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Cosmic blast may have killed off megafauna Scientists say early humans doomed, too
Boston Globe ^ | September 27, 2007 | Colin Nickerson

Posted on 09/25/2007 6:45:11 PM PDT by baynut

Wooly mammoths, giant sloths, saber-toothed cats, and dozens of other species of megafauna may have become extinct when a disintegrating comet or asteroid exploded over North America with the force of millions of hydrogen bombs, according to research by an international team of scientists.

The blast, which the researchers believe occurred 12,900 years ago, may have also doomed a mysterious early human culture, known as Clovis people, while triggering a planetwide cool-down that wiped out the plant species that sustained many outsize Ice Age beasts, according to research published online yesterday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

(Excerpt) Read more at boston.com ...


TOPICS: Culture/Society; Miscellaneous; Philosophy
KEYWORDS: catastrophe; catastrophism; clovis; clovisimpact; comet; extinction; godsgravesglyphs; impact
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If this stuff happens only once every 1,000,000 years, as we are are repeatedly told -- isn't it strange that it seems to have happened only 1-100th of that length of time in our past? Things can extraordinarily rare -- or extraordinarily recent -- I have trouble believing both.

Its time to reevaluate the threat from space.

1 posted on 09/25/2007 6:45:18 PM PDT by baynut
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To: baynut

Yoo-Hoo, It was the world wide flood during Noah’s time, your only off by 6,000 years. But no, they just can’t bring themselves to believe in God. No, No, we can’t have Noah, we can’t have God, we can’t have Jesus. No, no, we must be are own little gods. No, no, we don’t want to be held accountable by a perfect God for how we live, it must have been a comet, it must have been a meteor!


2 posted on 09/25/2007 7:00:07 PM PDT by Rodm (Seest thou a man diligent in his business? He shall stand before kings)
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To: baynut
"Wooly mammoths, giant sloths, saber-toothed cats, and dozens of other species of megafauna may have become extinct..."

My wife, as luck would have it, managed to survive.

3 posted on 09/25/2007 7:03:18 PM PDT by billorites (freepo ergo sum)
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To: baynut
"...may have also doomed a mysterious early human culture, known as Clovis people,..."

Jist call Arkansas, and ask Clovis how his'ns is doin'.
4 posted on 09/25/2007 7:08:59 PM PDT by familyop (cbt. engr. (cbt.)--has-been, will write Duncan Hunter in)
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To: baynut; DaveLoneRanger; GodGunsGuts

The flood, obviously. So much time and energy is wasted trying to refute what is obvious.


5 posted on 09/25/2007 7:15:57 PM PDT by editor-surveyor (Turning the general election into a second Democrat primary is not a winning strategy.)
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To: Rodm
“But no, they just can’t bring themselves to believe in God.”

The Burckle impact crater in the Indian Ocean created gigantic tsunami waves, that pushed megatons of seafloor up onto Madagascar. The vaporized ocean probably made it rain for weeks far away from the crater. Anyone close to the Indian Ocean would have been killed, and many people would have perished in the weather that followed the impact.

http://gsa.confex.com/gsa/2006AM/finalprogram/abstract_114274.htm

http://www.earth2class.org/k12/w9_s2005/scioverview.html

It would have been about 6000 years ago, just about right for the Flood.

God could have easily caused the impact and worldwide super rain storm- proof that the Bible is again correct. Noah and his family were warned and survived. You don’t have to discount science when reading the Bible, and you don’t have to discount God when reading science.

6 posted on 09/25/2007 7:20:23 PM PDT by DBrow
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To: baynut

Or they could have been killed off by global warming. Or maybe it was Bush’s fault. Or then there is the real possiblility that they were killed off by a flood.


7 posted on 09/25/2007 7:24:27 PM PDT by taxesareforever (Never forget Matt Maupin)
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To: baynut

Chicken little was right.. The sky is falling.


8 posted on 09/25/2007 7:27:47 PM PDT by TASMANIANRED (TAZ:Untamed, Unpredictable, Uninhibited.)
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To: baynut
I miss the megafauna.

Poor megafauna.

9 posted on 09/25/2007 7:28:36 PM PDT by SIDENET (I don't want to find "common ground" with a bunch of damn leftists.)
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To: familyop

All of the Clovis people are here in Miami.


10 posted on 09/25/2007 7:31:44 PM PDT by Rome2000 (Peace is not an option)
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To: taxesareforever

But how could it possibly have been Bush’s fault ... but then ... no that would be too crazy ... what if Bush had access to a time machine and ...


11 posted on 09/25/2007 7:34:30 PM PDT by who_would_fardels_bear
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To: baynut

“It’s always something.” - Roseanne Roseannadanna


12 posted on 09/25/2007 7:35:23 PM PDT by TigersEye (Dont' taze me, Bro!)
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To: baynut

yeaaaah! Remember, like it was today!


13 posted on 09/25/2007 7:37:57 PM PDT by Leo Carpathian (ffffFReeeePeee!)
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To: baynut

Good thing we know how to fight off ice ages now. /semisarc


14 posted on 09/25/2007 7:40:50 PM PDT by NonValueAdded (Fred Dalton Thompson for President)
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To: baynut
"If this stuff happens only once every 1,000,000 years, as we are are repeatedly told..."

 

On average... over eons.  Extinction events aren't like John Kerry or Slow-Joe Biden saying something stupid, occurring on a predictable schedule. A comet hits sometimes every 12,000 years, sometimes every  3.86521478 million years.

To get a sense of time... Stretch your arms out.  This is represents the timeline of earth's ~4.5 billion-year  history.  The distance from your left fingertips to the wrist of your right hand represents the pre-Cambrian (pre-complex-life) period.   All complex life on earth exists in the time represented by your right hand.  And "in a single stroke with a medium-grained nail file you could eradicate human history."*

* John McPhee "Basin and Range" as contained in...

  

 

And, yes, I believe in God... and comets, and asteroids, and meteors.

 

15 posted on 09/25/2007 7:43:09 PM PDT by itsamelman (Announcing your plans is a good way to hear God laugh. - - Al Swearengen)
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To: baynut

Well, it’s not exactly a celestial lottery, happening every Saturday Era and Wednesday Era.


16 posted on 09/25/2007 8:13:25 PM PDT by Hoosier-Daddy ("It does no good to be a super power if you have to worry what the neighbors think." BuffaloJack)
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To: baynut

How come there is no sign of this major cooling in the Vostok data?


17 posted on 09/25/2007 8:27:34 PM PDT by expatpat
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To: DBrow
God could have easily caused the impact and worldwide super rain storm- proof that the Bible is again correct. Noah and his family were warned and survived. You don’t have to discount science when reading the Bible, and you don’t have to discount God when reading science.

Or a meteor could have caused the flood and men wrote about it. One such book that contains the story is the Bible. The Bible is a book written and printed by men. That we know.

18 posted on 09/25/2007 8:31:46 PM PDT by LoneRangerMassachusetts (The only good Mullah is a dead Mullah. The only good Mosque is the one that used to be there.)
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To: Rodm

“But no, they just can’t bring themselves to believe in God. “

I believe in God and believe the earth is a few billion years older than 6,000.


19 posted on 09/25/2007 8:37:19 PM PDT by Rb ver. 2.0 (Reunite Gondwanaland!)
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To: baynut; SunkenCiv

another one...


20 posted on 09/25/2007 8:54:54 PM PDT by Fred Nerks (Fair dinkum!)
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To: baynut

Good timing for the announcement. This year is the 1500th anniversary of when Clovis’ people whipped the Visigoths at the battle of Vouille.


21 posted on 09/25/2007 9:09:48 PM PDT by Verginius Rufus
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To: Rodm
Yoo-Hoo, It was the world wide flood during Noah’s time, your only off by 6,000 years.

Do you also believe the sun revolves around the earth and the stars are lights from heaven?

22 posted on 09/25/2007 9:17:48 PM PDT by Maynerd (What would Ronald Reagan do?)
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To: Rb ver. 2.0

They might not understand really big numbers back then. it might be, even talking in terms of “thousands” was fairly big numbers.


23 posted on 09/25/2007 9:54:32 PM PDT by Tut
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To: LoneRangerMassachusetts
I know, there is even a filk song about it- God wrote the rocks, men wrote the Bible; God wrote the sky, men wrote the Bible.

I think my point was, there are some that discount the findings of scientific inquiry because the Bible explains it all; and others who do not look in the Bible, but only go by the slow meanderings of science.

I see value in both approaches, since both are attempts to describe the world and explain what we see around us. Neither are perfect and neither are terribly accurate, but looking at both ways of seeing things helps explain people and their thoughts.

24 posted on 09/26/2007 5:26:27 AM PDT by DBrow
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The Cycle of Cosmic Catastrophes: Flood, Fire, and Famine in the History of Civilization The Cycle of Cosmic Catastrophes:
Flood, Fire, and Famine
in the History of Civilization

by Richard Firestone, Allen West, and Simon Warwick-Smith


25 posted on 09/26/2007 9:04:47 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (Profile updated Wednesday, September 12, 2007. https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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Research Team Says Extraterrestrial Impact To Blame For Ice Age Extinctions (More)
Eureka Alert | Northern Arizona University - Lisa Nelson
Posted on 09/25/2007 3:58:19 PM EDT by blam
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/chat/1902003/posts


26 posted on 09/26/2007 9:07:00 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (Profile updated Wednesday, September 12, 2007. https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: baynut
If this stuff happens only once every 1,000,000 years, as we are are repeatedly told -- isn't it strange that it seems to have happened only 1-100th of that length of time in our past?
Even if it happened like clockwork, it would merely mean that the next one won't happen for 990,000 years. :') Of course, the 1 myr estimate (and that's just one such) is merely an estimate, and the problem with the real clockwork is that it involves trillions of different clocks running on different schedules. (': I wholeheartedly agree, we do need more observatory capability.
27 posted on 09/26/2007 9:11:09 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (Profile updated Wednesday, September 12, 2007. https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: Fred Nerks
Thanks Fred.
 
Catastrophism
· join · view topics · view or post blog · bookmark · post new topic ·

28 posted on 09/26/2007 9:22:53 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (Profile updated Wednesday, September 12, 2007. https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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· join list or digest · view topics · view or post blog · bookmark · post a topic ·

 
Gods
Graves
Glyphs
Thanks Fred Nerks for the ping. Just adding, not sending a distribution, due to earlier topic.

To all -- please ping me to other topics which are appropriate for the GGG list.
GGG managers are Blam, StayAt HomeMother, and Ernest_at_the_Beach
 

· Google · Archaeologica · ArchaeoBlog · Archaeology magazine · Biblical Archaeology Society ·
· Mirabilis · Texas AM Anthropology News · Yahoo Anthro & Archaeo ·
· History or Science & Nature Podcasts · Excerpt, or Link only? · cgk's list of ping lists ·


29 posted on 09/26/2007 9:25:57 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (Profile updated Wednesday, September 12, 2007. https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: baynut

This story seems to be everywhere in the news media. it might be a valid hypothesis, who knows, but it is rare for the media to adopt a science hypothesis so quickly across the board. Perhaps it is related to the upcoming launch of the Dawn spacecraft tomorrow.


30 posted on 09/26/2007 9:26:07 AM PDT by RightWhale (25 degrees today. Phase state change accomplished.)
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To: Rodm

If God didn’t want science he wouldn’t have given us brains.


31 posted on 09/26/2007 9:40:41 AM PDT by Dr.Deth
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To: itsamelman
* John McPhee "Basin and Range" as contained in...

Bryson's great but you really should read McPhee's entire 4-book Annals of a Former World series for a better understanding of Deep Time.

32 posted on 09/26/2007 9:42:31 AM PDT by Bernard Marx
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To: expatpat
This article doesn’t explain it, but their argument is that this impact caused the Younger Dryas event, which is a documented cool cycle. They argue the impact caused a massive melt in the glacier sheet that spilled into the Atlantic and shut down the Gulf Stream, thereby causing the event.
33 posted on 09/26/2007 9:46:21 AM PDT by colorado tanker (I'm unmoderated - just ask Bill O'Reilly)
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To: baynut

Don’t Comet-ize me, bro!


34 posted on 09/26/2007 9:46:27 AM PDT by LZ_Bayonet (There's Always Something.............And there's always something worse!)
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To: Bernard Marx

Thx for the tip... I’ll check it out.


35 posted on 09/26/2007 10:32:15 AM PDT by itsamelman (Announcing your plans is a good way to hear God laugh. - - Al Swearengen)
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To: itsamelman
No kidding. I understand the concept of averages. What you seem to miss is that it is highly unlikely that something that happens every “on average” once in a million years would have happened only 1-100 of that time in our past, immediately after which civilization began. Either it happens more frequently, or we are a result of the event itself, or a combination. Put another way, what is the likely-hood that our civilization followed immediately after the last extinction? We are a result of the event itself.

Or, if you like time lines. Envisage a time line reaching from the dinosaurs, in LA, to the present day, at Ground Zero in New York, this happened 6 block away or half a mile, not even across the Hudson river....

Consider that carefully.

36 posted on 09/26/2007 7:47:00 PM PDT by baynut
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To: baynut
"Women and Minorities Hardest Hit."

"Bush's Fault."

Cheers!

37 posted on 09/26/2007 7:50:49 PM PDT by grey_whiskers (The opinions are solely those of the author and are subject to change without notice.)
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To: Maynerd
Do you also believe the sun revolves around the earth and the stars are lights from heaven?

Golly, why would anyone believe secular ancient Greek science these days? I don't think Ptolemy was no fundie.

38 posted on 09/26/2007 8:02:03 PM PDT by JusPasenThru (Just another angry military veteran.)
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To: JusPasenThru
I don't think Ptolemy was no fundie.

I agree, although the Pope thought it was worth censoring and threatening Galileo for upsetting the Greek/Aquinas applecart.

I find it sad that fundies view the scienfic method as a mortal threat to Christianity. IMHO Christianity can handle the big bang and evolution just fine.

39 posted on 09/26/2007 10:57:52 PM PDT by Maynerd
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To: Maynerd

I thought Copernicus was a Catholic priest. I’m sooooo confused.


40 posted on 09/27/2007 7:39:44 AM PDT by JusPasenThru (Just another angry military veteran.)
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To: JusPasenThru

Copernicus purposely had his worked published posthumously. I wonder why?


41 posted on 09/27/2007 7:49:08 AM PDT by Maynerd
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To: Maynerd
>Copernicus purposely had his worked published posthumously. I wonder why?

To dilute payments
of tax liabilities
incurred by his kids

during settlement
of capital gains transfers
of his estate's net?
42 posted on 09/27/2007 7:54:35 AM PDT by theFIRMbss
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To: Maynerd
Copernicus purposely had his worked published posthumously. I wonder why?

For the answer to this and other exciting questions, read a book called "Six Modern Myths" by Sampson.

43 posted on 09/27/2007 10:25:59 AM PDT by JusPasenThru (Just another angry military veteran.)
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To: theFIRMbss

LOL


44 posted on 09/27/2007 8:17:10 PM PDT by Maynerd
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To: JusPasenThru; Maynerd; neverdem

A better discussion of how, when, why, and with whom Coper. wrote his book - and who published it, how, when, and who read it - is “The Book Nobody Read: Chasing the Revolutions of Nicolaus Copernicus” by Owen Gingerich.

I agree completely with one reviewer ...

Fascinated by the marginal notes as well as the antiquarian texts themselves, Gingerich became a full-time historian of science. His thirty-year quest to locate, identify, and study all the early editions of Copernicus’s magnum opus, with a particular emphasis on annotated copies, became “The Great Copernicus Chase.” The chase turned up a rich collection of marginalia, which has led to a deepening understanding of Copernicus’s influence and of the intellectual climate of the era. And it culminated, two years ago, in Gingerich’s weighty An Annotated Census of Copernicus’ De Revolutionibus.

Few people are likely to read Gingerich’s census, but anyone who appreciates the printed word will gallop through his new account of how it came to be. The Book Nobody Read moves around the world like an espionage thriller—from federal courtrooms in Washington (where Gingerich was an expert witness in the prosecution of a book thief), to Beijing, Australia, Soviet-era Leningrad, and the Vatican. Using investigative techniques worthy of Sherlock Holmes, Gingerich has identified the personal copies owned by such figures as Johannes Kepler and Adam Smith. Many, pace Koestler, bought the book to read it; others became buyers just because it was rare and important.

Gingerich describes their lives so vividly that it seems he’s met them in the flesh. Yet whenever the reader begins to tire of historical minutiae, Gingerich throws in charming tidbits of bibliophilic lore. Attentive readers will learn how many books a sixteenth-century printing press could produce in a day, which insects bore round holes through the pages of old books, and how a German library once sold off a copy of Newton’s Principia because it was too heavily annotated, only to discover that the notations were made by Newton’s contemporary and archrival Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz.

Now that its first editions bring as much as $800,000 at rare-book auctions, De revoutionibus has truly become a book that few can read, at least in its original editions. Spend a few hours, then, with The Book Nobody Read, which, title notwithstanding, is a book to be read by everybody.

Laurence A. Marschall,


45 posted on 09/27/2007 8:39:06 PM PDT by Robert A. Cook, PE (I can only donate monthly, but Hillary's ABBCNNBCBS continue to lie every day!)
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To: Dr.Deth; Rodm; neverdem
What is so very odd about the “flood” is that more than 200 ancient legends and myths all describe the SAME story.

Something - we don’t know what - DEFINITELY happened to many hundred tribes and civilizations all about the same time - but far enough back that the living people who wrote it down repeat the same events as stories, not eyewitness accounts.


Discovery/TLC/History Channel had a recent report on this: claim most likely event is a comet/asteroid impact off Madasgascar with wavews wiping out people in Africa, Carib, south Persian coasts, India, Australia, Borneo, Malaysia, etc.

46 posted on 09/27/2007 8:43:49 PM PDT by Robert A. Cook, PE (I can only donate monthly, but Hillary's ABBCNNBCBS continue to lie every day!)
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To: Robert A. Cook, PE; baynut
Evidence for an extraterrestrial impact 12,900 years ago that contributed to the megafaunal extinctions and the Younger Dryas cooling

Thanks for the ping, Bob. Free via Open Access: Full Text (PDF)

47 posted on 09/27/2007 9:06:31 PM PDT by neverdem (Call talk radio. We need a Constitutional Amendment for Congressional term limits. Let's Roll!)
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To: DBrow
What is amazing to me is how precisely the account of the physics for the earth’s creation match the words and terms (as used by a pre-literate bunch of sheepherding slaves) of Creation.

Everything biological is in the proper sequence, and everything geophysical and astronomical (atmospheric, oceanic, vegetation, formation of the seas & continental drift, clearing of the atmosphere, formation of matter, energy, light, and the stars & world itself - and visibility of the stars & moon - is correct.)

Creation even details that birds (dinosaurs) came before mammals.

48 posted on 09/27/2007 10:38:23 PM PDT by Robert A. Cook, PE (I can only donate monthly, but Hillary's ABBCNNBCBS continue to lie every day!)
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To: Robert A. Cook, PE

Leibniz HA! My Latin and Calculus have expired. It’s been too long since they were used.


49 posted on 09/28/2007 12:49:25 AM PDT by neverdem (Call talk radio. We need a Constitutional Amendment for Congressional term limits. Let's Roll!)
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To: baynut
Envisage a time line reaching from the dinosaurs, in LA, to the present day, at Ground Zero in New York, this happened 6 block away or half a mile, not even across the Hudson river....

Since you're using Ground Zero in New York, where I used to drive a taxi, "6 block away or half a mile," is wrong.

For the sake of the argument, let's agree that the axis of Manhattan is on a north - south axis, even though it's really on a north by northeast axis. North of Houston Street 20 blocks equals one mile on the north and south orientation of the grid. Six blocks between the avenue's east and west orientation of the grid was almost a mile, about 6/7th's, depending on where you are in Manhattan. Check a map of Manhattan.

You can zoom into Manhattan, and you can make queries about the distances.

50 posted on 09/28/2007 1:41:55 AM PDT by neverdem (Call talk radio. We need a Constitutional Amendment for Congressional term limits. Let's Roll!)
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