Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

Breaking: Bridge Collapse in Minneapolis
KSTP TV 5/ME | 8/1/07 | Me

Posted on 08/01/2007 4:28:27 PM PDT by ButThreeLeftsDo

Just turned on the news. 35W bridge collapsed in the Mississippi River. Cars, trucks, semis.....

Fires burning, tanker trucks, at least one school bus, more than ten cars......

Just now breaking.......


TOPICS: Breaking News; News/Current Events; US: Minnesota
KEYWORDS: 35w; bridge; bridgecollapse; bridges; btld; collapse; corrosion; engineering; infrastructure; jihad; minneapolis; mosques; mothman; prayerforminnesotans; rust; slownewsday; terroristattack; transportation; twincitiescell
Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first previous 1-50 ... 2,451-2,5002,501-2,5502,551-2,600 ... 2,701-2,710 next last
To: LUV W

Nix on the “reckon”, too. That would be more Southern. :^D


2,501 posted on 08/03/2007 8:09:47 AM PDT by Shelayne (I will continue to pray for President Bush and my country, as I am commanded to do by my Lord.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2406 | View Replies]

To: Milwaukee_Guy

Somewhat disagree. Every bridge I am aware of (I used to inspect them and supervised other inspectors afterward) has bad expansion joints. Every one of them is rusted and most are totally locked up. It sometimes causes localized failures, particularly on the deck if it is concrete, however, I have never heard of that being a primary cause of failure.

My bet is a fatigue crack that was hidden or missed during inspection. The combination of bumper-to-bumper traffic and the construction machinery was more than the remaining tension (the uncracked area) could take.


2,502 posted on 08/03/2007 8:10:17 AM PDT by jim_trent
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2479 | View Replies]

To: jim_trent
Mianus River bridge failure.
2,503 posted on 08/03/2007 8:14:32 AM PDT by spunkets ("Freedom is about authority", Rudy Giuliani, gun grabber)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2502 | View Replies]

To: jeffers

I agree. I have seen a lot of fatigue failures (most not on bridges, thankfully), and every one of them has been in a tension member or in a tension area.

I have never seen a fatigue failure in a compression member. I have seen buckling in compression and seen all kinds of different joint failures (weld cracks, poor fusion, rivet shear, bolt shear — but more often shear failure in the plate the rivet or bolt goes through — bad metal, bad repairs, bad initial welding, but I have never seen a fatigue failure in compression.


2,504 posted on 08/03/2007 8:19:24 AM PDT by jim_trent
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2471 | View Replies]

To: spunkets
Just hope the local bridge inspector, or engineers in charge does a good job.

Frighteningly, I live in the land of PennDOT.

2,505 posted on 08/03/2007 8:25:28 AM PDT by PennsylvaniaMom (Just because you're paranoid doesn't mean THEY aren't out to get you...)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2497 | View Replies]

To: bert

My understanding was it is a riveted connection not bolted..but nonetheless, something failed.


2,506 posted on 08/03/2007 8:29:43 AM PDT by concretebob (I'm NOT pro-war, I'm ANTI - TERRORIST)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2495 | View Replies]

To: jim_trent

Over at

http://www.chicagotribune.com/services/newspaper/premium/printedition/Friday/chi-070803bridgecollapse-htmlpage,0,3347666.htmlpage?coll=chi_news_local_promo

there is a good diagram.

The center span over water is 468’ (if I recall correctly) of the 1900’ total.

The whole bridge was limited to one lane each direction where there is normally four lanes of heavy traffic each direction.


2,507 posted on 08/03/2007 8:30:04 AM PDT by hlmencken3 (Originalist on the the 'general welfare' clause? No? NOT an originalist!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2502 | View Replies]

To: ButThreeLeftsDo

Cannot find links to a terrific TV documentary on The World’s most celebrated bridges - but did find this interesting site.

http://architecture.about.com/od/famousbridges/Famous_Bridges.htm


2,508 posted on 08/03/2007 8:58:37 AM PDT by sodpoodle ( Despair - man's surrender. Laughter - God's redemption)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: hlmencken3
The whole bridge was limited to one lane each direction where there is normally four lanes of heavy traffic each direction.

Has that been confirmed? Even 2 days later i've heard conflicting accounts, 1/2 those saying 2 lanes were open per direction (4 total), and the other half saying only 1 lane per side(2 total). Could it be the reason for the confusion was that while parts of the collapsed section was down to 2 lanes, others were still at 4?

2,509 posted on 08/03/2007 9:10:37 AM PDT by RckyRaCoCo (sing after me......de-por-ta-tion cha-cha-cha)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2507 | View Replies]

To: jim_trent

Actually the bridge next to it is the 3rd avenue bridge. Not a freeway.

The 35W bridge carried traffic in both directions.


2,510 posted on 08/03/2007 9:30:33 AM PDT by toast
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2499 | View Replies]

To: jeffers

Very interesting analysis. Thank you.


2,511 posted on 08/03/2007 9:42:01 AM PDT by Abigail Adams
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2467 | View Replies]

To: spunkets

Great pics with notes. Thanks.


2,512 posted on 08/03/2007 9:42:56 AM PDT by Abigail Adams
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2464 | View Replies]

To: RckyRaCoCo

There were two lanes going in both directions. It would be quite rare for a major freeway to be down to one lane only in each direction during rush hour. (Sometimes they do it on the weekends.)


2,513 posted on 08/03/2007 9:52:34 AM PDT by Abigail Adams
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2509 | View Replies]

To: RckyRaCoCo; hlmencken3

Road or bridge construction control varies hour by hour, I would think - and at Rush Hour usually they make necessary adjustments. Probably not a conflict - just a time difference.


2,514 posted on 08/03/2007 9:55:33 AM PDT by sodpoodle ( Despair - man's surrender. Laughter - God's redemption)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2509 | View Replies]

To: Abigail Adams

OK, thanks for the information. It helps to know the facts.


2,515 posted on 08/03/2007 9:56:37 AM PDT by RckyRaCoCo (sing after me......de-por-ta-tion cha-cha-cha)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2513 | View Replies]

To: toast

Thanks for the information.


2,516 posted on 08/03/2007 10:11:11 AM PDT by jim_trent
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2510 | View Replies]

To: Dead Corpse

“They can have my 1978 Camaro when they pry it from my cold dead hands....”

There will allways be gas for those willing to pay for it - but the more people taking light rail, and driving the ity-bitty electric cars, the more gas left at a more reasonable price for you.


2,517 posted on 08/03/2007 10:12:12 AM PDT by RS ("I took the drugs because I liked them and I found excuses to take them, so I'm not weaseling.")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2477 | View Replies]

To: jim_trent

Actually I made a mistake. It’s the 10th avenue bridge.

The 3rd avenue bridge is on the other side of the stone arch bridge. :)


2,518 posted on 08/03/2007 11:34:40 AM PDT by toast
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2516 | View Replies]

To: toast

Interesting article here about the inspections and decisions made:

http://www.startribune.com/10204/story/1339411.html

“According to a source with knowledge of the state and federal investigations, MnDOT is focused on the east side of the northbound section of the bridge past the Washington Avenue entrance as the likely spot where the bridge first gave way.”


2,519 posted on 08/03/2007 11:43:37 AM PDT by Abigail Adams
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2518 | View Replies]

To: Enchante

You make several very good points.


2,520 posted on 08/03/2007 11:54:27 AM PDT by Palladin (Judge Munley is a nincompoop.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2162 | View Replies]

To: UCANSEE2

Until I see an actual picture, I’ll file that one under “myth”.

All I remember is Bush hugging Brown and saying “Helluva job, Brownie” while hundreds of people slowly drowned in their attics.


2,521 posted on 08/03/2007 11:56:04 AM PDT by Palladin (Judge Munley is a nincompoop.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2152 | View Replies]

To: Abigail Adams

You’re welcome.


2,522 posted on 08/03/2007 11:59:57 AM PDT by spunkets ("Freedom is about authority", Rudy Giuliani, gun grabber)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2512 | View Replies]

To: Abigail Adams

I already read that. I just didn’t want to admit to reading the Trib.

Click on the graphic of the bridge halfway down the page. Very informative view of where the investigation will probably focus.


2,523 posted on 08/03/2007 12:00:48 PM PDT by toast
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2519 | View Replies]

To: spunkets
That's a good truss diagram that explains the basic design element of simple trusses well.

In this case however, it's not a simple truss. It's an arched truss, and in my opinion, has a strong cantilever element to it as well. Here's a picture of the bridge, looking northeast, before the collapse:

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

A simple truss has flat bottom and top chords, as indicated in your excellent diagram.

An arched truss incorporates the strength of an arch into the truss framework, usually as the top or bottom chord, sometimes in between the two.

All of the above can function as standalone units between piers.

The cantilever design comes into play when superstructure components on the shoreward side of the mainspan piers counterbalance all or part of the weight of the center span superstructure. If one span of a cantilever fails, the adjacent spans usually fail in sympathy, because the counterbalancing weight has been removed.

I agree that this bridge is not a true cantilever. There are no massive counterweights attached to the approach ends of the superstructure, there are no free ends in the center of the mainspan, and no pivot pin to join two cantilevers together.

However, it's not a simple truss either. There's an arch to contend with, and it is very clear, on two counts, that the spans are not independant.

Obviously, the northern approach span failed after the center span dropped. It failed just as you would expect half a cantilever to fail, by rocking shoreward in the absence of its counterweight. Just as obviously, the approach spans were not designed to be independent, as the superstructure ran over the piers on into the approaches without interuption at the piers as is normally seen in simple post and beam, post and plate, or post and truss design.

Without the engineering drawings, and a lot of processing time, I can't say to what degree arch type, truss type, and cantilever type load distribution mechanisms were in play in the static design, much less in the dynamic forces of daily use, and further still from the dynamics of failure.

The best I have to go on here are the images, statements from MnDOT to the effect that the bridge was designed such that failure of any major component would fail the entire superstructure, and the specifics of the failure sequence itself.

At this point, rather than labelling the design a truss, or cantilever, or arched truss, about the best I can do is call it a unitary design, somewhat like modern automobile frames are put together, putting several different load distribiuting mechanisms into play to create one overall structure. In fact, I can't even say whether the bottom chord was in tension or in compression. That arch is a pretty flat one, as arches go, but arches are in compression, as are the bottom chords of cantilevers. As you note, the bottom chords of trusses are in tension, and its beyond my abilities to say whether this design was more of a truss, arch, or cantilever.

It's hard to tell in the photos, but my impressions are that in your first photo, the failure of the bottom chord, as far as visibility allows are at least consistent with a compression failure, i.e., diagonal shear. That's not good enough to be conclusive, and I'm not engineer enough to analyze this design just from the pictures.

On the good side, from the article posted above, MnDOT is looking at the same general area we are, southeast side of the bridge. Between us and MnDOT we have one or more layers of usually clueless reporters, but we're in the same ballpark no matter how you look at it.
2,524 posted on 08/03/2007 12:55:44 PM PDT by jeffers
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2486 | View Replies]

To: concretebob; spunkets; jeffers; jim_trent
Thank you all for the educated discussion you've all provided, it is appreciated.

I just watched a blurb about the MNDoT Bridge List, and they showed some pictures of the structure of this one from (I believe) the 2005 report. [ It runs as "Bridge History" under KARE-11 OnLive ^ ] They showed missing bolts, severe corrosion, and misaligned members in the steelwork support structures.

I'm sure there are probably more than a single cause to the failure, just as there is a multiple cause for the dearth of maintenance to the infrastructures -- self-aggrandizing politicians, money-grubbing lobbyists, and an uninterested public.

2,525 posted on 08/03/2007 12:57:15 PM PDT by brityank (The more I learn about the Constitution, the more I realise this Government is UNconstitutional !!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2493 | View Replies]

To: Abigail Adams; y'all
"He said inspectors have long been on the lookout for metal fatigue and cracking in the bridge because it was designed before engineers learned about dangers to bridges from fatigue cracking."

Thanks for the article. The existence and practical effects and consequences of metal fatigue's been known and understood since the 30s and that was definitely so post WWII. This bridge was built in '67. They're still passing the BS about how they didn't know.

It's interesting, how in the same article, the folks that know and are responsible for spending the money, say that there was plenty to spend on fixing dangerous faults. The others say flat out in the face of that, that there was none. The fact is that the engineers didn't appreciate and know what they had in front of them and froze. IOWs, it was over their heads. MNDOT designed and built the bridge in the first place. Now they're doing a song and dance over the poor results.

I can't see a politician, rep, or rat that would turn down $s after a warning that their bridge is a jalopy that's threatening to fall in the water. The reason's are obvious. Regardless of credentials, they're inept bureaucrats frozen in the state of ignorance, confusion and indecision. I doubt many will be entertained by their song and dance. They may be taken in by it. The Gov is probably fuming and the rats are certainly over joyed that this occurred in a rep admin.

2,526 posted on 08/03/2007 12:59:47 PM PDT by spunkets ("Freedom is about authority", Rudy Giuliani, gun grabber)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2519 | View Replies]

To: jeffers
Thanks.

"it's not a simple truss either. There's an arch to contend with"

I know, I was just giving a simple explanation. The bottom chord is an approximation of a parabola. That allows all the triangular elements in the span to be reduced in size, as they occur in the truss away from the simple support. It simply reduces the overall weight of the truss, while maintaining the support capability in each element. The bending moments are the same for each element ina parabolic truss.

At the support post, the truss element(triangles) is large, because it supports half the weight out to the center. The next element can be smaller, because it supports less weight to the center. ect...

"On the good side, from the article posted above, MnDOT is looking at the same general area we are, southeast side of the bridge."

Right. I think they knew about this before, but froze.

2,527 posted on 08/03/2007 1:20:06 PM PDT by spunkets ("Freedom is about authority", Rudy Giuliani, gun grabber)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2524 | View Replies]

To: brityank

You’re welcome.


2,528 posted on 08/03/2007 1:21:06 PM PDT by spunkets ("Freedom is about authority", Rudy Giuliani, gun grabber)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2525 | View Replies]

To: Hillarys Gate Cult

Oh heavens. I am so very sorry...


2,529 posted on 08/03/2007 1:21:09 PM PDT by Sweet_Sunflower29 (Multiple Sclerosis may not kill me, but it's trying to annoy me to death! <><)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2205 | View Replies]

To: spunkets

> “The existence and practical effects and consequences of metal fatigue’s been known and understood since the 30s and that was definitely so post WWII. This bridge was built in ‘67. They’re still passing the BS about how they didn’t know.”

Yes and No. Fatigue was not really known until metal airplanes. It was not well known in the aviation industry until after WWII — after several fatigue failures. It was not used elsewhere because it was expensive to design for that (mostly, it could not be designed for — parts were made and tested to failure) and most things were heavier than airplanes and did not need to worry about fatigue.

The information on fatigue was filtering down to the highway industry in the mid to late 1960’s. I had some of the early articles written on it at the start of my engineering career. A lot of it was VooDoo. I saw a newer article on it a while back that is much more usable. Over-the-road highway trailers were just starting to get light enough back then that fatigue started to be a problem — particularly in gasoline tankers (they went from a tank on a frame to a monocoque structure with the shell actually carrying the load and they also became totally welded at about that time).

Fatique information had not made it to the bridge industry even then. They had a bridge at Sioux City over the Missouri river that was built sometime in the 1970’s or so that started fatigue cracking within a year of its completion. It had to be replaced in just a few years.

Back then, the engineers thought that bridges would never see enough cycles to cause fatigue cracking (at least, that is what they are teaching in bridge inspection courses). Obviously, they were wrong. A combination of using calculators and computers to pare down the weight to the absolute minimum and the increased use of welding was the major causes (note that riveting and bolting structures, which is rarely used now, means fatigue cracks are less likely to start and will end at the next joint instead of cracking completely through the structure).

As far as you statement that politicians would NEVER fail to correct a problem — you have obviously never dealt with politicians. Unless you can give them and EXACT date and time when it will fail, they are not interested. Sometime soon is not good enough. Read my “All About” page here if you want to read about my experiences on that.


2,530 posted on 08/03/2007 1:26:45 PM PDT by jim_trent
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2526 | View Replies]

To: Shelayne

“Reckonin” and “cypherin” are my favorite words.


2,531 posted on 08/03/2007 1:36:41 PM PDT by spanalot
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2501 | View Replies]

To: spunkets

I see that there is a navigable canal and lock near the end of the bridge that seemd to drop first - wonder if there were any collisions over the year - a dent in the steel tube could drastically reduce its compressive strength - the lower chord is in compression, right?


2,532 posted on 08/03/2007 1:50:38 PM PDT by spanalot
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2526 | View Replies]

To: Shelayne

Gotcha....yew betcha!


2,533 posted on 08/03/2007 1:57:06 PM PDT by LUV W (Thompson)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2501 | View Replies]

To: jim_trent; All

Interesting map of USA showing percentage of deficient or obsolete bridges by state

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/20093413/?GT1=10252

apologies if this has already been posted.


2,534 posted on 08/03/2007 2:03:36 PM PDT by sodpoodle ( Despair - man's surrender. Laughter - God's redemption)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2530 | View Replies]

To: jim_trent
"Yes and No. Fatigue was not really known until metal airplanes. It was not well known in the aviation industry until after WWII "

Short... Yes, one of the first engineering studies was done by a Boing engineer regarding airframes. It was shown dramatically that even mild steel does that, when a 30 y/o ship slit i half. ~ in the 40s.(CRS) The process itself though is a solid state phenominon that was studied in physics, but for different reasons. I just gave the WWII date, because the subject occurs in 50s era metallurgy and engineering books. I realize that there are different quality and levels of texts and that more detailed knowledge doesn't spread far.

Yes, I have dealt with politicians. I can't say much now, except they are just people. It's like advising on critical car work. The car owner has to make a decision regarding the mechanic's claims. The mechanic may not be able to say when the wheel will fall off, but he can make the case as best he can that it will in fact do so. The pol must make the decision for the community regarding public property. Something like a bridge is simple. If the engineer sees somehting like a bridge containing fatigue cracks, or even unsafe stress levels, his duty is to inform both the exec and the public, because it's public property and safety involved. The public certainly understands bridges and "public" buildings collapsing, and anyone that is a pol certainly should.

2,535 posted on 08/03/2007 2:13:09 PM PDT by spunkets ("Freedom is about authority", Rudy Giuliani, gun grabber)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2530 | View Replies]

To: terilyn

Kiran is a lib, but a few corrections to your post-

Kiran didn’t start working at FNC until March of 2001, and didn’t start as a fill-in co-host for Fox and Friends until about a year later. Yes, she did remark that Edwards was “dreamy”, but I’m lead to believe that she was saying it as a joke at the time.

I figured that Gretchen was a Republican, but didn’t have any proof. She is just who Roger Ailes is looking for in a co-host for his morning show. Chetry is way too far to the left for any kind of mainstream weekday program, at least for anything that would have been on FNC. I think she’s on cloud nine at CNN! You can tell she’s taking great pleasure in clobbering the heck out of the Bush Administration and his Iraq War policy! I wonder if she’s having fun hanging out with Christianne, Wolf and John Roberts? Somehow, they seem so intellectually above her!


2,536 posted on 08/03/2007 2:13:18 PM PDT by fox0566
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2282 | View Replies]

To: spanalot

The lower chord is in tension. It’s unlikely anything hit the bridge. That’s a major incident that would have been reported and repaired if there was any damage.


2,537 posted on 08/03/2007 2:17:18 PM PDT by spunkets ("Freedom is about authority", Rudy Giuliani, gun grabber)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2532 | View Replies]

To: All

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/20099056
Just a sample of a chart of the 245 bridges in the District of Columbia - which has the worst rating in the US.

Keys to using the data below:
Status of “D” means the bridge has been rated structurally deficient; “O” means it has been rated functionally obsolete.

Sufficiency rating is a value obtained by calculating four separate factors (structural adequacy and safety, serviceability and functional obsolescence, essentiality for public use, and special reductions) that is indicative of a bridge’s sufficiency to remain in service. A value of 100 represents an entirely sufficient bridge and a zero represents a deficient bridge.

The raw dataset of the National Bridge Inventory, which is compiled by the U.S. Department of Transportation’s Federal Highway Administration from state reports, used for analysis was provided to MSNBC.com by the National Institute for Computer-Assisted Reporting at the University of Missouri. The most recent data includes inspections through December 2006.

Status Rating Road Place County Feature Location
O 64.0 DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA POTOMAC R. & C&O CANAL “OVER POTOMAC RIVER
O 63.0 29 DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA WHITEHURST FRWY WHITEHURST FRWY
O 74.0 DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA SOUTH CAPITOL STREET M STREET & S. CAPITOL ST.


2,538 posted on 08/03/2007 2:20:24 PM PDT by sodpoodle ( Despair - man's surrender. Laughter - God's redemption)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2534 | View Replies]

To: jeffers

forgot... The parabola comes from the thickness squared dependence of the bending moment of a cantilever as the distance from the support increases. The beam will remain flat if the thickness decreases parabolically as the distance from the support increases.


2,539 posted on 08/03/2007 2:21:41 PM PDT by spunkets ("Freedom is about authority", Rudy Giuliani, gun grabber)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2524 | View Replies]

To: toast

LOL! Here’s a link to the bridge sufficiency list from MNDOT:

http://www.dot.state.mn.us/bridge/Misc/xyz/FHWA-DeficientBridgeList.pdf


2,540 posted on 08/03/2007 2:45:15 PM PDT by Abigail Adams
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2523 | View Replies]

To: spunkets; jeffers

Another article with a few more details:

http://www.startribune.com/10204/story/1342989.html


2,541 posted on 08/03/2007 2:53:46 PM PDT by Abigail Adams
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2526 | View Replies]

To: spunkets; jeffers; All
http://www.thedeadpelican.com/jackstands.htm Image and video hosting by TinyPic I wonder if this is real ?
2,542 posted on 08/03/2007 3:13:46 PM PDT by 1COUNTER-MORTER-68 (THROWING ANOTHER BULLET-RIDDLED TV IN THE PILE OUT BACK~~~~~)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2539 | View Replies]

To: bert

We’ll see. The “bedrock” layer can be pretty far down.


2,543 posted on 08/03/2007 3:34:24 PM PDT by bvw
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2476 | View Replies]

To: fox0566

You’re right, it was the primaries where he was running vs Kerry not in 2000. My mistake, thanks.

It sure didn’t sound like a joke to me. She got picked on for it and came back with an affirmation of her opinion.

No doubt she’s missing Paula Zahn over there lol! Two peas in a pod. Gorgeous without four brain cells between them.


2,544 posted on 08/03/2007 3:47:57 PM PDT by terilyn
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2536 | View Replies]

To: SilvieWaldorfMD; MinnesotaLibertarian

You’re kidding right? No, we haven’t gone around the bend that far. Heck, it was only about 2 years ago that JC Penney’s here even put the hours and welcome sign on their doors in Spanish as well as English.


2,545 posted on 08/03/2007 3:49:28 PM PDT by terilyn
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2491 | View Replies]

To: 1COUNTER-MORTER-68

Do you know where are these photos supposedly from? Just curious. That is a crazy photo, if not photoshopped.

Yikes.


2,546 posted on 08/03/2007 4:16:01 PM PDT by Shelayne (I will continue to pray for President Bush and my country, as I am commanded to do by my Lord.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2542 | View Replies]

To: LUV W

;^)


2,547 posted on 08/03/2007 4:16:48 PM PDT by Shelayne (I will continue to pray for President Bush and my country, as I am commanded to do by my Lord.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2533 | View Replies]

To: Shelayne

JACK STANDS HOLDING UP TWIN- SPAN BRIDGE?

The above photo comes from a DEAD PELICAN reader who claims that there are several areas under the twin bridges that have jacks placed between the support column and the roadway under-section. We are told that some of these jacks cannot reach as far as they need to contact the cement. In order to make contact with the cement 4X4 pieces of lumber are inserted between the jacks and the bridge under-sections. Our source claims that these photos were taken while fishing.


by Chad E. Rogers
http://www.thedeadpelican.com
(C) THE DEAD PELICAN 2006
~~~~~~~~~~~
I think that’s in South Louisiana...


2,548 posted on 08/03/2007 4:28:29 PM PDT by 1COUNTER-MORTER-68 (THROWING ANOTHER BULLET-RIDDLED TV IN THE PILE OUT BACK~~~~~)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2546 | View Replies]

To: 1COUNTER-MORTER-68; concretebob

Those are screw jacks(new). Those 2 can’t hold up ALL that concrete above. They can be put there and tightened temporarily to support only what’s intended for that support alone. Those screws can never be tightened to lift the weight above it. They’re too amall. As they are being used, it’s unsafe. There shold be plates there to distribute the load. Otherwise, if the concrete sits on that, it will get broken up. That’s an expansion joint and they might be there to HOLD it in place while work is being done on a bearing, but there’s still no heavy plates there to distribute the stress and the screw can’t be used to adjust the concrete so a bearing fix ends up in the right place. hydraulic jacks should be used to do that. They just won’t keep the position stable, because they creep. Screw jacks are used to hold, or to lift something withinn their capacity. THose are too small. It’s also 1/2 of an expansion joint, so they’ll tip, or break concrete when the slab moves. Concretebob might be able to elaborate. I don’t know what’s inside, or what they’re up to.


2,549 posted on 08/03/2007 4:32:54 PM PDT by spunkets ("Freedom is about authority", Rudy Giuliani, gun grabber)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2542 | View Replies]

To: 1COUNTER-MORTER-68

Thanks.

Again—yikes! :^O


2,550 posted on 08/03/2007 4:37:12 PM PDT by Shelayne (I will continue to pray for President Bush and my country, as I am commanded to do by my Lord.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2548 | View Replies]


Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first previous 1-50 ... 2,451-2,5002,501-2,5502,551-2,600 ... 2,701-2,710 next last

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson