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America Is Preparing Kids For The Future As Servants
EconomyInCrisis.org ^ | 12/21/06 | Thomas Heffner

Posted on 04/18/2007 7:59:30 AM PDT by A. Pole

In the 1950's 30% of US employees were in manufacturing - almost 1 in 3 jobs. This country was a relative manufacturing super power, we were the world's richest and most productive country. In 1994 approximately 1 in 8 jobs were in manufacturing. In 2014 if the US government (Bureau of Labor Statistics) projections are accurate that figure will have slipped to 1 in 12 jobs.

The government is telling us in black and white that the policies they are enacting will decrease both absolute and relative manufacturing employment to levels below that of the 1950's - over 2 million below.

In less than 20 years since America put in place some of its most self-devastating policy decisions (NAFTA, WTO, CAFTA, etc.), this country will have almost completely converted from a self-sufficient sovereign state, capable of manufacturing what it needs to sustain and protect itself, to a country of servants – serfs, working at the behest of foreign employers or engaged in the sales, marketing, and distribution of foreign-made goods – working at their discretion, for wages they determine, and forced to pay their prices for needed goods. This is the definition of a servant.

A country that ends up producing little of value will have little to consume at home and little to trade abroad, and will have a low standard of living. The way this country was built was by developing world-leading industries and dominating the markets for products that we invented. Now we have conceded that we are instead going to exist by selling our assets and eliminate most of our ability to produce for ourselves. This would make any country extremely vulnerable.

From 1994-2004, manufacturing was the second fastest job-losing sector in our economy (second only to agricultural employment). From 2004-2014, the government predicts that most of the employment growth will come from retail, health care, leisure and hospitality, government jobs, and “professional and business services.”

This country needs salespeople, waiters, attorneys, doctors, and managers. But how could we have ever built a superpower country on those professions alone?

Many say that we are shipping jobs overseas because they are too low-paying or too rudimentary. Anyone who has worked in factory operating a million-dollar piece of equipment can tell you the satisfying difference from being forced to work in a restaurant as a waiter because of lack of alternatives. Why would we send factory jobs overseas to replace them with jobs in retail and hospitality? Factories sustain communities. Retail and hospitality enriches absentee corporations and shareholders. Offshore outsourcing strips us of technology, taxes, profits, and career opportunities. Why would we choose that path as manufacturing jobs pay much more on average than service jobs?

Some other countries, like Japan, pay wages as high as or higher than America because their manufacturing is capital and knowledge intensive and requires fewer workers per unit of output. In addition, other countries like China that pay wages as low as 1/10 of ours, also does not have the same cost of living as the US. Their goods cost a fraction of what they cost here in America; therefore it is not possible to compare the wages on an absolute basis.

Many people also say education is the key. They say that not enough Americans are being trained for engineering, science, or production occupations. There is no point in educating people when there are no jobs – when these industries are being systematically and predatorily destroyed by foreign subsidized competition producing and operating both externally and here in this country through insourcing.

We are living in a fool’s paradise, being propped up by foreign loans to our government and foreign subsidized consumption of our incredulous trade deficits which is approaching $800 billion ($1.6 million per minute) this year alone..

The net takeaway of the Bureau of Labor Statistics report is that if you expect to earn a decent living by producing a product – any product – in this next 10 years, you will have little opportunity to do that in this country.


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Foreign Affairs
KEYWORDS: cheaplabor; china; deficit; immigration; japan; jobs; manufacturing; technology; trade
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To: ketsu
Other than protectionism what's to stop India from providing say, the next big operating system and eating our lunch?

Nothing, as a matter of fact American businesses are showing them exactly how to do it. American engineers are wearing a hole in the carpet between the U.S. and Asia.

51 posted on 04/18/2007 10:17:07 AM PDT by Realism (Some believe that the facts-of-life are open to debate.....)
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To: Leo Carpathian

Good for you, my friend. God bless and good luck.


52 posted on 04/18/2007 10:21:32 AM PDT by massadvj
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To: Realism

I think not.


53 posted on 04/18/2007 10:23:22 AM PDT by 1rudeboy
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To: 1rudeboy
I think not.

You don't think?

54 posted on 04/18/2007 10:27:40 AM PDT by Realism (Some believe that the facts-of-life are open to debate.....)
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To: Realism

Not the way you do, for sure. Only in an upside-down world are freer markets feared more than state regulation of them.


55 posted on 04/18/2007 10:29:53 AM PDT by 1rudeboy
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To: ketsu
But in the future how will the American economy sustain itself?

It will sustain itself as it always has. By being at the forefront of technology, information and innovation, and by adapting as the world changes.

We cannot predict where the future growth will come from anymore than we could have predicted what the Internet would become in 1980. But we do know what kind of system will keep us competitive; and that is a system that is open and honest and free of government intrusion.

You want to be rich yourself? Figure out the next big thing and make that thing happen. Given the fact that you have free and open, instantaneous communication with just about anyone in the world, there are very few boundaries except those imposed by your own fears. I suggest you stop thinking about what may not be possible and focus on what is possible.

Every American economic pessimist in history was wrong. Don't join them.

56 posted on 04/18/2007 10:30:51 AM PDT by massadvj
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To: A. Pole; Willie Green; Wolfie; ex-snook; Jhoffa_; FITZ; arete; FreedomPoster; Red Jones; ...
Many people also say education is the key. They say that not enough Americans are being trained for engineering, science, or production occupations.

ROFLMAO.

The majority of people have IQ's around 100.

And we have already reached the point where even people having IQ's above average are finding our technological world harder and harder to keep up with.

I would guess that maybe only 10% of college graduates were smart enough to begin with to make a real contribution in our brave new economy.

The rest are in over their heads, and spend more time hiding their incompetence from peers and superiors, until they bail out for a job somewhere else, where they repeat the cycle.

Point is, the majority of people are incapable of embarking on careers in science and technology.

Most people just aren't smart enough (and God bless them for it, but that's another story).

But they can be adept at working with their hands, which is just what nature designed the majority of people to do.

This free-for-all economy ignores human nature as much as communism did, and will fail just as communism did.

57 posted on 04/18/2007 10:36:58 AM PDT by Age of Reason
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To: 1rudeboy
free markets

It's not a free market..... It's having your stuff made somewhere else and shipping it back. There is no trading going on here, they are laborers only.

58 posted on 04/18/2007 10:37:54 AM PDT by Realism (Some believe that the facts-of-life are open to debate.....)
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To: Realism

I was responding to your comment #47, which clearly tried to diminish the impact that regulation has on U.S. business.


59 posted on 04/18/2007 10:41:23 AM PDT by 1rudeboy
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To: ketsu
And in what fields?

If I were a young person thinking about a major, I would major in some technical field such as engineering or Biology, and minor in business. I would take my electives in introductory languages so that I had a working knowledge of Spanish and Arabic and Chinese.

We simply do not know what will be important in the future. That is what makes the present so exciting. If I were designing a curriculum, I'd make students take 120 one unit classes to graduate, as opposed to 40 3 unit classes.

The people who do the best in the future will be very adaptable, not particularly locked into any one way of thinking, and functionally skillful in a multitude of areas, both technical and cultural.

60 posted on 04/18/2007 10:41:36 AM PDT by massadvj
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To: The_Republican
100 years ago, agriculture was the dominant industry and majority of the employment. Now it is probably less than 2%.

That is not entirely a good thing. Raising kids in a rural environment would go a long way to stop the gang/criminal activities in our urban areas. So called 'progress' isn't always progress.

61 posted on 04/18/2007 10:42:39 AM PDT by AuntB (" It takes more than walking across the border to be an American." Duncan Hunter)
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To: Age of Reason; hedgetrimmer; B4Ranch; All
Point is, the majority of people are incapable of embarking on careers in science and technology. Most people just aren't smart enough (and God bless them for it, but that's another story). But they can be adept at working with their hands, which is just what nature designed the majority of people to do. This free-for-all economy ignores human nature as much as communism did, and will fail just as communism did.

Thank you! A voice of reason from Age of Reason!

62 posted on 04/18/2007 10:46:27 AM PDT by AuntB (" It takes more than walking across the border to be an American." Duncan Hunter)
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To: 1rudeboy
I was responding to your comment #47, which clearly tried to diminish the impact that regulation has on U.S. business.

Such as? Monopolies are frowned upon, they can't dump raw sewage or hazardous chemicals into the Great Lake's any more, what?

63 posted on 04/18/2007 10:47:10 AM PDT by Realism (Some believe that the facts-of-life are open to debate.....)
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To: Realism
Let's review your comment, shall we?

Most of these things [regulations, unions] have been around since the industrial revolution and now all of a sudden they are the cause of off-shoring? I believe you should pay more attention to more recent events such as free trade agreements, Most Favored Nation status, WTO, etc.

As if the burdens on companies have remained static since the Industrial Revolution. What a silly notion.
64 posted on 04/18/2007 10:50:45 AM PDT by 1rudeboy
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To: AuntB; Age of Reason; hedgetrimmer; B4Ranch; A. Pole; Willie Green; Wolfie; ex-snook; Jhoffa_; ...
Thank you.

And I suspect that the current craze for globalism is foisted upon us by intellectuals who--or whose intellectual predecessors--formerly espoused communism as the way to global utopia.

65 posted on 04/18/2007 10:52:01 AM PDT by Age of Reason
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To: The_Republican; jpsb
Jobs you mentioned are hardly done my “Americans” even if they are in America.

That is the biggest load of BS ever shoved off onto the American people, with the exception of GW. Americans do those jobs and Americans will do those jobs. The fact is that our manufacturing jobs have gone away and with it a large part of our strength. The so called free traders, who want to call everyone who believes in keeping our jobs in the country a protectionist, are full of it and the facts and figures they throw out are shown to be the lies they are when you compare what we manufacture now and the volume we used to manufacture, plus the wages, on average, are lower than they were 30 years ago if you use real world dollars. Don't believe the free traders, Nafta and the other so called free trade agreements are raping America not helping her.

66 posted on 04/18/2007 10:53:55 AM PDT by calex59
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To: Zhang Fei
That should have read: Why does Toyota lead the world's automakers in profitability?

Several years ago I read article in which US business experts were warning that Toyota is over-investing in technology and equipment and looking too far into future. They were recommending more focus on short term profits and bottom line.

Well, this distant future is now.

67 posted on 04/18/2007 10:55:59 AM PDT by A. Pole (FReeper: "So trade did not hurt the Indians who sold Manhattan for $24 dollars worth of trinkets?")
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To: Age of Reason
And I suspect that the current craze for globalism is foisted upon us by intellectuals who--or whose intellectual predecessors--formerly espoused communism as the way to global utopia.

I suspect you are correct. Plus the corporate desire for cheap labor. Never underestimate greed.

68 posted on 04/18/2007 10:56:23 AM PDT by AuntB (" It takes more than walking across the border to be an American." Duncan Hunter)
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To: calex59
The so called free traders, who want to call everyone who believes in keeping our jobs in the country a protectionist, are full of it and the facts and figures they throw out are shown to be the lies they are when you compare what we manufacture now and the volume we used to manufacture, plus the wages, on average, are lower than they were 30 years ago if you use real world dollars. Don't believe the free traders, Nafta and the other so called free trade agreements are raping America not helping her.

You nailed it. I call it "Conscience FREE trade".

69 posted on 04/18/2007 10:58:08 AM PDT by AuntB (" It takes more than walking across the border to be an American." Duncan Hunter)
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To: Realism; 1rudeboy
"I think not." You don't think?

Hey, don't you not know this famous saying - "Non cogito ergo sum"?

70 posted on 04/18/2007 10:59:32 AM PDT by A. Pole (FReeper: "So trade did not hurt the Indians who sold Manhattan for $24 dollars worth of trinkets?")
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To: calex59; Toddsterpatriot
The so called free traders, who want to call everyone who believes in keeping our jobs in the country a protectionist, are full of it and the facts and figures they throw out are shown to be the lies they are when you compare what we manufacture now and the volume we used to manufacture, plus the wages, on average, are lower than they were 30 years ago if you use real world dollars.

Proving yet again, that "so called" protectionists return to the same emotional garbage on thread after thread, like a dog returning to vomit.

71 posted on 04/18/2007 10:59:37 AM PDT by 1rudeboy
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To: 1rudeboy
As if the burdens on companies have remained static since the Industrial Revolution. What a silly notion.

Devise a product people want or need, manufacture it, sell it for as much profit as humanly possible. Whats changed?

72 posted on 04/18/2007 10:59:56 AM PDT by Realism (Some believe that the facts-of-life are open to debate.....)
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To: Age of Reason
A little blunt but astute statement!
73 posted on 04/18/2007 11:01:41 AM PDT by A. Pole (FReeper: "So trade did not hurt the Indians who sold Manhattan for $24 dollars worth of trinkets?")
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To: A. Pole; Realism
Don't tell Realism that Toyota is building plants in States with favorable regulatory climates and minimal union presence.
74 posted on 04/18/2007 11:01:47 AM PDT by 1rudeboy
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To: massadvj
Well said. Free trade is like electricity in the global economy. The more wealth moves and is spent, the more income generated by the same amount of money. I worry more about the fortitude and honor of the West. Why didn’t more people fight back at VT. I understand the shooter lined people up against the wall like NAZIs. Also, the British sailors did not show strength. Is this a problem for our younger generation?
75 posted on 04/18/2007 11:02:26 AM PDT by GeorgefromGeorgia
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To: massadvj
The people who do the best in the future will be very adaptable, not particularly locked into any one way of thinking, and functionally skillful in a multitude of areas, both technical and cultural.

Can you be very advanced in many fields? How many people are capable to have Renaissance personality like Leonardo da Vinci?

76 posted on 04/18/2007 11:06:04 AM PDT by A. Pole (FReeper: "So trade did not hurt the Indians who sold Manhattan for $24 dollars worth of trinkets?")
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To: Realism
"I don’t know how its holding together"

teachers, postal workers, police, military, firemen, forest rangers, IRS agents...all govt employees and as long as Uncle Sam keeps heaping money and benefits on them, there will be money around....just not in my pocket....

the people that make the paychecks will also have to pay for the entire Federa/state/local govt entities....as well as carry SS....because no one else will have any money....

77 posted on 04/18/2007 11:07:12 AM PDT by cherry
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To: 1rudeboy
like a dog returning to vomit

You quoting the Bible? (Prov:26:11: "As a dog returneth to his vomit, so a fool returneth to his folly.")

78 posted on 04/18/2007 11:09:00 AM PDT by A. Pole (FReeper: "So trade did not hurt the Indians who sold Manhattan for $24 dollars worth of trinkets?")
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To: 1rudeboy
Don't tell Realism that Toyota is building plants in States with favorable regulatory climates and minimal union presence.

I heard that....... Absolutely nothing wrong with manufacturing your product within the target market, everybody wins.

79 posted on 04/18/2007 11:10:32 AM PDT by Realism (Some believe that the facts-of-life are open to debate.....)
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To: A. Pole
LOL

(1rude:4:18: "As a dog returneth to his vomit, so a fool returneth to his emotional outbursts.")

80 posted on 04/18/2007 11:14:03 AM PDT by 1rudeboy
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To: calex59
when you compare what we manufacture now and the volume we used to manufacture,

Do you have proof that we used to manufacture more?

81 posted on 04/18/2007 11:19:31 AM PDT by Toddsterpatriot (Why are protectionists (and goldbugs) so bad at math?)
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To: The_Republican
Times change - no fear!

A direct quote from Rome, about 476AD.

82 posted on 04/18/2007 11:21:13 AM PDT by GingisK
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To: A. Pole
Thank you for posting this. A country with declining ability to manufacture essential goods, a country who depends on third world countries to supply those goods, a country who allows insane trade agreements to be passed, a country who gives the finger to the middle class who once sustained the country, and a country who is importing poverty, disease, ignorance and dependence, does not have a bright future.

We have greedy, ignorant politicians who are destroying our nation. We keep electing them because they're the only ones who have enough money to win an election.

83 posted on 04/18/2007 11:29:53 AM PDT by janetgreen (NO AMNESTY FOR ILLEGAL ALIENS)
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To: Zhang Fei

General Electric has consolidated its major R&D operations into four centers in the World. Only one in the U.S. Another in Germany. The other two are in China and India.


84 posted on 04/18/2007 11:59:49 AM PDT by Paul Ross (Ronald Reagan-1987:"We are always willing to be trade partners but never trade patsies.")
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To: Age of Reason
This free-for-all economy ignores human nature as much as communism did, and will fail just as communism did.

The really sad thing is that its win-win for the Chi-Comms. I.e., the failure is being exploited by the communist government of China, and they are positioning themselves in some not-so-distant future to re-assert communism's ideological primacy...and will nationalize all the foreign investments, not to mention orchestrate an international isolation of the then-dependant U.S.

85 posted on 04/18/2007 12:06:18 PM PDT by Paul Ross (Ronald Reagan-1987:"We are always willing to be trade partners but never trade patsies.")
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To: Realism

The value of the dollar is falling compared to foreign currencies, making our goods more expensive overseas, and increasing the price of goods being shipped here. This is a fool’s paradise!


86 posted on 04/18/2007 12:32:29 PM PDT by Ciexyz (Is the American voter smarter than a fifth grader?)
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To: A. Pole

Mfg. bump for later.......


87 posted on 04/18/2007 12:52:17 PM PDT by indthkr
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To: Ciexyz
The value of the dollar is falling compared to foreign currencies, making our goods more expensive overseas, and increasing the price of goods being shipped here.

Yep, when the dollar is down exports are less expensive and imports are more expensive. This really is going to kill us if oil is traded in Euros in the near future.

88 posted on 04/18/2007 12:53:05 PM PDT by Realism (Some believe that the facts-of-life are open to debate.....)
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To: Paul Ross; AuntB; Age of Reason; hedgetrimmer; B4Ranch; A. Pole; Willie Green; Wolfie; ex-snook

We resisters of globalism will need to learn new skills—

At reeducation camps.


89 posted on 04/18/2007 12:54:51 PM PDT by Age of Reason
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To: Age of Reason
Time to reread Solzhenitsyn?
90 posted on 04/18/2007 1:30:03 PM PDT by A. Pole (Solzhenitsyn: "Men have forgotten God; that's why all this has happened.")
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To: A. Pole
Yet, America is self sufficient in food.

I have heard contradicting info on that. I believe 2004 was the first year we imported more food than we exported. Not good.

91 posted on 04/18/2007 1:33:14 PM PDT by stevio ((NRA))
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To: A. Pole

nump


92 posted on 04/18/2007 2:00:16 PM PDT by markman46 (engage brain before using keyboard!!!)
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To: A. Pole
Can you be very advanced in many fields?

I said functionally skillful, not advanced. Knowing a lot about a little will not get you far anymore, IMHO. It is the person who knows a little about a lot who will do better. In a changing environment, the successful person will be the one who can understand the synthesis of different areas. Health care marketing, for example.

93 posted on 04/18/2007 2:44:40 PM PDT by massadvj
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To: massadvj
In a changing environment, the successful person will be the one who can understand the synthesis of different areas. Health care marketing, for example.

What about providing actual care, like doing surgery?

94 posted on 04/18/2007 3:03:36 PM PDT by A. Pole (Solzhenitsyn: "Men have forgotten God; that's why all this has happened.")
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To: A. Pole

In the history of mankind, doctors have always been among the most prosperous professions, so I would not bet against them. As the population ages, their services will be in greater demand.


95 posted on 04/18/2007 3:46:35 PM PDT by massadvj
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To: Realism
>>removing crippling regulations, unions, enviro BS that is driving wealth producting manufacturing offshore.<<
>Most of these things have been around since the industrial revolution and now all of a sudden they are the cause of off-shoring? I believe you should pay more attention to more recent events such as free trade agreements, Most Favored Nation status, WTO, etc.<

Not to the extent, that they are now. Government is sticking their nose into more and more things and businesses. Freedom and competition is the way to go.

96 posted on 04/18/2007 3:56:10 PM PDT by Leo Carpathian (ffffFReeeePeee!)
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To: A. Pole

You want fries with that?


97 posted on 04/18/2007 6:41:27 PM PDT by xJones
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To: massadvj
My question was if you can have good medicine without stable careers. You said "It is the person who knows a little about a lot who will do better."

My opinion is that highly evolved society needs specialization and people who know a lot about a little and who are secure in their jobs. You cannot have tall building made from flexible bricks.

Your "person who knows a little about a lot who will do better" if there is order around, but with dislocation and chaos all gains will go to hell.

98 posted on 04/18/2007 6:59:14 PM PDT by A. Pole (Hush Bimbo: "Low wage is good for you!")
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To: jpsb
LOL, yes keep the presses rolling by all means. BTW I noticed that the pound is selling at over 2 bucks today. Hmmm, wonder if that has anything at all to do with off shoring production of wealth?

On my last trip to the UK (1999), the price of items in UK pounds was about the same as I paid in US dollars. That meant the UK was paying 63% more for the same goods. Assuming that pricing strategy hasn't changed, the Brits are paying 100% more i.e. 2X as much for the same goods. I'll be spending my vacation time in the U.S. where I can have fun for half the price.

99 posted on 04/18/2007 6:59:30 PM PDT by Myrddin
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To: A. Pole

Don’t think that agriculture won’t get outsourced. I can’t think of any particular reason why not.


100 posted on 04/18/2007 7:05:03 PM PDT by Freedom4US
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