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Cosmic blast may have killed off megafauna Scientists say early humans doomed, too
Boston Globe ^ | September 27, 2007 | Colin Nickerson

Posted on 09/25/2007 6:45:11 PM PDT by baynut

Wooly mammoths, giant sloths, saber-toothed cats, and dozens of other species of megafauna may have become extinct when a disintegrating comet or asteroid exploded over North America with the force of millions of hydrogen bombs, according to research by an international team of scientists.

The blast, which the researchers believe occurred 12,900 years ago, may have also doomed a mysterious early human culture, known as Clovis people, while triggering a planetwide cool-down that wiped out the plant species that sustained many outsize Ice Age beasts, according to research published online yesterday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

(Excerpt) Read more at boston.com ...


TOPICS: Culture/Society; Miscellaneous; Philosophy
KEYWORDS: catastrophe; catastrophism; clovis; clovisimpact; comet; extinction; godsgravesglyphs; impact
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To: JusPasenThru

Copernicus purposely had his worked published posthumously. I wonder why?


41 posted on 09/27/2007 7:49:08 AM PDT by Maynerd
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To: Maynerd
>Copernicus purposely had his worked published posthumously. I wonder why?

To dilute payments
of tax liabilities
incurred by his kids

during settlement
of capital gains transfers
of his estate's net?
42 posted on 09/27/2007 7:54:35 AM PDT by theFIRMbss
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To: Maynerd
Copernicus purposely had his worked published posthumously. I wonder why?

For the answer to this and other exciting questions, read a book called "Six Modern Myths" by Sampson.

43 posted on 09/27/2007 10:25:59 AM PDT by JusPasenThru (Just another angry military veteran.)
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To: theFIRMbss

LOL


44 posted on 09/27/2007 8:17:10 PM PDT by Maynerd
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To: JusPasenThru; Maynerd; neverdem

A better discussion of how, when, why, and with whom Coper. wrote his book - and who published it, how, when, and who read it - is “The Book Nobody Read: Chasing the Revolutions of Nicolaus Copernicus” by Owen Gingerich.

I agree completely with one reviewer ...

Fascinated by the marginal notes as well as the antiquarian texts themselves, Gingerich became a full-time historian of science. His thirty-year quest to locate, identify, and study all the early editions of Copernicus’s magnum opus, with a particular emphasis on annotated copies, became “The Great Copernicus Chase.” The chase turned up a rich collection of marginalia, which has led to a deepening understanding of Copernicus’s influence and of the intellectual climate of the era. And it culminated, two years ago, in Gingerich’s weighty An Annotated Census of Copernicus’ De Revolutionibus.

Few people are likely to read Gingerich’s census, but anyone who appreciates the printed word will gallop through his new account of how it came to be. The Book Nobody Read moves around the world like an espionage thriller—from federal courtrooms in Washington (where Gingerich was an expert witness in the prosecution of a book thief), to Beijing, Australia, Soviet-era Leningrad, and the Vatican. Using investigative techniques worthy of Sherlock Holmes, Gingerich has identified the personal copies owned by such figures as Johannes Kepler and Adam Smith. Many, pace Koestler, bought the book to read it; others became buyers just because it was rare and important.

Gingerich describes their lives so vividly that it seems he’s met them in the flesh. Yet whenever the reader begins to tire of historical minutiae, Gingerich throws in charming tidbits of bibliophilic lore. Attentive readers will learn how many books a sixteenth-century printing press could produce in a day, which insects bore round holes through the pages of old books, and how a German library once sold off a copy of Newton’s Principia because it was too heavily annotated, only to discover that the notations were made by Newton’s contemporary and archrival Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz.

Now that its first editions bring as much as $800,000 at rare-book auctions, De revoutionibus has truly become a book that few can read, at least in its original editions. Spend a few hours, then, with The Book Nobody Read, which, title notwithstanding, is a book to be read by everybody.

Laurence A. Marschall,


45 posted on 09/27/2007 8:39:06 PM PDT by Robert A Cook PE (I can only donate monthly, but Hillary's ABBCNNBCBS continue to lie every day!)
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To: Dr.Deth; Rodm; neverdem
What is so very odd about the “flood” is that more than 200 ancient legends and myths all describe the SAME story.

Something - we don’t know what - DEFINITELY happened to many hundred tribes and civilizations all about the same time - but far enough back that the living people who wrote it down repeat the same events as stories, not eyewitness accounts.


Discovery/TLC/History Channel had a recent report on this: claim most likely event is a comet/asteroid impact off Madasgascar with wavews wiping out people in Africa, Carib, south Persian coasts, India, Australia, Borneo, Malaysia, etc.

46 posted on 09/27/2007 8:43:49 PM PDT by Robert A Cook PE (I can only donate monthly, but Hillary's ABBCNNBCBS continue to lie every day!)
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To: Robert A. Cook, PE; baynut
Evidence for an extraterrestrial impact 12,900 years ago that contributed to the megafaunal extinctions and the Younger Dryas cooling

Thanks for the ping, Bob. Free via Open Access: Full Text (PDF)

47 posted on 09/27/2007 9:06:31 PM PDT by neverdem (Call talk radio. We need a Constitutional Amendment for Congressional term limits. Let's Roll!)
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To: DBrow
What is amazing to me is how precisely the account of the physics for the earth’s creation match the words and terms (as used by a pre-literate bunch of sheepherding slaves) of Creation.

Everything biological is in the proper sequence, and everything geophysical and astronomical (atmospheric, oceanic, vegetation, formation of the seas & continental drift, clearing of the atmosphere, formation of matter, energy, light, and the stars & world itself - and visibility of the stars & moon - is correct.)

Creation even details that birds (dinosaurs) came before mammals.

48 posted on 09/27/2007 10:38:23 PM PDT by Robert A Cook PE (I can only donate monthly, but Hillary's ABBCNNBCBS continue to lie every day!)
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To: Robert A. Cook, PE

Leibniz HA! My Latin and Calculus have expired. It’s been too long since they were used.


49 posted on 09/28/2007 12:49:25 AM PDT by neverdem (Call talk radio. We need a Constitutional Amendment for Congressional term limits. Let's Roll!)
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To: baynut
Envisage a time line reaching from the dinosaurs, in LA, to the present day, at Ground Zero in New York, this happened 6 block away or half a mile, not even across the Hudson river....

Since you're using Ground Zero in New York, where I used to drive a taxi, "6 block away or half a mile," is wrong.

For the sake of the argument, let's agree that the axis of Manhattan is on a north - south axis, even though it's really on a north by northeast axis. North of Houston Street 20 blocks equals one mile on the north and south orientation of the grid. Six blocks between the avenue's east and west orientation of the grid was almost a mile, about 6/7th's, depending on where you are in Manhattan. Check a map of Manhattan.

You can zoom into Manhattan, and you can make queries about the distances.

50 posted on 09/28/2007 1:41:55 AM PDT by neverdem (Call talk radio. We need a Constitutional Amendment for Congressional term limits. Let's Roll!)
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To: DBrow
(months later) thanks for those links:

Comet/Asteroid Impacts and Human Society Comet/Asteroid Impacts
and Human Society

ed by Peter T. Bobrowsky
and Hans Rickman

intro (PDF)
due to links here


51 posted on 03/20/2008 7:40:43 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/______________________Profile updated Saturday, March 1, 2008)
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To: SunkenCiv

No problem! Gotta get that book!


52 posted on 03/20/2008 8:10:37 PM PDT by DBrow
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To: DBrow

Burckle Impact Crater, Indian Ocean ping and links.


53 posted on 05/08/2008 9:33:40 PM PDT by gleeaikin
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