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An Outing For Hadrian At The British Museum
The Telegraph (UK) ^ | 1-11-2008 | Nigel Reynolds

Posted on 01/10/2008 7:13:28 PM PST by blam

An outing for Hadrian at the British Museum

By Nigel Reynolds
Last Updated: 2:48am GMT 11/01/2008

An exhibition on the Roman emperor Hadrian - the first staged anywhere in the world - is to be mounted at the British Museum this summer, replacing the First Emperor terracotta warriors show which closes in April.

Negotiations over several years will see more than 200 loans from 31 countries - most of them once under the Roman yoke - being put on display in London.

The British Museum’s Ralph Jackson with the bronze bust of Hadrian fished out of the Thames

Though Hadrian, best known here for his wall, ruled Rome from AD117-138, the museum says visitors may make unexpected links.

Within weeks of coming to power and recognising imperial overreach, he withdrew his army from Mesopotamia, modern-day Iraq. He was openly homosexual and his empire, larger than the European Union, had a unified language and currency.

A section of the exhibition will be devoted to his Greek catamite, Antinous, who Hadrian turned into the Pop Idol of the ancient world after his mysterious drowning in the Nile in AD130 when he was just 20.

So besotted was he with the boy that he deified him, built a city, Antinopolis, in Upper Egypt in his honour and ordered cities throughout the empire to show busts and statues of his dead lover.

"Hadrian was gay - we can say it now but the Victorians had problems with it," Thorsten Opper, curator of the exhibition said.

Scores of busts, statues, marble fragments, scraps of papyrus and decorative bronze and silver artefacts that have never been seen in Britain before will tell the story of Hadrian - a complex figure who, although ruthless in battle, was also highly cultured philhellene, reviving Greek architecture and art in Rome and building the Pantheon.

Likely stars of the exhibition will be a papyrus scrap that is the last remnant of Hadrian's autobiography and the Vindolanda tablets, the hundreds of notes scribbled by Roman soldiers on wood tablets found at Hadrian's Wall.

A centrepiece will be the museum's own larger than lifesize bronze bust of Hadrian, probably cast in AD122 when he visited this country and fished up from the Thames in 1834.

It has never left London but will be put on display in Carlisle and Wallsend, the ends of the wall, and then brought back to the museum before the exhibition.


TOPICS: News/Current Events; United Kingdom
KEYWORDS: antinous; british; epigraphyandlanguage; godsgravesglyphs; hadrian; hadrianswall; museum; roman; romanempire; unitedkingdom; vindolanda; vindolandatablets

1 posted on 01/10/2008 7:13:30 PM PST by blam
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To: blam
Trajan is still my favorite. He certainly didn’t have any problems adopting Hadrian as his son. As to the nature of Hadrian’s sexuality - who cares? Hadrian was a damn fine Emperor and a damn fine General. (Considered #3 on the list of the “5 Good Emperors”)
2 posted on 01/10/2008 7:17:55 PM PST by MrsEmmaPeel
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To: blam

Of course. Everyone who is great and dead was gay. Actually, being dead is a necessary prerequisite. If they were still alive, they might look for some serious whoopass on those making these revelations.


3 posted on 01/10/2008 7:22:11 PM PST by rbg81 (DRAIN THE SWAMP!!)
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To: SunkenCiv

ping


4 posted on 01/10/2008 7:34:25 PM PST by Perdogg (Fred Thompson - John Bolton 2008)
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To: blam

Ummm...why is this news to anyone seriously interested in the subject?


5 posted on 01/10/2008 7:44:22 PM PST by arderkrag (Libertarian Nutcase (Political Compass Coordinates: 9.00, -2.62 - www.politicalcompass.org))
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To: MrsEmmaPeel
Of course the Victorians would not have understood the meaning of the statement "Hadrian was gay."

The official version is that Trajan adopted Hadrian (his relative), but not everyone believes the official version--it's a bit like the official version of Vince Foster's death. Hadrian was very unpopular with the Senate because several leading Senators were executed early in his reign. The Senate didn't want to deify him after his death--because his adopted son Antoninus insisted on Hadrian's deification, he gained the epithet "Pius" (because he was mindful of his duties to his "father").

6 posted on 01/10/2008 7:54:00 PM PST by Verginius Rufus
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To: blam
31 countries - most of them once under the Roman yoke

In many cases, that period "under the Roman yoke" was the peak of their civilization.

7 posted on 01/10/2008 8:08:29 PM PST by IronJack (=)
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To: IronJack

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5kiUgr9dCrk&feature=related


8 posted on 01/10/2008 8:21:27 PM PST by Flavius (24/7)
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To: blam; StayAt HomeMother; Ernest_at_the_Beach; 1ofmanyfree; 24Karet; 3AngelaD; 49th; ...

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Thanks Blam. Hadrian the pantywaist is one of the grossly overrated Roman emperors. His predecessor Trajan expanded the empire to its greatest extent and brought it to its all-time financial pinnacle, then Hadrian spent years and serious cash tooling his keister around the provinces, wasting money building a short-lived city in honor of his dead catamite, and murdering various politicians. He also despised the Jews, primarily because of their practice of circumcision.

To all -- please ping me to other topics which are appropriate for the GGG list.
GGG managers are Blam, StayAt HomeMother, and Ernest_at_the_Beach
 

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9 posted on 01/11/2008 12:26:35 AM PST by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/____________________Profile updated Sunday, December 30, 2007)
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http://users.bigpond.net.au/bstone/antinous.htm
http://www.antinopolis.org/antinopolis.html


10 posted on 01/11/2008 12:30:45 AM PST by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/____________________Profile updated Sunday, December 30, 2007)
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To: IronJack
"31 countries - most of them once under the Roman yoke"

In many cases, that period "under the Roman yoke" was the peak of their civilization.

And both Trajan and Hadrian were born, not in Rome or Italy, but in Hispania.


11 posted on 01/11/2008 12:42:27 AM PST by Polybius
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To: SunkenCiv

^


12 posted on 01/11/2008 12:47:34 AM PST by prognostigaator
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To: blam

thanks


13 posted on 01/11/2008 3:24:09 AM PST by beebuster2000 (choice is not not peace or war, but small war now, or big war later masquerading as peace now.)
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To: IronJack
In many cases, that period "under the Roman yoke" was the peak of their civilization.

If you consider having your men slaughtered and your women and children sold into slavery "civilization".

14 posted on 01/11/2008 4:01:51 AM PST by jalisco555 ("The only thing we learn from history is that we never learn from history." Winston Churchill)
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To: jalisco555

Yeah, cuz none of that ever happened before the Romans got there. And didn’t happen after the Empire fell either.


15 posted on 01/11/2008 2:49:32 PM PST by IronJack (=)
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To: blam

Interesting stuff, and an exhibition that should be visited by us in the UK. Hadrian played an important role as Britain harnessed the culture and practices of the Romans on there way to developing into the society we know and love today.

Also, you can see his indelible impact on the UK by visiting Hadrians Wall, which he built to keep out the barbaric and bloodthirsty Celts and Scots (typed with a bit of tongue in cheek!). Think of it as a mini-Great Wall.


16 posted on 01/14/2008 9:03:57 AM PST by Rikstir
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To: rbg81

His homosexual relationship with the Greek youth Antinous, and his reaction to his death is well documented historical fact. This isn’t historical revisionism as you seem to be suggesting...


17 posted on 01/14/2008 8:27:13 PM PST by thundrey
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To: thundrey

Perhaps not in this case. But the large number of historical figures being “outed” by historians these days does make one suspicious.


18 posted on 01/15/2008 4:24:41 AM PST by rbg81 (DRAIN THE SWAMP!!)
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