contracts for other Army installations, including Fort Meade in Maryland, but the Walter Reed deal received the most flak.

Union groups and congressional members charged that the six-year process ignored crucial federal deadlines and spawned several versions of the solicitation.

In August, the White House Office of Management and Budget, which says that the contract was awarded fairly, projected cost savings of about $6 million a year for the next five years.

Walter Reed to cut 200 jobs, outsource support work - Washington Business Journal:
http://washington.bizjournals.com/washington/stories/2006/11/13/story3.html

 

So only 200 OUT OF MORE THAN 1,000 jobs have only just started to be turned over to "private contractors." And only after they offer them to the current government employees first.

AND THE DEMS ARE FIGHTING THAT!

38 posted on 03/14/2007 7:51:43 PM PDT by Sam Hill
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To: USNBandit

"You are right. Maintenance was contracted out last year. I disagree with Coulter on this."

Please read my last three previous posts above.


39 posted on 03/14/2007 7:54:36 PM PDT by Sam Hill
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To: kellynla

Ilove what she said at the end about Cleland and Chambliss. It was a pleasure to boot Cleland out of office....he's been burning bridges and showing his true colors ever since.


40 posted on 03/14/2007 8:01:20 PM PDT by fkabuckeyesrule (Good News everyone!!!! It's baseball season!!!!!)
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To: All

"When Bush came in the Army began looking at contracting out some services at places like Walter Reed. After a review process that took FIVE YEARS and 7 MILLION DOLLARS, the first "independent contractors" just started coming in at the end of 2006."

Actually, I was wrong. They only began to trickle in at the beginning of this year.

And at full flood (which they probably not not yet reached) the contractors will only have at most 200 out of the 1,100 maintenance jobs at Walter Reed.


41 posted on 03/14/2007 8:03:19 PM PDT by Sam Hill
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To: Sam Hill
I know that the maintenance replaced government employees last year and there wasn't enough time for Walter Reed to go from a pristine state to the state it is in today.

No matter who is doing the maintenance the commanding officer of the installation is still responsible for the conditions of the facilities on the post. If the conditions were that way when he arrived he should have noted the problems to his superiors and fought to correct the problems.

42 posted on 03/14/2007 8:04:29 PM PDT by USNBandit (sarcasm engaged at all times)
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To: All
something the cowards of the MSM will not state.
43 posted on 03/14/2007 8:08:59 PM PDT by longtermmemmory (VOTE! http://www.senate.gov and http://www.house.gov)
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To: USNBandit

"I know that the maintenance replaced government employees last year and there wasn't enough time for Walter Reed to go from a pristine state to the state it is in today."

Not according to the article I just posted.

They were only scheduled to begin to replace government maintenance people with contractors at the start of this year. And then, as I said, only 200 out of 1,100 when they were finally done.

"Walter Reed Army Medical Center plans to cut at least 200 jobs early next year in its drawn-out, bitterly contested effort to outsource more work to a private contractor."

And that is from November 2006.


44 posted on 03/14/2007 8:09:32 PM PDT by Sam Hill
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To: All
because of civil service rules put into place by Democrats — the maintenance crew can't be fired.


something the cowards of the MSM will not state.

45 posted on 03/14/2007 8:10:38 PM PDT by longtermmemmory (VOTE! http://www.senate.gov and http://www.house.gov)
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To: Sam Hill
Yes, I know. That is what I said. Those who would bust on the Administration for the condition of Walter Reed based on outsourcing to IAP are wrong. The transition began in November and there is no way the building fell apart in that amount of time.

Base on your article it looks like the entire 1100 person staff was being looked at for replacement, but they only outsourced the maintenance.

The problem here is not a political one, it is a bureaucratic one. DoD puts a facility on the BRAC list, which means it is cut off from most capital funding, and then expects it gets tasked with it's highest loading since Vietnam. What do they expect to happen.

The same thing happened with the USS John F. Kennedy. It had a couple major yard periods cancelled and then, what do you know, they failed a major inspection and couldn't deploy on time. In its wake that ship left a couple fired Captains and various other major department heads who were given a turd and told to spit polish it.

That doesn't relieve the commanding officer from his responsibility to try to fix his situation, but he has to have the documentation to protect himself when they come looking for a head to lop off.

46 posted on 03/14/2007 9:05:39 PM PDT by USNBandit (sarcasm engaged at all times)
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To: kellynla
New York Times reporter David Rosenbaum also died in Washington last year after being treated to the famed work ethic of the average government employee. Rosenbaum was mugged near his house and hit on the head with a pipe. A neighbor found him lying on the sidewalk and immediately called 911.

First, the ambulance got lost on the way to Rosenbaum. Then, instead of taking him to the closest emergency room, the ambulance took him to Howard University Hospital, nearly 30 minutes away, because one of the "emergency medical technicians" had personal business in the area.

Once he finally arrived at the hospital, Rosenbaum was left unattended on a gurney for 90 minutes because the "emergency medical technicians" had completely missed his head injury and listed him as "drunk" and "low priority."

Months later, the deputy mayor for public safety told The Washington Post that "to the best of his knowledge, no one involved in the incident had been fired."

Great of Ann to put in this nice section so liberals would have a chance to "relate". Coulter's great.

47 posted on 03/14/2007 9:15:25 PM PDT by GOPJ (Club of Rome had half the world's population dead by the year 2000 -freeper driftless2)
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To: kellynla; Sam Hill; rebel_yell2; Mpatl; RonDog; ABG(anybody but Gore); Loyal Buckeye; ...

As a member of the DC Chapter and a weekly volunteer at Walter Reed, I would like to point out a couple of things.

First, anyone with a heart would like to see soldiers having relief from bureaucratic nightmares regarding their paperwork and medical care. However, I venture to say that there are few people in the United States with comparable injuries who have not also experienced a bureaucratic nightmare with their hospital and insurance company.

Secondly, the Washington Post articles citing mold and rats referred to Building 18. That building is not a medical care facility, it is a barracks. It is not on the main 116-acre campus of Walter Reed; it is a former motel across the 6-lane avenue that was purchased as an overflow residence.

Of all the approximately 120 rooms in Building 18, only 7 of them were affected by mold according to my sources, representing about 5% of the rooms in Building 18, which is only one of many, many barracks and residences associated with the Walter Reed base. The mold was caused by a bathtub overflow. The men who stay in Building 18 are on MedHold -- they are either outpatients whose injuries are not serious enough to require hospitalization or who are healed up and awaiting orders to go home or to go back into their units. Some times they drink and party on the weekends, leave pizza boxes around and other mess that would attract vermin in any city in the United States, as Coulter illustrated in her column.

Several concerned soldiers held a press conference last week attended by all the major news outlets. They wanted to set the record straight and tell their side of the story -- that they feel they are receiving great care at Walter Reed and that the original series of articles contained serious flaws and misleading claims. Did you see any articles or televised stories as a result of their news conference, which lasted over an hour? Neither did I. Even FoxNews only did a less-than-one-minute clip, according to my sources who were at the conference.

I would also like to point out that when I have been talking with soldiers at Walter Reed, I have heard complaints from two of the head-injury patients that they believed that WR does not understand the needs of head injury patients as well as those of amputees.

Two of the soldiers whose complaints were quoted in the Washington Post were head injury patients. I was fairly well acquainted with one of them and knew the other one in passing. I have also known a few civilian head injury patients over the years, including one who went on to do graduate work in brain injury and who discussed the topic with me at length; I was working as a writer about medical issues at the time.

We need to take into account that the brain is not a mechanical part like a leg or arm that may be rebuilt or to which a prosthesis may be attached. It can be greatly more difficult to assess and repair a head injury than a limb injury. Furthermore, many head injury patients experience bouts of combativeness and rage. While understandable from a psychological point of view, rage after head injury may also be a physiological response that takes an indeterminate amount of time and pharmaceutical intervention to manage and resolve. Therefore, we should allow a wider margin of credibility when evaluating the comments by Walter Reed head injury patients about their care. Instead, their angry responses have been taken as gospel by the sensationalizing news reports and waves of chatter afterwards, including on this forum.

And finally, as a householder with a nice middle-class life, I must nevertheless admit that I have had mice in both the houses I have owned at one time or another, that the mice in the City were bigger than the ones in the suburbs; and that once I had a City water main break that dumped two feet of water into my basement, rusted out my heater and clothes dryer and ruined my stored business records and clothing and my kid's baby furniture. We had rot and mold problems afterwards that took us months to clean up – none of which State Farm would cover. Yet no one took my child away nor threatened to impeach me as a parent. And no congressional oversight committee denounced anyone, nor demanded that I be repaid by the City or the insurer, because there was nothing to be gained politically by it. But there has been plenty to be gained by the fame-seeking reporters and the grandstanding politicians who could easily have visited Walter Reed countless times during the past 5 years of war – but didn't.

The exposé articles were written to embarrass the Bush administration, to worry and harass the soldiers, to give aid and comfort to the Democrat quislings in Congress and to discourage enlistments. Don't think for a moment the authoresses cared one bit about the troops. The troops were just Pulitzer-fodder for another generation of Woodward 'n' Bernstein wannabes.


48 posted on 03/14/2007 10:00:04 PM PDT by Albion Wilde (...where the Spirit of the Lord is, there is freedom. -2 Cor 3:17)
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To: Albion Wilde

Thanks for update.. and effort..


49 posted on 03/14/2007 10:23:46 PM PDT by hosepipe (CAUTION: This propaganda is laced with hyperbole)
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To: kellynla

At my last command - CNCTC Wash DC - I complained to the LT in charge of the galley because the galley was continually not open for breakfast an average of 3 days of the week. I sat down with him and he told me that the cooks are civil service employees getting the basic min wage and could probably make more on welfare. Also, the last LT in charge still had an EEO suit against him so basically the LT was afraid to say anything because he didn't want his career harmed. It's probably easier fighting the terrorists than most of these civil service employees.


50 posted on 03/15/2007 3:46:42 AM PDT by 7thson (I've got a seat at the big conference table! I'm gonna paint my logo on it!)
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